Rep. Liz Cheney rebukes former Trump advisor Michael Flynn for suggesting a coup ‘should happen’ in the US

liz cheney gop white supremacy
Rep. Liz Cheney (R-Wyoming).

  • Rep. Liz Cheney on Monday pushed back on Michael Flynn’s comments about a coup in the US.
  • “No American should advocate or support the violent overthrow of the United States,” she tweeted.
  • Flynn suggested that a coup, like the one in Myanmar, should happen in the US. He has since walked back his comments.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming rebuked Michael Flynn, President Donald Trump’s former national security advisor, for appearing to endorse a coup in the US similar to the one in Myanmar in February.

“No American should advocate or support the violent overthrow of the United States,” the Republican lawmaker tweeted Monday, referring to comments Flynn made over the weekend at a QAnon conference in Dallas.

Flynn, a keynote speaker at the four-day convention, has peddled conspiracy theories endorsed by the far-right movement, which broadly believes in the existence of a “deep state” cabal of pedophiles.

During a panel on Sunday, an audience member asked Flynn: “I want to know why what happened in Myanmar can’t happen here.”

“No reason, I mean, it should happen here. No reason. That’s right,” Flynn responded, according to footage of the interaction that later circulated on Twitter.

Other prominent attendees at the event, called the For God & Country Patriot Roundup, included pro-Trump lawyers Sidney Powell and Lin Wood, former Trump advisor George Papadopoulos, and GOP Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas, a Trump ally.

In February, Myanmar’s military overthrew the country’s democratically elected government and arrested its leaders. The military junta has since imprisoned more than 4,400 protestors and killed at least 841, according to data compiled by the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, a non-profit human rights organization.

Flynn on Monday attempted to walk back his remarks and accused the “media” of “manipulating” his words.

“Let me be VERY CLEAR – There is NO reason whatsoever for any coup in America, and I do not and have not at any time called for any action of that sort,” Flynn wrote on Telegram, a social media platform favored by far-right groups.

Flynn served as Trump’s first national security advisor for 22 days before resigning. He later pleaded guilty in 2017 to lying to the FBI about his communications with Russia’s ambassador to the US. Trump ultimately pardoned him last November.

Flynn was thrust into the spotlight in the QAnon universe after he baselessly repeated that Trump won the 2020 presidential election. Followers of the QAnon movement have also praised the coup in Myanmar and shown support for a coup in the US, according to reporting by Media Matters for America.

Cheney has emerged as a fierce opponent of Trump and his allies following the January 6 Capitol riot. She has condemned his false claims about the 2020 race and voted to impeach him. House Republicans booted her from her leadership position last month over her stance.

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Michael Flynn denies suggesting a Myanmar-style military coup should happen in the US

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In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, then-Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington.

  • Michael Flynn appeared to say there “should” be a Myanmar-style coup in the US.
  • The former national security adviser backtracked the statement on Monday.
  • In February, Myanmar’s military overthrew its elected government and arrested its leaders.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former national security advisor Michael Flynn, who worked briefly under former President Donald Trump, said Monday that there was “NO reason” for a military coup in the United States – one day after he appeared to suggest the opposite at a QAnon-themed convention over the weekend.

“Let me be VERY CLEAR – There is NO reason whatsoever for any coup in America, and I do not and have not at any time called for any action of that sort,” Flynn said in a post on Telegram, a social-media app that has been favored by far-right groups.

“Any reporting of any other belief by me is a boldface fabrication based on twisted reporting at a lively panel at a conference of Patriotic Americans who love this country, just as I do,” Flynn added to his 227,000 subscribers.

But Flynn’s comments Monday were at odds with those he made a day earlier at the For God & Country Patriot Roundup conference in Dallas. Attendees included Sidney Powell, Lin Wood, George Papadopoulos, and other prominent peddlers of the QAnon conspiracy theory, which baselessly alleges the existence of a “deep state” cabal of pedophiles.

“I want to know why what happened in Myanmar can’t happen here,” an audience member asked Flynn, who is seen as something of a celebrity in the QAnon universe, during a panel.

“No reason, I mean, it should happen here. No reason. That’s right,” Flynn responded.

Video of the interaction circulated across social media immediately following Flynn’s remarks Sunday. In his Telegram post on Monday, Flynn claimed the “media” was “manipulating” his words.

In February, the Myanmar military overthrew the nation’s democratically elected government and arrested its leaders. More than 4,400 political prisoners have been arrested since the coup began and 840 have been killed by the military junta as it attempts to silence dissent, according to research from the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners, a non-profit organization that has been tracking and uploading the data.

“I am no stranger to media manipulating my words and therefore let me repeat my response to a question asked at the conference: There is no reason it (a coup) should happen here (in America),” Flynn wrote Monday.

Flynn served as national security adviser under Trump for 22 days before resigning. In 2017, he pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his communications with a Russian ambassador, though he later retracted his plea and was pardoned by the former president last November.

As Insider’s Rachel E. Greenspan previously reported, Flynn has previously echoed the rhetoric of QAnon supporters, including last year the baseless theory that Dominion Voting Systems, which sells electronic voting hardware, rigged the 2020 election in President Joe Biden’s favor. There is no evidence to support that claim.

In July last year, he shared a video to Twitter espousing QAnon’s main slogan.

As CNN reported Monday, Flynn continued to repeat false claims about the 2020 election during last weekend’s convention, saying, “Trump won. He won the popular vote, and he won the Electoral College vote.” Trump won neither the popular vote nor the Electoral College vote.

Many followers of the QAnon conspiracy theory, which centered on the false narrative that Trump was fighting a fictional cabal of human traffickers, have refused to accept last year’s election results in the wake of Biden’s ascension to the presidency. QAnon followers and their theories were directly linked to the January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol that led to five deaths.

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Former Trump advisor Michael Flynn said the US should have a coup like Myanmar, where the military overthrew the democratically elected government

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Anti-coup protesters march with homemade air rifles as one of them holds sign showing support for a civilian-formed federal army during a protest march in Yangon, Myanmar, Saturday, April 3, 2021.

  • Former national security adviser Michael Flynn spoke at a QAnon conference in Dallas this weekend.
  • When asked about the coup in Myanmar, Flynn said that “it should happen here.”
  • Myanmar’s military overthrew the democratically elected government and has killed hundreds of people.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Michael Flynn, who served as President Donald Trump’s national security adviser, told a crowd at a QAnon conference in Dallas, Texas, this weekend that the US should have a coup like the one in Myanmar.

On February 1, Myanmar’s military overthrew its democratically elected government and arrested its leaders. The coup immediately sparked protests across the country, prompting the junta to launch a campaign against its own citizens.

Upwards of 800 Burmese people, including at least 40 children, have been killed, according to Myanmar’s Assistance Association for Political Prisoners. More than 4,000 people have been arrested.

Flynn, who has become a prominent figure in the QAnon conspiracy theory, was a main attraction at the event, held at the Omni Hotel in Dallas.

In a video shared on Twitter, an attendee asks Flynn: “I want to know why what happened in Myanmar can’t happen here.”

The crowd immediately cheers, followed by Flynn’s response: “No reason. I mean, it should happen here.”

QAnon communities have praised the Myanmar coup and endorsed the idea that it should happen in the US, according to Media Matters for America.

In 2017, Flynn pleaded guilty to lying to the FBI about his communications with Russia. He later accused the Justice Department of entrapment and moved to withdraw his guilty plea. In November, Trump pardoned him.

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Mass killing in Myanmar has ‘clear echoes of Syria,’ UN human rights commissioner warns. The parallels are eerie.

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A protester makes a three-finger salute as others march on February 07, 2021 in Yangon, Myanmar.

  • Myanmar has “clear echoes of Syria in 2011,” UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet said Tuesday.
  • The military in Myanmar overthrow the democratically elected government in February.
  • It has killed hundreds of pro-democracy protesters in the weeks since.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Myanmar is on the verge of a “full-blown conflict,” a top United Nations official warned Tuesday, urging the world community not to repeat the passive observation that allowed the conflict in Syria to grow into the bloodiest of the 21st century.

“There are clear echoes of Syria in 2011,” UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Michelle Bachelet said.

“There too we saw peaceful protests met with unnecessary and clearly disproportionate force,” said Bachelet, a former president of Chile, noting that the absence of an international response led the repression to both persist and grow worse, leading to “some individuals taking up arms, followed by a downward and rapidly expanding spiral of violence.”

In February, Myanmar’s long-dominant military overthrew the country’s tenuous democracy, making false claims of voter fraud to evict de facto leader Aung San Suu Kyi and her party from power. In the weeks since, the military has repeatedly opened fire on protesters, killing over 700 people, including 82 in one city last Friday.

In March, White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said the Biden administration was “deeply concerned” by the violence in Myanmar, also known as Burma.

“We, of course, continue to work with our allies and partners and like-minded institutions as we condemn the actions of the military, call for the immediate restoration of democracy, and hold those who seize power accountable,” Psaki said.

But in her remarks Tuesday, Bachelet said the world was not doing nearly enough to actually stop the bloodshed.

“Statements of condemnation, and limited targeted sanctions, are clearly not enough,” she said. “States with influence need to urgently apply concerted pressure on the military in Myanmar to halt the commission of grave human rights violations and possible crimes against humanity.”

Myanmar’s envoy to the UN, appointed by the last democratically elected government, has urged the international community to impose an arms embargo on the country as well as a no-fly zone, which would entail forcing the military junta’s aircraft out of the skies.

While much attention has been focused on the military’s response to pro-democracy rallies, it has also been launching airstrikes against armed groups in Karen state, along the border with Thailand. Locals have claimed the strikes have exacted a civilian toll, causing thousands to flee and prompting fears of an all-out civil war.

Syria 2.0?

The parallels to Syria are glaring. In early 2011, thousands of people inspired by the Arab Spring took to the streets to demand reform in an authoritarian dictatorship led by Bashar al-Assad. The crackdown was swift and brutal: snipers took shots at activists, thousands of whom disappeared in torture chambers (the UN would later declare the government guilty of “extermination”).

At first, Western leaders offered only tepid criticism. “What’s been happening there the last few weeks is deeply concerning,” former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said, “but there’s a difference between calling out aircraft and indiscriminately strafing and bombing your own cities [and] police actions which, frankly, have exceeded the use of force that any of us would want to see.”

Many members of Congress, she added, believe Assad is a “reformer.” Indeed, the US had collaborated with Assad’s government during the War on Terror, the Bush administration sent detainees there who were later tortured. (The US, likewise, helped train Myanmar’s military, suspending that assistance in 2017 amid the Rohingya genocide.) And the Obama administration had recently reopened the US embassy in Damascus, hoping to see a formal peace agreement between Israel and Assad’s government.

It would take months more for President Barack Obama to demand Assad step down – time that allowed massacres to continue and armed groups, including extremists, to fill the vacuum left by the seeming indifference of the world’s democracies.

Assad would go on to bomb most of the country’s cities to rubble, while using chemical weapons to kill civilians who defied his regime, according to reports from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. That – a death toll in the hundreds of thousands, with millions forced to become refugees – is a future Bachelet hopes to stave off.

“The military seems intent on intensifying its pitiless policy of violence against the people of Myanmar, using military-grade and indiscriminate weaponry,” she observed.

But it is not just the US and its allies that she called out. At the UN, Russia and China, as with Syria before, have blocked the UN from even condemning the coup in Myanmar.

“The UN High Commissioner has sounded the alarm bell,” Sherine Tadros, deputy director of advocacy at Amnesty International, told Insider. “It’s now up to members of the Security Council to act and impose a comprehensive, global arms embargo and targeted sanctions on senior officials before the situation worsens further.”

Have a news tip? Email this reporter: cdavis@insider.com

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Myanmar’s ambassador to the UK – who didn’t support the military coup – was locked out of his embassy and had to spend the night in his car

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Myanmar’s ambassador to the UK Kyaw Zwar Minn stands outside the Myanmar Embassy in London on April 8, 2021, after he was locked out the day before.

  • Kyaw Zwar Minn, Myanmar’s ambassador to the UK, said he was locked out of the embassy on Wednesday.
  • Sources told Reuters that his deputy took over.
  • Kyaw Zwar Minn had called for Myanmar’s civilian leader to be released after her detention in the coup.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Myanmar’s ambassador to the UK, who did not support the military coup in the country, said he was locked out of the embassy on Wednesday night.

Sources told Reuters that his deputy had shut him out and taken over.

Kyaw Zwar Minn told Reuters: “It’s a kind of coup, in the middle of London … you can see that they occupy my building.”

The BBC’s Charlotte Wright said Kyaw Zwar Minn told her that he spent the night sleeping in his car outside the embassy.

The ambassador also said that embassy staff were being threatened with “severe punishment if they don’t continue to work for the military general,” the BBC reported.

Myanmar’s military staged a coup on February 1 after claiming voter fraud in its November 2020 election, and detained its leaders. Since then it has also cracked down on anti-coup protests and killed hundreds of demonstrators.

Kyaw Zwar Minn has called for the release of Aung San Suu Kyi, the civilian leader that the military detained during the coup.

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13 members of the pro-Trump House Freedom Caucus refused to condemn Myanmar’s generals who violently overthrew elected leaders

andrew clyde andy harris andy biggs
From left, Reps. Andy Harris, R-Md., Andrew Clyde, R-Ga., and Andy Biggs, R-Ariz., conclude a news conference with members of the House Freedom Caucus outside the Capitol to oppose the Equality Act, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of sex, gender identity, and sexual orientation, on Thursday February 25, 2021.

  • A House resolution censuring those who carried out the Myanmar coup passed by a 398-14 vote on Friday.
  • Over a dozen GOP Reps., mostly from the pro-Trump Freedom Caucus, opposed the motion.
  • Some of those who voted against the measure tied it to immigration or the results of the US election.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

On Friday, the US House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed a resolution that censured the military coup in Myanmar by a 398-14 vote. Over a dozen Republicans, most of them from the pro-Trump Freedom Caucus, stood in opposition.

The vote condemned the military generals who orchestrated the coup and called for the Biden administration to place sanctions on them.

Some Freedom Caucus representatives tied their votes to right-wing political talking points, and some referenced the 2020 US elections.

Those who voted no were, 13 of whom are part of the Freedom Caucus:

  1. Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona
  2. Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia
  3. Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado
  4. Rep. Chip Roy of Texas
  5. Rep. Scott Perry of Pennsylvania
  6. Rep. Andy Harris of Maryland
  7. Rep. Ted Budd of North Carolina
  8. Rep. Mary Miller of Illinois
  9. Rep. Alex Mooney of West Virginia
  10. Rep. Barry Moore of Alabama
  11. Rep. Jody Hice of Georgia
  12. Rep. Ken Buck of Colorado
  13. Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida

Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona, a member of the caucus, voted present.

One Republican, who is not a part of the Freedom Caucus, also voted against the resolution: Rep. Thomas Massie of Kentucky.

Perry objected to Pennsylvania’s electors ahead of the insurrection on January 6, and on Friday, and his spokesperson told Forbes that the Myanmar resolution “is an overt attempt to trap Republicans into condemning the claims of evidence of election fraud in Burma while perpetuating similar claims (in the Democrat’s views) of evidence in US elections.”

Harris issued a statement aimed at immigrants, saying that Congress should address, “COVID positive illegal aliens being dispersed into our communities rather than wasting time on useless resolutions about a foreign country.”

Biggs, the caucus chair, posted a video on Twitter explaining his opposition to the resolution.

In the video, Biggs said the violence resulting from the coup is “tragic.” However, Biggs says that “there is suffering everywhere in the world” and he believes the US “can’t be the military police for the entire world.” He alleged that the resolution was a means to “put our foot in the door in Burma.”

In Myanmar’s November elections, the ruling National League for Democracy won 396 out of 476 seats in Parliament, with the military-affiliated Union Solidarity and Development Party winning 33 seats.

The military, known as the Tatmadaw, claimed that the election was rife with voter fraud – charging 8.6 million instances of “voter irregularities” among a population of 54 million – a claim that was rejected by the country’s election commission, according to the AP.

Top members of the ruling party, including civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi and President Win Myint, were detained by the military.

Mass protests have followed the coup in Myanmar since early February, and according to the UN, military forces have killed at least 138 protesters since then. The military has also instituted media and internet blackouts.

After the vote on Friday, Democratic Rep. Don Beyer of Virginia tweeted that, “The House QAnon Caucus refuses to condemn the military coup in Burma.”

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Myanmar’s UN ambassador implores world to take action to end military coup and restore democracy

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Myanmar’s ambassador Kyaw Moe Tun addresses the Human Rights Council at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland, March 11, 2019.

  • Myanmar’s UN ambassador called on the world body to end the military coup in his country. 
  • Kyaw Moe Tun called for the “strongest possible action” to “restore the democracy.”
  • Myanmar’s military staged a coup in early February, ousting the civilian government.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Myanmar’s UN Ambassador Kyaw Moe Tun, speaking for the country’s elected civilian government ousted in a military coup on February 1, appealed to the UN on Friday “to use any means necessary to take action against the Myanmar military” to restore democracy to the Southeast Asian country.

He addressed the 193-member U.N. General Assembly after Secretary-General Antonio Guterres’ special envoy on Myanmar, Christine Schraner Burgener, warned that no country should recognize or legitimize the Myanmar junta and all efforts must be made to restore democracy.

“We need further strongest possible action from the international community to immediately end the military coup, to stop oppressing the innocent people, to return the state power to the people and to restore the democracy,” Kyaw Moe Tun said to applause and praise from Western and Islamic counterparts.

Schraner Burgener pushed for a collective “clear signal in support of democracy” as she sounded the alarm over the coup, urging “influential” countries to push the military to allow an independent assessment of the situation.

Myanmar has been in turmoil since the army seized power and detained civilian government leader Aung San Suu Kyi and much of her National League for Democracy (NLD) party after the military complained of fraud in a November election.

“Regrettably, the current regime has so far asked me to postpone any visit. It seems they want to continue making large-scale arrests and have been coercing people to testify against the NLD Government. This is cruel and inhumane,” Schraner Burgener said.

The country has been largely paralyzed by weeks of protests and a civil disobedience campaign of strikes against the military. While military chief General Min Aung Hlaing says authorities are using minimal force during the protests, three protesters and one policeman have been killed.

“If there is any escalation in terms of military crackdown – and sadly as we have seen this before in Myanmar – against people exercising their basic rights, let us act swiftly and collectively,” Schraner Burgener said.

‘Make sure that this coup fails’

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A man takes a picture of a graffiti by Thai artist Mue Bon against the military coup in Myamar in a street in Bangkok, Thailand, February 6, 2021.

The army has promised an election, but has not given a date. It has imposed a one-year state of emergency.

The question of an election is at the center of a diplomatic effort by the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), of which Myanmar is a member. Indonesia has taken the lead, but coup opponents fear the efforts will confer legitimacy on the junta.

“It is important the international community does not lend legitimacy or recognition to this regime,” Schraner Burgener said. “The result of the election of November 2020 was clear with 82 percent of the votes for the NLD.”

Guterres has pledged to mobilize enough international pressure “to make sure that this coup fails.” The Security Council has voiced concern over the state of emergency, but stopped short of condemning the coup.

Schraner Burgener expressed concern for the Rohingya Muslims and other minorities.

A 2017 military crackdown in Myanmar’s Rakhine State sent more than 700,000 Rohingya Muslims fleeing into Bangladesh, where they are still stranded. Guterres and Western states have accused the Myanmar army of ethnic cleansing, which it denies.

“We must ask, how can we rely on a military regime when the very same led the security operations leading to the human rights violations and forced displacement of Rohingya people and others from their homes?” Schraner Burgener said.

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Facebook removed the main page of Myanmar military as protests continue following a military coup

Myanmar coup
Buddhist monks hold placards as they participate in a rally protesting election results by supporters of the Myanmar military and the military-backed Union Solidarity and Development Party near Shwedagon pagoda Saturday, Jan. 30, 2021, in Yangon, Myanmar.

  • Facebook removed the main page for the Myanmar military on Sunday, Reuters reported. 
  • The platform said the page violated standards that prohibit the incitement of violence. 
  • Several people have been killed by police in recent anti-coup protests. 
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Facebook deleted the main page of the Myanmar military on Sunday for violating the platform’s standards that prohibit the incitement of violence, Reuters reported. 

Insider has reached out to Facebook for comment, but a spokesperson told Reuters: “In line with our global policies, we’ve removed the Tatmadaw True News Information Team Page from Facebook for repeated violations of our Community Standards prohibiting incitement of violence and coordinating harm.” 

The military, known as the Tatmadaw, took over on February 1, claiming there was mass voter fraud during the country’s November elections.

An independent election committee, however, reviewed the claims and found them to be baseless. 

The coup resulted in the detention of officials including President Win Myint and civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi.

On Saturday, riot police shot and killed two people protesting against the coup, the Associated Press reported. 

On February 9, another woman was shot in the head during protests. Mya Thweh Thweh Khine, 20, died on Friday after being on life support. 

In a Facebook post, Kyi Toe, spokesperson for the National League for Democracy said Khine was shot by “a bullet that pierced a motorcycle helmet,” and rights groups confirmed that she was shot by police.

The military’s “True News Information Unit” however, claimed that only non-lethal weapons were used during the protests. 

Earlier this month, in response to the coup, Facebook said it would “significantly reduce the distribution of all content on Facebook Pages and profiles run by the Myanmar military that has continued to spread misinformation. 

The platform has been criticized in the past for not being strict enough on moderating political content. 

In 2018, Mark Zuckerberg said the platform played a role in the ethnic cleansing of the country’s Rohingya Muslim population.

On Saturday, Google also removed a propaganda blog that was in support of the coup. An online activist discovered that the military was using Blogger, which is owned by Google, for propaganda, as well as Gmail accounts being used to manage companies on a sanctions list released by President Joe Biden. 

“We take action against accounts on our platforms in accordance with our product policies and applicable laws,” a Google spokesperson told Insider’s Jeff Elder. “In this case, we have terminated accounts as a result of President Biden’s Executive Order of 11 February 2021 concerning Myanmar.” 

Biden announced an executive order on February 10 which ordered sanctions against Myanmar’s military leaders, limited the military’s access to the country’s $1 billion in government funds held in the US, and froze assets that help Myanmar’s government. 

“The people of Burma are making their voices heard, and the world is watching,” Biden said in a briefing: “We’ll be ready to impose additional measures, and we’ll continue to work with our international partners to urge other nations to join us in these efforts.”

Have a news tip? Contact this reporter at salarshani@insider.com

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Google has pulled down a propaganda blog backing the military coup in Myanmar after outcry by online activists

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Protesters against the Myanmar military coup outside the US Embassy in Yangon on February 20, 2021.

  • Google has yanked hosting of a blog promoting propaganda for the Myanmar military’s coup. 
  • The blog, named for the coup’s leader, was hosted on the Google-owned Blogger platform. 
  • Freedom-of-information activist Donk Enby tipped off Insider about the blog this week.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Google has pulled down a propaganda blog supporting the military coup in Myanmar after the blog was discovered by an online activist this week. 

The blog was managed and hosted via the Google-owned Blogger platform under the URL seniorgeneralminaunghlaing.com, taking its name from the Myanmar military leader who has seized control of the country. 

Claiming there was mass voter fraud during the country’s November elections, the military seized control of Myanmar on February 1. An independent election committee reviewed the claims and found them to be baseless. The US formally declared the military takeover as a coup on February 2. The Biden administration announced sanctions against the military on February 11. 

Hacker and activist Donk Enby discovered the coup’s use of Blogger for propaganda and of Gmail accounts in managing companies on the US sanctions list released by Biden to discourage business with the military. Insider wrote about the use of Google tools by the military on Tuesday. Protesters of the military coup retweeted Insider’s tweet of the article more than 850 times. Google removed the blog on Saturday. Financial information about the coup discovered by Enby is now being hosted by freedom-of-information activists on the website DDOS Secrets.   

“We take action against accounts on our platforms in accordance with our product policies and applicable laws,” a Google spokesperson told Insider. “In this case, we have terminated accounts as a result of President Biden’s Executive Order of 11 February 2021 concerning Myanmar.” Google also removed apps run by the coup from its Play Store app marketplace. 

After the blog was pulled down, Enby told Insider that “taking down Senior General Min Aung Hlaing’s website and propaganda apps on the Play Store is a step in the right direction, but Google should speak out and tell us whether they also intend to cut them off from services like Gmail that he and his cronies rely on to do their day-to-day business.” 

Google did not respond to questions about pulling other services used by the coup. 

A post on the blog on Monday claimed the military leadership “has not changed the path of multi-party democracy. All tasks are being carried out in accord with the Constitution (2008). No policies were changed in politics, administration, economic, social affairs, peace and international relations.” The domain listed its registrant organization as the Myanmar Ministry of Defence.

The United Nations cited the blog in a 2019 report noting the coup’s promotion of “a false narrative propagated to breed hatred.”  

The coup’s leaders, which earlier corresponded with Insider via a Gmail account also discovered by Enby, did not respond to a request for comment. 

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Biden announces sanctions targeting Myanmar military leaders to urge them to release detained elected leaders

Myanmar Coup
Military soldiers with tanks and police truck block the road near parliament in Naypyidaw in Myanmar on February 1, 2021.

  • Biden announced sanctions against military leaders in Myanmar following their coup. 
  • The initial rounds of individuals sanctioned will be announced this week. 
  • Biden also called on the military to release officials, including civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

President Joe Biden ordered sanctions against Myanmar’s military leaders after a coup earlier this month and called on them to release detained officials, including President Win Myint and civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi. 

“The people of Burma are making their voices heard, and the world is watching,” Biden said in a briefing. “We’ll be ready to impose additional measures, and we’ll continue to work with our international partners to urge other nations to join us in these efforts.”

The first round of individuals to be reprimanded will be announced this week, but Biden promised to “immediately sanction the military leaders who directed the coup, their business interests, as well as close family members.”

State Department spokesperson Ned Price also said the US would work with other countries to impose “steep and profound costs on those responsible for this coup.”

The US formally declared the military takeover as a coup on February 2, which prompted a review of foreign aid to the country, NBC reported. 

The military, known as the Tatmadaw, took over on February 1, claiming there was mass voter fraud during the country’s November elections. An independent election committee, however, reviewed the claims and found them to be baseless. 

Biden’s executive order will also limit the military’s access to the country’s $1 billion in government funds held in the US. 

Read more:  Brad Parscale is back again in Trump’s orbit. The former 2020 campaign manager hated by the ex-president is building his post-White House digital operation.

Additionally, the US said it would freeze assets that help Myanmar’s government, but will continue to support “health care, civil society groups, and other areas that benefit the people of Burma directly,” Biden said.

While the US has ordered sanctions, Reuters reported that it’s unlikely that countries like China, India, Japan, and other Southeast Asian neighbors will impose sanctions on Myanmar. 

“The key will not be just what America does,” Derek Mitchell, a former US ambassador to Myanmar told Reuters. “It’s going to be how we get others along with us, allies who may have more skin in the game, more leverage, or at least better relationships with the key players.”

Other countries like New Zealand have already condemned the coup and taken diplomatic measures including directing New Zealand’s aid program to “not include projects that are delivered with, or benefit, the military government.”

The country is also suspending “all high-level political and military contact with Myanmar.” 

The UN Human Rights Council will hold a special session on the situation in Myanmar on Friday. 

 

 

 

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