MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says he ‘never even watched footage’ of the Capitol insurrection and believes ‘it was a setup’

mike lindell trump
US President Donald Trump listens as Michael J. Lindell, CEO of MyPillow Inc., speaks during the daily briefing on the novel coronavirus, COVID-19, in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington, DC, on March 30, 2020.

  • Mike Lindell denied ever witnessing the Capitol insurrection and claimed it was a “setup.”
  • “I’ve never even watched footage of that,” he told Rolling Stone in a recent interview.
  • Lindell joins a growing chorus of Republicans who have downplayed the deadly riot.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell in a new interview published Monday denied ever witnessing the January 6 Capitol insurrection and claimed it was a “setup.”

When asked about the deadly riot, Lindell told Rolling Stone magazine: “I’ve never even watched footage of that.”

“But in my opinion it was a setup,” he continued. “I’ve been to over 50 rallies … There has never been one incident. And you don’t think it was a setup? Gimme a break.”

Lindell joins several other Trump allies who have sought to downplay the insurrection or spread falsehoods about it. GOP Sen. Ron Johnson of Wisconsin has previously said the Capitol riot “didn’t seem like an armed insurrection” and has falsely described it as a “peaceful protest.” He most recently reiterated that stance during a Fox News appearance on Sunday.

Widely circulated video footage and photos of the Capitol on January 6 show large numbers of apparent Trump supporters rioting, constructing a gallows on the complex, holding zip ties, and attacking police officers. Federal investigators have charged 521 people so far in connection with the riot.

Former President Donald Trump has been widely accused of inciting the insurrection after he rallied his supporters to protest the 2020 election results based on lies that the race was stolen from him. Lindell, a staunch ally of Trump’s, has repeatedly pushed his false claims about the election.

Congressional Republicans last month voted to block the creation of a bipartisan commission to investigate the Capitol insurrection. Trump had been against the bill.

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MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says Trump is the first president in his lifetime ‘who wasn’t in it for the ego’

Mike Lindell Donald Trump
President Donald Trump listens to MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell speak with members of the coronavirus task force and reporters during a briefing in response to the COVID-19 coronavirus pandemic from the Rose Garden at the White House on March 30, 2020.

  • Mike Lindell said that Trump was the first president in his lifetime “who wasn’t in it for the ego.”
  • Lindell, the CEO of MyPillow, first met the former president after the 2016 RNC Convention.
  • Lindell continues to spread election-fraud claims about the 2020 presidential race.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell once had a dream where he met Donald Trump.

“Donald Trump and I were in some kind of room,” he wrote in his 2019 memoir ‘What Are the Odds?’ that detailed his rise from difficult beginnings to successful businessman. “It was an office with pictures on the wall behind us, and we were standing next to each other posing for a picture.”

After the two men met in 2016, they quickly hit it off. Since then, Lindell has become one of the former president’s staunchest political allies.

In a recent Rolling Stone interview, the intensity of Lindell’s affinity for the president remains apparent.

“He is the only president in my lifetime who wasn’t in it for the ego and worked only for the people and not for his own interests,” Lindell told journalist Stephen Rodrick.

After peddling the theory that Trump would be “reinstated” as president in August, Lindell shifted his timeline in the Rolling Stone interview.

“Six months from now, Trump will be our real president and our country will be heading toward its greatest rebirth in history,” he said.

Read more: The Justice Department is scrutinizing Arizona’s pro-Trump vote audit as threats of violence and political fallout loom

This past weekend, Lindell held a MAGA Frank Free Speech rally in New Richmond, Wisconsin, which featured Trump acolytes Diamond and Silk, conservative commentator Dinesh D’Souza, and David Clarke, a former Milwaukee County sheriff.

Trump was himself a featured speaker, via satellite, where he continued to complain about a range of issues, from the 2020 presidential election to what he perceives as President Joe Biden’s deficiencies at the US-Mexico border.

Last month, Lindell was reportedly booted from the Republican Governors Association (RGA) conference in Nashville, Tennessee, after planning to grill Govs. Doug Ducey of Arizona and Brian Kemp of Georgia about the 2020 election results in their respective states, according to a Politico report.

Biden defeated Trump in both Arizona and Georgia, which were significant wins for the Democratic Party, but Lindell has continued to push the former president’s debunked election-fraud claims.

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MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell falsely claims Trump will be ‘our real president’ in 6 months

Mike Lindell
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • Mike Lindell continues to push the conspiracy theory that Trump will be reinstated as president.
  • In a new interview with the Rolling Stone, he said Trump will be president in six months.
  • He initially said that Trump will take back the White House in August.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell in a new interview pushed back the date for when he believes former President Donald Trump will be reinstated as president.

“Six months from now, Trump will be our real president and our country will be heading toward its greatest rebirth in history,” Lindell told the Rolling Stone in a report published Monday.

The comments come after Lindell promoted a conspiracy theory that the Supreme Court will put Trump back in the White House by August. By then, Lindell previously said, he will have obtained evidence of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 presidential election to present to the nation’s highest court, which will delegitimize President Joe Biden’s win.

Now, it appears Lindell needs until December to do so.

Lindell told the Rolling Stone that the total amount of voter fraud will be confirmed once all 50 states carry out election audits, similar to the current GOP-led audit in Arizona’s Maricopa County, where Biden won.

Lindell first spread the conspiracy theory, which has gained traction in far-right circles, on Steve Bannon’s “War Room” podcast in March.

“What I’m talking about, Steve, is what I have been doing since January 9. All of the evidence I have, everything that is going to go before the Supreme Court, and the election of 2020 is going bye-bye,” Lindell said at the time.

To be clear, the conspiracy theory has no constitutional basis, as Insider has previously reported. The Supreme Court is not able to overturn a presidential election. The only way to remove a sitting president is through impeachment. And in any case, the vice president would then take over.

It’s been more than seven months since the 2020 race and there has been no evidence of widespread voter fraud. Federal, state, and local election officials have repeatedly pushed back on the false claims spread by Trump and his allies. The Trump campaign filed and lost dozens of lawsuits in an attempt to challenge the results.

Lindell, however, still contends that the race was stolen from Trump, specifically by 20 million votes, he told The Rolling Stone. The MyPillow founder is currently being sued for $1.3 billion by the voting-technology company Dominion for repeatedly asserting the company rigged the election.

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MyPillow targets wider consumer base as it opens UK subsidiary

mypillow ceo mike lindell profile 2x1
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell is targeting UK consumers.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell has launched a UK-based subsidiary of his company.

Products targeting UK consumers will be manufactured in a factory based in the West Midlands city of Coventry.

In a video advertisement on its UK website, the company said: “With its unique technology and design, MyPillow has taken America by storm and now it’s available here in the UK for the first time.”

Several products are advertised on the site, with prices ranging from £17 to £119.

According to a report by The Scotsman, the Coventry factory employs a monthly average of three employees and is based in a nondescript industrial park.

MyPillow did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Lindell has remained under the spotlight in recent months for reasons other than his business interests. He has repeatedly claimed that the 2020 US election was rigged, despite a lack of evidence. At a political rally on Saturday, he continued to double down on these claims.

Back in April, Lindell filed a lawsuit against Dominion Voting Systems for $1.6 billion, claiming the company was trying to stifle free speech. The suit was part of an ongoing fight that began when Dominion sued Lindell for $1.3 billion in damages for spreading claims that its machines enabled voter fraud.

Lindell also told Insider’s Grace Dean in February he expected to lose $65 million in pillow revenue this year because of retailer boycotts over his fraud claims.

In April, Lindell confirmed that Costco had pulled his products. It was the second-largest retailer to cut ties with him.

Most recently, Lindell’s lawyers said he is set to lose $2 billion as a result of his latest lawsuit against Dominion and Smartmatic.

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Mike Lindell’s lawyer has left his law firm, after being accused of filing a suit against Smartmatic and Dominion without authorization

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell
Mike Lindell.

  • Alec Beck, the lawyer representing MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, has parted ways with his law firm.
  • The move comes a day after he filed a new lawsuit against Smartmatic and Dominion Voting Systems.
  • According to Beck’s former employer, the lawsuit was filed without any authorization.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Alec Beck, the lawyer representing MyPillow’s CEO, Mike Lindell, has left his law firm a day after filing a new lawsuit against Smartmatic and Dominion, according to Bloomberg.

Barnes & Thornburg, Beck’s former employer, said he filed the suit without its authorization.

The company issued a statement on Twitter on Friday night: “Late last night, firm management became aware that a Minneapolis firm lawyer filed a complaint, as local counsel, in federal district court without receiving firm authorization pursuant to internal firm approval procedures,” it said.

Lindell’s new lawsuit, filed in federal court in Minnesota, accuses both voting-machine companies of “weaponizing the litigation process to silence political dissent and suppress evidence showing voting machines were manipulated to affect outcomes in the November 2020 general election.”

As previously reported by Insider’s Grace Dean, Lindell stands to lose $2 billion over the legal battle.

Lindell’s latest complaint featured references to dystopian novels and William Shakespeare. One of the included quotes is attributed to Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451”: “But you can’t make people listen. They have to come round in their own time, wondering what happened and why the world blew up around them. It can’t last.” Another quote is from George Orwell’s classic novel “1984.”

Legal experts have spoken out about Lindell’s latest filing. These included attorney Akiva Cohen, who described it as “craptastic” and “half-assed” in a series of tweets.

In its Friday statement, Barnes & Thornburg added: “Firm management took action immediately. The firm has withdrawn as local counsel in this matter and has ended the client relationship. The attorney representing the client in this matter is no longer with the firm.”

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Trump is trying hard to recruit politicians and journalists to back the baseless theory he will be reinstated as president

Former U.S. President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in Manhattan on May 18, 2021 in New York City. (Photo by James Devaney/GC Images)
Former U.S. President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in Manhattan on May 18, 2021 in New York City.

  • Donald Trump is attempting to recruit people to promote his theory that he will be reinstated as president, a report said.
  • “Trump is trying hard to recruit journalists, politicians, and other influential figures to promulgate this belief,” the National Review reported.
  • The baseless theory has been circulating among Trump supporters and fringe conservative media outlets for months.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump is “trying hard” to recruit politicians and journalists to promote his baseless theory that he will be reinstated as president in August, the National Review reported.

Charles C. W. Cooke, a senior reporter for the National Review, confirmed New York Times journalist Maggie Haberman’s reporting that Trump has told a number of people that he believes he will re-enter the White House as president as August.

“Haberman’s reporting was correct,” he wrote. “I can attest, from speaking to an array of different sources, that Donald Trump does indeed believe quite genuinely that he – along with former senators David Perdue and Martha McSally – will be “reinstated” to office this summer.”

He added: “Trump is trying hard to recruit journalists, politicians, and other influential figures to promulgate this belief – not as a fundraising tool or an infantile bit of trolling or a trial balloon, but as a fact.”

Haberman tweeted Tuesday that Trump had told a number of people about his belief that he would re-enter the White House in August as a sitting president.

“Trump has been telling a number of people he’s in contact with that he expects he will get reinstated by August (no that isn’t how it works but simply sharing the information),” Haberman tweeted.

The baseless theory has been circulating among Trump supporters and fringe conservative media outlets for months, Insider’s Jake Lahut reported.

It is based on the belief that President Joe Biden’s victory will be overturned following “audits” of last year’s presidential election in states including Georgia and Arizona. Trump and his allies filed more than 40 legal challenges to last year’s election result, all of which failed.

Mike Lindell, the chief executive of MyPillow, has been a vocal proponent of the theory that Trump will be reinstalled to the White House in August. He told Trump’s former advisor Steve Bannon that the theory was “100% real.”

Lindell also took credit for Trump’s reported belief in the August deadline, telling the Daily Beast: “If Trump is saying August, that is probably because he heard me say it.”

Sidney Powell, a former attorney for Trump, also pushed the theory at a conference over the weekend.

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MyPillow’s Mike Lindell filed another lawsuit against voting machine companies that includes quotes from ‘1984,’ Shakespeare, and ‘Fahrenheit 451’

GettyImages 1175240450
Mike Lindell, CEO of My Pillow, speaks during a campaign rally held by U.S. President Donald Trump at the Target Center on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

  • Mike Lindell filed another lawsuit against voting machine companies involved in the 2020 election.
  • Dominion sued Lindell in February for $1.3 billion over his election-fraud claims.
  • The latest lawsuit features references to dystopian novels and William Shakespeare.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

“MyPillow guy” Mike Lindell filed another federal lawsuit Thursday against voting machine companies involved in the 2020 presidential election, Dominion Voting Systems and Smartmatic.

MyPillow had already filed a lawsuit in April against Dominion for $1.6 billion, claiming the company was trying to stifle free speech. Dominion sued Lindell in February for $1.3 billion over claims he was making about election fraud involving their machines.

In the latest lawsuit, filed in federal court in Minnesota, Lindell accuses the companies of “weaponizing the litigation process to silence political dissent and suppress evidence showing voting machines were manipulated to affect outcomes in the November 2020 general election.”

Read more: Check out the 17-foot mural of fan mail Marjorie Taylor Greene created on Capitol Hill that’s annoying Democrats – before House rules might force her to remove it

Lindell, a staunch ally of former President Donald Trump, has repeatedly spread false or unsubstantiated claims about the integrity of the election. For example, he perpetuated the since-debunked conspiracy theory that Dominion voting machines switched votes from Trump to Joe Biden.

The recent lawsuit repeats many of the claims from the first lawsuit MyPillow filed in April and accuses Dominion and Smartmatic of engaging in a racketeering conspiracy to use the court system to silence claims about them.

Sections of the 82-page lawsuit include titles such as “The Rise of the Machines,” “Gaslighting: The REAL Big Lie,” and “Shut Up Or Else.”

The lawsuit also features quotes from famous dystopian novels and English playwright William Shakespeare.

One of the included quotes is attributed to Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451”: “But you can’t make people listen. They have to come round in their own time, wondering what happened and why the world blew up around them. It can’t last.”

Another quote included is from George Orwell’s “1984”: “And if all others accepted the lie which the Party imposed-if all records told the same tale-then the lie passed into history and became truth.”

Dominion and Smartmatic did not respond to Insider’s request for comment. A Dominion spokesperson previously told Insider the initial lawsuit brought by MyPillow was a “meritless retaliatory lawsuit, filed by MyPillow to try to distract from the harm it caused to Dominion.”

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Trump is telling people he thinks he’ll be ‘reinstated’ as president in August, according to a report

donald trump august reinstated
Former President Donald Trump.

  • Former President Donald Trump is reportedly floating another idea about unlawfully taking power.
  • Trump is said to have echoed a far-right conspiracy theory that he’ll be “reinstated.”
  • Pro-Trump personalities such as MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell have pushed the baseless claim for months.
  • Sign up for the 10 Things in Politics daily newsletter.

Former President Donald Trump has reportedly been telling people that he thinks he’ll somehow return to the White House as sitting president by August, according to New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman.

Haberman, who broke some of the biggest stories from the Trump administration and has been covering him for decades, added that Trump has been “laser focused” on voting audits in states whose results he is still trying to overturn.

The anti-democratic conspiracy theory has been bubbling up in fringe conservative media for several months.

It has no basis under the Constitution or any legitimate legal framework.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell is one of the most prominent proponents of the theory.

Former Trump attorney Sydney Powell also floated the idea at a recent QAnon conference.

Read more: Low-paid Capitol Hill staffers are moonlighting for Starbucks and Door Dash. They’re fed up with unlivable salaries that hinder diversity and kneecap careers.

The anticipation of such an event among the most dedicated Trump supporters is similar to the buildup ahead of the January 6 insurrection, which began to gain steam during a nationwide pro-Trump bus tour calling for the 2020 election results to be overturned.

In Lindell’s telling, August would be when he would go to the Supreme Court to present evidence the pillow tycoon says he acquired on January 9. Lindell claims the evidence will be so convincing that the justices will be forced to reject the 2020 election results.

Former Trump adviser Steve Bannon’s podcast has amplified the conspiracy theory, with Lindell and others going on the show to promote it with minimal pushback.

The Bannon podcast remains influential among GOP lawmakers hoping to avoid a primary challenge while seeking reelection.

Dozens of lawsuits related to the election have been filed by Trump lawyers and other Republicans, and all of them have failed.

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MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell flew Kristi Noem to Republican Governors Association conference on private jet: Politico

Kristi Noem
Gov. Kristi Noem of South Dakota.

  • Mike Lindell flew Gov. Kristi Noem to a RGA conference on his private jet, according to Politico.
  • Lindell was booted from the event for plans to confront two governors about the election, per Politico.
  • Noem is a potential 2024 GOP presidential candidate.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Gov. Kristi Noem of South Dakota flew on MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell’s private jet en route to a three-day Republican Governors Association (RGA) conference in Nashville, Tennessee, this week, according to a Politico report.

Lindell, a high-profile ally of former President Donald Trump, reportedly was booted from the event after planning to grill Govs. Doug Ducey of Arizona and Brian Kemp of Georgia about the 2020 election results in their respective states, per Politico. President Joe Biden defeated Trump in both Arizona and Georgia, significant Sun Belt triumphs for the Democrats, but Lindell has continued to push the former president’s false election-fraud claims.

An official told Politico that Lindell was unable to attend official RGA events since he was not a full member of the organization.

However, Lindell was allowed access to the RGA meeting as a “guest” of Noem and a “prospective member,” according to Politico.

Earlier this week, Lindell told Politico that after arriving in Nashville on Monday and intending to stay for much of the week, he changed course and departed in his jet on Tuesday.

Lindell’s itinerary shift forced Noem to find alternate accommodations for her return home, according to a source familiar with the matter who spoke with Politico.

However, Noem spokesperson Ian Fury fully disputes this claim.

“Lindell was not a guest of Governor Noem’s at the conference,” he told Politico. “Neither did her travel plans change following the conference. Governor Noem follows the law and reimburses for flights when appropriate.”

In a phone conversation with Politico, Lindell said that he “is not revealing anybody who goes on my plane.”

“I have people on my plane all the time and I don’t know who told you that,” he said. “I’m not disclosing anything.”

After hanging up, he sent a text message: “Anyone who ever is on my plane is highly confidential! I cannot comment on that or my plane’s flights … This is for security reasons[.] I have had many threats since I went public with the Dominion and machine evidence.”

Read more: A multitude of Trump-era mysteries are poised to come roaring back into the headlines. Everyone involved is bracing for what happens after that.

In February, Lindell was sued by Dominion Voting Systems for $1.3 billion for defamation after repeatedly spreading debunked claims that the company’s machines contributed to Trump’s loss. His products have also been pulled from the shelves by numerous retailers, including Bed Bath & Beyond and Costco.

Noem and Lindell have spoken at events together in the past, including a Trump rally in Michigan last September where she criticized Democratic Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer’s implementation of COVID-19 restrictions.

That month, she also campaigned in Minnesota with Lindell for Trump.

“It was an honor to travel to Minnesota with Mike Lindell to support President Trump in his re-election,” she wrote in a Facebook post at the time. “We both understand that we need to leave it all on the table to ensure President Trump wins on November 3rd.

Noem, who faces reelection as governor in 2022 and is widely seen as a likely 2024 GOP presidential contender, recently started a federal PAC called the “Noem Victory Fund.”

According to Politico, most states permit governors to fly on the private jets of friends or associates, but gifts have to be reported “under certain circumstances.”

Under South Dakota law, public officials or their immediate families cannot accept gifts from lobbyists that exceed $100 during a full calendar year.

However, the state lacks any additional regulations on gifts from individuals who are not lobbyists.

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Some Mike Lindell fans reportedly stood in line for 7 hours to watch his rally at the Corn Palace – but when the event started, the venue was half-empty

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.

  • Mike Lindell held a rally in South Dakota Monday to speak about his voter-fraud website Frank.
  • The Dickinson Press reported that guests stood in line for hours – but the venue was only half-full.
  • Ben Carson and Eric Metaxas spoke at the event, while Joe Piscopo performed a music set.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Supporters of MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell stood in line for hours to attend his rally in South Dakota on Monday – but the Corn Palace venue was only half-full for the event.

Lindell held the rally to launch “Frank,” the website he billed as a social-media site, but is so far a one-way platform for him to spread baseless allegations of voter fraud.

Photos shared on Twitter show lines snaking around the Corn Palace in Mitchell. The Dickinson Press reported that some people stood in line for up to seven hours for the free event, which let people in on a first-come, first-served basis.

Some guests said they came from neighboring states, including Minnesota and Nebraska, while others came from as far away as Texas, the publication reported.

Corn Palace Director Doug Greenway told Insider’s Kevin Shalvey that he had fielded calls from dozens of people interested in attending the event.

The venue fits about 3,000 people, and photos on Twitter suggest that it was around half full for the event.

Lindell, a close ally of former President Donald Trump, has repeatedly pushed disproven voter-fraud conspiracy theories about the presidential election, leading to voting-machine company Dominion suing him for $1.3 billion.

Some attendees at Monday’s event brought along Trump merchandise, including hats and flags. Salon.com’s Zachary Petrizzo reported that a group of far-right Proud Boy members attended, citing a source at the event.

The event featured talks from Ben Carson, Trump’s secretary of housing and urban development, who joined on video call, and conservative podcaster Eric Metaxas. Comedian Joe Piscopo of “Saturday Night Live” fame performed a music set, which included the national anthem.

This was followed by a 90-minute speech from Lindell, who spread voter-fraud theories, including claims that Trump got 80 million votes in the 2020 presidential election, per Newsweek. The Federal Election Commission says that Trump got just over 72 million votes.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

Attendees received a free copy of both Lindell’s autobiography and his self-made film “Absolute Proof,” which alleges fraud in the 2020 election.

Mitchell has a population of around 15,000, but Lindell said he chose the location partially because of the South Dakota GOP governor’s resistance to COVID-19 lockdown measures.

His Corn Palace rally was sandwiched between a Dakota Wesleyan University graduation ceremony and an event by the American Corn Hole Association.

Frank failed to fully launch

Lindell announced plans to launch his own social-media site in March after Twitter banned him and billed the site as a “YouTube-Twitter combination.”

But it was hit by multiple delays, technical problems, and what Lindell claimed was “the biggest attack ever” before Frank ultimately launched as a one-way channel in April.

The site features videos and articles, many written by Lindell himself, that largely focus on voter-fraud conspiracy theories. Some also spread misinformation about the coronavirus, with one article calling vaccines “a deadly depopulation bioweapon.”

Lindell regularly livestreams from the site, hosting other right-wing personalities.

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