MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell is trying to get ads back on Fox News, but the network keeps turning him down, report says

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MINNEAPOLIS, MN – OCTOBER 10: Mike Lindell, CEO of My Pillow, speaks during a campaign rally held by U.S. President Donald Trump at the Target Center on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis, Minnesota.

  • Mike Lindell yanked all his ads from Fox News in July after it wouldn’t run his cyber-symposium ad.
  • Since then, Lindell has pitched at least four commercials to the network, he told The Daily Beast.
  • Fox News keeps rejecting them, despite MyPillow’s prior status as one of the network’s biggest sponsors.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

After angrily pulling all his commercials from Fox News this summer following a spat with the network, MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell seems to have changed his tune.

In July, Lindell, who at the time was Fox host Tucker Carlson’s biggest sponsor, said he was yanking his commercials because the network refused to air an ad for his cyber symposium. Lindell was claiming the symposium would prove voter fraud, but after the event occured in August, it was dismissed by cyber experts.

Lindell said he was pulling his ads “immediately and indefinitely,” saying “shame on Fox” for refusing to run the ad for the symposium.

“It’s unfortunate Mr. Lindell has chosen to pause his commercial time on Fox News given the level of success he’s experienced in building his brand through advertising on the number one cable news network,” the network said in a statement to Insider’s Matthew Loh at the time.

But according to a new report from The Daily Beast, the tables have turned, with Fox now turning down Lindell.

Lindell told the outlet he first approached Fox just weeks after cutting ties, in an attempt to mend the advertising relationship and promote his new social media network, FrankSpeech.

He has since pitched at least four commercials to Fox, all of which have been rejected, according to The Daily Beast.

Fox News confirmed to the outlet that as recently as this week, it had rejected two ads from Lindell, though it did not provide reasoning for the decisions.

But Lindell told Insider that Fox doesn’t like the content at FrankSpeech.com.

“Fox is only turning down ads that have frank or frankspeech in the title,” Lindell said in a message.

He told The Daily Beast that at first Fox did not want any mention of the cyber symposium or election fraud, but that commercials he pitched without these factors were also turned down.

“They said I couldn’t mention the words ‘Frank’ or ‘FrankSpeech,'” he told The Daily Beast Thursday. “It was the fastest reply we’ve gotten. But if I removed the words ‘FrankSpeech’ it might have cleared, but it would have just been a MyPillow ad, which I said I’m not doing! Outrageous!”

Lindell has been an ardent supporter of former President Donald Trump and a steadfast proponent of conspiracy theories about the 2020 election, even as he faces down lawsuits from election technology companies Dominion and Smartmatic.

Fox News and some of its hosts have also been targeted by the lawsuits over their coverage of the election.

Fox News did not immediately reply to Insider’s request for comment.

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MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell threatens to ‘go after’ investigative journalist, calling him an ‘enemy of our country’

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MyPillow CEO Michael Lindell laughs during a press conference in Des Moines, on February 3, 2020.

  • MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell threatened to “go after” an investigative journalist on Friday.
  • Lindell called Salon reporter Zachary Petrizzo an “enemy of our country.”
  • Petrizzo told Insider Lindell is “more interested in lying about a reporter than a 1.3 billion dollar lawsuit.”
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell on Friday threatened an investigative journalist who wrote several exposés about him, calling him “an enemy of the country.”

In a live stream posted on his social media platform, Frank, Lindell vowed to “go after” Salon investigative reporter Zachary Petrizzo.

“I going to spend a lot more money, Zachary. I’m not out of money contrary to your little thing here,” Lindell said. “We are going after this kid.”

“Zachary is an enemy … He’s an enemy of our country,” Lindell added.

Petrizzo has written several stories about Lindell and his unsuccessful quest to prove voter fraud at the 2020 presidential election.

He recently reported that Lindell allegedly paid more than $3 million to “white hat hackers” who were meant to reveal evidence that China helped President Joe Biden “steal” the election. However, the experts did not deliver.

Salon also published an article alleging that Lindell sold a 10-seat luxury aircraft this summer to fund his defense in the Dominion Voting Systems defamation lawsuit.

In a statement to Insider, Petrizzo said: “Unfortunately, Mr. Mike Lindell is more interested in lying about a reporter than a 1.3 billion dollar lawsuit against him from Dominion. Sounds like his priorities are backward! As to having me criminal charged? I wish him luck in that venture. I’ll keep my head on a swivel for the pillow police!”

“Mr. Lindell knows our Salon investigation is showing first hand that he was conned! More to come on that next week,” he added.

Insider has reached out to Lindell for comment.

Lindell has been a staunch ally of former President Donald Trump and a driving force of voter-fraud conspiracy. Earlier this year, he was sued by voting-machine company Dominion for spreading baseless election claims.

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Mike Lindell may have purchased a $1.5 million home for a discredited ‘expert’ who didn’t actually turn up the cyber symposium, reports say

Mike Lindell
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell.

  • An ex-member of Mike Lindell’s team said the MyPillow chief paid millions to supposed experts.
  • Josh Merritt told Salon that $3 million was split among Lindell’s advisors and “white-hat hackers.”
  • Most of the cash went towards a luxury Florida home for a discredited expert, said Merritt.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Mike Lindell reportedly paid more than $3 million to several advisers and “white hat hackers” who failed to provide evidence of voter fraud at the 2020 presidential election, Salon reported.

At Lindell’s 72-hour “cyber symposium” in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, the experts were meant to reveal concrete proof that China helped Joe Biden “steal” the 2020 election, but this did not happen.

Rob Graham, a cyber expert who attended the event said it was just full of “random garbage that wastes our time.”

For its report, Salon spoke to Josh Merritt, a former member of Lindell’s “red team,” at the event, who said the money was split among a group of Lindell’s cyber experts.

Merritt told the outlet that most of the money went towards a $1.5 million luxury home in Naples, Florida, for Dennis Montgomery. According to the outlet, Montgomery is a discredited former government contractor and part of Lindell’s inner circle.

The reported purchase appears to have been completed on July 12 – weeks before Lindell’s voter-fraud event. According to Salon, Montgomery did not even attend the event.

Montgomery did not return Salon’s request for comment.

Khaya Himmelman, a reporter for the Dispatch, attended Lindell’s cyber symposium. She told Salon: “It’s so obvious Lindell was taken for a ride. I’m not surprised about Montgomery’s involvement, but I couldn’t have guessed a house in Florida was involved. I’m only left wondering how Lindell fell for it.”

Salon reached out to Lindell for comment but said he hung up. Lindell did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

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MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says he is hiding a pro-Trump election official at a secret safe house to help her dodge a FBI investigation

Mike Lindell, Tina Peters
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell told Vice News that Peters is now “holed up” in a safe house.

  • A Colorado county clerk is accused of assisting in leaking election data to a QAnon influencer.
  • Tina Peters is now under investigation by the FBI, according to reports.
  • MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell told Vice News that Peters is now “holed up” in a safe house.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell has said he is providing a safe house for a Colorado county clerk amid an FBI investigation into her role in an alleged plot to leak election data to a QAnon leader, according to Vice News.

The official at the center of the probe, Mesa County clerk Tina Peters, is accused of compromising voting machines and allowing someone to share sensitive data with QAnon figurehead, Ron Watkins, Insider previously reported.

Peters, a so-called “Trump Truther,” permitted surveillance cameras to be turned off for up to two months, it is alleged.

Read more: A pro-Trump county clerk is accused of helping to leak sensitive election data to one of QAnon’s leaders: reports

She is under investigation by the Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, and on Tuesday, the FBI said it was also looking into it. The FBI announced that it was working with Colorado’s District Attorney’s office “to determine if there was a potential federal criminal violation,” FBI Denver office spokeswoman Courtney Bernal told the Denver Post.

Two weeks ago, when Griswold issued an order authorizing her staff to travel to Mesa County to inspect the election system, Peters was on her way to MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell’s “cyber symposium” in South Dakota, Vice News reported.

Lindell told Vice News on Wednesday that, following the symposium, a member of his own security team leaked the secret location she was staying in, the media outlet reported.

Peters is now “holed up” in a new safe house, Lindell said.

“She’s worried about her safety. These people are ruthless,” he told Vice News.

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Here’s what happened at Mike Lindell’s cyber symposium, from him storming offstage to Bolsonaro’s son giving him a MAGA hat signed by Trump

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Mike Lindell is a leading promoter of baseless voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

  • Mike Lindell just held a 72-hour voter-fraud “cyber symposium” in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
  • Speakers included Ronald Watkins, Steve Bannon, and the son of Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro.
  • Here’s what happened.
Lindell said the event would prove his voter-fraud theories

mike lindell trump
Lindell is a staunch Trump supporter.

Mike Lindell, a leading promoter of baseless voter-fraud conspiracy theories, has spent months gathering information that he said would prove that China helped Joe Biden to “steal” the 2020 presidential election from Donald Trump.

This culminated in the MyPillow CEO holding a 72-hour “cyber symposium” in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, between Tuesday and Thursday.

Lindell claimed that he had 37 terabytes of information related to voter fraud to reveal at the cyber symposium, which was livestreamed on his website, Frank. He said he’d give $5 million to anyone who could disprove the data, provided they attend the event in person.

The event featured controversial speakers, as well as a documentary played on repeat

Speakers on stage at Mike Lindell's
Steve Bannon spoke at the event.

Speakers at the event included conspiracy theorists Ronald Watkins, Raheem Kassam, and Steve Bannon, as well as the son of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

And in between speeches, attendees watched a series of videos. This included watching the same conspiracy theory-filled documentary four times on Tuesday, Salon reporter Zachary Petrizzo said.

Jair Bolsonaro’s son gave Lindell a MAGA hat signed by Trump

Mike Lindell Eduardo Bolsonaro Steve Bannon at cyber symposium in South Dakota
Eduardo Bolsonaro gave a speech at the event.

Eduardo Bolsonaro, the son of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, gave Lindell a “Make America Great Again” hat he said was signed by Trump, on Tuesday.

The hat was signed “to Mike, a great patriot,” Lindell said, adding, “Thank you, Mr. President, our real president.”

Bolsonaro then gave a speech about voter fraud in Brazil. Jair Bolsonaro has suggested that Brazil’s voting machines were used to rig the country’s elections, leading to the country’s election authority launching an investigation into Bolsonaro.

Lindell once against blasted Fox News

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Lindell was formerly one of the biggest advertisers on Tucker Carlson’s show.

Throughout the event Lindell slammed multiple news outlets – including another attack on Fox News where he implied that he wouldn’t trust the network to report the weather.

“I said the other day they should be a weather channel,” the MyPillow CEO said Tuesday, per The Washington Times. “And the next day I changed my mind because they wouldn’t report an oncoming storm.”

Lindell has clashed with Fox News several times over the past few months after the outlet stepped up its content moderation and refused to cover some of his debunked theories about the 2020 presidential election.

This culminated in Lindell pulling MyPillow’s advertisements from Fox News last month after it refused to air ads for his cyber symposium. Lindell was formerly one of the biggest advertisers on Tucker Carlson’s show.

A spokesperson for Fox News told CNN that the network hadn’t sent a reporter to cover the symposium.

Lindell invited a reporter to interview him on stage, before called him a “cancer”

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Lindell ranted about a Salon reporter from the main stage.

But Fox News wasn’t the only outlet in the firing line.

Lindell has repeatedly sparred with Salon reporter Zachary Petrizzo during interviews, phone calls, and livestreams.

After ranting about Petrizzo’s work on stage Tuesday, including calling his articles “hit jobs,” Lindell texted him later that night inviting him for an interview.

“Zach go write your garbage, and then we will interview on stage,” the text message read.

But on Wednesday, Lindell took back the offer.

“Lose my number. You are a cancer to our country,” he texted Petrizzo, before calling him “insane.”

Insider viewed screenshots of the messages.

Lindell fled the stage after a judge ruled Dominion could proceed with its lawsuit against him

Lindell rushed offstage when news broke that the $1.3 billion defamation suit voting-machine company Dominion filed against him would go ahead.

Lindell attempted to have the defamation lawsuit dismissed, but a US district judge ruled on Wednesday the suit could proceed in full.

“After news emerged at about 6 p.m. on Wednesday that his attempt to have the lawsuit dismissed was unsuccessful, Lindell was seen on video getting off his seat and rushing off the stage abruptly, disappearing behind a dark curtain,” Insider’s Cheryl Teh reported.

The livestream was instead replaced by a video reel showing articles about voter fraud, alongside an image of Lindell hugging a pillow.

A reporter was reportedly removed from the event – but snuck back in

Mike Lindell
Lindell’s security frog-marched the reporter out of the event.

According to Salon’s Petrizzo, a reporter from far-right outlet The Gateway Pundit was “frog-marched” out of the event Wednesday afternoon.

Petrizzo told Insider that the reporter has been “super rude” and “very aggressive” towards another journalist. Petrizzo said the Pundit reporter also shoved a camera in his face and surreptitiously recorded his laptop.

The Pundit did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Lindell said he got attacked and claimed Antifa was trying to infiltrate the event

Lindell said on Thursday morning that he had been attacked on Wednesday night when he got back to his hotel room.

A Sioux Falls Police Department spokesperson told The Associated Press that his officers had taken a report about an assault at a hotel near the symposium at 11.30 p.m. on Wednesday. They did not say whether Lindell was involved in the incident.

Retired army colonel Phil Waldron said that they had received “credible threat warnings” around two weeks beforehand, and that they had “somebody working in the crowd … detecting threats.”

He added that there were “really radical folks outside trying to penetrate” the event and that attendees were exchanging press badges in the parking lot.

“The big end game is to discredit all the legislators who have had the courage to be here,” Waldron said. “They’re obviously trying to subdue the message that Mike’s trying to get out.”

“So this is a typical insurrection-type activity,” he added.

Lindell also said that his staffers had told him that “Antifa things” were trying to infiltrate the event.

Lindell’s website Frank sent out an email to subscribers Thursday afternoon with the subject: “Mike Lindell and His Cyber Symposium Attacked — Please Share Everywhere.”

The email included video footage of Lindell talking about the attack at the event and Waldron speaking about the alleged security threats.

The event also included prayers and the national anthem

Before launching into a series of speeches, the second day of the symposium started with morning prayers and the national anthem, The Dispatch’s Khaya Himmelman said.

The size of the audience dwindled over the course of the event, according to reports

Salon’s Petrizzo reported on the first day of the event there were “a ton of Republican state legislators and their staffs.”

But not many attendees stayed until the end of the symposium.

Petrizzo said the next day that the crowd had mostly left. “Only about half of the crowd here on day two is back for the third day,” he added Thursday.

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A pro-Trump county clerk is accused of helping to leak sensitive election data to one of QAnon’s leaders: reports

Tina Peters, left, and Ron Watkins, right.
Tina Peters, a Mesa County clerk, is accused of allowing information to be leaked to Ron Watkins.

  • Colorado’s secretary of state said that a county clerk is accused of “assisting” in a security breach.
  • Sensitive election data collected during the breach was leaked to Ron Watkins, Vice reported.
  • Watkins, who is believed by some to be ‘Q,’ shared information from the leak on his Telegram channel.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A pro-Trump election official in Colorado is accused of assisting in the compromising of voting machines and allowing someone to leak sensitive data to a prominent QAnon influencer, according to Vice.

Tina Peters, a county clerk in Mesa, Colorado, and so-called “Trump Truther,” permitted surveillance cameras to be turned off for up to two months, it is alleged. During that time, she has allowed someone to steal information that was then leaked to QAnon figurehead Ron Watkins, the media outlet reported.

Read more: Dozens of people who supported radical right-wing efforts to overturn the 2020 election currently sit on government boards running places like the Holocaust Memorial and the Kennedy Center

At some point in May, Peters’s office reportedly ordered officials to turn off the surveillance cameras monitoring Mesa County’s voting equipment, according to evidence from Colorado’s Democratic Secretary of State Jenna Griswold.

The cameras were not turned on again until this month, Vice reported, which broke the equipment’s “chain of custody” and means that the machines cannot be used in November’s city, town, and school district elections.

“This is troubling for the entire state of Colorado to have someone in a trusted position, literally trusted to protect democracy, allow this type of situation to occur,” Griswold said during a Thursday press conference. “To be very clear, Mesa County Clerk and Recorder allowed a security breach and by all evidence at this point assisted it.”

On May 23, an unknown person gained access to one of the Election Management Systems machines from Dominion Voting Systems used by Mesa County, Vice reported. That person was then able to download an image of the machine’s hard drive, a process repeated on May 26, a cybersecurity expert told Vice.

On May 25, Dominion employees visited the country to conduct a highly-regulated “trusted build” upgrade to the voting machines’ software, the media outlet said.

According to state law, only staff from Griswold’s office, Mesa County, and Dominion are permitted to be in the room during a “trusted build.”

Peters, however, invited an unauthorized non-employee into the room during the process, the Associated Press reported. She misled Griswold about his employment status, CBS Denver said.

While the unauthorized man was there, he allegedly illegally captured footage of the machines being updated.

On August 2, this footage was posted to Watkin’s Telegram channel. The former 8chan owner and administrator has fervently promoted the QAnon conspiracy theory, and some people believe that him and his father could be the infamous ‘Q.’

According to Griswold’s team, the footage included an image that accidentally linked the leak to Mesa County.

Griswold issued an order last week authorizing her staff to travel to Mesa County to inspect the election system, but when they arrived, Peters was nowhere to be seen.

Peters was on her way to MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell’s “cyber symposium” in South Dakota, Vice reported.

While speaking at the event, the Colorado Newsline reported that Peters accused Griswold’s office of “raiding” her county’s office.

At the South Dakota symposium, Vice said that Watkins showed the audience images that appear to have been taken from the Mesa County machines on May 23 and May 26.

Griswold’s office is investigating the security breach, Colorado Newsline reported. An investigator with 21st Judicial District Attorney Dan Rubinstein’s office is also looking into related potential criminal conduct, according to the local paper.

Read the original article on Business Insider

From Mike Lindell to OAN, here’s everyone Dominion and Smartmatic are suing over election conspiracy theories so far

Three side-by-side images of MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, Sidney Powell, and Rudy Giuliani.
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, Sidney Powell, and Rudy Giuliani are being sued by Dominion.

  • Conspiracy theorists claim Dominion and Smartmatic “flipped” votes from Donald Trump to Joe Biden.
  • The election technology companies are now suing the people who spread those claims.
  • Here’s who’s being sued so far.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Dominion and Smartmatic have launched a series of defamation lawsuits against individuals and groups who spread election fraud conspiracy theories related to their voting machines during the 2020 presidential election.

Dominion filed a $1.6 billion defamation suit against Fox News on Friday, and more could be on their way. Dominion has sent cease-and-desist notices and warnings to preserve documents to more than 150 people, and its CEO previously told CNBC that the company was “not ruling anyone out.”

Because of the coronavirus pandemic, people turned to alternative ways to vote in the election, and voter fraud conspiracy theories quickly sprung up.

One posited that Dominion and Smartmatic developed technology that “flipped” votes from Donald Trump to Joe Biden through a method developed with the regime of the late Venezuelan dictator Hugo Chávez.

The theory has been thoroughly debunked. That didn’t stop pro-Trump attorney Sidney Powell and Trump’s former personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani from pushing elements of the theory while filing a series of failed lawsuits seeking to overturn the results of the election. Lindell has also spread misinformation about the machines, saying Dominion “built them to cheat.”

As well as making the brand “radioactive” and putting its multiyear contracts in jeopardy, according to its attorney Tom Clare, the allegations about Dominion also put its employees in danger, the company wrote in a lawsuit.

Its customer support number received a voicemail message saying “we’re bringing back the firing squad,” it wrote in the suit in January. The need for heightened personal security cost Dominion $565,000, according to the lawsuit, bringing its total costs attributed to the vote fraud claims to almost $1.2 million.

Here’s a list of everyone is being sued so far.

Sidney Powell by Dominion and Smartmatic

Sidney Powell
Attorney Sidney Powell at a Trump Campaign press conference.

Dominion was the first to snap.

On January 8, it filed a defamation suit against pro-Trump attorney Sidney Powell, seeking $1.3 billion in damages.

Powell was one of the faces of the Trump campaign’s legal team in November, but Trump kicked her off the team after she floated her conspiracy theory at a press conference.

Despite being purged from Trump’s “Elite Strike Force” legal team Powell used her false theories as the premise of four federal lawsuits seeking to overturn the election result. All of them failed, and some have resulted in motions for her to be disbarred.

Dominion’s lawsuit alleges that Powell’s claims caused the company business losses after she baselessly accused the company of fraud, election rigging, and bribery.

“Powell’s statements were calculated to — and did in fact — provoke outrage and cause Dominion enormous harm,” Tom Clare, the attorney representing Dominion, wrote in the lawsuit.

The 124-page defamation lawsuit also outlines how Powell raised money from her media tour peddling her conspiracy theory through a corporate vehicle called “Defending the Republic,” also named as a party in the lawsuit.

Powell responded by tweeting that the lawsuit “is baseless & filed to harass, intimidate, & to drain our resources as we seek the truth of #DominionVotingSystems‘ role in this fraudulent election.”

Smartmatic filed a defamation lawsuit against Powell a month later, suing her at the same time it sued Rudy Giuliani, a fellow conspiracy theorist, and Fox News.

The company claimed that Powell and Giuliani used right-wing media outlets like Fox News to make their conspiracy theories go viral.

“These defendants are primary sources of much of the false information,” the company said. “Their unfounded accusations were repeated by other media outlets, journalists, bloggers and influencers the world over.”

A federal judge Wednesday denied Powell’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit.

Rudy Giuliani by Dominion and Smartmatic

Rudy Giuliani
Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani at a Trump Campaign press conference.

On January 26, Dominion filed a defamation suit against Rudy Giuliani, Trump’s now-former personal lawyer, again seeking $1.3 billion in damages.

In the lawsuit, Dominion accused Giuliani of creating “a viral disinformation campaign about Dominion,” referring to more than 50 of his statements.

Through hearings, television appearances, Twitter, and his own YouTube show, it said, Giuliani repeatedly accused Dominion of election fraud and misrepresented the company’s security measures while doing so.

He “cashed in by hosting a podcast where he exploited election falsehoods to market gold coins, supplements, cigars and protection from ‘cyberthieves,'” Dominion wrote in the lawsuit.

The 107-page document also cited numerous other people who said they believed Giuliani’s claims, which it argued demonstrated the scope of the damage.

“Rudy Giuliani actively propagated disinformation to purposefully mislead voters,” Dominion CEO John Poulos said in a statement. “Because Giuliani and others incessantly repeated the false claims about my company on a range of media platforms, some of our own family and friends are among the Americans who were duped.”

In a statement, Giuliani said he welcomed the lawsuit and suggested he had not previously done a thorough investigation of Dominion’s practices.

A federal judge Wednesday denied Giuliani’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit.

Smartmatic also included Giuliani as a defendant in its lawsuit filed in February.

The company said Giuliani used the conspiracy theories to enrich himself.

“He reportedly would seek thousands of dollars ($20,000/day) in fees from President Trump to spread the story and file frivolous lawsuits,” Smartmatic wrote in its lawsuit.

“He would also use the attention brought to him as one of the primary storytellers to sell various products – from coins to supplements to title fraud protection.”

Mike Lindell by Dominion

mike lindell trump
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell.

On February 22, Dominion filed a defamation suit against MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, also seeking $1.3 billion in damages.

Lindell is a staunch ally of former president Donald Trump and a major GOP donor, who has repeatedly supported Trump’s claims challenging the integrity of the election.

Dominion’s lawsuit accused Lindell of repeatedly making false allegations while knowing there was no credible evidence to support his claims. As well as rallies, interviews, and a two-hour movie, Lindell used his social-media profiles to spread his baseless claims of voter fraud.

In the lawsuit, Dominion claimed Lindell used the claims as a way to ramp up his pillow sales, advertising on far-right media outlets that parroted his claims and sponsoring a bus tour that sought to overturn the election results. Lindell told Insider that retailer boycotts of MyPillow following the insurrection have cost him tens of millions of dollars in business.

He “knowingly lied about Dominion to sell more pillows to people who continued tuning in to hear what they wanted to hear about the election,” Dominion wrote.

Lindell told Insider Dominion had “zero, zero, zero” chance of winning. The lawsuits were part of cancel culture’s attempts at silencing voices, he said.

“I looked at it as a great day for America when they sued me,” Lindell added. “I can put the evidence for the whole world to see, and it’ll be public record, and the media will quit trying to suppress it.”

A federal judge Wednesday denied Lindell’s motion to dismiss the lawsuit.

Fox News by Smartmatic and Dominion

Donald Trump Fox News
A close-up of the Fox News Channel website with a picture of President Donald Trump displayed on a smartphone.

On February 4, Smartmatic filed a $2.7 billion lawsuit against Fox News, accusing it of waging disinformation campaigns about the company’s role in the 2020 election.

“In November and December 2020, Fox News broadcast multiple reports stating and implying that Smartmatic had fixed and rigged the 2020 election,” the company said.

“They repeated the false claims and accusations on air and in articles and social media postings that were together seen by millions in the US and even more around the world.”

Fox called the lawsuit “meritless” and asked a judge to dismiss the case.

On March 26, Dominion also filed a lawsuit against Fox News. The $1.6 billion suit – its biggest yet – claimed that the network gave prominence to the election-fraud claims as a tactic to revive viewership as ratings dropped after President Donald Trump’s loss.

The voting-technology company said that Fox News “sold a false story of election fraud in order to serve its own commercial purposes, severely injuring Dominion in the process.”

In a statement, Fox News said: “Fox News Media is proud of our 2020 election coverage, which stands in the highest tradition of American journalism, and will vigorously defend against this baseless lawsuit in court.”

Fox News representative told Insider in February that the network ran several “fact-check” segments “prior to any lawsuit chatter.”

While several of its news shows reported that there was no evidence of Dominion’s systems changing votes, Fox News, in particular its opinion hosts, “questioned the results of the election or pushed conspiracy theories about it at least 774 times” in the two weeks after the network called the race, according to Media Matters.

Jeanine Pirro, Maria Bartiromo, and Lou Dobbs by Smartmatic

Jeanine Pirro, Maria Bartiromo, Lou Dobbs
Fox News hosts Jeanine Pirro, Maria Bartiromo, and Lou Dobbs.

Smartmatic’s 285-page lawsuit against Fox News also named the hosts Lou Dobbs, Maria Bartiromo, and Jeanine Pirro as defendants.

Smartmatic said the hosts had offered Powell and Giuliani a platform and endorsed their falsehoods.

Bartiromo, Pirro, and Dobbs all filed separate motions to dismiss the lawsuit.

Fox News canceled Dobbs’ show days after the lawsuit was filed and said he would no longer have a relationship with the network. It added that the move had been planned.

Newsmax by Dominion

Rudy Giuliani on Newsmax.
Newsmax hosted Powell and Giuliani on its shows.

Dominion filed a $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against Newsmax, the right-wing outlet owned and run by Trump’s friend Chris Ruddy, on Tuesday.

Newsmax was slow to acknowledge the reality of Biden’s victory in the November 2020 election. Dominion accused Newsmax of promoting falsehoods about the company in order to compete with Fox News, which had correctly recognized Biden’s victory in November.

“Newsmax chose to prioritize its profits over the truth,” the lawsuit said. “For Ruddy and Newsmax, the facts did not matter. What mattered was feeding the audience what it wanted — even if it was spreading false information. And the race to the bottom began in earnest, dragging Dominion down with it.”

After the election, the network also hosted Powell and Giuliani. By allowing them to spout their false theories unchallenged on Newsmax’s programs, this amounted to defamation, Dominion said.

Newsmax representative Brian Peterson told Insider that the media organization was simply reporting on what notable figures said.

“While Newsmax has not reviewed the Dominion filing, in its coverage of the 2020 Presidential elections, Newsmax simply reported on allegations made by well-known public figures, including the President, his advisors and members of Congress — Dominion’s action today is a clear attempt to squelch such reporting and undermine a free press,” Peterson said.

One America News by Dominion

one america news oan
A One America News reported.

Dominion filed a $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against One America News (OAN) Tuesday, accusing it of engaging “in a race to the bottom with Fox and other outlets such as Newsmax to spread false and manufactured stories about election fraud.”

OAN refused to acknowledge Biden’s victory in the 2020 election even as Fox News and Newsmax pulled back on far-fetched election claims and aired videos attesting to the legitimacy of the results.

Dominion said that OAN’s falsehoods contributed toward the insurrection at the Capitol on January 6 and that it defamed Dominion by broadcasting “Absolute Proof,” Lindell’s conspiracy theory-filled documentary about voter fraud.

Dominion also accused OAN hosts Chanel Rion and Christina Bobb of amplifying and spreading false claims about Dominion.

After Dominion threatened to sue OAN for defamation in December, OAN warned Dominion of a countersuit.

Patrick Byrne by Dominion

patrick byrne overstock
Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne.

Dominion filed a $1.6 billion defamation lawsuit against former Overstock CEO Patrick Byrne Tuesday.

The lawsuit accuses Byrne, a staunch Trump ally, of waging “a defamatory disinformation campaign against Dominion” in collaboration with Powell, Giuliani, Lindell, and others. This includes pushing election conspiracy theories in television appearances, a blog series, a book, and a film, Dominion said.

“Byrne continues to stick to his manufactured, inherently improbable, profitable, and demonstrable lies,” the lawsuit said.

Dominion is ‘still exploring’ whether to sue Trump over election lies

Trump
Former President Donald Trump.

More lawsuits could be on their way, with Dominion’s CEO telling CNBC in February that the company was “not ruling anyone out” after sending cease-and-desist notices and warnings to preserve documents to more than 150 people.

Asked directly if Dominion would sue Trump, Shackelford, an attorney at Susman Godfrey LLP, told Insider’s Jacob Shamsian Tuesday that the company has not ruled it out.

“We are still exploring options as to how to hold other participants in the campaign of lies against Dominion to account,” Shackelford said.

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Mike Lindell said his cyber symposium would prove voter fraud. One cyber expert said it was just full of ‘random garbage that wastes our time.’

mike lindell white house
Mike Lindell claimed he had 37 terabytes of information related to voter fraud that he was going to reveal.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell’s 72-hour “cyber symposium” failed to produce legitimate evidence of voter fraud, cyber experts who attended the event said.

Lindell said he would reveal new information proving that China helped Joe Biden to “steal” the 2020 election from former President Donald Trump at the event in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.

Lindell claimed he had 37 terabytes of information related to voter fraud that he would reveal. He said he’d give $5 million to any cyber expert, politician, or reporter who could refute the data, provided they attend the event in person.

Read more: I asked MyPillow whether it sells customer data to political committees. Mike Lindell called back – and things got interesting.

Lindell’s claims were meritless, according to Rob Graham, a cyber expert who attended the symposium. “He gave us experts NOTHING today, except random garbage that wastes our time,” Graham tweeted Wednesday.

He added: “All day Mike Lindell has been on stage saying the cyber experts are happily working on packet captures. We are not. We haven’t been given the packet captures we were promised.”

Packet captures are intercepted network data obtained by other hackers. Lindell claimed the packet captures from the November 2020 election could be unencrypted to reveal evidence of voter fraud.

Harri Hursti, another attendee and election security expert, doubled down on criticism towards the event. He told The Washington Post that Lindell’s symposium was “a big fat nothing and a distraction,” adding that, “they have fed us with garbage just to control the narrative.”

Cyber expert Josh Merritt, who said he was hired by Lindell to study data for the event, told The Washington Times that the data his team had access to wasn’t enough to prove that China hacked the election.

On day two, the crowd “wasn’t having it” and mostly left as a result, tweeted Zachary Petrizzo, a Salon reporter who also attended.

A staunch ally of Trump, Lindell has been a superspreader of conspiracy theories about the election being “stolen,” despite no evidence of voter fraud.

This led to Lindell being sued by voting-machine company Dominion for $1.3 billion for saying it “switched” votes from Trump to Biden. Retailers have pulled MyPillow’s products, and Lindell said he’d received death threats.

The pundit’s relationship with conservative cable outlet, Fox News, similarly soured after the network refused to air advertisements promoting Lindell’s symposium.

Some of Trump’s most influential supporters attended the event. These included conspiracy theorists Ronald Watkins and Steve Bannon, as well as the son of Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro.

While Bannon is pro-Trump, Salon reported that he, too, was skeptical about Lindell’s claims, stating that he needed to see additional evidence.

One expert in cyber security and technology told the outlet that even if Lindell’s data claims were correct, he could face legal charges. “You can’t just pull this kind of information from a remote, you have to have a physical device sitting there that is providing this information,” the expert said.

The expert said the only way Lindell could have accumulated the kind of data he claims about voter fraud is by inserting a physical device that can “watch information that is going in and out of a network,” which is wiretapping and a breach of federal law.

Lindell did not respond to the specific concerns raised by the expert, Salon reported.

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My Pillow CEO Mike Lindell fled the stage at his cyber symposium at the same time news broke that Dominion’s billion-dollar defamation lawsuit against him would proceed

Lindell my pillow
Voting machine maker Dominion Voting Systems is currently suing MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell for defamation.

  • Mike Lindell fled the stage at his cyber symposium at the same time news broke that Dominion’s defamation lawsuit against him is going forward.
  • A federal judge denied Lindell’s bid to dismiss the voting machine maker’s $1.3 billion lawsuit.
  • Lindell is holding a 72-hour event in South Dakota to prove his election conspiracy theories.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell was seen dashing off the stage at his cyber symposium at the same time news broke that the $1.3 billion defamation suit filed against him by Dominion Voting Systems will go ahead.

Lindell attempted to have this defamation lawsuit against him dismissed during a hearing in June. But US District Judge Carl J. Nichols on August 11 ruled that the three defamation lawsuits against Lindell and Trump lawyers Sidney Powell and Rudy Giuliani, which are seeking more than a billion dollars in damages from each party, are slated to proceed in full.

Nichols noted in his judgment that the First Amendment offers “no blanket immunity” to Lindell in the Dominion lawsuit. The company alleges it was defamed by Lindell’s false claims that it rigged the election against Trump.

The judgment comes one day after Dominion filed lawsuits accusing right-wing media networks One America News and Newsmax of pushing false theories about the election.

Lindell is currently hosting a marathon 72-hour cyber symposium in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, from August 10 to August 12 in a bid to prove his election conspiracy theories.

After news that his attempt to have the lawsuit dismissed came out at around 6 p.m. on August 11, Lindell was seen on video getting off his seat and rushing off-stage abruptly, disappearing behind a dark curtain.

At press time, Lindell had not returned to the stage, and the live stream of the cyber symposium was replaced by a video reel showing news articles touting voter fraud claims next to an image of Lindell hugging a pillow.

mike lindell pillow cyber symposium
The livestream of Mike Lindell’s cyber symposium feed was replaced with a reel of news article clips accompanied by a MyPillow ad, after the CEO dashed off-stage abruptly.

Lindell told attendees on August 11 that he intended to stay on stage for three days straight.

“We’re not going on a break,” Lindell said. “You guys can go eat. That’s fine, but I ain’t eating! I’m staying up here for 72 hours.”

Zachary Petrizzo, a journalist from news outlet Salon who was covering the event, noted that Lindell was talking to a mostly empty hall on day two of the conference.

Insider has reached out to Mike Lindell for comment.

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Mike Lindell blasted Fox News again for ignoring his debunked voter-fraud theories. “What happened to reporting the news?” he asked.

Mike Lindell speaks to Jimmy Kimmel in April 2021
Relations between Fox News and MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell have soured in recent months.

  • Mike Lindell has again blasted Fox News for declining to report his voter-fraud conspiracy theories.
  • The MyPillow CEO suggested Fox News wouldn’t report the weather properly, per The Washington Times.
  • “They wouldn’t report an oncoming storm,” Lindell said Tuesday.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Mike Lindell has launched another attack on Fox News, this time implying that he wouldn’t trust the news station to report the weather.

“I said the other day they should be a weather channel,” the MyPillow CEO said Tuesday, per The Washington Times. “And the next day I changed my mind because they wouldn’t report an oncoming storm.”

Lindell is a leading promoter of conspiracy theories positing that China helped Joe Biden to “steal” the 2020 presidential election from Donald Trump. Lindell has promised to reveal 37 terabytes of information related to voter fraud at his cyber symposium in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, which ends late Wednesday.

Reporters from media outlets including Salon and The Dispatch attended the event. A spokesperson for Fox News told CNN that the network hadn’t sent a reporter.

“Shame on you, Fox,” Lindell said at the event, per The Washington Times. “Disgusting that they haven’t talked about this election.

“It’s disgusting,” Lindell said. “What happened to reporting the news?”

Fox News did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Lindell, a staunch ally of former president Donald Trump, has clashed with Fox News several times over the past few months after the outlet stepped up its content moderation and refused to cover some of his debunked theories about the 2020 presidential election. This culminated in Lindell pulling MyPillow’s advertisements from Fox News last month after it refused to air ads for his voter-fraud “cyber symposium” event, at which Lindell launched his latest attack.

Guest speakers at the event so far have included Steve Bannon, Trump’s former chief of staff in the White House, and Eduardo Bolsonaro, the son of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, who gave Lindell a MAGA hat he said was signed by Trump.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

Lindell said that he’d give $5 million to anyone who could disprove the data provided they attend the 72-hour event in person, and urged reporters to come along.

Lindell was one of Fox News’ biggest advertisers before relations soured

Relations between the Fox News and Lindell were already souring before he pulled MyPillow’s ads from the station. Lindell was previously one of the network’s biggest advertisers and said he spent nearly $50 million advertising on it in 2020.

In April, Lindell slammed Fox News for not reporting his $1.6 billion lawsuit against Dominion, which accused the voting-machine company of trying to stifle free speech and facilitating voter fraud.

Fox News had been sued by Dominion, as well as fellow voting-machine company Smartmatic, who accused the network of airing baseless segments about the companies’ roles in facilitating election fraud. Fox News said it would “vigorously” defend itself against the lawsuits in court.

“Fox has already been sued by Dominion and Smartmatic, so if you’ve already been sued, why would you not want to pour out the evidence that you were talking about before anyway?” Lindell said in April.

Earlier that month, Lindell told Bannon that he had hired private investigators to find out why Fox News isn’t letting him go on the network.

Meanwhile, Lindell has moved closer to right-wing networks like One America News and has also spread debunked voter-fraud conspiracy theories on his own website, Frank.

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