Ford will temporarily shut 8 factories and cut production of its F-150 pickups and Mustang due to the global chip shortage, a report says

2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT350R Heritage Edition_6.JPG
2020 Ford Mustang Shelby GT350R Heritage Edition.

  • Ford will temporarily shut factories in the US, Canada, and Mexico due the global chip shortage, CNBC reported.
  • Ford told CNBC it planned to cut production of its Ford Mustang, Bronco Sport SUV, and F-150 pickup.
  • The automaker unveiled its new fully-electric F-150 Lightning pickup this week.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Ford plans to temporarily shut eight factories due to a global shortage of semiconductor chips, according to an internal memo viewed by CNBC.

The automaker told CNBC that it plans to cut production due to the chip shortage, including its Ford Mustang, Bronco Sport SUV, and F-150 pickup models.

The eight plants to close include facilities in Chicago, Mexico, and Canada, the memo reportedly said.

“Our teams continue making the most of our available semiconductor allocation and will continue finding unique solutions to provide as many high-quality vehicles as possible to our dealers and customers,” Ford said in a statement to CNBC.

The company plans to close its Dearborn, Michigan truck plant for two weeks starting May 31, and reopen on a reduced schedule from June 14, according to the memo.

Ford recently showed off a fully-electric version of its popular F-150 pickup, the F-150 Lightning EV, which will be produced at the Rouge Electric Vehicle Center in Dearborn, Michigan. This is a separate factory, and was not mentioned in the memo.

President Joe Biden visited the new facility earlier this week to promote his $2 trillion infrastructure plan, which includes a $174 billion investment in electric vehicles.

In April, Ford said that it expected production to drop 50% in the second quarter due to the chip shortage, before bottoming out and then increasing during the rest of 2021.

Ford said the chip shortage would cost the automaker about $2.5 billion this year.

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A judge dismissed a Trump-endorsed lawsuit to audit votes in a Michigan county

Trump
Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida.

  • A Michigan judge dismissed a 2020 election lawsuit heavily hyped by former President Trump.
  • The lawsuit over a local ballot proposal challenged the integrity of the county’s election.
  • Antrim County’s results were fully audited and hand-recounted in December, affirming Trump’s win.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A Michigan judge formally dismissed a lawsuit seeking to audit and recount votes that former President Donald Trump heavily hyped as a “major” case, the Washington Post reported Monday

Trump posted a May 11 statement posted on his website cheerleading the Antrim County lawsuit, even though he was formally certified as winning the most votes in the county during the 2020 presidential election.

Trump touted the baseless contents of a “bombshell pleading” in a “major Michigan Election Fraud case” that he said will show that votes were “intentionally switched” to harm him, a claim for which there is no evidence.

He also compared the nonexistent fraud in the 2020 election to a heist of precious jewels, writing that if “a thief robs a jewelry store of all of its diamonds (the 2020 Presidential Election), the diamonds must be returned.”

Trump won a majority of votes in Antrim County but lost Michigan overall to now-President Joe Biden.

A human error with tabulating the results initially showed Biden winning the county. Antrim County Clerk Sheryl Guy, who happens to be a Republican, swiftly rectified the problem and certified the county’s election results for Trump, who carried the county with 61% of the vote with 37% going to Biden. Trump and his allies have seized on a quickly-corrected counting error in the county to spread disinformation about the 2020 election results.

The crux of the lawsuit filed by Antrim County resident Bill Bailey was about the results of a marijuana-related ballot initiative in the village of Central Lake, 9 & 10 News reported.

Bailey claimed he has the standing for the lawsuit because three ballots were spoiled during a recount for the initiative, though he does not actually live in Central Lake. Bailey asked the judge to allow him to conduct his own audit of all the 2020 election results, baselessly alleging that software developed by Dominion Voting Systems used in the election was intentionally programmed to falsify results.

The state of Michigan already audited the results

The Antrim County election results were already audited nearly five months ago, as lawyers for the townships and the Michigan secretary of state’s office noted in a May 11 hearing.

On December 17, officials from the secretary of state’s office oversaw a risk-limiting audit of the county’s election, conducted by bipartisan counting boards, that included a full hand-recount of all 15,000 ballots cast in the county affirmed Trump’s win over Biden. It boosted the margin of Trump’s win by 11 votes from 9,748 to 9,759. As the secretary of state’s office noted, it’s common for there to be slight changes in hand recounts due to human counters interpreting pen marks or write-in votes differently than ballot scanners.

The judge overseeing the case, 13th Circuit Court Judge Kevin Elsenheimer, dismissed the case as moot because Antrim’s results had already been fully verified in both the December recount and in a statewide post-election audit that finished up in March, according to the Post.

trump rally traverse city michigan
U.S. President Donald Trump leaves after a campaign rally at Cherry Capital Airport in Traverse City, Michigan, U.S., November 2, 2020.

Despite the recount, Bailey continued to press his lawsuit. His attorney Matthew DePerno, who has embraced Trump’s support for the legal efforts on social media, issued subpoenas to various Antrim County lawsuits, according to the Traverse City Record-Eagle.

Bailey also tried to expand the scope of the lawsuit by adding state and local election officials as defendants. In a hearing Money attended by 9 & 10 News, he claimed that expanding the lawsuit and having Elsenheimer enforce the subpoenas would allow him to prove the existence of widespread fraud. There is no evidence of widespread fraud.

Read more: Church attendance is to President Biden as golf outings were to President Trump

DePerno is also seeking a subpoena for Dominion. The election technology company has been the subject of a number of conspiracy theories falsely alleging it used its devices and software to “flip” results from Trump to Biden. The December audit found that Dominion’s technology accurately tabulated the county’s votes and played no role in the initially erroneous tabulation.

Jocelyn Benson
Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson.

Dominion is involved in several defamation lawsuits against election conspiracy theorists and right-wing media organizations it says pushed those false theories. Bailey’s lawsuit has been bolstered by an error-ridden “report” by Russell Ramsland, a conspiracy theorist championed by Trump. Attorneys for Dominion sent both Ramsland and DePerno document-retention letters in December, warning of “imminent” defamation litigation. A representative for Dominion directed Insider to a fact-check of Ramsland’s claims.

Attorneys for Antrim County and the Michigan secretary of state’s office asked Elsenheimer to dismiss the case in the May 11 hearing, arguing that Bailey’s legal rights had been satisfied by the December audit, which found that the results were sound. Elsenheimer said he’d decide whether to grant the dismissal next week, according to 9 & 10 News.

Despite his electoral loss, Trump has continued to falsely claim he was the true winner of the 2020 presidential election, and has endorsed a recount in Arizona’s Maricopa County that has been condemned by election experts.

If Bailey loses his Antrim County lawsuit, it will be another addition to the list of more than 40 failed election lawsuits from Trump and his allies.

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Trump is cheerleading a long-shot lawsuit to audit votes in a Michigan county he already won in the 2020 election

Trump
Donald Trump addresses the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) held in the Hyatt Regency on February 28, 2021 in Orlando, Florida.

  • Trump is encouraging a 2020 election lawsuit in a Michigan county he already won.
  • An ongoing lawsuit over a ballot proposal challenges the integrity of the county’s election.
  • Antrim County’s results were fully audited and hand-recounted in December, affirming Trump’s win.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

More than six months after the 2020 presidential election, former President Donald Trump is hyping a lawsuit in a small Michigan county that he already won.

In a Monday statement posted on his website, Trump touted the baseless contents of a “bombshell pleading” in a “major Michigan Election Fraud case” that he said will show that votes were “intentionally switched” to harm him, a claim for which there is no evidence.

He also compared the nonexistent fraud in the 2020 election to a heist of precious jewels, writing that if “a thief robs a jewelry store of all of its diamonds (the 2020 Presidential Election), the diamonds must be returned.”

Trump won a majority of votes in Antrim County but lost Michigan overall to now-President Joe Biden.

A human error with tabulating the results initially showed Biden winning the county. Antrim County Clerk Sheryl Guy, who happens to be a Republican, swiftly rectified the problem and certified the county’s election results for Trump, who carried the county with 61% of the vote with 37% going to Biden. Trump and his allies have seized on a quickly-corrected counting error in the county to spread disinformation about the 2020 election results.

The crux of the lawsuit filed by Antrim County resident Bill Bailey is about the results of a marijuana-related ballot initiative in the village of Central Lake, 9 & 10 News reports.

Bailey claims he has the standing for the lawsuit because three ballots were spoiled during a recount for the initiative, though he does not actually live in Central Lake. Bailey is asking a judge to allow him to conduct his own audit of all the 2020 election results, baselessly alleging that software developed by Dominion Voting Systems used in the election was intentionally programmed to falsify results.

The state of Michigan already audited the results

The Antrim County election results were already audited nearly five months ago, as lawyers for the townships and the Michigan secretary of state’s office noted in a Monday hearing.

On December 17, officials from the secretary of state’s office oversaw a risk-limiting audit of the county’s election, conducted by bipartisan counting boards, that included a full hand-recount of all 15,000 ballots cast in the county affirmed Trump’s win over Biden. It boosted the margin of Trump’s win by 11 votes from 9,748 to 9,759. As the secretary of state’s office noted, it’s common for there to be slight changes in hand recounts due to human counters interpreting pen marks or write-in votes differently than ballot scanners.

trump rally traverse city michigan
U.S. President Donald Trump leaves after a campaign rally at Cherry Capital Airport in Traverse City, Michigan, U.S., November 2, 2020.

Despite the recount, Bailey has continued to press his lawsuit. His attorney Matthew DePerno, who has embraced Trump’s support for the legal efforts on social media, issued subpoenas to various Antrim County lawsuits, according to the Traverse City Record-Eagle.

Bailey is also trying to expand the scope of the lawsuit by adding state and local election officials as defendants. In a hearing Money attended by 9 & 10 News, he claimed that expanding the lawsuit and having the judge overseeing the case, 13th Circuit Court Judge Kevin Elsenheimer, enforce the subpoenas would allow him to prove the existence of widespread fraud. There is no evidence of widespread fraud.

Read more: Church attendance is to President Biden as golf outings were to President Trump

DePerno is also seeking a subpoena for Dominion. The election technology company has been the subject of a number of conspiracy theories falsely alleging it used its devices and software to “flip” results from Trump to Biden. The December audit found that Dominion’s technology accurately tabulated the county’s votes and played no role in the initially erroneous tabulation.

Jocelyn Benson
Michigan Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson.

Dominion is involved in several defamation lawsuits against election conspiracy theorists and right-wing media organizations it says pushed those false theories. Bailey’s lawsuit has been bolstered by an error-ridden “report” by Russell Ramsland, a conspiracy theorist championed by Trump. Dominion sent Ramsland a document-retention letter in December, warning of “imminent” defamation litigation. A representative for Dominion directed Insider to a fact-check of Ramsland’s claims.

Attorneys for Antrim County and the Michigan secretary of state’s office asked Elsenheimer to dismiss the case in Monday’s hearing, arguing that Bailey’s legal rights have been satisfied by the December audit, which found that the results were sound. Elsenheimer said he’d decide whether to grant the dismissal next week, according to 9 & 10 News.

Despite his electoral loss, Trump has continued to falsely claim he was the true winner of the 2020 presidential election, and has endorsed a recount in Arizona’s Maricopa County that has been condemned by election experts.

If Bailey loses his Antrim County lawsuit, it will be another addition to the list of more than 40 failed election lawsuits from Trump and his allies.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A 7-foot-long, 240-pound sturgeon has been caught in Michigan. Scientists believe she’s more than 100 years old.

Fish Skitch
A US Fish and Wildlife Service member lying next to the sturgeon.

  • A sturgeon measuring seven feet long and 240 pounds was found in the Detroit River, Michigan.
  • The scientists who found it said they believe the fish is female and over 100 years old.
  • “Imagine everything that fish has lived through and seen,” one biologist said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Biologists found an almost-seven-foot-long, 240-pound sturgeon in Michigan’s Detroit River that they believe could be over 100 years old.

Three scientists with the US Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office in Alpena, Michigan, were on the river in April, where they were trying to measure the sturgeon population in the river.

One of the biologists, Jason Fischer, told The Washington Post that the team usually catches 40- to 60-pound fish, but could tell that one that it started pulling in was bigger.

It turned out to be a 6-foot 10-inch fish.

In a post announcing the find, the Alpena Fish and Wildlife Conservation Office called the fish a “real life river monster.”

It added that it believes the fish is female, and that the size suggests “that she has been roaming our waters over 100 years.”

The conservation office added that the fish was one of the largest lake sturgeon ever recorded in the US, and that it was “quickly released back into the river after being processed.”

The biologist Paige Wigren, who was part of the team that found the sturgeon, said: “Imagine everything that fish has lived through and seen,” according to the Associated Press.

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GOP official said he ‘felt like I was going into a den of virus’ after catching COVID-19 at a nearly-maskless Republican meeting

surgical mask
  • A Michigan GOP official raged at state party officials after catching COVID-19 after a party meeting.
  • Jason Watts attended an indoor meeting after some officials petitioned for his removal after he criticized Trump to The New York Times.
  • Watts told MLive that masks and vaccines “shouldn’t have a political party.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A local GOP official in Michigan tested positive for COVID-19 after attending a nearly-maskless party meeting discussing a petition to fire him, Michigan Live reported Wednesday.

Jason Watts, an elections official in Allegan County, Michigan, and party treasurer in the 6th Congressional District, told MLive on Tuesday that he was one of at least three people he saw wearing a mask at the March 31 meeting, which took place at an indoor restaurant.

The meeting was called because some officials were petitioning to remove him as treasurer after he criticized former President Donald Trump in an interview with The New York Times. He said he felt required to be at the meeting in person because “there was no Zoom option.”

Watts said he attended the meeting wearing two cloth masks but noticed that others were not wearing any masks at all.

“I felt like I was going into a den of virus,” he told MLive, estimating that there were about 70 people in attendance.

The restaurant, Travelers CafĂ© and Pub in Portage, Michigan, was operating under the state’s restaurant restrictions – reducing occupancy by 50%, allowing 80 people indoors, General Manager Brandon Jeannot told MLive. Jeannot added that staff generally encourage guests to wear masks if walking around the restaurant but are permitted to take off masks at their tables while eating.

After the meeting, Watts tested positive for COVID-19. At least four Michigan Republicans – up to as many as eight – also tested positive following the meeting, the Chicago Tribune reported. Two weeks after the meeting, Watts is still in recovery at a hospital in Grand Rapids.

Kalamazoo County Republican Chair Scott McGraw said he believes that appropriate precautions were taken in order to have the indoor meeting.

“We had a meeting,” McGraw told MLive. “Some people got COVID unfortunately after the meeting. I assume it was from the meeting but I can’t really pinpoint what these people were doing before and after a meeting. I just think you can still follow all the rules and the virus can spread easily.”

McGraw, who was vaccinated before the March 31 party meeting, said “there’s a faction of the Republican Party who don’t want to get the vaccine,” and encourages others to get the vaccine and wear masks.

“I would think it would probably have its roots in in our resolve for freedoms,” McGraw told MLive about some people being resistant to taking health precautions against COVID-19, but he said he does not have the same reluctance to follow them.

McGraw did not immediately respond to Insider’s questions regarding the March 31 event.

Watts slammed other Republicans who refused to wear masks and get vaccinated in general, saying a mask and a vaccine “shouldn’t have a political party.”

“But we’ve conjured these things to have these connotations,” Watts told MLive. “People are getting sick. And to put these connotations on these things does nobody any good.”

Insider has reached out to Scott McGraw, chair of the 6th District, for comment.

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Sydney Powell’s defense in the $1.3 billion Dominion lawsuit may be used against her in Michigan sanctions effort

Sidney Powell
Sidney Powell. Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc via Getty Images

  • Michigan’s attorney general said Powell made “stunning admissions” in the Dominion lawsuit.
  • The state said those admissions should be further reason to sanction Powell.
  • Powell and others are facing defamation lawsuits for claims made about 2020 election fraud.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Sidney Powell‘s defense in the $1.3 billion Dominion Voting Systems lawsuit is being used against her in a court case over unsubstantiated claims of election fraud in the 2020 presidential race.

Powell, an attorney who became widely known after filing multiple lawsuits and floating conspiracy theories about 2020 election fraud, claimed “no reasonable person would conclude that the statements were truly statements of fact” in her defense against a defamation lawsuit brought by election-technology company Dominion.

Now, Michigan Attorney General Dana Nessel says Powell’s statement is another reason a federal court should approve sanctions against her, Forbes first reported, citing a legal filing.

Powell “made a series of stunning admissions,” in the Dominion lawsuit that addressed statements about election fraud, “many of which also were made to this Court,” the filing said.

Nessel asked a federal court in January to sanction Powell and three other attorneys over a lawsuit in Michigan that requested the state overturn its elections results, claiming fraud in President Joe Biden’s defeat of former President Donald Trump.

In her filing to the federal court this week, Nessel said Powell’s defense in the Dominion lawsuit proves that the attorney’s behavior “warrants sanctions because it unreasonably multiplied the proceedings in this case and abused the judicial process.”

Powell did not respond to Insider’s requests for comment.

Read more: Trump-ally media outlet OAN quietly deleted articles about Dominion despite publicly doubling down on election conspiracy theories

Powell, who was hired and then fired by former President Trump, claimed Dominion and Smartmatic, which is also suing her, used their voting machines to falsify votes in the 2020 presidential election.

Her law firm filed lawsuits regarding 2020 election fraud in Michigan, Arizona, Georgia, and Wisconsin, all of which lost in court.

Powell isn’t the only one facing legal repercussions for claims made about the 2020 election. Former President Donald Trump’s lawyer Rudy Giuliani, Fox News, and MyPillow Chief Executive Officer Mike Lindell are also facing defamation lawsuits from the election-technology companies.

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Of the 1.7 million people who are fully vaccinated in Michigan, 246 people tested positive for COVID-19

michigan covid-19 vaccines
Syringes used to administer a dose of the Pfizer Covid vaccine to Governor Gretchen Whitmer and a group of students sit at a vaccine station at Ford Field during an event to promote and encourage Michigan residents to go and get their vaccines on April 6, 2021 in Detroit, Michigan.

  • Out of 1.7 million fully vaccinated people in Michigan, 246 tested positive for COVID-19.
  • That places the breakthrough rate of fully-vaccinated cases at a fraction of a percent.
  • As of April 4, nearly 3 million Michigan residents have received at least one vaccine dose.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Less than 250 of the 1.7 million fully vaccinated people in Michigan have tested positive for COVID-19, state officials said Monday, a finding that supports the findings of clinical studies that the vaccines are extremely effective.

The Michigan Department of Health and Human Services said 246 cases were reported between January 1 and March 31, and that they had tested positive 14 or more days after their second dose of the COVID-19 vaccine – meaning a fraction of a percent of those who were fully vaccinated are contracting the virus.

Essentially, .0001% of those in Michigan who have had both doses have tested positive for COVID-19, according to Fox 2 Detroit.

No vaccine 100% guarantees that someone who receives it will never get ill. But those developed for COVID-19 come close, with the shots from Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna both coming in at a roughly 95% efficacy rate in clinical trials. The real world is, of course, different, and the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, among others, is continuing to assess how the vaccines perform outside clinical settings.

While national data is limited, the available evidence indicates that so-called “breakthrough” cases are far from the norm. In Minnesota, for example, only 89 out of 800,000 fully vaccinated people tested positive, a figure so low it shocked local health officials.

There are also other factors to consider, such as whether the rare positive cases post-vaccination are among people who were exposed to the virus before they were fully inoculated.

In Michigan, MDHHS spokeswoman Lynn Sutfin told the Detroit News that hospitalization data was available for 117 of those who tested positive – 11 were hospitalized, 103 were not, and the status of three remains unknown.

“Some of these individuals may ultimately be excluded from this list due to continuing to test positive from a recent infection prior to being fully vaccinated,” Sutfin told the outlet in an email.

“These cases are undergoing further review to determine if they meet other CDC criteria for determination of potential breakthrough, including the absence of a positive antigen or PCR test less than 45 days prior to the post-vaccination positive test,” she continued. “In general, these persons have been more likely to be asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic compared with vaccinated persons.”

As of April 4, nearly 3 million Michigan residents – about 36.7% of the state’s population – have been vaccinated with at least one dose, according to state data.

According to data collected by The New York Times, the six metropolitan areas with the highest rates of new reported cases are in Michigan.

FOX 2 reported some of those who are fully vaccinated and have tested positive for COVID-19 “may have been continuing to test positive from a recent infection prior to being fully vaccinated,” according to health officials.

The news comes after 89 fully vaccinated people tested positive for COVID-19 in Minnesota last month, out of the 800,000 who have received both doses of the vaccine at the time. The breakthrough rate of the Minnesota cases was around 0.01%.

“That’s well below one-tenth of one percent – an incredibly small number of cases that dramatically illustrates how effective these vaccines are,” state infectious disease director Kris Ehresmann said in a March 24 briefing of the Minnesota incident.

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Younger people seem to be contracting more transmissible variants, causing another COVID-19 surge in Michigan

coronavirus covid hospital chaplain patient intubated
Chaplain Kevin Deegan places his hand on the head of a COVID-19 patient while praying for him at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in Los Angeles on January 9, 2021.

  • Michigan is experiencing another surge in coronavirus cases.
  • The surge seems to be attributed to younger people getting infected with variants.
  • CDC director Rochelle Walensky previously warned that the US could experience another surge.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

As the country ramps up its vaccination efforts against COVID-19, Michigan is battling another surge in cases as a result of more transmissible variants, especially among younger people.

Dr. Justin Skrzynski, a coronavirus hospitalist at Beaumont Health’s Royal Oak facility, told CNN regular testing still only shows if someone is positive or negative for coronavirus. However, many of the samples that are sent to the state to be tested for mutations have come back showing 40% of patients are infected with the B.1.1.7 variant, which was discovered in the United Kingdom last November.

The variant is more transmissible and studies have suggested it’s also deadlier.

Late last month, Rochelle Walensky, the new director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, warned that a fourth surge was on its way as cases, deaths, and hospitalizations began to trickle upwards. “Right now I’m scared,” Walensky said during a White House press briefing last month.

On Monday, Walensky said younger people are fueling the latest spike in COVID-19 cases across the country, citing school reopenings and after-school sports.

“We are learning that many outbreaks in young people are related to youth sports and extracurricular activities. According to CDC guidance, these activities should be limited,” Walensky said.

Tina Catron, 44, who is hospitalized for COVID-19, told CNN she suspects her family became infected via her kid’s soccer league.

“We’re not 100% sure,” she told CNN, “but we think from the soccer field, with the parents, even though we’re all masked up. From the sidelines, everyone’s yelling. And I think what happened is my husband was with my son, his soccer game. And he brought it home.”

The Detroit News reported last week that COVID-19 cases among kids ages 10 to 19 in the state rose by 133% in the four weeks prior.

The state reported 10,293 new coronavirus cases and 21 additional deaths over the past two days. Overall, Michigan has recorded more than 700,000 cases with over 16,000 deaths.

Have a news tip? Contact this reporter at salarshani@insider.com

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The chair of Michigan’s GOP apologized for calling top female Democratic lawmakers ‘witches’ who should face ‘burning at the stake’

michigan capitol
People gather at the Michigan State Capitol for a “Stop the Steal” rally in support of US President Donald Trump on November 14, 2020, in Lansing, Michigan.

  • The leader of Michigan’s Republican Party apologized after calling female Democratic lawmakers “witches.”
  • Michigan GOP chair Ron Weiser made the comments during a local Republican meeting Thursday.
  • Weiser also joked about GOP members of Congress who voted to impeach Trump being assassinated.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The chair of Michigan’s Republican Party has apologized after calling female Democratic lawmakers “witches” and joking about the assassination of GOP congressmen who voted to impeach former President Donald Trump.

Ron Weiser, the chair of the Michigan GOP, made the comments during a Northern Oakland Republican Club meeting Thursday. They were first reported by The Detriot News.

“Our job now is to soften up those three witches and make sure that we have good candidates against them, that they are ready for the burning at the stake,” Weiser said in a video recording of the meeting.

He was referring to Michigan’s Democratic Gov. Gretchen Whitmer, Secretary of State Jocelyn Benson, and attorney-general Dana Nessel.

When subsequently asked about the political prospects of two Michigan GOP congressmen who voted to impeach former President Trump, Weisel told a member of the audience: “Other than assassination, I have no other way other than voting.”

Weiser on Sunday apologized for his remarks after initially refusing to do so, but said he would not resign.

“In an increasingly vitriolic political environment, we should all do better to treat each other with respect, myself included,” he said in a statement provided to Fox News Detriot on Sunday.

“I fell short of that the other night. I apologize to those I offended for the flippant analogy about three women who are elected officials and for the off-hand comments about two other leaders.”

“I have never advocated for violence and never will. While I will always fight for the people and policies I believe in, I pledge to be part of a respectful political dialogue going forward.”

In a previous statement issued on Friday, Weiser said he would not resign as GOP or from the University of Michigan, where he a member of the Board of Regents.

A spokesman for Gov. Whitmer called Weiser’s remarks “destructive and downright dangerous” in a statement provided to Fox News Detriot.

“We saw this firsthand when Republican legislators met with the very militias that tried to kidnap and kill the governor, and when Republican party leaders helped organize the January 6th protest at the U.S. Capitol building.”

A group of Michigan men were arrested in October last year after the FBI said they conspired to kidnap Whitmer from her north Michigan holiday home.

Whitmer also referenced Weiser’s comments on Twitter on Friday, referencing a quote from author Lindsay West which said: “For a long time, a certain set of men have called women like me ‘witches’ to silence and discredit us.”

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In light of Cuomo allegations, Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer suggests Dems have a double standard when it comes to allegations of sexual harassment

Gretchen Whitmer
Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is pictured on October 16, 2020.

Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer suggested Thursday that fellow Democrats have a double standard when it comes to holding their own accountable around allegations of sexual harassment, according to Politico.

Speaking at a Politico Live event, Whitmer was asked about the mounting cascade of sexual misconduct allegations against Democratic New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo.

“Is there a different standard for different sides of the aisle? We just had a president who lasted all four years with numerous allegations against him, so far as rape. No one on his own side of the aisle was making observations about whether or not he should stay in office,” Whitmer said. “So is there a different standard? I guess one could conclude that.”

“But weighing in on that, I don’t know [if that] gets either one of us very far,” Whitmer told Politico’s White House correspondent Anita Kumar at the event.

Whitmer added that she supported New York Attorney General Tish James’ investigation into the allegations, and shared that she is a survivor of sexual assault, according to Politico.

“If [the allegations] are true, then there should be accountability. But until that investigation happens, I don’t know that you can make a conclusion,” Whitmer said.

Cuomo is facing escalating bipartisan pressure from state and federal lawmakers to resign after at least six women have accused him of sexual harassment. Cuomo has repeatedly denied the allegations, saying on Friday that he wouldn’t bow down to “cancel culture.”

On Thursday, Sens. Kirsten Gillibrand and Chuck Schumer also added their voices to the chorus of politicians calling for Cuomo to step down.

During the 2016 election, former President Donald Trump faced claims of sexual harassment and sexual assault from dozens of women. Trump has denied all allegations of sexual misconduct.

In the run-up to the 2016 election, audio of Trump boasting about groping women was unearthed, ahead of a 2005 “Access Hollywood” interview with Billy Bush. While the tape was widely condemned across the political aisle, Trump went on to win the presidency and build political support as new allegations followed him throughout his term.

In 2019, journalist E. Jean Carroll alleged that Trump had raped her in the mid-1990s. Trump continued to maintain support from GOP lawmakers.

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