Robinhood is going public. Warren Buffett, Michael Burry, and other top investors have blasted the trading app and warned day traders to be careful.

Michael Burry against a gray promotional backdrop for the movie "The Big Short."
Michael Burry.

  • Robinhood is poised to go public on Thursday at a $32 billion valuation.
  • Warren Buffett, Michael Burry, and other top investors have blasted the trading app as reckless.
  • Market veterans have also warned day traders against rampant speculation and taking on debt.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Robinhood is set to go public on Thursday at a potential $32 billion valuation, capitalizing on booming demand from retail investors seeking to trade stocks, cryptocurrencies, and other assets during the pandemic.

The trading app is popular among amateur investors and day traders because it doesn’t charge commissions, allows fractional investing, and trusts its users to trade on margin and buy and sell risky, complex financial products such as options.

However, Warren Buffett, Michael Burry, and other leading investors have accused Robinhood and its peers of encouraging speculation and excessive risk-taking. They have also warned market newbies not to borrow too much, trade things they don’t understand, or treat investing like a game they’re guaranteed to win.

Robinhood didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment from Insider.

Here’s what 10 top investors have said about Robinhood and the day-trading boom. Their quotes have been lightly edited and condensed for clarity:

Warren Buffett

Warren Buffett
Warren Buffett, the chairman and CEO of Berkshire Hathaway.

“There’s nothing illegal about it, there’s nothing immoral. But I don’t think you build a society around people doing it. I hope we don’t have more of it.” — accusing Robinhood of encouraging users to trade options rather than invest for the long term. (May 2021)

Michael Burry

Michael Burry against a promotional backdrop for the movie "The Big Short."
Michael Burry, the star of “The Big Short” and head of Scion Asset Management.

“If you do not use #robinhood, you have to see it to understand what #gamification of #stonks/options means. So here it is. If this looks like a serious investing app to you, and NOT a dangerous casino ‘fun for all ages,’ you’ve been #gamified.” (February 2021)

 

Mark Cuban

Mark Cuban speaking at Business Insider's IGNITION conference on December 3, 2018.
Mark Cuban, the “Shark Tank” star and Dallas Mavericks owner.

“It’s not investing, and it’s almost not even trading, it’s more like revenge. It is the revenge of the nerd. It’s the revenge of the little guy.” — commenting on the horde of retail investors who sparked the meme-stock boom (February 2021)

“If you’re a day trader and you can walk and chew gum, you are making money right now. You’re doing the same thing they did in the late ’90s. You’re rolling it. You think everybody is a genius in a bull market.” (June 2020)

Chris Sacca

chris sacca
Chris Sacca, the founder of Lowercase Capital and an early investor in Uber, Twitter, and Instagram.

“I have axes to grind against a lot of the guys you’re wrecking, and I love to hear about real people stacking chips. But, please, from someone who has been there … don’t trade what you can’t afford to lose.” — advising the retail investors who executed short squeezes and hammered hedge funds to be careful (January 2021)

“To the angry Robinhood bros who got into trading stocks this year: I was wrong. You’re amazing. This has nothing to do with the market. It’s all you and your mad skillz. Don’t take profits off the table. Double down, on margin. Borrow everything you can. Stonks never go down!” — sarcastically responding to the backlash from day traders after he tweeted they got lucky and should cash out some of their profits (January 2021)

Charlie Munger

charlie munger
Charlie Munger, Warren Buffett’s business partner and Berkshire Hathaway’s vice-chairman.

“Robinhood is beneath contempt. It’s a gambling parlor masquerading as a respectable business. It’s basically a sleazy, disreputable operation.” (May 2021)

Leon Cooperman

Leon Cooperman holding his glasses up to his right temple.
Leon Cooperman, the former CEO of Omega Advisors, runs a family office now.

“They are just doing stupid things. This will end in tears.” — commenting on retail traders buying shares in bankrupt companies and making other high-risk trades (June 2020)

Jim Chanos

Jim Chanos
Jim Chanos, the president and founder of Kynikos Associates.

“They are going to trade themselves into oblivion. We are at prices now where the crowd that is betting on margin and betting through options had better be right. Anything that corrects and reverts to the mean, or to real valuation metrics, is going to destroy a whole generation of investors.” (November 2020)

Jeffrey Gundlach

Jeffrey Gundlach
“Bond King” Jeffrey Gundlach, the CEO of DoubleLine Capital.

“There’s been an incredible increase in tiny retail investor activity in terms of the accounts on Robinhood and other platforms that have just exploded in term of size. I think that’s pretty dangerous. These people that are buying slices of the stock market don’t even know what they’re doing, and have probably lost money already.” (June 2020)

“We’ll have a tremendous unwind of a lot of the money that thinks the stock market is a one-way thing.” (March 2021)

Howard Marks

Howard Marks
Howard Marks, the cofounder and co-chairman of Oaktree Capital Management.

“Some people think it’s a gambling game, like betting on football. It’s not healthy to have people who are buying stocks for fun. It reminds me of the people who were day trading in 1999 and declaring day trading a ‘can’t miss’ strategy. The tech stocks crapped out in 2000.” (June 2020)

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Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway faces a court battle with Volkswagen after rejecting its Dieselgate settlement deal

warren buffett
Warren Buffett.

  • Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway is facing a legal clash with Volkswagen.
  • The German carmaker settled with other insurers over Dieselgate, but Berkshire rejected the deal.
  • Volkswagen is now preparing to take legal action against Berkshire to force it to pay up.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway is facing a legal battle with Volkswagen after rejecting a settlement deal with the German auto giant related to its emissions scandal.

Volkswagen took out a “first excess liability insurance policy” with Berkshire’s international-insurance unit in January, the automaker revealed in an investor document last week. That policy puts Buffett’s company on the hook for up to 50 million euros ($59 million) if a claim exceeds Volkswagen’s 25 million euros’ worth of coverage from its primary insurer, Zurich.

The German automaker had been locked in talks with insurers for years over how much they owed it under various insurance policies following its emissions fiasco. It has now reached a settlement with insurers including AIG and Allianz that will see them pay a total of 270 million euros to Volkswagen, minus payments they’ve already made or scheduled. However, Berkshire refused to sign the agreement.

Volkswagen intends to enforce Berkshire’s insurance obligation “including in court if necessary,” and its supervisory board has “instructed that preparations be made for legal action against Berkshire Hathaway,” the investor document shows.

The automaker added that it won’t be bound by the settlement amount and other terms it offered Buffett’s company while negotiating the settlement. That suggests it could seek more money from Berkshire than it initially requested.

Berkshire and Volkswagen didn’t immediately respond to requests for comment from Insider.

Volkswagen has faced billions of dollars’ worth of legal claims and fines since it admitted to installing “defeat devices” in millions of its diesel-powered cars between 2009 and 2015. The secret software enabled the cars to cheat vehicle-emission tests and skirt environmental regulations – a scandal dubbed “Dieselgate.”

In addition to its insurers, Volkswagen has reached Dieselgate-related settlements with its former chairman, Martin Winterkorn, and an Audi board member, Rupert Stadler. Winterkorn and Stadler will pay 11.2 million euros and 4.1 million euros respectively, partly by waiving their claims to bonuses.

Volkswagen might be clashing with Buffett, but it counts another famous value investor among its fans: Michael Burry of “The Big Short.” The Scion Asset Management boss disclosed in March that he holds a stake in Porsche SE, the German holding company that owns about 31% of Volkswagen.

“Investors, partly due to the #ESGFog, underestimate the size, scale, brands, staying power, and resources of Volkswagen,” Burry tweeted at the time.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Michael Burry should have retired after ‘The Big Short’ and should stop tweeting alarming market-crash warnings, finance professor Aswath Damodaran says

Michael Burry
  • NYU’s Aswath Damodaran said Michael Burry should “stop talking” and avoid tweeting bearish forecasts.
  • The professor said Burry should have retired after successfully predicting the 2008 housing crash.
  • Damodaran said there are people who think deeply about markets, but Burry “is not one of them.”
  • Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell.

Dr. Michael Burry should have retired after successfully betting against the US housing market in the mid-2000’s and being the center of the book and movie “The Big Short,” Aswath Damodaran said.

In an interview with Moneycontrol published last week, the NYU Stern School of Business professor slammed Michael Burry and his notoriously alarmist forecasts. He said there are people who think deeply about markets, but Burry “is not one of them.”

Burry has issued several bearish market forecasts over the years, and most recently tweeted that the market is in the “greatest speculative bubble of all time.

But Damodaran suggested investors have given Burry more respect than he deserves, and history doesn’t guarantee the future.

“Could markets be in a bubble? Absolutely,” Damodaran said. “It could be true at any point in time. And looking in the past and saying this looks just like 2008, or just like 2000 is exactly how we get into trouble. Market crises never resemble each other.”

He continued: “So I’m afraid that on this one I’ve got to look at Michael Burry and say just stop talking. I mean, it’s a no, and tweeting just makes it worse.”

Burry isn’t the only market participant sounding the alarm on speculative excess in the stock market. British investor Jeremy Grantham said the market was in a “fully fledged epic bubble” in January, while Stanley Druckenmiller – who runs Duquesne Family Office – said that all assets are in a “raging mania,” but cautioned he doesn’t “have a clue when that’s going to end.”

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Michael Burry, Jeremy Grantham, and other top investors are predicting an epic market crash. Here are their gravest warnings so far.

Michael Burry against a promotional backdrop for the movie "The Big Short."
Michael Burry.

  • Michael Burry, Jeremy Grantham, and other experts are predicting an epic market crash.
  • Jeffrey Gundlach, Leon Cooperman, and Stanley Druckenmiller expect a downturn too.
  • Here are the gravest warnings so far from eight top investors and commentators.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Michael Burry and Jeremy Grantham are bracing for a devastating crash across financial markets. They’re far from the only experts to warn that rampant speculation fueled by government stimulus programs can’t shore up asset prices forever.

The billionaire investors Leon Cooperman, Stanley Druckenmiller, and Jeffrey Gundlach have also sounded the alarm. The same is true for the “Shark Tank” star Kevin O’Leary, the market prophet Gary Shilling, and the “Rich Dad Poor Dad” author Robert Kiyosaki.

Here are the most striking warnings from these 8 market experts:

Michael Burry

Michael Burry against a gray promotional backdrop for the movie "The Big Short."
Michael Burry.

Burry in June described the markets as the “greatest speculative bubble of all time in all things” and said retail investors were buying into the hype around meme stocks and cryptocurrencies before the “mother of all crashes.”

Earlier this year, the investor of “The Big Short” fame, who runs Scion Asset Management, pointed to Tesla, GameStop, bitcoin, dogecoin, Robinhood, and the red-hot US housing market as signs of speculative excess.

Read more: Goldman Sachs says buy these 20 stocks that have the most upside potential right now — including 5 set to surge by at least 50%

Jeremy Grantham

Jeremy Grantham against a blurry background.
Jeremy Grantham.

Grantham in January said the market was a “fully fledged epic bubble” and described it as the “real McCoy.”

“When you have reached this level of obvious super-enthusiasm, the bubble has always, without exception, broken in the next few months, not a few years,” the legendary investor and GMO cofounder said.

“We will have to live, potentially, possibly, with the biggest loss of perceived value from assets that we have ever seen,” Grantham added.

Leon Cooperman

Leon Cooperman holding his glasses up to his right temple.
Leon Cooperman.

Cooperman expressed deep concerns about financial markets in May.

“Everything I look at would suggest caution, intermediate to long term, would be the rule of the day,” the billionaire investor and Omega Advisors boss said. “When this market has a reason to go down, it’s going to go down so fast your head’s going to spin.”

But Cooperman described himself as a “fully invested bear” because factors that typically cause bear markets — rising inflation, recession fears, a hostile Federal Reserve — weren’t present.

Read more: How to mine doge: An 18-year-old TikTok influencer shares his process for earning crypto without directly buying via a $700 rig — and explains how it works for other altcoins including litecoin

Stanley Druckenmiller

Stanley Druckenmiller speaking and gesturing against a black-and-orange background.
Stanley Druckenmiller.

Druckenmiller said in May that the bull market reminded him of the dot-com boom, but he cautioned that asset prices could continue rising for a while.

“I have no doubt that we are in a raging mania in all assets,” the billionaire investor and Duquesne Family Office chief said. “I also have no doubt that I don’t have a clue when that’s going to end.

“I knew we were in a raging mania in ’99, but it kept going on, and if you had shorted the tech stocks in mid-’99, you were out of business by the end of the year,” Druckenmiller added.

The investor indicated he would pull his cash out of equities in a matter of months.

“I will be surprised if we’re not out of the stock market by the end of the year, just because the bubbles can’t last that long,” he said.

Jeffrey Gundlach

Jeff Gundlach speaking against a black background.
Jeffrey Gundlach.

Equities are undeniably expensive, Gundlach said in March.

The billionaire investor and DoubleLine Capital boss said that claiming the stock market was “anything other than very overvalued versus history” was “just to be ignorant of all the metrics of valuation.” He predicted that stocks would fall by upwards of 15% when the downturn comes.

Gundlach, known as the “bond king,” predicted that the retail investors who had piled into meme stocks and other speculative assets wouldn’t stick around once prices started dropping.

“We’ll have a tremendous unwind of a lot of the money that thinks that the stock market is a one-way thing,” he said.

Read more: Famed investor Michael Burry is predicting the ‘mother of all crashes’. Here’s what 9 other key ‘Big Short’ players are doing now.

Kevin O’Leary

Kevin O'Leary speaking and pointing on "Shark Tank."
Kevin O’Leary.

O’Leary said in April that stocks would eventually crumble, but he framed the downturn as an educational opportunity for rookie investors.

“Buying the dip is more rock-and-roll, but what invariably happens is you go through a massive correction and you learn a very important lesson,” the “Shark Tank” star and O’Leary Funds chief said.

“The generation that is trading right now has never gone through a sustained correction. It’s coming — I don’t know when, I don’t know what’ll trigger it, but they will learn their lesson,” he continued.

“If you have a lot of leverage on, it’s a hell of a lesson because you end up in a negative net-worth position,” O’Leary added. “But you do learn from it.”

Robert Kiyosaki

Robert Kiyosaki against a green background.
Robert Kiyosaki.

Kiyosaki tweeted in June that he was expecting the greatest market crash ever.

“Biggest bubble in world history getting bigger,” the personal-finance guru and author of “Rich Dad Poor Dad” said. “Biggest crash in world history coming.”

Kiyosaki has accused the Federal Reserve of overstimulating markets and devaluing the dollar. He’s advised investors to prepare for the downturn by stocking up on precious metals and cryptocurrencies.

“ARE YOU READY?” he tweeted in April. “Boom, Bust, Mania, Crash, Depression. Mania in markets today. Prepare for biggest crash, depression in world history. What will Fed do? Print more money? Save more gold, silver, bitcoin.”

Gary Shilling

Gary Shilling against a yellow-and-orange background.
Gary Shilling.

Shilling predicted in April that financial markets would nosedive, but he declined to hazard a guess at when the crash would arrive.

“I’m not making any firm prediction as to when this thing is going to collapse,” the veteran forecaster and president of A. Gary Shilling & Co. said.

“Speculations outrun any logic and that’s probably going to be true of this one,” Shilling continued. “But at some point, boy, there’s going to be a lot of blood on the floor.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Big Short’ investor Michael Burry compared the meme-stock craze to the dot-com and housing bubbles – and warned of an impending crash

Michael Burry Getty
Michael Burry.

  • Michael Burry said the meme-stock craze reminded him of the dot-com and housing bubbles.
  • “The Big Short” investor predicted the buying frenzy would end in a brutal crash.
  • Burry also explained why becoming a meme stock can be a huge boon for a company.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Michael Burry warned the frenzied buying of meme stocks reminded him of the dot-com boom and housing bubble in a recent Barron’s interview, and predicted the social-media favorites would plummet in value soon.

The Scion Asset Management chief noted the people who went all-in on technology stocks at the turn of century, and those who took out massive loans to buy multiple homes in the mid-2000s, didn’t expect the good times to end. Meme-stock investors are falling into the same trap and risk getting burned, he said.

“We probably do not have to wait too long, as I believe the retail crowd is fully invested in this theme, and Wall Street has jumped on the coattails,” Burry told Barron’s in an email. “We’re running out of new money available to jump on the bandwagon.”

Burry is best known for his billion-dollar bet against the housing bubble in the mid-2000s, which was immortalized in the book and the movie “The Big Short.” He also took a stake in GameStop in 2019 and underscored the video-game retailer’s potential in letters to its board, emboldening retail investors to execute a short squeeze of the meme stock at the start of this year.

The Scion chief told Barron’s that Wall Street professionals are now tracking social-media chatter and cashing in on the latest meme stocks.

“They are in a better position than retail to participate, sniff out and start gamma squeezes in the options market,” he said. A “gamma squeeze” refers to buying call options on a stock to force market makers to purchase the underlying shares to hedge themselves, which in turn pushing the stock price up even more.

Burry, who has been warning of an historic market crash for months, also trumpeted the success of his GameStop wager. While he exited the position before the stock skyrocketed in January, he still turned a sizeable profit. “If I get within years of a thesis coming true, I’m happy,” he said.

Finally, the investor emphasized that for an ailing business like GameStop or AMC Entertainment, being picked as a meme stock is like hitting the jackpot. They can issue shares at inflated prices to rake in huge sums, allowing them to pay off their debts, invest in their operations, and revitalize their prospects.

“This is a Godsend for these companies,” Burry told Barron’s. Indeed, GameStop went from spending nearly $200 million to repurchase 37% of its outstanding shares in 2019, to raising over $1.6 billion from share sales in the first six months of this year.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Michael Burry says the market is on the brink of collapse. A WallStreetBets user argues the famed investor’s predictions have been mostly wrong for the last 15 years.

Michael Burry big short
  • A post that analyzes how often Michael Burry’s bearish forecasts come true is trending on Reddit’s WallStreetBets.
  • The “Big Short” investor often warns about financial bubbles and crashes.
  • The Reddit user concluded that Burry is more often wrong than right with his predictions.
  • Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell.

A post that analyzes how often Michael Burry’s bearish forecasts come true is trending on Reddit’s Wall Street Bets forum.

The legendary investor rose to fame betting against the US housing market in the mid-2000’s, with his billion-dollar bet immortalized in the book and movie “The Big Short.”

Since then, Burry has issued several bearish forecasts, like a 2017 warning that the global financial system is going to collapse, and most recently a warning that the market is in the “greatest speculative bubble of all time.

User “u/nobjos” who told Insider their first name is “Noble” posted an analysis in several Reddit threads questioning how many times Burry has been correct. The user originally posted it on their Substack blog, though the post in WallStreetBets received over 5,000 upvotes.

“I recently observed that in every news article/tweet, he always talks about an impending crash. As recently as last week, he issued another warning stating that there would a ‘mother of all crashes soon due to the meme-stock and *****currency rally that will approach the size of countries,'” Noble said. “Basically, what I wanted to analyze was whether Michael Burry always predicts a crash and gets lucky when there is an actual crash or does his prediction actually turns out to be true most of the time?”

Noble tracked news articles that mentioned Burry forecasts from the last 15 years. He then compared the S&P 500’s return one month, one quarter, and to date after Burry’s bearish call. If Burry specified a stock, he used the particular stock as a benchmark.

The analysis shows that the S&P 500 has gone up 93% since Burry’s 2017 warning about a global financial meltdown and 50% since his 2019 prediction that index fund inflows are the next market bubble. Tesla stock has mostly gone down following Burry’s latest musings.

reddit thing

Noble concludes that “Burry’s only prediction that we can say confidently was right” after 2008 is that he called bitcoin a “speculative bubble” in March 2021. Bitcoin has dropped roughly 30% since his prediction, though Noble noted there isn’t enough data yet to show how Burry’s prediction will turn out over the next few years.

“I have immense respect for Michael Burry and his skills. He was a doctor and worked as a Stanford Hospital neurology resident and then left to start his own hedge fund that became extremely successful. But, as you can see from the above analysis, he is more often wrong than right with his predictions,” Noble wrote.

“But, the stock market rewards predictions disproportionately . Out of the 100 predictions you make, even if you get 99 wrong but get one extremely unlikely event right your overall returns will still be extremely high,” he added.

As for now, it remains to be seen whether Burry’s latest forecasts will come true. Some on Wall Street argue bubbles can take years to form and eventually pop, and it’s nearly impossible to pinpoint when the crash will occur.

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Big Short’ investor Michael Burry warned against buying meme stocks and crypto and predicted the ‘mother of all crashes’ during his brief Twitter return. Here are the 10 best tweets.

Dr. Michael Burry
Michael Burry.

  • Michael Burry returned to Twitter for eight days after deleting his account in April.
  • “The Big Short” investor rang the alarm on meme stocks, crypto, inflation, and the Federal Reserve.
  • Burry also warned of an unprecedented market bubble and predicted the “mother of all crashes.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Michael Burry returned to Twitter for eight days this month after deleting his account in early April. The investor of “The Big Short” fame issued dire warnings about meme stocks, cryptocurrencies, inflation, a wrongheaded Federal Reserve, a sprawling market bubble, and a historic crash before taking down his profile again this week.

The Scion Asset Management boss, who famously predicted the US housing-market collapse that precipitated the global financial crisis, has pointed to Tesla, Robinhood, dogecoin, GameStop, and SPACs as demonstrating signs of rampant speculation and dangerous excess in recent months.

Here are Burry’s 10 best tweets from his brief Twitter homecoming:

1. “People always ask me what is going on in the markets. It is simple. Greatest Speculative Bubble of All Time in All Things. By two orders of magnitude. #FlyingPigs360.”

2. “All hype/speculation is doing is drawing in retail before the mother of all crashes. #FOMO Parabolas don’t resolve sideways; When crypto falls from trillions, or meme stocks fall from tens of billions, #MainStreet losses will approach the size of countries. History ain’t changed.”

3. “The problem with #Crypto, as in most things, is the leverage. If you don’t know how much leverage is in crypto, you don’t know anything about crypto, no matter how much else you think you know.”

4. “Easiest riddle you’ll ever get from me. What do Troy Polamalu and #Bitcoin have in common?” – “Neck not broken yet on either,” he explained in a follow-up tweet about the former American football player with an enormous head of hair, and the leading cryptocurrency.

5. “Knowing saves half the battle. Got it? It’s not hard. Analyze, think independently, be informed, find the data, and you’ll know a lot that no one else does.”

6. “Some stocks, funds cannot own, for now. Maybe 1x book, 1x sales. Growing fast. But, pink sheets, federal laws, clients in certain jurisdictions… some cases there is a path to funds gaining the ability to own such. Knowing saves half the battle, #capisce?” – underscoring the opportunity for investors to buy stocks now that institutions might own in the future.

7. “Re: RMBS CDS, ancient history, but… because my investors revolted, I was completely out of the trade before any bailouts. And I hated the bailouts too! AIG should have been allowed to fail, and @GoldmanSachs with it. Today’s narratives would be very different.” – commenting on the government bailouts of major banks and insurers during the financial crisis.

8. “Everywhere and anywhere you see #shortages – things, people, places, experiences, and services – you know the price is just not high enough, yet.” – suggesting that a national ammo shortage is evidence of upward pressure on prices.

9. “Micro-hoarding. Millions and millions micro-hoarding. The secret to longevity… of the inflationary mindset. And since #PlungeProtectionTeam mentality infiltrated the Greenspan #Fed after the ’87 crash, it has compounded and compounded. And become today’s misguided monster.” – accusing the Federal Reserve of fueling inflation by focusing too much on shoring up financial markets.

10. “Who could’ve seen this coming?” – Commenting on a news report that supply-chain disruptions, labor shortages, and a post-pandemic demand surge are stoking inflation. Burry flagged the risk of inflation spiking after the economy reopens as early as April 2020.

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Big Short’ investor Michael Burry deleted his Twitter profile again – days after warning of a massive bubble and epic market crash

Michael Burry Getty
Michael Burry.

  • Michael Burry deleted his Twitter profile again after issuing a slew of dire warnings.
  • “The Big Short” investor warned of a huge market bubble and predicted a brutal crash.
  • Burry rang the alarm on crypto, meme stocks, inflation, and the Fed in tweets over the past week.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Michael Burry deleted his Twitter account on Monday after sounding the alarm on a colossal bubble in asset prices and predicting the worst crash in history.

The investor of “The Big Short” fame only rejoined Twitter last week after deleting his account in early April. During his brief return to the platform, his tweets ranged from investing advice to song lyrics, and he also commented on cryptocurrencies, stocks, inflation, and government bailouts.

“Greatest Speculative Bubble of All Time in All Things” was his description of the state of markets last week. “All hype/speculation is doing is drawing in retail before the mother of all crashes,” he tweeted a couple of days later.

The Scion Asset Management boss cautioned in now-deleted tweets that bitcoin is overpriced and a dangerous borrowing binge has fueled the crypto boom. He also described the Federal Reserve as a “misguided monster” for focusing so much on preventing market declines. Moreover, he highlighted news reports of supply shortages and hoarding as evidence of a mounting inflation threat.

Burry offered some tips for investors, too. “Analyze, think independently, be informed, find the data, and you’ll know a lot that no one else does,” he tweeted.

The fund manager highlighted the opportunity to pinpoint stocks that institutions can’t own currently because of their size, client base, or federal regulations, but where there’s a path to future ownership.

Burry revealed that he wasn’t a fan of the US government stepping in to save banks and insurers during the financial crisis. “I hated the bailouts too!” he tweeted, adding that AIG and Goldman Sachs should have been allowed to collapse.

Notably, the value investor isn’t as bearish on “big tech” stocks as might be assumed. He tweeted that recent stock-price gains for Google parent Alphabet and Facebook were “for very good reasons that completely #trump my own personal distaste.”

Meanwhile, one of Burry’s followers asked him whether he’d been approached about making a new movie, presumably on the meme-stock boom this year. “Believe it or not, yes,” he tweeted in response.

Burry is best known for his starring role in “The Big Short,” a book by Michael Lewis that chronicled his billion-dollar bet against the US housing bubble in the mid-2000s. The fund manager was played by Christian Bale in the movie adaptation.

The Scion chief laid the groundwork for the GameStop short squeeze in January by investing in the video-game retailer back in 2019, and underscoring the company’s untapped potential in several letters to its bosses.

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Big Short’ investor Michael Burry warns the ‘mother of all crashes’ is coming – and predicts crypto and meme stocks will plummet

Dr. Michael Burry
“The Big Short” investor Michael Burry.

  • Michael Burry predicted meme stocks and cryptocurrencies will plummet.
  • “The Big Short” investor warned the “mother of all crashes” is coming.
  • Burry pointed to excessive leverage as a major problem for crypto.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Casual investors buying meme stocks and cryptocurrencies are signing up for devastating losses, Michael Burry warned on Thursday.

“All hype/speculation is doing is drawing in retail before the mother of all crashes,” the investor tweeted. “When crypto falls from trillions, or meme stocks fall from tens of billions, #MainStreet losses will approach the size of countries.”

Burry added that people’s fear of missing out has propelled asset prices to unsustainable levels. “#FOMO Parabolas don’t resolve sideways,” he cautioned.

The Scion Asset Management boss also sounded the alarm on crypto fans borrowing recklessly to buy their favorite coins.

“The problem with #Crypto, as in most things, is the leverage,” he tweeted. “If you don’t know how much leverage is in crypto, you don’t know anything about crypto.”

Burry returned to Twitter this week after deleting his profile in April. He’s previously used the social-media platform to issue warnings about Tesla – which he’s short – as well as GameStop, bitcoin, dogecoin, Robinhood, inflation, and the wider stock market.

The Scion chief has attracted a cult following since he anticipated the housing-market crash that precipitated the global financial crisis. His billion-dollar bet against the bubble was chronicled in the book and the movie “The Big Short.”

Burry also helped pave the way for the GameStop short squeeze in January, which kicked off the meme-stock boom. He bought a stake in the video-game retailer in 2019 and wrote several letters to its board, emboldening retail investors to bet on the stock.

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Big Short’ investor Michael Burry is back on Twitter – and warning of the biggest market bubble in history

Michael Burry big short
Michael Burry.

Michael Burry on Tuesday warned of the biggest market bubble in history, suggesting that his concerns about rampant speculation only grew during his 10-week hiatus from Twitter.

“People always ask me what is going on in the markets,” the investor tweeted. “It is simple. Greatest Speculative Bubble of All Time in All Things. By two orders of magnitude. #FlyingPigs360.”

The hashtag was likely a reference to a famous saying in investing: “Bulls make money, bears make money, but pigs get slaughtered.” Burry has repeatedly told investors that they’re being too greedy, speculating wildly, shouldering too much risk, and chasing unrealistic returns.

The Scion Asset Management chief deleted his Twitter profile in early April after sounding the alarm on Tesla stock – which he’s short – as well as GameStop, bitcoin, dogecoin, Robinhood, SPACs, inflation, and the broader stock market. He resumed tweeting on Monday.

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Burry is best known for his billion-dollar bet against the US housing bubble in the mid-2000s, which was immortalized in the book and the movie “The Big Short.” He also helped lay the groundwork for GameStop’s comeback this year, as he bought a stake in the video-game retailer in 2019 and wrote several letters to its board.

The investor, who has complained many times about his warnings being ignored, has “Cassandra” as his display name on Twitter, a reference to the priestess from Greek mythology who was cursed by the gods to share true prophecies but never to be believed.

Burry’s latest tweet echoed his other cautions. For example, he’s compared the hype around bitcoin, electric vehicles, and meme stocks to the dot-com and housing bubbles and said earlier this year that the stock market was “dancing on a knife’s edge.”

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