Trump yelled ‘I don’t give a fuck’ at his defense secretary for opposing the troop deployments Trump wanted to quell unrest after George Floyd’s murder, book says

Trump Esper Milley
US Defense Secretary Mark Esper, left, President Donald Trump, center, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark Milley, right, wait for a meeting with senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House on October 7, 2019.

  • Trump yelled ‘I don’t give a fuck’ at his defense secretary in a blowup over the George Floyd protests, new book says.
  • Secretary Mark Esper publicly shot down Trump’s desire to invoke the Insurrection Act.
  • Trump yelled “you took away my authority!” at Esper for opposing active-duty troops helping control protests.
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Former President Donald Trump exploded at then-Defense Secretary Mark Esper, yelling, “I don’t give a fuck about your fucking transcript!” after Esper threw cold water on his desire to quell protests with military force, according to a new book.

Authors Bob Woodward and Robert Costa revealed more details of profanity-laden blowups between Trump and top officials in the military in their forthcoming book “Peril,” set to be published on September 21.

Trump was insistent on a strong military show of force in response to protests and civil unrest over the murder of George Floyd.

In particular, Trump wanted to invoke the Insurrection Act of 1807, which would allow him to deploy troops to quash the protesters. He especially wanted the elite 82nd Airborne division (whose specialty is crisis response, often by parachuting into hostile areas – not civil disturbance and crowd control), a suggestion military leaders weren’t keen to go along with.

Esper, in a press conference the day before, clearly stated that his opposition to the idea, telling reporters that active-duty forces “should only be used as a matter of last resort, and in the most urgent and dire of situations.”

“We are not in one of those situations now. I do not support invoking the Insurrection Act,” he said.

White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, according to the book, called Esper immediately after to warn him that Trump was “really pissed” and “is going to eat your face off.”

Meadows’ prediction came through the next day in a tense meeting at the Oval Office, when Trump unloaded on Esper, shouting “why did you do that?” and “you took away my authority!”

Esper explained that he wasn’t trying to usurp Trump’s authority and produced a physical transcript of his exact remarks, which only enraged Trump more, the book said.

“I don’t give a fuck about your fucking transcript!” Trump shot back, according to the book.

Trump then yelled: “You’re all fucked up! Everybody! You’re all fucked. Every one of you is fucked up!” at the room according to “Peril” and the book “I Alone Can Fix It,” published in July.

Going into that meeting, both Esper and Gen. Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, were resentful and somewhat shaken that Trump brought them along for his infamous walk across Lafayette Plaza to take a photo holding a Bible upside-down at the historic St. John’s church. Moments prior, federal agents cleared the plaza of peaceful protesters by beating them and firing smoke canisters and tear-gas agents.

Esper, when he fully realized what was going on, told Milley, who was dressed in his military fatigues, they had been “duped” and were being “used” as political pawns, contrary to the military’s strictly nonpartisan mission.

Milley, according to the authors, called it “fucked up,” saying to his security lead, “we’re getting the fuck out of here. I’m fucking done with this shit.”

Shortly thereafter, Milley publicly apologized for his presence, saying he “should not have been there,” and calling the episode “a mistake.”

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Gen. Mark Milley was ‘one of the happiest people’ at Biden’s inauguration because it meant Trump was out of office, book says

General Mark Milley testifies in front of Congress.
General Mark Milley, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

  • Gen. Mark Milley was one of “the happiest people” at Biden’s inauguration, a new book says.
  • He was buoyant not because “it was President Biden,” but because “Trump was out of the presidency.”
  • “Peril” documented Milley’s inner turmoil throughout Trump’s presidency and how he responded to Trump’s impulsivity.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, was one of the most buoyant people at President Joe Biden’s inauguration, according to “Peril,” by The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward and Robert Costa, an early copy of which was obtained by Insider.

Being at the inauguration “was part of the job,” the authors wrote, but Milley “thought he might be one of the happiest people up there. Not because it was President Biden, but because Trump was out of the presidency and it looked like another peaceful transfer of power.”

Biden’s inauguration on January 20 came two weeks after a mob of pro-Trump supporters stormed the Capitol in a failed effort to force Congress to certify Trump as the winner of the 2020 election.

The insurrection shocked Milley, who was already in a heightened state of alert given Trump’s increasingly erratic behavior after he lost the election to Biden. The siege prompted Milley, the nation’s highest ranking military officer, to issue a rare public memo to the military calling the event “a direct assault on the US Congress, the Capitol building, and our Constitutional process.”

“The rights of freedom of speech and assembly do not give anyone the right to resort to violence, sedition and insurrection,” the memo said, adding that on January 20, “President-elect Biden will be inaugurated and will become our 46th Commander in Chief.”

When he finished drafting it, Milley took the memo to the joint chiefs and told them he could sign it on his own “or we can all sign it,” according to “Peril.”

The officials – seven generals and one admiral – read it over and said they would all sign it, and it was sent to the military on January 12. The memo was a public reflection of the inner turmoil Milley felt at many points throughout Trump’s presidency, particularly in the run-up to the election, as well as in the months after.

On November 12, five days after the election was called for Biden, the book said Milley described the state of the country as “a plane with four engines and three of them are out.”

He made the assessment to then-Secretary of State Mike Pompeo following a meeting in which Trump’s national security officials had to talk him out of launching a strike against Iran, according to the book. It said Milley spoke with Pompeo by phone that night and stressed the importance of keeping calm.

“Just steady,” he was quoted as saying. “Breathe through our noses. Steady as a rock. We’re going to land this plane safely. We’ve got a plane with four engines and three of them are out. We’ve got no landing gear. But we’re going to land this plane and we’re going to land it safely.”

Woodward and Costa also reported that in the days before the election and after the Capitol siege, Milley was so alarmed by Trump’s behavior that he called his counterpart in China, once on October 30 and once on January 8, to assure him that the US was not going to start a war with China.

The authors wrote that although Milley assured Gen. Li Zuocheng in January 8 call that the US was “100 percent steady,” he privately thought the riot amounted to “treason” and believed Trump was still looking for his “Reichstag moment.”

The joint chiefs chairman drew sharp criticism after details of his calls with Li were published from the book. Trump accused Milley of “treason,” while former Trump impeachment witness retired Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman called for his immediate resignation.

But Milley’s spokesperson released a statement saying the calls were “in keeping with these duties and responsibilities conveying reassurance in order to maintain strategic stability,” and that they were coordinated with the Department of Defense and the interagency.

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Trump was fixated on the Navy’s new supercarrier and ranted to military leaders that the ship ‘just doesn’t look right’: book

Donald Trump speaking at a microphone.
Donald Trump.

  • Trump was reportedly obsessed with the USS Gerald Ford, according to a new book.
  • He was fixated on the ship’s appearance and said “it just doesn’t look right.”
  • “I know aesthetics,” he said, per the book, and then rubbed his own hair, adding, “Can’t you tell?”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump was obsessed with the way a new US aircraft carrier looked and routinely complained to military officials that he did not like it, according to a new book by Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Robert Costa.

Insider obtained an early copy of the book, “Peril,” which is set to be released next week.

The book said that Trump was fixated on the first-in-class aircraft carrier USS Gerald R. Ford and regularly expressed dissatisfaction with the ship’s high cost of more than $13 billion, the weapons elevators, the catapults, and the placement of the flight command center, known as the ship’s “island,” on the flight deck.

“The generals and admirals were horrible businessmen, Trump complained repeatedly, and particularly terrible at acquisition and deal making on ships, ensuring the military was always being ripped off,” the book said.

In one meeting with military leaders, Trump reminded them that he had been in the construction business. “I know about elevators,” he told them, according to the book. “If water gets on them,” elevators on the ship could malfunction, he said.

The advanced weapons elevators on the Ford, which move weapons and ammunition on the ship and are part of a suite of new technologies, have long been trouble spots for the new supercarrier, though problems have been more with integration rather than the presence of water.

Throughout his presidency, Trump also complained, sometimes in public, about the catapult system.

Among the new technologies on the Ford is the electromagnetic aircraft launch system (EMALS), which relies on electrical currents to catapult aircraft off the flight deck instead of steam, which is used on the older Nimitz-class aircraft carriers.

Trump complained that the system – which has experienced problems during development but is designed to be more effective and efficient than the older steam catapults – was too complex, so much so that “you have to go to MIT to figure out how this damn thing works.”

In another instance a year earlier, he said that “you have to be Albert Einstein to really work it properly.”

He was particularly upset though about the placement of the ship’s island, Woodward and Costa reported. “It doesn’t look right. I have an eye for aesthetics,” the president told Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, at a dinner.

The book said that Trump then rubbed his own hair and said, “Can’t you tell?”

Naval officers tried to explain to Trump why the island was positioned the way it was and how its placement to the rear made it easier for pilots to land aircraft by giving them more runway space. Also, moving the island so late in the building process would also cost an astronomical sum.

“It just doesn’t look right,” Trump insisted, according to the book.

The book said that Trump complained about the Ford often and that Milley sat and listened. “What was there to say,” the book said. “The president did not like a ship’s look. [Milley] had to endure it, just let him vent.”

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Psaki rejects GOP calls for Gen. Mark Milley’s dismissal, saying ‘many of them were silent’ as Trump ‘fomented an insurrection’

jen psaki
White House press secretary Jen Psaki speaks at a press briefing at the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021.

  • The White House defended Gen. Mark Milley as he’s faces criticism from Republicans for reports of his actions during the Trump administration’s last days.
  • Biden has “has complete confidence in Chairman Milley.”
  • A new report details that Milley spoke with a Chinese official without Trump’s knowledge, and potentially overstepped his role.
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White House press secretary Jen Psaki on Wednesday defended US Gen. Mark Milley, who’s facing criticism for potentially overstepping his role as the top military advisor to then-President Donald Trump.

“I can’t speak to the former president’s experience with him or the former president’s views of him,” Psaki told reporters during a press briefing. “But this president, this current president, who follows the Constitution, who’s not fomenting an insurrection, who follows the rule of law, has complete confidence in Chairman Milley.”

The comments come after an excerpt of a forthcoming book by Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa published on Tuesday reported new details about Milley’s alleged conduct under Trump in the final months of his presidency.

Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, was “certain” that Trump suffered a mental decline after his 2020 election loss and feared that he may “go rogue,” the authors wrote.

Days after the Capitol riot on January 6, Milley grew so concerned about what Trump may do that he privately called his Chinese counterpart twice to assure him that the US had no plans to strike China. The top general also spoke with senior US military officials for them to vow not to carry out orders from anyone without his involvement, according to the book.

The role of the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff advises the president and defense secretary but is not part of the chain of command for operational decisions like the launching of nuclear weapons.

A spokesperson for Milley on Wednesday confirmed the general’s calls with the Chinese official and said the move was “to maintain strategic stability.”

In light of the book’s reporting, Trump, along with a growing number of congressional Republicans, have accused Milley of treason.

Milley “working to subvert the military chain of command and collude with China is exactly what we do not accept from military leaders in our country,” Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky wrote on Twitter on Tuesday evening. “He should be court martialed if true.”

Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida called for Milley’s firing in a letter to the White House on Tuesday. Sen. Roger Marshall of Kansas tweeted that Milley should resign.

Psaki on Wednesday slammed the GOP members attacking Milley, saying “many of them were silent” while Trump had “fomented an insurrection.”

Biden is not “looking for the guidance” from those Republicans to make decisions, Psaki added.

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Pentagon defends Milley’s calls to top Chinese general in final months of Trump presidency, saying such calls are vital to avoiding conflict

Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley

  • The Pentagon confirmed Wednesday that Gen. Milley made two calls to his counterpart in China in the final months of the Trump administration.
  • A Joint Staff spokesperson said the calls were aimed at maintaining stability.
  • The White House said that it has complete confidence in Milley, whom critics are accusing of “treasonous” behavior.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The top US general called his counterpart in China twice in the final months of the Trump administration to reassure the Chinese and avoid conflict, the Pentagon said Wednesday, characterizing the interactions as a vital part of his duties but not addressing specific quotes attributed to him in recent reporting.

Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward and Robert Costa reported in the new book “Peril” that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley made two secret phone calls to his counterpart in China’s People’s Liberation Army, Gen. Li Zuocheng, in part because there were concerns that President Donald Trump had declined mentally and might spark a war.

One call was just days before the presidential election, and the other was two days after the Capitol riot.

Milley reportedly told Li during their first phone call that he wanted to assure him “that the American government is stable and everything is going to be okay.” Milley told the Chinese officer that “we are not going to attack or conduct any kinetic operations against you.”

The book also said that the general pledged to give the Chinese advanced warning of an attack.

During the second call, Milley told Li that “we are 100 percent steady. Everything’s fine. But democracy can be sloppy sometimes.” The call reportedly did not alleviate Li’s discomfort.

donald trump mark milley
U.S. President Donald Trump speaks as Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman, Army Gen. Mark Milley looks on after getting a briefing from senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room at the White House on October 7, 2019.

Amid news reports on Milley’s call, the general began to face criticism from Trump, who appears to have been unaware of the calls, as well as Republican lawmakers, who have said that if Milley acted as described, then his actions were “treasonous.” The general has faced several calls to resign.

“The Chairman of the Joint Chiefs regularly communicates with Chiefs of Defense across the world, including with China and Russia,” Col. Dave Butler, a spokesperson for the Joint Staff, said in a statement. “These conversations remain vital to improving mutual understanding of US national security interests, reducing tensions, providing clarity and avoiding unintended consequences or conflict.”

“His calls with the Chinese and others in October and January were in keeping with these duties and responsibilities conveying reassurance in order to maintain strategic stability,” the statement read. “All calls from the Chairman to his counterparts, including those reported, are staffed, coordinated and communicated with the Department of Defense and the interagency.”

Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin reported late Tuesday that there were at least 15 people on the video teleconference calls. In addition to the calls to China, Milley also reportedly made more than a dozen calls to NATO allies in the wake of the Jan. 6 riot.

“Milley continues to act and advise within his authority in the lawful tradition of civilian control of the military and his oath to the Constitution,” Butler said in his statement.

White House press secretary Jen Psaki also defended Milley, saying on Wednesday that the reports on Milley are “anonymous unconfirmed reports about conversations with limited context.” She added that the president has “complete confidence in his leadership, his patriotism and his fidelity to our Constitution.”

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Republicans call Gen. Mark Milley ‘traitor,’ and say he should be fired or court-martialed for a report that he secretly intervened to avoid war with China

General Mark Milley testifies in front of Congress.
General Mark Milley, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

  • Milley reportedly sought to assure China that the US would not start a war with them following Trump’s defeat.
  • Joining former President Trump, some Republican members of Congress accused the top general of treason.
  • A spokesman for Milley confirmed the calls, arguing that they were in keeping with his duties to “maintain strategic stability.”
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Following new reports that Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mark Milley called his Chinese counterpart twice to assure him that the US would not start a new war with their country, some congressional Republicans are joining former President Donald Trump in accusing Milley of treason, while others are calling for his firing, resignation, or even for the top general to be court-martialled.

According to “Peril,” a forthcoming book by Washington Post journalists Bob Woodward and Robert Costa, Milley called his counterpart Gen. Li Zuocheng on both October 30 and January 8, reportedly telling him in one call: “If we’re going to attack, I’m going to call you ahead of time. It’s not going to be a surprise.”

A spokesman for Milley confirmed the calls on Wednesday, arguing that they were in keeping with his duties to “maintain strategic stability.”

But Republicans said these reports show Milley had overstepped his authority as the top military advisor, and possibly even offered a tip-off to a top US adversary.

“The Chairman of the JCOS working to subvert the military chain of command and collude with China is exactly what we do not accept from military leaders in our country,” wrote Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky on Twitter. “He should be court martialed if true.”

A court-martial is a trial conducted in a military court of paneled by the accused’s peers for violations of the Uniform Code of Military Justice, in contrast with a civil court, which all Americans are otherwise subject to. The accused can be convicted by only two-thirds of panel’s members, which in a civil trial would prompt a hung jury.

Paul was echoed by far-right Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, who simply tweeted, “Court-martial Mark Milley.”

Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida simply called for the top general to be fired, writing in a letter to the White House arguing that Milley had set a “dangerous precedent” through his actions and had “contemplated a treasonous leak of classified information to the Chinese Communist Party.”

While other GOP senators such as Cynthia Lummis of Wyoming and Roger Marshall of Kansas have also called for Milley’s firing, most GOP senators appear not to have commented on the matter yet.

On the House side, Rep. Matt Gaetz of Florida called for Milley’s ouster, suggesting on Newsmax that Milley had “broken some very good laws.

Meanwhile, several other congressional Republicans called for Milley to be either fired or to resign, including Reps. Chris Stewart of Utah, Dan Bishop of North Carolina, and Doug Lamborn of Colorado.

Other Republicans went even further, accusing Milley of treason. Rep. Jody Hice of Georgia falsely claimed Milley “conspired with a foreign power in a coup d’état,” while Rep. Andy Biggs of Arizona said that the general “should go down in history as a traitor to the American people.” And Rep. Byron Donalds of Florida released a statement saying Milley’s actions were “next to treasonist,” apparently misspelling “treasonous.”

Congressional Republicans aren’t the only ones calling for Milley’s removal. Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a key witness in Trump’s first impeachment and a long-time critic of the former President, said that Milley “usurped civilian authority, broke Chain of Command, and violated the sacrosanct principle of civilian control over the military.

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Gen. Mark Milley told his Chinese counterpart the US was ‘100 percent steady’ after the Capitol riot but privately thought the siege was ‘treason’: book

donald trump mark milley
Trump and Gen. Mark Milley.

  • Gen. Mark Milley told his Chinese counterpart the US was “100 percent steady” after the Capitol siege.
  • But he privately believed the riot amounted to “treason,” a new book says.
  • He also thought Trump was still looking for his “Reichstag moment,” according to the book.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Two days after the deadly Capitol siege, Gen. Mark Milley spoke to his Chinese counterpart to assure him that the US was still in good shape.

But privately, he believed differently, according to “Peril” by The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward and Robert Costa, an early copy of which was obtained by Insider.

In his call with Chinese Gen. Li Zuocheng, Milley said the US was “100 percent steady” and that the January 6 insurrection was an example of how “sloppy” democracy can be, the book says. But in reality, Milley thought the riot was “a coup attempt and nothing less than ‘treason,'” and that then President Donald Trump “might still be looking for what Milley called a ‘Reichstag moment'” in the wake of his election loss. That refers to the 1933 fire at the German parliament that Adolf Hitler used as a pretext to consolidate power into a dictatorship.

It’s one of several instances Woodward and Costa reported in which Milley grappled with how to ward off a national security crisis while remaining within the confines of his advisory role as the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff.

According to the book, Milley made two calls to Li, one on October 30 and the second on January 8. The January call came amid a heightened sense of urgency because the Capitol siege “had not only stirred up China but also caused Russia, Iran, as well as other nations to go on high alert to monitor the American military and political events in the United States,” the book said.

“Half the world was friggin nervous,” Milley said, according to the book. The general was said to be on high alert and told the Joint Chiefs to keep an eye on things “all the time.” He also told NSA Director Gen. Paul Nakasone to keep his “needles up” following the phone call with Li, and he told CIA Director Gina Haspel to “aggressively watch everything, 360,” according to the book.

Milley’s main concern with China was that it “could choose to do what’s called a ‘first-move advantage’ or a ‘Pearl Harbor,’ and conduct a strike,” the book said. His first call to Li, on October 30, was prompted by US intelligence suggesting that China believed the US was readying for a military strike amid increased military exercises in the South China Sea and Trump’s harsh rhetoric toward the country.

During the October call, Milley assured Li that “the American government is stable and everything is going to be okay. We are not going to attack or conduct any kinetic operations against you,” the book said. He also reportedly added: “General Li, you and I have known each other for now five years. If we’re going to attack, I’m going to call you ahead of time. It’s not going to be a surprise.”

But the January 6 Capitol siege only intensified China’s fears that the US was unstable and that Trump, seething over his election loss and behaving erratically, could authorize a military strike.

Milley’s reported conversations with Li drew sharp condemnation from Trump, some of his advisors, Republican lawmakers, and some ex-military members.

“If this is true GEN Milley must resign. He usurped civilian authority, broke Chain of Command, and violated the sacrosanct principle of civilian control over the military,” tweeted retired Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, a former Trump impeachment witness. “It’s an extremely dangerous precedent. You can’t simply walk away from that. #dotherightthingintherightway.”

However, Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin reported that there were 15 people on Milley’s video teleconference calls with his Chinese counterpart, Gen. Li Zuocheng, including a State Department representative. Griffin added that notes detailing the two calls were shared with the intelligence community and went through the interagency process.

Nayyera Haq, a former senior advisor at the State Department and senior director of Cabinet affairs at the White House, also added: “The only thing secret about the discussion was the classification. It’s literally how government and diplomacy are supposed to work.”

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Trump impeachment witness Alexander Vindman says Gen. Mark Milley ‘must resign’ following report that he called his Chinese counterpart to avoid war with China

Trump, Gen. Milley
Trump and Gen. Mark Milley.

  • Retired Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman said Gen. Mark Milley “must resign” amid Woodward book details.
  • Milley called his Chinese counterpart twice to reassure China that the US had no plans to attack.
  • Fox reported that there were 15 people on Milley’s call and its details were shared with the intel community.
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A key witness who testified against then-President Donald Trump in his first impeachment called for Gen. Mark Milley, the chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to resign following bombshell allegations from a new book by The Washington Post’s Bob Woodward and Robert Costa.

Insider obtained an early copy of the book, “Peril,” which is set to be released next week.

Woodward and Costa wrote that in the run-up to the 2020 election and in the months after, Milley grew so concerned by Trump’s erratic behavior that he called his Chinese counterpart twice to assure him that the US would not start a war with China.

The first call took place on October 30, a few days before the November 3 general election, the book said. The second call was on January 8, two days after a mob of pro-Trump rioters stormed the US Capitol in a failed attempt to stop Congress from certifying President-elect Joe Biden’s victory.

In one call, the new book reported that Milley told his counterpart, Gen. Li Zuocheng: “If we’re going to attack, I’m going to call you ahead of time. It’s not going to be a surprise.”

Such a tip-off would appear to violate the military’s rules about secrecy before missions. The book also said Milley had senior officers make an “oath” to inform him of any orders to launch nuclear weapons and that they follow procedures to the letter.

Reacting to the allegations, retired Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman tweeted, “If this is true GEN Milley must resign. He usurped civilian authority, broke Chain of Command, and violated the sacrosanct principle of civilian control over the military. It’s an extremely dangerous precedent. You can’t simply walk away from that. #dotherightthingintherightway.”

Vindman previously served as the top Ukraine expert on Trump’s National Security Council. He made headlines in 2019 when he testified to Congress about Trump’s efforts to strongarm the Ukrainian government into launching politically motivated investigations against the Bidens ahead of the 2020 election. Shortly after Trump was acquitted by the Republican-controlled Senate, he fired Vindman and his twin brother, Yevgeny, from the NSC in what Vindman’s lawyer described as retaliation for his testimony.

Trump slammed Milley following the revelations in Woodward and Costa’s book, and an anonymous senior Trump administration national security official told The Post’s Josh Rogin that it was “dangerous for Mark Milley to be doing freelance diplomacy on China without involving any of the other senior officials dealing with China at the time.”

However, Fox News’ Jennifer Griffin reported that there were 15 people on Milley’s video teleconference calls with his Chinese counterpart, Gen. Li Zuocheng, including a State Department representative. Griffin added that notes detailing the two calls were shared with the intelligence community and went through the interagency process.

Nayyera Haq, a former senior advisor at the State Department and senior director of Cabinet affairs at the White House, also added: “The only thing secret about the discussion was the classification. It’s literally how government and diplomacy are supposed to work.”

China is believed to have upwards of 300 nuclear warheads and has been building missile silos capable of launching intercontinental ballistic missiles that could strike the US, a persistent threat that contributes to the importance of military-to-military calls so nuclear-armed adversaries limit the possibilities of a miscalculation.

Milley was one of multiple senior Trump officials who harbored deep concerns about Trump’s actions during and after the election. Then-Attorney General Bill Barr grew so frustrated with the president’s insistence that the election was stolen from him that he confronted Trump on November 23 and told him his claims of voter fraud were “bullshit,” according to Woodward and Costa’s reporting.

The book said that then-CIA Director Gina Haspel was also worried that the US was headed toward a “right-wing coup,” while Milley, in the days after the Capitol siege, told House Speaker Nancy Pelosi he agreed with her assessment that Trump was “crazy.”

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A top US general said ‘I agree with you on everything’ when Nancy Pelosi called Trump ‘crazy’ after the Capitol riot: book

Mark Milley
Gen. Mark Milley.

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi told a top US general that Trump was “crazy.”
  • The general, Mark Milley, responded, “I agree with you on everything,” according to a new book.
  • Their reported conversation took place two days after the deadly Capitol riot.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A top US general reportedly agreed with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi when she said in January that then-President Donald Trump was crazy.

That’s according to “Peril,” by Washington Post editor Bob Woodward and Post reporter Robert Costa. The Post, which obtained an early copy of the book, published details from it on Tuesday.

The conversation in question took place on January 8, two days after Trump incited a mob of his supporters to storm the Capitol in a failed effort to disrupt Congress’ certification of the 2020 US election.

Woodward and Costa obtained a transcript of Pelosi’s January 8 phone call to US Gen. Mark Milley, in which she wanted to know “what precautions are available to prevent an unstable president from initiating military hostilities or from accessing the launch codes and ordering a nuclear strike.”

Milley told Pelosi that there were “a lot of checks in the system” to prevent Trump from going rogue, the book said.

Pelosi then told Milley, “He’s crazy. You know he’s crazy.”

“He’s crazy and what he did yesterday is further evidence of his craziness,” Pelosi said, referring to the deadly Capitol riot.

According to the book, Milley responded: “I agree with you on everything.”

Woodward and Costa reported that Milley’s conversation with Pelosi wasn’t the only time he expressed doubts about Trump’s actions and mental faculties. According to the book, Milley was so worried that Trump would spark a military confrontation with China near the end of his presidency that he called his Chinese counterpart, Gen. Li Zuocheng, twice to assure him that the US would not strike.

Milley’s conversations with Li and Pelosi were evidence of his belief that Trump had suffered a mental decline after the November general election, the book said.

Indeed, Milley repeatedly slammed Trump’s lies about the election and once even compared him to Adolf Hitler, according to “I Alone Can Fix It,” by The Post’s Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker.

Milley accused Trump of spreading “the gospel of the Führer” by lying about the election results and compared his supporters to “Brownshirts in the streets,” the book said. A week after the Capitol riot, Milley said of the pro-Trump mob, “These guys are Nazis, they’re boogaloo boys, they’re Proud Boys. These are the same people we fought in World War II.”

The general also publicly spoke out in recent months against the Capitol riot and the underlying sentiments that motivated it.

“I want to understand white rage. And I’m white,” Milley said while testifying before the House Armed Services Committee in June.

“What is it that caused thousands of people to assault this building and try to overturn the Constitution of the United States of America. What caused that?” Milley said. “I want to find that out.”

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Video captures Rudy Giuliani’s rambling speech at a 9/11 dinner in which he impersonated Queen Elizabeth II

Rudy Giuliani
Former mayor Rudy Giuliani.

  • Rudy Giuliani gave a rambling speech at his annual 9/11 dinner in a Manhattan restaurant.
  • The former mayor impersonated Queen Elizabeth and said he has never socialized with disgraced Prince Andrew.
  • Giuliani also described how he wanted to grab Gen. Mark Milley’s awarded stars and “shove it down his throat.”
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Former New York City mayor Rudy Giuliani gave a rambling speech at his annual 9/11 dinner.

In video clips, Giuliani can be seen impersonating Queen Elizabeth II and talking about wanting to get into a physical altercation with Gen. Mark Milley.

Giuliani claimed that Queen Elizabeth II offered him a knighthood in one clip, which he turned down.

“I turned down a knighthood because if you took a knighthood, you had to lose your citizenship,” Giuliani said.

The former mayor was given an honorary title by the Queen in 2001 and was not required to give up his citizenship.

Giuliani went on to talk about Prince Andrew, who has recently been served papers in a lawsuit from Jeffrey Epstein accuser Virginia Giuffre.

“I know Prince Andrew is very questionable now. I never went out with him. Ever!” Giuliani continued.

“Never had a drink with him, never was with a woman or young girl with him. Ever, ever, ever.”

In another clip, Giuliani criticized States Secretary of State Anthony Blinken and Gen. Mark Milley.

“How’s that guy a general?,” Giuliani said about Gen. Milley.

Giuliani criticized Gen. Milley for describing Bagram Air Base in Afghanistan as “not strategically important.”

“I wanted to grab his stars and shove it down his throat and say, ‘it’s 400 miles from China, asshole! China is going to be our enemy for the next 40 years! You have an airbase 400 miles from them and you’re giving it up? Idiot! What the hell is wrong with you? Who pays you? Christ!'”

Giuliani also slammed Joe Biden’s Afghanistan policy.

“What Biden did in the last two weeks is freaking insane,” Giuliani said, to applause from the audience.

The former mayor also spoke about his own role overseeing the aftermath of 9/11 in New York City.

“20 years ago, I did my job for the country. I’m very proud of it,” he said.

New York Times journalist Maggie Haberman said the event took place at a Cipriani restaurant and that lawyers Victoria Toensing and Joe diGenova were in attendance and former Donald Trump advisor Steve Bannon.

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