The ‘laughable’ comparison between Colorado and Georgia voting requirements

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Election workers validate ballots at the Gwinnett County Elections Office on Friday, Nov. 6, 2020 in Lawrenceville, GA.

  • Fox News and Republican politicians are comparing Colorado’s voting laws to Georgia’s.
  • But that comparison is “laughable,” said Paul Teske of the University of Colorado, Denver.
  • Colorado has fully embraced voting by mail, automatically sending ballots to all registered voters.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

When Major League Baseball announced it was moving its All-Star Game from Georgia to protest new restrictions on voting, local Republicans and conservative media outlets bemoaned the rise of “woke capital” and created a false equivalence. Colorado, they said – the game’s new home – was really no better when it comes to voting rights.

“I think it’s a little bit laughable,” Paul Teske, dean of Public Affairs at the University of Colorado Denver, told Insider of the comparison. “Colorado is such an easy place to vote.”

Georgia is not so easy, and it will now become more difficult.

Among other things, Georgia’s new elections law, passed by the state’s Republican-led legislature following a campaign by party leaders to paint the 2020 election as fraudulent, curtails the use of mail-in ballots. While before voters had up to six months before an election to request a ballot, they now have 11 weeks, and will have fewer drop boxes to cast their vote.

Crucially, people who vote by mail will also have to provide a driver’s license or other state-issued identification card, similar to the requirement for in-person voting. Previously, poll workers simply checked signatures to make sure they matched those on file – a process that, according to Georgia’s Republican elections officials, uncovered no real fraud.

That, according to GOP Gov. Brain Kemp, is no different than Colorado. In an appearance on Fox News this week, Kemp said he was confused by MLB’s decision to move its All-Star contest to Colorado where, “I’m being told, they also have a photo ID requirement.”

He was told wrong.

What counts as an “ID” in the Rocky Mountains is not the same as in Georgia. According to Colorado’s Secretary of State, acceptable forms of identification include not just those issued by the state or federal government, but those printed by colleges and universities. Don’t have one of those, either? Not a problem: the state also accepts utility bills, bank statements, and paycheck stubs.

In 2020, a super-majority of voters in Colorado cast their ballots by mail – all registered voters receive them automatically, as they have for years prior to the pandemic, with bipartisan support.

“The truth is Colorado’s election model works,” Colorado Secretary of State Jena Griswold, a Democrat, said in a statement on Tuesday. “[T]he proof is in voter turnout, consistently among the top in the nation,” she said, adding the state is “grateful that MLB is giving us the opportunity to showcase how elections can be.”

Mail-in ballots can also be deposited at any time; as Colorado Public Radio notes, there is one drop box for every 9,400 active registered voters, available 24 hours a day. By contrast, the new law in Georgia actually caps the number of drop boxes for ballots to one per 100,000 voters, while limiting accessibility. It also requires Georgians to provide ID every time they vote absentee, not just when they initially register (the state, previously, compared signatures, as they do in Colorado).

Nevertheless, Kemp’s false claim was provided journalistic cover. Fox News, for example, published a story stating that, “As it turns out, Colorado also requires voters to show identification when voting in person.” The outlet’s Peter Doocy, at a White House briefing, likewise asked Biden spokesperson Jen Psaki if the administration was concerned about the MLB game moving to Colorado, “where voting regulations are very similar to Georgia.”

Psaki rebutted the comparison. “It’s important to remember the context here,” she added. “The Georgia bill is built on a lie.”

Indeed, the new Georgia law comes not after evidence of voter fraud – the state’s Republican elections officials uncovered none that would alter the outcome of the 2020 election – but a concerted effort by a former president and other GOP politicians to invalidate ballots cast for Democrats.

“It’s just abundantly clear, from the outside looking in, that they had some close elections but they lost,” Teske said, “and so the Republican legislature is looking to restrict voting in ways that they think will help them win elections in the future.”

“That is not a great way to have a democracy,” he added.

Have a news tip? Email this reporter: cdavis@insider.com

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Donald Trump was wrong to claim absentee ballots helped Joe Biden beat him, according to new Stanford University study

Absentee Ballot Mail Voting Vote
A person fills out their absentee ballot form to vote during the 2020 election.

  • Published on March 5, the paper examines how absentee voting affected the 2020 US election.
  • It concludes that Democrats were equally less likely to vote early in-person or on election day. 
  • The study adds that there were already high levels of motivation to participate and mail-in ballots did not lead to a voting increase.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Mail-in ballots did not help Democrats or lead to a voting increase during the election, according to a new Stanford University study.

Published on March 5, the paper examines how absentee voting affected the 2020 US election by studying turnout rates in Texas, a state which decided not to ease its mail-in voting system process despite many others choosing to do so because of the pandemic

While Texan voters aged 65 or over could automatically vote by mail, younger people had to provide a legally justifiable reason to be able to do such as having a disability, the Associated Press reported.

Both age groups had identical voting rates with only 0.2% more Democrats in the older one, showing that mail-in ballots did not in fact increase the Democrats’ share of the vote, AP added. 

While Democrats were more likely to vote by mail than Republicans in 2020, it didn’t actually help win the election because they were equally less likely to vote early in-person or on election day, the study found.

It also revealed that there was a slightly higher turnout rate among 65-year-olds compared to 64-year-olds in 2014 and 2018, suggesting that absentee voting increases turnout in lower interest elections. 

The study concludes that making it easier to vote through mail-in ballots did not increase voting levels because there were already high levels of motivation to participate in the 2020 election.

Jesse Yoder, one of the paper’s eight authors and a PhD student in political science at Stanford University told AP: “We find a pretty precisely zero effect on turnout. Voter interest was really driving turnout more than these convenience voting forms.”

Republicans have baselessly maintained that the expansion of mail ballot votes was a major reason why Donald Trump lost the election and have legally challenged various states on their decision to do so. 

In Georgia, for example, there are proposals for absentee voters to require identification as well as a reason, The Guardian reported.

Meanwhile, some Democrats in Congress are also calling for a nationwide change that would require every state to offer  ‘no-excuse’ mail ballot voting to everyone, The Guardian added.

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Philadelphia GOP official says Trump ‘incited supporters to threaten to kill my children because we counted votes cast by eligible voters’

Al Schmidt
Philadelphia City Commissioner Al Schmidt.

  • Philadelphia city commissioner Al Schmidt called on Mitch McConnell to vote his “conscience” in Trump’s impeachment trial.
  • “The former POTUS incited supporters to threaten to kill my children,” Schmidt wrote on Twitter.
  • Ahead of a likely weekend vote, McConnell announced that he would vote to acquit Trump.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Republican Philadelphia City Commissioner Al Schmidt called on GOP Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky to vote his “conscience” as the impeachment trial of former President Donald Trump hurtles towards a conclusion.

In a late Friday note directed at McConnell, Schmidt recalls the days after the November general election when Trump attacked him as Republican “RINO,” or Republican in name only, on Twitter for disputing the former president’s claims of voter fraud in the overwhelmingly Democratic city.

“The former POTUS incited supporters to threaten to kill my children and put their ‘heads on spikes’ because we counted votes cast by eligible voters,” Schmidt wrote. “They named my children and included my home address in the threats.”

He added: “Please consider when voting your conscience.”

However, ahead of a likely weekend vote, McConnell announced in a letter on Saturday morning that he would vote to acquit Trump in the former president’s Senate impeachment trial for “incitement of insurrection” related to the January 6 Capitol riots.

Read more: Meet the little-known power player with the ‘hardest job’ on Capitol Hill. She’s shaping Trump’s impeachment trial and Joe Biden’s agenda.

The attacks on Schmidt’s family were accelerated by a November tweet that was posted on the former president’s now-disabled Twitter account.

“A guy named Al Schmidt, a Philadelphia Commissioner and so-called Republican (RINO), is being used big time by the Fake News Media to explain how honest things were with respect to the Election in Philadelphia,” Trump tweeted. “He refuses to look at a mountain of corruption & dishonesty. We win!”

After the tweet was posted, Schmidt, his wife, and children received threats sent by text and email, according to The New York Times Magazine.

“You lied,” one message read. “You a traitor. Perhaps 75cuts and 20bullets will soon arrive.”

Two emails sent to Schmidt’s wife read, “ALBERT RINO SCHMIDT WILL BE FATALLY SHOT,” “COPS CAN’T HELP YOU. #Q,” and “HEADS ON SPIKES. TREASONOUS SCHMIDTS.” 

In November, Schmidt also revealed that staff members in his office had been subjected to death threats and said that critics were “coming up with all sorts of crazy stuff” to discredit the work of the office.

Last month, Schmidt announced that he would not run for reelection in 2023 and insisted that the Pennsylvania vote count was “free and fair,” despite the relentless stream of debunked election-related conspiracy theories from the former president.

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‘I don’t think we have identified a problem we are trying to solve’: Georgia GOP officials are rallying behind voting changes despite no evidence of mass fraud

Geoff Duncan
Gov. Brian Kemp, center, with Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan, left, and Georgia state House Speaker David Ralston.

  • Top Georgia GOP officials are pushing for voting changes, especially with absentee balloting.
  • The state’s lieutenant governor could not fully explain why the changes are necessary.
  • The GOP response is widely seen as a reaction to Biden’s win and the dual Senate losses in January.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

After President Joe Biden’s victory in Georgia last November, as well as Democratic wins by US Sens. Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff in last month’s runoff elections, Republicans have sought to rebuild their once venerable political coalition in the newly-minted presidential swing state.

Despite GOP control of the Governor’s Mansion and Republican majorities in the state legislature, party leaders, who had to endure months of former President Donald Trump’s spreading debunked claims of mass voter fraud, have zeroed in on absentee ballot restrictions.

With many voters fearful of the spread of COVID-19 at voting precincts, absentee balloting gained popularity across the country last year. 

However, while being interviewed for an opinion article in The Atlanta Journal-Constitution, top Republicans were unable to provide concrete reasoning for the new voting proposals.

Republican Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan, who last year expressed concern that the Trump campaign’s election-related legal battles were hurting the party’s “brand of conservatism,” is opposed to ending the state’s no-excuse absentee voting policy, but couldn’t fully explain why new voting rules were needed.

“I think that’s a great question,” he said. “The answer is, I don’t think we have identified a problem we are trying to solve. I think this is an opportunity ‘to update and modernize’ voting in Georgia.”

Duncan wants to require photo identification for voters requesting absentee ballots, a position aligned with state GOP House Speaker David Ralston, after a sustained Trump-driven uproar over the current signature verification process. The lieutenant governor did not have a firm position on eliminating ballot drop boxes, a wish list item for many state Republicans.

Read more: Meet the little-known power player with the ‘hardest job’ on Capitol Hill. She’s shaping Trump’s impeachment trial and Joe Biden’s agenda.

When GOP state Senate Majority Leader Mike Dugan was asked why he sought to end Georgia’s no-excuse absentee voting policy, he admitted that there was no overarching problem that necessitated the legislation.

“It’s not a problem, as much as a-having-a-sense-of-a-surety that it’s not a right taken lightly,” he said. “This is one of the most sacred rights that we have as a people. It should have some thought that goes into it.”

However, there is little indication that voters are shirking their voting responsibilities in the Peach State.

In the 2021 Senate runoff elections, more than 4.5 million votes were cast, powered by elevated Black turnout across the state, according to the Associated Press. This turnout figure represented almost 90% of Georgia’s high November election turnout, according to CBS News.

Republicans, on the other hand, bore the brunt of Trump’s campaign to overturn Biden’s win.

In the weeks between the November election and Biden’s inauguration, the former president pressured Gov. Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to help him overturn Biden’s statewide win of nearly 12,000 votes, which made him the first Democratic presidential nominee to carry Georgia since Bill Clinton in 1992.

Last December, Trump asked Kemp to call a special session in an attempt to overturn the election results by having the legislature install pro-Trump presidential electors.

Kemp balked at the request.

In January 2021, Trump called Raffensperger in a roughly hourlong conversation to ask him to “find” the votes needed to overcome Biden’s victory.

The secretary of state refused to follow Trump’s orders.

On February 10, Fulton County prosecutors launched a criminal investigation into the former president’s pressure campaign to invalidate his statewide loss. The news came only a day after Raffensperger announced that his office would begin an administrative inquiry into Trump’s phone call.

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After Trump’s election loss, Republicans across the US are racing to enact new voting restrictions

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Lin Wilson waves a US flag to encourage people to vote, outside the CenturyLink Field Event Center in Seattle on November 3, 2020.

  • In the wake of Biden’s win, Republicans across the US are rolling out new voting restrictions.
  • Republican leaders contend that the proposals are about maintaining voter integrity, though fraud is a rare occurrence.
  • Here are some of the voting proposals that are being debated across the country.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Joe Biden has been in office for less than two weeks, but in state legislatures across the US, Republicans still reeling from former President Donald Trump’s electoral loss are devising ways to restrict the vote, from eliminating ballot drop boxes to requiring the notarization of absentee ballot applications.

In 2010, Republicans made historic gains in state legislatures, flipping 24 chambers that year, allowing them to control the redistricting process for the past decade. In additional drawing scores of safe GOP House seats, the party pushed a wave of socially-conservative legislation that centered on restricting abortion rights and minimizing the collective bargaining power of public-sector labor unions.

While Biden and Trump both won 25 states in the 2020 presidential election, Biden flipped five states that Trump carried in 2016, which included Arizona, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin, along with Nebraska’s 2nd congressional district.

These presidential swing states are now home to some of the most dramatic election-related proposals that have been floated or filed in the legislature for a vote. However, even in states where Trump won easily, including Mississippi and Texas, voting restrictions stand a good chance of passing.

According to the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University, 106 bills aimed at restricting voting access have been introduced or filed in state legislatures in 28 states, representing a nearly threefold increase from the same period last year.

The proposed laws ignore the overwhelming evidence that voter fraud is incredibly rare.

Last November, countering Trump’s debunked claims of voter irregularities, the Department of Homeland Security said in a statement that the November 2020 election “was the most secure in American history.”

Here are some of the voting proposals that are being debated across the country:

Arizona

Since 1952, Republicans have won Arizona in every presidential election except for Bill Clinton’s 1992 win and Biden’s victory last year.

Biden won the state by less than 11,000 votes out of roughly 3.3 million votes cast, performing strongly with Latino voters and even making inroads with a segment of the state’s Republican voters.

With the support of high-profile Republicans including Cindy McCain, the wife of the late GOP Sen. John McCain, and former Sen. Jeff Flake, Biden tapped into the independent-minded nature of the state, similar to the campaign strategy of Democratic Sen. Mark Kelly, who defeated appointed GOP Sen. Martha McSally last November.

Read more: Trump tested the Constitution and shredded traditions. Biden and the Democrats have big plans of their own about what to do next.

However, conservative activists vigorously challenged the election results, including Trump, who criticized GOP Gov. Doug Ducey for certifying the election results, a normally-routine process. Since the GOP controls the state legislature in Arizona, the raft of restrictive bills are being taken up in committees.

According to The Arizona Republic, Republican legislators have proposed bills that would:

  • Allow the legislature to void the results of a presidential election “at any time before the presidential inauguration”
  • Give the legislature the power to award two of the state’s 11 Electoral College votes
  • Award the state’s electoral votes by congressional district in lieu of the current winner-takes-all system
  • Curtail and/or end mail-in voting
  • Liming mail-in voting to those who cannot physically reach a voting precinct
  • Limit voting centers in each county according to the population size
  • Require mail-in ballot envelopes to be notarized or returned in-person

Arizona Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, a Democrat, was sharply critical of House Bill 2720, which was introduced by GOP state Rep. Shawnna Bolick and would allow the legislature to overturn the election results.

“It is a punch in the face to voters,” she said in an NBC News interview. “It absolutely, 100%, allows a legislature to undermine the will of voters.”

She also tweeted: “So really, we should just get rid of the presidential election altogether? In reality, that’s what this bill would do.”

Georgia

Georgia was the scene of deep political consternation for the GOP. Last November, Biden became the first Democratic presidential nominee to win the state since 1992. Trump insisted that he won the state for months, asking GOP Gov. Brian Kemp to overturn the election results and even pressuring GOP Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger to “find” the 12,000 roughly votes that he would need to overcome Biden’s margin of victory.

In the end, Trump caused so much internal political turmoil in the state that Democrats, fresh off of Biden’s win, had an enthusiasm advantage for two Senate runoff elections that featured then-GOP Sens. Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue running against Democrats Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff, respectively.

Georgia runoffs
Democrat Raphael Warnock addresses supporters during a rally with Jon Ossoff in Atlanta on the first day of early voting in the Georgia Senate runoff elections.

Warnock and Ossoff won their races, handing control of the Senate to the Democrats and giving the party their strongest anchor in the Deep South in years.

Georgia Republicans, stung by the losses, are now hoping to implement additional voting restrictions.

Top state officials, including Lt. Gov. Geoff Duncan, are backing a more rigorous voter identification process for absentee balloting.

A GOP lawmaker has proposed a bill that would require proof of identification, twice, in order to vote absentee.

Last year, House Speaker David Ralston floated stripping Georgia voters of their ability to choose the secretary of state by putting a measure on the ballot that would allow voters to cede that responsibility to the GOP-controlled legislature.

Michigan

Michigan voted for every Democratic presidential nominee from 1992 to 2012. When Trump pulled off a narrow upset in 2016, Democrats pledged to outwork the GOP and win back the Midwestern state and its 16 electoral votes.

In 2018, the party had a banner year, electing Gretchen Whitmer as governor, Dana Nessel as attorney general, and Jocelyn Benson as secretary of state.

Last November, Biden won the state by over 150,000 votes and a nearly 3% margin (50.6%-47.8%), securing a victory in a state that Democrats were thrilled to put back in their column.

The state legislature is still in GOP hands, a lingering result of the party’s 2010 midterm election sweep, but Whitmer also serves as a check on any far-reaching proposals.

Michigan GOP Senate Majority Leader Mike Shirkey told The Detroit News that he would like to improve the state’s qualified voter files and party leaders, including home state Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDaniel, said last year that the state needed “election reform.”

Pennsylvania

With its 20 electoral votes, Pennsylvania has long been a top prize for Democrats, who won the state by combining overwhelming victories in Philadelphia and Pittsburgh with growing suburban strength and blue-collar support in cities like Allentown and Scranton.

Democrats won Pennsylvania in every presidential election from 1992 to 2012, but similar to Michigan, Trump pulled off a narrow upset in 2016.

Biden, who was born in Scranton and represented neighboring Delaware in the Senate for 36 years, won the state 50%-49% over Trump last November.

Democrats, eager to build on Biden’s victory, have already zeroed in on the Senate seat being vacated by GOP Sen. Pat Toomey in 2022 and the governor’s race to succeed term-limited Democratic Gov. Tom Wolf that same year.

However, Republicans, who repeatedly sought to overturn the 2020 election results, including tossing out millions of mail-in ballots, are steadfastly committed to imposing new restrictions.

There are currently GOP proposals on the table to nix no-excuse absentee balloting and make it easier for state officials to toss ballots that have a signature mismatch if the ballot isn’t fixed within six days of being notified, according to the Brennan Center.

Wisconsin

Wisconsin is another key state in the Democrats’ Midwestern presidential electoral puzzle. After narrow wins in 2000 and 2004, the party won the state easily in 2008 and 2012 before seeing Trump narrowly win the state in 2016.

Gretchen Whitmer
Michigan Gov. Gretchen Whitmer is pictured on October 16, 2020.

After a hard-fought race, Biden won the state over Trump by roughly 20,000 votes out of more than 3.2 million votes cast.

Read more: Trump tested the Constitution and shredded traditions. Biden and the Democrats have big plans of their own about what to do next.

The Trump campaign, incensed that votes in Democratic-leaning Milwaukee County put Biden over the top, demanded a recount in Milwaukee and Dane County, home of Madison, the state’s liberal capital city. Not only was Biden’s win reaffirmed by the recounts, but he picked up additional votes.

A GOP legislator is floating a proposal to allocate eight of the state’s 10 electoral votes by congressional district, starting with the 2024 election, and the party may also seek additional restrictions on absentee balloting.

Democratic Gov. Tony Evers has the ability to wield his veto pen, but he is also up for reelection in 2022.

Nebraska’s 2nd Congressional District

Last year, Biden carried Nebraska’s Omaha-based congressional district, the first time a Democrat had won the district since Barack Obama in 2008.

The win was a breakthrough for the party in the otherwise overwhelmingly Republican state.

Since 1991, Nebraska has awarded two electoral votes to the overall statewide winner, with the remaining three votes awarded to the winner of each congressional district.

In 2020, Trump secured four electoral votes to Biden’s one electoral vote.

A new GOP bill introduced in the state legislature would put into place a winner-takes-all system; if it had been in place in 2020, Trump would have won all five electoral votes.

The 2nd congressional district contains sizeable Black and Latino populations, and opponents of the bill argue that the legislation would be detrimental to minority voters.

American Civil Liberties Union Nebraska executive director Danielle Conrad said as much in an interview with ABC News.

“You see very clearly that there was a lot of excitement particularly from voters of color in the Omaha metro-area who engage in that process over the last few election cycles because they had that meaningful opportunity,” she said.

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Pennsylvania Republicans spent $1 million in tax dollars on 2020 election lawsuits to suppress voters

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A woman participates in a protest in support of counting all votes in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on November 5, 2020.

  • Pennsylvania Republicans spent $1.04 million in taxpayer dollars on 2020 election lawsuits.
  • That’s according to documents obtained Thursday by the news organization PA Spotlight.
  • Republicans had sought to disenfranchise millions of people who voted by mail.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Pennsylvania Republicans spent more than $1 million in taxpayer dollars on litigation aimed at making it more difficult to vote ahead of the 2020 election, according to documents obtained by the news organization PA Spotlight. Over $650,000 went to the same law firm that tried and failed to place Kanye West on the ballot in another swing state.

In a post on Thursday, PA Spotlight revealed that the Pennsylvania Senate Republican Caucus, which controls the commonwealth’s upper chamber, spent a total of $1,042,200 in the runup to November trying to restrict methods of voting. In particular, the state GOP sought to overturn key provisions of Act 77, a law passed in 2019 – with unanimous support from Senate Republicans – that allowed voters to request mail-in ballots for any reason.

At the time, the Pennsylvania state Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman called the legislation “the most historic reform bill we’ve done.” But as time went on, Republicans began to see the measure as a boon to their political opponents, with Democratic voters far more likely to vote by mail during the pandemic. The Senate GOP also sought to prevent those ballots from being placed in secure drop boxes and to throw out millions of mail-in votes altogether, an effort rejected by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court.

According to PA Spotlight, money on such litigation went to two firms, the bulk of it going to Holtzman, Vogel, Josefiak, and Torchinksy, founded by a former lawyer for the Republican National Committee. That firm also tried to place Kanye West on the ballot in Wisconsin.

Obermayer, Rebmann, Maxell, and Hippell also received just under $385,000 in tax collars for election work in Pennsylvania. Lawrence Tabas, chairman of the Pennsylvania Republican Party, is a partner at the firm, PA Spotlight reported.

Neither Tabas nor the Senate Republican Caucus immediately responded to Insider’s requests for comment.

In the meantime, having lost in the courts, Pennsylvania Republicans are turning to legislation: On Thursday, state Sen. Doug Mastriano – who spent thousands of dollars busing protesters to the January 6 insurrection at the US Capitol, falsely claiming the 2020 election was stolen – introduced a bill that would eliminate “no excuse” mail-in voting.

Have a news tip? Email this reporter: cdavis@insider.com

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Trump and Republican officials have won zero out of at least 42 lawsuits they’ve filed since Election Day

donald trump debate
President Donald Trump.

  • President Donald Trump’s campaign and Republican officials have filed dozens of lawsuits since Election Day in an effort to contest the results of the 2020 election.
  • The campaign filed lawsuits and motions to intervene in cases in swing states Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
  • They’ve notched zero victories, 38 cases where they’ve withdrawn or lost, and have four cases pending.
  • Scroll down for a list of lawsuits the Trump campaign and Republicans have filed and where they stand.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Faced with the prospect of losing to a man he spent months hammering as corrupt, doddering, and mentally deficient, President Donald Trump is going on offense, spreading lies and conspiracy theories about a “rigged” election marred by “major fraud” from Democrats.

He’s alternated between demanding that some states stop counting ballots, which he doesn’t have the power to do, and saying that others should keep counting, which they were doing anyway.

To that end, the Trump campaign, Republican allies, and Trump himself have mounted at least 42 legal challenges since Election Day.

They’ve won zero.

The lawsuits argue that states and counties have violated election laws, playing into Trump’s political strategy to discredit the results of the 2020 election that President-elect Joe Biden won.

Republicans have filed the lawsuits in local, state, and federal courts in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, and Pennsylvania – all states that Biden won. They have also filed direct appeals to the Supreme Court, all of which have also failed.

The Trump campaign initially had a single win, when a Pennsylvania judge ruled on November 12 that first-time voters were supposed to confirm their IDs with county boards of election by November 9, rather than November 12. The decision opened the door to disqualify the ballots of people who didn’t verify their IDs in time. But the state Supreme Court later overturned that decision.

That leaves Trump and other Republicans with at least 38 cases they have withdrawn or lost, and four that are still pending.

rudy giuliani
Attorney for the President, Rudy Giuliani, speaks about election lawsuits at a news conference in the parking lot of a landscaping company on November 7, 2020 in Philadelphia.

Here’s a list of the lawsuits and where they stand

Direct appeals to the Supreme Court – 2 losses, one pending

  • Several Republican politicians, led by Rep. Mike Kelly, asked the US Supreme Court to block the certification of Pennsylvania’s election results. The court turned down the case.
  • Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton sued Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan, and Wisconsin in the US Supreme Court seeking to overturn their election results. The Supreme Court rejected the case.
  • The Trump campaign asked the US Supreme Court to overturn three decisions from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court over various technical rules regarding absentee and mail-in ballots. The court hasn’t yet decided whether to hear the case.

Pennsylvania – 13 losses

  • The Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee filed a lawsuit asking a state appeals court to reject the Pennsylvania secretary of state’s announcement that registered voters had until November 12 to provide proof of identity for mail-in ballots. Republicans believe the deadline should be November 9. This is the one case that Trump won, before the state Supreme Court overturned the lower court decision.
  • In a wide-ranging federal lawsuit, the Trump campaign sued over alleged irregularities in the way ballots were counted throughout the state. They’ve argued that 14,000 votes should be thrown out. The campaign submitted a revised version of the lawsuit days later that retracted many of its original allegations. A judge threw out the case, saying Trump’s lawyers presented the court “with strained legal arguments without merit and speculative accusations, unpaid in the operative complaint and unsupported by evidence.” An appeal of the case also failed.
  • Another federal lawsuit brought by Republicans sought to delay the deadline for ballot requests. The judge rejected it.
  • A third federal lawsuit sought to stop the Montgomery County Board of Elections from allowing voters to “cure” their ballots – a process that allows people to fix clerical errors on their ballots to make sure their votes count. Republicans abandoned the lawsuit and withdrew from the case.
  • The campaign sued in yet another federal case to stop Philadelphia County from counting votes without Republicans present. The judge dismissed the case after Trump’s lawyers said Republican election watchers were, in fact, present.
  • In another Montgomery County case, this one filed in a local court, Trump’s lawyers sought to stop the county from counting mail-in ballots. The lawsuit is still pending, but the lawyers withdrew from the case.
  • A lawsuit in Bucks County filed by Republican congressional candidate Kathy Barnette on Election Day made a technical challenge on the county’s method of organizing ballots before counting them. She withdrew the case two days later and lost the election.
  • The Trump campaign appealed that Bucks County case soon afterward, but a judge rejected it and pointed out in his ruling that fraud wasn’t an issue. 
  • In a state court, Republicans challenged an instruction from the Secretary of State’s office regarding provisional ballots. A state appellate court judge dismissed the request but ordered the secretary of state to segregate provisional ballots in case their validity becomes contested.
  • Local Republicans sought to stop Northampton County from revealing the identities of people whose ballots were canceled and lost the case.
  • A group of Pennsylvania Republicans lost at the state Supreme Court with a lawsuit trying to invalidate absentee voting after the voting period already ended, and trying to block the certification of election results.
  • Another group of Republicans filed a similar lawsuit and lost.
  • The Trump campaign filed a motion to intervene in a Supreme Court case brought by Republicans that centers on the deadline by which Pennsylvania officials are allowed to receive ballots. Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court ruled that officials could receive ballots until November 6 as long as they are postmarked by Election Day. Republicans appealed the decision to the high court, which was deadlocked at 4-4 because Justice Amy Coney Barrett did not participate, leaving the lower court’s ruling in place. The Supreme Court signaled it could hear the case again but has not yet granted the request to intervene.

Nevada – 4 losses

  • The Trump campaign filed a lawsuit requesting that ballots stop being counted in the state over concerns about signature-matching technology and election observers’ claims that they weren’t being allowed to watch ballots being processed closely enough. The Nevada Supreme Court denied the request.
  • The Trump campaign and the RNC filed a lawsuit in state court asking to stop ballot counting in Clark County – a heavily Democratic area – until GOP officials could observe the process. A district judge rejected the request on the grounds that the plaintiffs did not have evidence to back up their allegations. Republicans appealed the case to the Nevada Supreme Court, which said on November 5 that the campaign and Republican officials had reached a settlement that allowed expanded ballot observation. They later withdrew the case.
  • A group of Republicans dropped a lawsuit in Clark County challenging mail-in ballots, including those sent by members of the military.
  • The Trump campaign filed a different lawsuit in Carson City District Court alleging multiple irregularities that the campaign claimed, without providing specific evidence, would be enough to overturn the election results in Nevada and flip the state to Trump. It failed.

Georgia – 4 losses, one pending

Michigan – 5 losses

Arizona – 4 losses

  • The Trump campaign joined a lawsuit brought by two Republicans in Maricopa County claiming that a substantial number of GOP ballots were invalidated because voters used Sharpies to fill in their choices. There is no evidence that using Sharpies leads to issues with scanning ballots, and, in fact, officials have said using Sharpies is preferred. The Post also reported that the Maricopa County attorney’s office said no ballots were rejected and that if they are, voters have an opportunity to cast another one. A Republican-aligned group abandoned the legal fight after Maricopa County officials challenged the factual basis for the lawsuit, and the Trump campaign lost the fight soon afterward.
  • The Trump campaign filed a lawsuit in state court alleging that Maricopa County was improperly rejecting ballots cast by some voters. The lawsuit was dismissed after an audit found no problems with the votes.
  • Arizona’s Supreme Court unanimously rejected a case from the state GOP chair Kelli Ward, saying the facts she presented were incorrect and that she “fails to present any evidence of misconduct.”
  • Powell filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn election results as well, based on a conspiracy theory about voting machines used in the state. A judge dismissed the case.

Wisconsin – 6 losses, one pending

New Mexico – one pending

  • The Trump campaign sued the state over what it claims was the illegal use of ballot drop boxes after the state had already certified its results and sent them to the Electoral College.

Key cases and Supreme Court rulings before Election Day

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, the state Supreme Court ruled that election officials could receive mail-in ballots until November 6 as long as they are postmarked by Election Day. Republicans requested an immediate stay from the US Supreme Court that would have blocked the state Supreme Court’s ruling.

But the US Supreme Court was deadlocked at 4-4, leaving the lower court’s ruling in place. Justices Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel Alito voted to grant Republicans’ request, while Chief Justice John Roberts, and Justices Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan, and Sonia Sotomayor dissented.

Justice Amy Coney Barrett declined to participate in the case “because of the need for a prompt resolution of it and because she has not had time to fully review the parties’ filings,” the court said in a statement. However, Barrett has not recused herself, meaning she could cast a decisive fifth vote when the Supreme Court takes up the case again.

North Carolina

In a similar case brought by Republicans in North Carolina, the Supreme Court ruled that ballots received up to nine days after November 3 could be counted as long as they are postmarked by Election Day.

The decision came after the Trump campaign and Republicans asked in two separate cases for the high court to put back in place a June statute from the state’s Republican-controlled Legislature that would have allowed ballots to be counted only if they were received up to three days – not nine – after Election Day.

Five justices – Roberts, Kavanaugh, Breyer, Kagan, and Sotomayor – ruled against reinstating the statute. Gorsuch, Alito, and Thomas dissented, while Barrett did not participate in the North Carolina case.

Wisconsin

Republicans notched a victory in a case involving the deadline to receive ballots in Wisconsin. The US Supreme Court ruled against reviving an appeals court decision that would have allowed election officials to receive absentee ballots up to six days after Election Day.

The court’s five conservative justices – Roberts, Gorsuch, Kavanaugh, Thomas, and Alito – ruled against reviving the lower court’s ruling, while the three liberals – Breyer, Kagan, and Sotomayor – dissented.

The Wisconsin case made headlines because of Kavanaugh’s and Kagan’s dueling opinions.

Kavanaugh, a Trump-appointed justice who was confirmed to the high court in 2018, wrote in a concurring opinion that all ballots should be received by Election Day.

“Those States want to avoid the chaos and suspicions of impropriety that can ensue if thousands of absentee ballots flow in after election day and potentially flip the results of an election,” he wrote. “And those States also want to be able to definitively announce the results of the election on election night, or as soon as possible thereafter.”

Kagan fired back in a sharp dissent, taking issue with Kavanaugh’s assertion that the arrival of absentee ballots after Election Day could “flip” the results of the race.

“Justice Kavanaugh alleges that ‘suspicions of impropriety’ will result if ‘absentee ballots flow in after election day and potentially flip the results of an election,'” she wrote. “But there are no results to ‘flip’ until all valid votes are counted. And nothing could be more ‘suspicio[us]’ or ‘improp[er]’ than refusing to tally votes once the clock strikes 12 on election night. To suggest otherwise, especially in these fractious times, is to disserve the electoral process.”

Texas

A federal court in Texas and the state’s Supreme Court denied two Republican requests to throw out nearly 130,000 ballots that were cast via drive-thru polling sites in Harris County, one of Texas’ most heavily Democratic areas.

The Texas Supreme Court rejected a request from Republican candidates and activists to toss the ballots. US District Judge Andrew Hanen, appointed by President George W. Bush, reached the same conclusion and denied the second request from GOP candidates and a right-wing radio host.

Hanen ruled that the plaintiffs did not have the standing to sue and ask that ballots that were legally cast be discounted. However, he ordered the county to set aside the 127,000 ballots in case an appeals court disagreed with him and ultimately threw those votes out.

This article has been updated.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Trump and Republican officials have won zero out of at least 40 lawsuits they’ve filed since Election Day

donald trump debate
President Donald Trump.

  • President Donald Trump’s campaign and Republican officials have filed dozens of lawsuits since Election Day in an effort to contest the results of the 2020 election.
  • The campaign filed lawsuits and motions to intervene in cases in swing states Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.
  • They’ve notched zero victories, 36 cases where they’ve withdrawn or lost, and have four cases pending.
  • Scroll down for a list of lawsuits the Trump campaign and Republicans have filed and where they stand.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Faced with the prospect of losing to a man he spent months hammering as corrupt, doddering, and mentally deficient, President Donald Trump is going on offense, spreading lies and conspiracy theories about a “rigged” election marred by “major fraud” from Democrats.

He’s alternated between demanding that some states stop counting ballots, which he doesn’t have the power to do, and saying that others should keep counting, which they were doing anyway.

To that end, the Trump campaign, Republican allies, and Trump himself have mounted at least 40 legal challenges since Election Day.

They’ve won zero.

The lawsuits argue that states and counties have violated election laws, playing into Trump’s political strategy to discredit the results of the 2020 election that President-elect Joe Biden won.

Republicans have filed the lawsuits in local, state, and federal courts in Arizona, Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, and Pennsylvania – all states that Biden won. They have also filed direct appeals to the Supreme Court, all of which have also failed.

The Trump campaign initially had a single win, when a Pennsylvania judge ruled on November 12 that first-time voters were supposed to confirm their IDs with county boards of election by November 9, rather than November 12. The decision opened the door to disqualify the ballots of people who didn’t verify their IDs in time. But the state Supreme Court later overturned that decision.

That leaves Trump and other Republicans with at least 36 cases they have withdrawn or lost, and four that are still pending.

rudy giuliani
Attorney for the President, Rudy Giuliani, speaks about election lawsuits at a news conference in the parking lot of a landscaping company on November 7, 2020 in Philadelphia.

Here’s a list of the lawsuits and where they stand

Direct appeals to the Supreme Court – two losses, one pending

  • Several Republican politicians, led by Rep. Mike Kelly, asked the US Supreme Court to block the certification of Pennsylvania’s election results. The court turned down the case.
  • Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton sued Pennsylvania, Georgia, Michigan, and Wisconsin in the US Supreme Court seeking to overturn their election results. The Supreme Court rejected the case.
  • The Trump campaign asked the US Supreme Court to overturn three decisions from the Pennsylvania Supreme Court over various technical rules regarding absentee and mail-in ballots. The court hasn’t yet decided whether to hear the case.

Pennsylvania – 13 losses

  • The Trump campaign and the Republican National Committee filed a lawsuit asking a state appeals court to reject the Pennsylvania secretary of state’s announcement that registered voters had until November 12 to provide proof of identity for mail-in ballots. Republicans believe the deadline should be November 9. This is the one case that Trump won, before the state Supreme Court overturned the lower court decision.
  • In a wide-ranging federal lawsuit, the Trump campaign sued over alleged irregularities in the way ballots were counted throughout the state. They’ve argued that 14,000 votes should be thrown out. The campaign submitted a revised version of the lawsuit days later that retracted many of its original allegations. A judge threw out the case, saying Trump’s lawyers presented the court “with strained legal arguments without merit and speculative accusations, unpaid in the operative complaint and unsupported by evidence.” An appeal of the case also failed.
  • Another federal lawsuit brought by Republicans sought to delay the deadline for ballot requests. The judge rejected it.
  • A third federal lawsuit sought to stop the Montgomery County Board of Elections from allowing voters to “cure” their ballots – a process that allows people to fix clerical errors on their ballots to make sure their votes count. Republicans abandoned the lawsuit and withdrew from the case.
  • The campaign sued in yet another federal case to stop Philadelphia County from counting votes without Republicans present. The judge dismissed the case after Trump’s lawyers said Republican election watchers were, in fact, present.
  • In another Montgomery County case, this one filed in a local court, Trump’s lawyers sought to stop the county from counting mail-in ballots. The lawsuit is still pending, but the lawyers withdrew from the case.
  • A lawsuit in Bucks County filed by Republican congressional candidate Kathy Barnette on Election Day made a technical challenge on the county’s method of organizing ballots before counting them. She withdrew the case two days later and lost the election.
  • The Trump campaign appealed that Bucks County case soon afterward, but a judge rejected it and pointed out in his ruling that fraud wasn’t an issue. 
  • In a state court, Republicans challenged an instruction from the Secretary of State’s office regarding provisional ballots. A state appellate court judge dismissed the request but ordered the secretary of state to segregate provisional ballots in case their validity becomes contested.
  • Local Republicans sought to stop Northampton County from revealing the identities of people whose ballots were canceled and lost the case.
  • A group of Pennsylvania Republicans lost at the state Supreme Court with a lawsuit trying to invalidate absentee voting after the voting period already ended, and trying to block the certification of election results.
  • Another group of Republicans filed a similar lawsuit and lost.
  • The Trump campaign filed a motion to intervene in a Supreme Court case brought by Republicans that centers on the deadline by which Pennsylvania officials are allowed to receive ballots. Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court ruled that officials could receive ballots until November 6 as long as they are postmarked by Election Day. Republicans appealed the decision to the high court, which was deadlocked at 4-4 because Justice Amy Coney Barrett did not participate, leaving the lower court’s ruling in place. The Supreme Court signaled it could hear the case again but has not yet granted the request to intervene.

Nevada – 4 losses

  • The Trump campaign filed a lawsuit requesting that ballots stop being counted in the state over concerns about signature-matching technology and election observers’ claims that they weren’t being allowed to watch ballots being processed closely enough. The Nevada Supreme Court denied the request.
  • The Trump campaign and the RNC filed a lawsuit in state court asking to stop ballot counting in Clark County – a heavily Democratic area – until GOP officials could observe the process. A district judge rejected the request on the grounds that the plaintiffs did not have evidence to back up their allegations. Republicans appealed the case to the Nevada Supreme Court, which said on November 5 that the campaign and Republican officials had reached a settlement that allowed expanded ballot observation. They later withdrew the case.
  • A group of Republicans dropped a lawsuit in Clark County challenging mail-in ballots, including those sent by members of the military.
  • The Trump campaign filed a different lawsuit in Carson City District Court alleging multiple irregularities that the campaign claimed, without providing specific evidence, would be enough to overturn the election results in Nevada and flip the state to Trump. It failed.

Georgia – 4 losses

  • A judge in Chatham County denied the Trump campaign’s request to toss out 53 ballots that a GOP poll watcher said arrived after polls closed at 7 p.m. on November 3. The Washington Post reported that the poll watcher presented no evidence in court that the ballots came in late and that county officials testified that they were received in time.
  • Republican elector Lin Wood, whose attorney also represents the Trump campaign, sued to stop vote certification because. He argued that because the Georgia Secretary of State agreed to allow signature matching on ballots – a measure designed to prevent voter fraud – eight months before the election, his rights as an individual voter had been infringed upon. A state judge dismissed the case, saying the arguments have “no basis in fact and law.”
  • Wood filed another lawsuit in federal court and lost that one as well.
  • Sidney Powell, who was kicked off of Trump’s legal team after spreading numerous conspiracy theories about election fraud, filed a federal lawsuit in Georgia alleging widespread election fraud. A federal judge quickly dismissed the case, calling it “extraordinary” that the lawsuit sought to disqualify the votes of millions of voters.

Michigan – 5 losses

Arizona – 4 losses

  • The Trump campaign joined a lawsuit brought by two Republicans in Maricopa County claiming that a substantial number of GOP ballots were invalidated because voters used Sharpies to fill in their choices. There is no evidence that using Sharpies leads to issues with scanning ballots, and, in fact, officials have said using Sharpies is preferred. The Post also reported that the Maricopa County attorney’s office said no ballots were rejected and that if they are, voters have an opportunity to cast another one. A Republican-aligned group abandoned the legal fight after Maricopa County officials challenged the factual basis for the lawsuit, and the Trump campaign lost the fight soon afterward.
  • The Trump campaign filed a lawsuit in state court alleging that Maricopa County was improperly rejecting ballots cast by some voters. The lawsuit was dismissed after an audit found no problems with the votes.
  • Arizona’s Supreme Court unanimously rejected a case from the state GOP chair Kelli Ward, saying the facts she presented were incorrect and that she “fails to present any evidence of misconduct.”
  • Powell filed a lawsuit seeking to overturn election results as well, based on a conspiracy theory about voting machines used in the state. A judge dismissed the case.

Wisconsin – 4 losses, 2 pending

New Mexico – one pending

  • The campaign sued the state over what it claims was the illegal use of ballot drop boxes after the state had already certified its results and sent them to the Electoral College.

Key cases and Supreme Court rulings before Election Day

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, the state Supreme Court ruled that election officials could receive mail-in ballots until November 6 as long as they are postmarked by Election Day. Republicans requested an immediate stay from the US Supreme Court that would have blocked the state Supreme Court’s ruling.

But the US Supreme Court was deadlocked at 4-4, leaving the lower court’s ruling in place. Justices Neil Gorsuch, Brett Kavanaugh, Clarence Thomas, and Samuel Alito voted to grant Republicans’ request, while Chief Justice John Roberts, and Justices Stephen Breyer, Elena Kagan, and Sonia Sotomayor dissented.

Justice Amy Coney Barrett declined to participate in the case “because of the need for a prompt resolution of it and because she has not had time to fully review the parties’ filings,” the court said in a statement. However, Barrett has not recused herself, meaning she could cast a decisive fifth vote when the Supreme Court takes up the case again.

North Carolina

In a similar case brought by Republicans in North Carolina, the Supreme Court ruled that ballots received up to nine days after November 3 could be counted as long as they are postmarked by Election Day.

The decision came after the Trump campaign and Republicans asked in two separate cases for the high court to put back in place a June statute from the state’s Republican-controlled Legislature that would have allowed ballots to be counted only if they were received up to three days – not nine – after Election Day.

Five justices – Roberts, Kavanaugh, Breyer, Kagan, and Sotomayor – ruled against reinstating the statute. Gorsuch, Alito, and Thomas dissented, while Barrett did not participate in the North Carolina case.

Wisconsin

Republicans notched a victory in a case involving the deadline to receive ballots in Wisconsin. The US Supreme Court ruled against reviving an appeals court decision that would have allowed election officials to receive absentee ballots up to six days after Election Day.

The court’s five conservative justices – Roberts, Gorsuch, Kavanaugh, Thomas, and Alito – ruled against reviving the lower court’s ruling, while the three liberals – Breyer, Kagan, and Sotomayor – dissented.

The Wisconsin case made headlines because of Kavanaugh’s and Kagan’s dueling opinions.

Kavanaugh, a Trump-appointed justice who was confirmed to the high court in 2018, wrote in a concurring opinion that all ballots should be received by Election Day.

“Those States want to avoid the chaos and suspicions of impropriety that can ensue if thousands of absentee ballots flow in after election day and potentially flip the results of an election,” he wrote. “And those States also want to be able to definitively announce the results of the election on election night, or as soon as possible thereafter.”

Kagan fired back in a sharp dissent, taking issue with Kavanaugh’s assertion that the arrival of absentee ballots after Election Day could “flip” the results of the race.

“Justice Kavanaugh alleges that ‘suspicions of impropriety’ will result if ‘absentee ballots flow in after election day and potentially flip the results of an election,'” she wrote. “But there are no results to ‘flip’ until all valid votes are counted. And nothing could be more ‘suspicio[us]’ or ‘improp[er]’ than refusing to tally votes once the clock strikes 12 on election night. To suggest otherwise, especially in these fractious times, is to disserve the electoral process.”

Texas

A federal court in Texas and the state’s Supreme Court denied two Republican requests to throw out nearly 130,000 ballots that were cast via drive-thru polling sites in Harris County, one of Texas’ most heavily Democratic areas.

The Texas Supreme Court rejected a request from Republican candidates and activists to toss the ballots. US District Judge Andrew Hanen, appointed by President George W. Bush, reached the same conclusion and denied the second request from GOP candidates and a right-wing radio host.

Hanen ruled that the plaintiffs did not have the standing to sue and ask that ballots that were legally cast be discounted. However, he ordered the county to set aside the 127,000 ballots in case an appeals court disagreed with him and ultimately threw those votes out.

This article has been updated.

Read the original article on Business Insider

After Biden’s win in Georgia, the state’s GOP House Speaker wants to strip voters from choosing the Secretary of State

David Ralston Georgia
Georgia House Speaker David Ralston.

  • Georgia House Speaker David Ralston on Thursday called for a constitutional amendment to allow state legislators to choose the Secretary of State, which would take away the responsibility from voters.
  • The proposal is seen as a response to lingering Republican dissatisfaction with Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger and President-elect Joe Biden’s statewide victory in Georgia.
  • Voters would have to approve the constitutional amendment for the drastic change to be made.
  • “In a clear power grab, Ralston and the Trump campaign want to give the General Assembly the power to select winners of elections and violate the will of the people,” Deputy Secretary of State Jordan Fuchs said in a statement.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Georgia House Speaker David Ralston on Thursday called for a constitutional amendment to allow state legislators to choose the Secretary of State – thereby taking away the responsibility from voters – in response to continued Republican unrest over President-elect Joe Biden’s statewide victory over President Donald Trump in the November election.

Ralston, a Republican, said that legislators in the GOP-controlled Georgia General Assembly, which includes the state House of Representatives and Senate, would select the Secretary of State, who runs statewide elections, upon approval of the amendment.

However, voters would have to approve the constitutional amendment.

After Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a fellow Republican, declined to participate in a state Senate hearing on the election, Ralston said that he was “shocked” and “disappointed” by the move, according to Atlanta’s NBC affiliate 11 Alive.

“As the state’s chief elections official, it is incumbent on the Secretary of State to be responsive to the People’s House and faithfully perform his or her duties in accordance with the laws passed by the General Assembly,” he said a press briefing.

Expressing his support for the legislature picking the secretary of state, he added: “I think it’s the only way to right this ship. I don’t do this lightly. I don’t do this disrespectfully to the incumbent who I have personal regard for, but I do it because we have a job to do as members of the House and members of the Senate.”

The legislature chooses the secretary of state in only three states – Maine, New Hampshire, and Tennessee.

Raffensperger has been the target of attacks from President Donald Trump and party members who have pushed debunked narratives of widespread fraud in the election, allegations that Raffensperger has consistently denied.

The secretary of state’s office forcefully replied to the intraparty legislative proposal.

“In a clear power grab, Ralston and the Trump campaign want to give the General Assembly the power to select winners of elections and violate the will of the people,” Deputy Secretary of State Jordan Fuchs said in a statement.

In an interview with Business Insider’s Grace Panetta, Raffensperger defended the integrity of Georgia’s results, calling it “the most secure election ever.”

“Every time these rumors come up, it’s like the rumor whack-a-mole, we go ahead and we address it, and we have a transparent process and we have press releases on a daily basis … but also there’s been a lot of misinformation and honestly, disinformation or outright lying,” he said of the rampant election misinformation pushed by Trump and many of his allies.

Biden won Georgia and its 16 electoral votes by a little over 12,000 votes out of nearly 5 million votes cast statewide, the first Democratic presidential victory in the Southern state since 1992.

On December 7, the state recertified Biden’s win after a recount was completed last week.

Read the original article on Business Insider