Los Angeles City Council voted in favor of anti-homelessness ordinance that would impact roughly 40,000 unhoused Angelenos

california homelessness los angeles
Echo Park Lake Thursday, March 25, 2021 in los Angeles, CA.

  • The LA City Council passed an ordinance that would prohibit homeless encampments in some areas of the city.
  • The measure restricts “sitting, lying, or sleeping or storing, using, maintaining, or placing personal property in the public right-of-way.”
  • The measure passed Wednesday in a 13-2 vote, but LA Mayor Garcetti still has the power to veto it.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Los Angeles City Council voted on Wednesday in favor of an ordinance that would prohibit homeless encampments in some areas of the city.

The measure, which would replace a similar version known as Municipal Code 41.18, was co-authored by city council members Paul Krekorian and Mark Ridley-Thomas. It would prohibit “sitting, lying, or sleeping or storing, using, maintaining, or placing personal property in the public right-of-way.”

There are approximately 40,000 unhoused Angelenos who would be impacted by the ordinance, according to the Associated Press.

Members of the LA City Council first voted on the measure on July 1, approving it in a 13-2 vote. However, a second vote was required because it did not pass unanimously the first time around.

The second vote also had 13 in favor and two against. Councilmembers Nithya Raman and Mike Bonin both voted against the ordinance in the meeting.

Raman posted a thread on Twitter detailing her concerns, saying that “real solutions – housing, outreach, and services – take time and money.”

“None of it is easy to do,” the councilwoman wrote. “But that’s exactly what we *need* to be doing, not enacting harmful and illusory ‘quick fixes.'”

During the meeting, Bonin said pointed to contrasts between “housing” and “sheltering.”

“We need a right to housing, not a mandate to shelter,” Bonin said. “People want housing. They don’t want warehousing, they don’t want shelter, they want housing.”

Earlier this month, Krekorian, one of the councilmembers who proposed the ordinance, defended the ordinance to Spectrum News, saying it “does not make homelessness illegal,” “criminalize homelessness,” nor does it “make any conduct that is fundamental to being human illegal”

“What it does do is it guarantees that we will reestablish passable sidewalks,” Krekorian said on July 1. “It protects the users of our public infrastructure and the unhoused residents of our city from being put into positions of interaction with automobiles, around loading docks, driveways, and so forth. It guarantees access to our fire hydrants, entrances to buildings.”

Some Los Angeles residents, however, find the ordinance to be unjust. Knock LA, an independent journalism platform, captured a few of those disapproving statements while covering the city council meeting.

“You’re creating a problem because you’re going to be arresting a lot more homeless people,” a resident told Spectrum News at the Right to Rest Without Arrest Rally, which took place outside of Los Angeles City Hall prior to the Wednesday meeting.

“The idea is they’re trying to keep the homeless people moving all the time,” the resident continued. “That’s impossible. They get tired. They’re carrying their stuff. They need places to live and stay, and they don’t have it.”

The ordinance is not law, yet. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti still has the authority to veto the measure. Representatives for Garcetti did not immediately return Insider’s request for comment.

Watch the meeting here:

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Mayor Garcetti announces that Los Angeles will require city employees to show proof of vaccination or test weekly

eric garcetti
Mayor Eric Garcetti addresses a news conference held at the launch of mass COVID-19 vaccination site at Dodger Stadium in Los Angeles, California, U.S., January 15, 2021.

  • Los Angeles is following New York in requiring proof of vaccination for city employees.
  • Mayor Garcetti said that in the last month in Los Angeles COVID-19 cases have soared 20-fold.
  • Workers who do not show proof of vaccination will be required to test negative for COVID-19 weekly.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and City Council President Nury Martinez announced on Tuesday that city employees will soon need to either submit proof of vaccination or produce a negative COVID-19 test weekly.

The announcement follows in line with several federal, state, and city initiatives where officials have started to implement vaccine mandates for workers or have workers take regular tests.

“The fourth wave is here, and the choice for Angelenos couldn’t be clearer – get vaccinated or get COVID-19,” Mayor Eric Garcetti said in a press release.

“This urgent need means that if you’re a City employee, we’re now going to require you to either show that you’re vaccinated or take a weekly test, and we’re committed to pursuing a full vaccine mandate. I urge employers across Los Angeles to follow this example,” Garcetti added.

“Angelenos have stayed inside for over a year to protect themselves and others. I think it’s safe to say that we’re getting tired of putting our lives on hold to protect people who don’t want to protect themselves and get vaccinated,” Council President Martinez said in the release. “In order for us, as leaders, to ask Angelenos to get vaccinated, we must set an example as the largest employer in the City of Los Angeles. This is us doing our part.”

The release added that in the last month in Los Angeles COVID-19 cases have soared 20-fold.

With no official date set, city employees will soon be required to show their HR department their proof of vaccination, or test negative for COVID-19 on a weekly basis, in order to maintain their employment.

Once the vaccines receive full approval by the FDA, the release says, “the Mayor and City Council will aggressively pursue a vaccine mandate for all City workers.”

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The CDC now recommends masks for vaccinated people – but at least 6 major cities had already told residents to mask up again

la mask requirement
Lilian Zhu, 17, works at her laptop inside Charlie’s Coffee House in South Pasadena, California, on July 18, 2021.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended on Tuesday that vaccinated people wear masks in public indoor settings – a change from the previous guidelines, which suggested vaccinated people didn’t need masks. The new rules apply to areas of the country with high rates of coronavirus transmission, as well as K-12 schools, the CDC said.

Some vaccinated Americans, though, have already been told to mask up again.

Amid a rise in COVID-19 cases fueled by the Delta variant, at least six cities have issued new mask guidance in the last few weeks. Los Angeles and St. Louis have instated official mask mandates for all residents, while New Orleans, Philadelphia, San Francisco, and Seattle have recommended masks.

Some cities have also reissued mask mandates for specific indoor settings. Clark County, Nevada – which includes Las Vegas – began requiring masks in court facilities last week. Public schools in Atlanta, Chicago, and New York City will require students and staff to wear masks this school year, regardless of their vaccination status. And in Hawaii, the government is waiting until more residents are vaccinated before lifting its indoor mask mandate.

Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told Fox News that these local mask requirements are “quite understandable” given Delta’s prevalence in the US.

CDC Director Rochelle Walensky said on Tuesday that vaccinated people infected with Delta may be contagious and spread the virus to others. Data on previous variants indicated that vaccinated people were less likely to transmit the virus than unvaccinated people.

At least 6 cities have issued new mask guidance

New Orleans mask
An employee at Turtle Bay, a bar in the French Quarter, wears a mask as he takes the names and contact information of people walking in on May 16, 2020.

The San Francisco Bay Area was among the first places to buck the no-mask trend in July. Several Bay Area counties, including San Francisco County, began recommending masks for all people – vaccinated or not – in indoor spaces like theaters, grocery stores, and retail stores starting July 16. In nearby San Mateo County, masks are now required, even for fully vaccinated people, inside county offices, clinics, and public facilities.

Los Angeles County also reinstated its indoor mask mandate on July 18 following a sharp uptick in cases. Average daily cases more than doubled there in the first two weeks of July, then tripled by the third week.

In New Orleans, health officials issued a “mask advisory” instead of a mandate. The city’s “inadequate vaccination rate” was part of the reason for that rule, they said. New Orleans has the second-highest vaccination rate in Louisiana – around 57% of residents have received at least one dose – but cases have still increased 10-fold there since the start of July.

two students sitting at their desks, wearing masks
Students wearing masks listen to their teacher during third grade summer school in Los Angeles, June 23, 2021.

On Thursday, Philadelphia also “strongly recommended” that all residents wear masks inside public places. James Garrow, a spokesperson for the city’s health department, told The Philadelphia Inquirer that officials were concerned about an uptick in COVID-19 hospitalizations among the city’s unvaccinated children.

King County, Washington, which includes Seattle, followed suit with a similar recommendation on Friday. Health officials now advise that all residents ages 5 and up wear masks in indoor public settings – despite the fact that King County is one of the most vaccinated counties in the US. (Around 72% of residents have received at least one dose.)

“This extra layer of protection will help us all stay safer, including those who are unvaccinated, such as the 300,000 children in King County who aren’t able to get vaccinated yet, and the many thousands of people who have immune systems that are weakened or suppressed,” the county said in a statement.

St. Louis County, Missouri, took a firmer stance on Monday by requiring vaccinated people ages 5 and older wear masks on public transportation and in all indoor public spaces. The mandate doesn’t apply to people eating or drinking in restaurants or bars, though.

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Rep. Maxine Waters calls for federal probe into alleged ‘Executioners’ gang in Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department

maxine waters
House Financial Services Committee Chairwoman Maxine Waters, takes her mask off to speak during a signing ceremony for the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act, H.R. 266, after it passed the House on Capitol Hill, Thursday, April 23, 2020, in Washington.

  • Rep. Maxine Waters is asking for a federal probe into the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department.
  • Waters called on Attorney General Merrick Garland to investigate the alleged “Executioners” gang.
  • The group was accused of celebrating police shootings by a whistleblower within the station.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Rep. Maxine Waters on Tuesday called for Attorney General Merrick Garland and Assistant Attorney General Kirsten Clarke to conduct a federal probe into the alleged “Executioners” gang within the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department.

According to the Los Angeles Times and whistleblower Deputy Austreberto “Art” Gonzalez, the “Executioners” are a group within the Compton station accused of having matching, offensive tattoos and celebrating police shootings.

A spokesperson for the LASD claimed the letter was made up of “unproven allegations which she is portraying as facts.”

The alleged groups were first reported on by the Los Angeles Times in 2018, after multiple deputies within the Compton station testified to having identifying tattoos, including one who had a tattoo of a skull with a rifle and military helmet, engulfed in flames.

“I ask that the DOJ take two immediate actions: launch an independent investigation into the existence of the ‘Executioners,’ both at the LASD Compton station and within the greater LASD community, and launch a pattern or practice investigation into the Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department for potential civil rights and constitutional violations,” Waters wrote in the letter.

Members of the alleged “Executioners” were also involved in the police killing of 18-year-old Andres Guardado, according to the testimony of a whistleblower deputy at the Compton station. Guardado was shot in the back five times by LASD deputies in an alleyway following a foot chase. The shooting was ruled a homicide by a Los Angeles County inquest.

“The gang allegedly sets illegal arrest quotas, threatens and harasses fellow deputies, and holds parties after shootings, called ‘998 parties,’ which are in part a celebration that a new deputy will be inked by the gang,” said Rep. Waters, citing Gonzalez’s whistleblower testimony.

“The killing of Andres Guardado is not the only example of the LASD’s excessive and brutal tactics in the Los Angeles community. On August 31, 2020, LASD deputies fatally shot Dijon Kizzee in South Los Angeles,” Rep. Waters added.

The LASD spokesperson pushed back on the assertion: “Additionally, the uses of deadly force Congresswoman Waters cites have been thoroughly investigated and turned over to the Los Angeles County District Attorney, Justice System Integrity Division for further investigation and review, along with monitoring by The California Office of the Attorney General and The Federal Bureau of Investigation.”

Rep. Waters’ letter also called for a broader focus on the “pattern of police associating with militant groups nationwide.”

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Remembering Kid Yamaka, the telegenic star and proudly Jewish boxer

One boxer is seen aiming a swing at another boxer, who is seen blocking his face.
Zachary Wohlman punches Alonso Loeza during a Welterweights fight at Staples Center on November 10, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Loeza would win the fight.

  • Zachary Wohlman, a boxer known as Kid Yamaka, died in February at 32.
  • Wohlman survived a nightmarish childhood in Los Angeles to become a promising welterweight and telegenic media star.
  • The writer Alex Halperin explores Wohlman’s legacy as a celebrated Jewish athlete, and what Wohlman meant to some of those who knew him best.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Late in February, mourners gathered at Zuma Beach in Malibu to remember Zachary Wohlman, a boxer who had recently died at 32. In the billion dollar sunshine, they stood around a wreath of white orchids, the flowers Wohlman tended when he wasn’t bloodying his opponents.

Wohlman’s movie star good looks had survived a broken jaw, a textbook pugilist’s nose, and multiple other facial traumas. One eulogist, a longtime sparring partner, boasted about kicking Kid Yamaka’s ass.

Some of the bereaved wore jackets embroidered with Wohlman’s tag line, “All class.” His young widow gave out t-shirts for Kid Yamaka’s “retirement party.” Some grievers wore wetsuits. Others went shirtless. They embraced and stood close, mostly wearing masks.

Wohlman had survived a nightmarish childhood in the Valley to become a promising welterweight and telegenic media star. He had hoped to fight for a world championship.

However realistic the dream, his ongoing struggles with addiction, made it less so. “I’ll just be honest,” he said in the Emmy-nominated docu-series, “Why We Fight.” “I have a problem with opiates.” Yet for a time he was able to overcome his illness to express himself as a fighter and as a man with an enviable capacity for love and empathy. “There’s nothing more therapeutic than being of service to somebody,” Wohlman had said.

As one mourner said: “He often helped me when I should have been helping him.”

“If you make a living getting hit in the face, something went wrong,” Wohlman said in a short film directed by Matt Ogens. But keep listening and unarmed combat sounds less like a job and more like a calling, the purest distillation of the human condition. Boxers say you don’t know someone until you fight them, and maybe they’re right.

Jews have a special reverence for our tribe’s great athletes, perhaps because there are so few of them. Wohlman wasn’t observant, but he cared about his heritage. He got Bar Mitzvahed at 20 and had an attachment to Jewish stars, whether diamond encrusted or massive and tattooed across his belly – “FAITH”.

A magazine cover has an illustration of a soldier in boxing gloves under the title "The Ring"
The March 1943 cover of Ring Magazine with an illustration of boxer Barney Ross.

He was conscious of himself as heir to an endangered tradition of Jewish boxers. In the first half of the 20th century, when big bouts resonated far beyond the ring and Jews had a much more tenuous position in American life, quite a few found glory in the ring. In 1933, Max Baer wore Star of David trunks when he defeated Hitler’s favorite fighter and former heavyweight champion, Max Schmelling, at Yankee Stadium. (Baer’s victory led to an affair with Greta Garbo. Schmelling later defeated Joe Louis and then lost to him in a 1938 title fight dubbed the “battle of the century.”)

One of the most celebrated Jewish fighters was Barney Ross, a tough Chicago kid, the son of a murdered rabbi, who held world championships in three weight classes, including welterweight. Later, Ross enlisted in the Marines and earned a Silver Star for valor fighting Japanese soldiers at Guadalcanal. While recovering from his wounds, Ross became addicted to morphine. There’s a 1957 movie about him called “Monkey on My Back.”

Ogens’ film juxtaposes Wohlman wrapping his hands for the ring with wrapping tefillin. With the phylacteries, a rabbi tells him, “Your arms become instruments not of destruction but of God.” Wohlman shadow boxes across the old city of Jerusalem, a Rocky sequel that never got made.

A more memorable sequence, to my mind a more Jewish one, comes in the first episode of the docu-series “Why We Fight.” Wohlman travels to Tijuana, for an easy fight to juice his won/loss record and with that his prospects for a higher profile bout back home.

Wohlman scores a first round TKO against a tomato can named Roman Mendez. After the fight, he visits Mendez’ barrio to meet the boxer’s family and see the pig Mendez buys with his prize money. Wohlman meets another fighter, a candy hawker by day, and encourages him to train harder, and to be faithful to his wife.

Two men wearing grey suits stand side by side, as one pumps his fist
Zachary Wohlman (left) and Freddie Roach, the legendary Hall of Fame trainer, attend Smash Global II in 2016 in Los Angeles.

A later episode distills the grim economics of bloodsport even more starkly. In Cambodia, Wohlman meets a 10-year old prize-fighter and his trainer/promoter, the self-described “Don King of Cambodia,” who both cares for and profits from pre-pubescent fighters. “I want [the 10-year old] to be wealthy and whatever his version of successful is,” Wohlman said. “But I don’t think what I hope he’ll become and the reality will meet.”

Wohlman didn’t just perform concern on camera. For the last two years of his life, he directed Ring of Hope, a boxing program for at-risk kids in Dallas. He’d hoped to open a branch in L.A., hinting at a life he could have led once his dreams of glory subsided.

Instead the people who loved him gathered on the beach to say goodbye. After the tributes, the singing and the crying, two guys in wetsuits bore the wreath out to sea. As the waves enveloped it, the crowd applauded.

“High-speed miserable chess”

I first heard of Wohlmann a few years ago from my friend Vanessa Adriance, a corporate litigator who became one of his closest friends. A serious amateur jock, Adriance had been cardio boxing for a couple years at an L.A. gym when he showed up.

Wohlman introduced himself as an acolyte of Freddie Roach, a legendary Hall of Fame trainer whose gym, Wild Card Boxing, is on the second floor of a Hollywood strip mall. Wohlman began to teach real boxing, how to throw a punch, how to dodge one, not anything Adriance had to worry about when she was just getting sweaty whaling on a bag.

Adriance found Wohlman “magnetic” and, with her marriage falling apart, she was open to new experiences. She and another woman decided they wanted to box each other. Wohlman wasn’t interested in supervising them, but he offered to spar with Adriance. He wouldn’t knock her out, but he’d punch her and she could punch back.

Adriance started going to every class he taught, pestering him for months until he told her to get a mouth guard at the Sports Authority. He found some dusty headgear lying around the gym and rubbed her face with vaseline – “greased” her – to reduce the damage from his punches.

Two people wearing casual exercise clothing are seen sparring in a boxing ring.
Vanessa Adriance (left) sparring with Zachary Wohlman.

“It doesn’t feel good to get punched of course,” Adriance said of that first day of sparring but the pain didn’t overwhelm her. “What I remember is being disoriented.” It felt like she was underwater and didn’t know which way was up. For some people, Wohlman said, throwing the first punch is harder. Not for my friend. “I don’t know what that says about me,” she said. She thinks she landed a sloppy jab or two.

She also found it intellectually engaging, like “high-speed miserable chess,” litigation in the raw. As she describes it, Wohlman indulged her, like a father driving with a toddler on his lap. But she refused to let go of the wheel. After three rounds she felt overwhelmed by the adrenaline rush, “Something about hard sparring cleanses your brain,” she said “It will rinse you clean or it will break you emotionally, whatever dam is holding it together.”

As she got to know Wohlman, she learned his story. (Wohlman’s widow didn’t respond to interview requests for this story.) His mother, he has said in interviews, changed the locks on him when he was 15 and he went to live with his father. They committed crimes and did meth together, he has said, until a police raid one morning. Wohlmann flushed money and drugs down the toilet and the cops told him his father was going to prison.

When Wohlman got fired from the gym, she followed him to the hallowed and intimidating confines of Wild Card. She felt the pull of the gym’s “weird, fast intimacy.” People whose names she didn’t know would wipe up her blood or reach into her mouth to pull out her guard. It seems she’s spoken about little else since.

Wohlman won the Los Angeles Golden Gloves in 2010 and then went pro, stringing together a professional record of 10-3-2 according to the site BoxRec. No brawler, he had an old-school fighting style and cared about technique. “He was a lot tougher and meaner and angrier than his boxing style almost allowed him to be,” Javier Calderon, a longtime sparring partner said. “He was willing to take a shot to give a shot.”

Calderon, who describes himself as “a gainfully unemployed artist,” sparred with and mentored Wohlman for about 12 years. “I beat his ass until he got better.” Wohlman lacked a “concussive” punch but he was accurate. Calderon thinks Wohlman may have been responsible for tearing his retina, an injury that needed surgery. “His jab was working beautifully and digging into my eyeballs”

A man is seen listing his shirt to reveal his chest tattoos
The boxer Kid Yamaka attends SKEE Live at The Conga Room at L.A. Live on November 12, 2013 in Los Angeles, California.

“One of his love languages was sparring,” said Eli Cobillas, who knew Wohlman in Dallas. He had a “slick, crafty” style and liked to put on soul or jazz before he started punching.

Eric Brown, a celebrated trainer who named Wohlman Kid Yamaka, said Wohlman liked to humiliate his opponents by standing right in front of them while somehow remaining untouchable.

Calderon is a tee-totaller who says he was never around Wohlman when he was high. Rather he emphasized Wohlman’s drive to improve himself. “I knew that even when things were going good, it’s a balancing act, a tightrope walk,” Calderon said. “There were times when he faltered and faltered hard.”

In December Wohlman came back to California and went to a rehab facility in the desert east of LA. It was the first time he was really sober since he was 19, he told Adriance, our mutual friend. In rehab he learned to play chess, which reminded him of slow-motion boxing.

On January 29 he posted a picture of a 60-days sober key chain on Instagram.

Adriance last spoke to Wohlman two weeks later, on the Friday before Valentine’s Day. He said he was coming out of a meeting with someone he’d met in rehab.

He died the next day. His body turned up at a gas station bathroom.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Get an early look inside Apple’s newest store that’s opening in an iconic theater after a meticulous 3-year renovation effort

An evening street view of the Tower Theater Apple Store

Apple offered an early look at its newest retail store location at the historic Tower Theater in downtown Los Angeles before it opens to the public on Thursday.

The project was first announced almost three years ago, and the renovation involved manually removing layers of paint and delicately restoring architectural features that are nearly a century old.

“At every corner, Los Angeles bursts with creativity across the arts, music, and entertainment, and we are thrilled to build on our relationship with this special city,” Apple’s senior vice president of Retail + People, Deirdre O’Brien said in a statement. “Apple Tower Theatre honors the rich history and legacy of this entertainment capital.”

First opened in 1927, the Tower Theater was the first to offer such modern features as motion pictures with sound, and “manufactured weather,” also known as air conditioning.

Archival and current views of the Tower Theater Apple Store

Renowned motion-picture theater architect S. Charles Lee designed the space, including several cinematic and classically inspired flourishes.

The proscenium at the Tower Theater Apple Store

The theater closed in 1988 and was largely unused apart from serving as a set for films like Coyote Ugly and The Gangster Squad.

An exterior view of the Tower Theater Apple Store

Source: Los Angeles Theatres

The theater’s original seats were removed for one production years ago, and now the main floor is home to Apple’s latest gadgets.

The main floor of the Tower Theater Apple Store

Source: AmericanTheatre.org

The design team used techniques like laser modeling and forensic paint analysis to document and restore every inch of the building.

A worker restoring an architectural feature for the Tower Theater Apple Store

Each pane of stained glass and every crystal of the chandelier was individually removed and cleaned before being reassembled.

A stained glass window and a chandelier at the Tower Theater Apple Store

A presentation screen in the event area is reminiscent of the theater’s original function…

The event area at the Tower Theater Apple Store

…and the upper balcony now serves as a Genius Bar for personalized help.

A view of the genius bar area at the Tower Theater Apple Store

Apple declined to share the total cost of the project, but several other theater renovations easily topped $30 million.

The grand staircase in the lobby of the Tower Theater Apple Store

The store opens to customers at 10am on Thursday, June 24.

Retail workers on the sales floor at the Tower Theater Apple Store
Read the original article on Business Insider

Videos show a herd of cows stampeding through Los Angeles as people try to lasso them after they broke free from a nearby slaughterhouse

A cow resting on hay. Cattle embryos have been found to be securities in the past.
Even cattle embryos have been found to be securities.

  • 40 cows raced through Pico Rivera streets after they escaped from a nearby slaughterhouse.
  • One cow was shot, while another trampled a Los Angeles resident.
  • Several residents captured the scene on video as police attempted to wrangle the wily cows.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

40 cows raced through a Los Angeles neighborhood on Tuesday night.

One cow trampled a Pico Rivera resident, sending him to the hospital, NBC News reported. Another cow was shot and killed by a Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department (LASD) deputy after it charged a family of four, including a baby, according to KABC.

Many residents attempted to capture the stray cows on foot, video footage shows, but LASD officers quickly took over, bringing in lassos and barricading the cows into a cul-de-sac.

A crowd developed and captured the scene as it unfolded on video. One clip shows a cow bucking as a man tries to lasso it. The videos show the cows running through the neighborhood, feeding on nearby gardens and busting down mailboxes and fences.

The cows had escaped from a nearby slaughterhouse after a gate was left unlocked, NBC Los Angeles reported. The herd appeared on Beverly Road and Durfee Avenue in Pico Rivera around 8:30 pm. At the time the LASD warned residents to stay away from the scene.

It took several hours for the LASD to wrangle the herd of cows into a trailer. 38 cows were recaptured within two hours, while one cow evaded police until after 11 pm, ABC News reported.

It’s not the first time a herd of cows has caused a stir. Earlier this year, over 65 cows escaped from a farm in Indiana and stopped highway traffic as they barreled down the roads. This time last year, about 200 goats raced through San Jose, California.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Get an early look inside Apple’s newest store that’s opening in an iconic theater after a meticulous 2-year renovation effort

An evening street view of the Tower Theater Apple Store
  • Apple is opening a new retail store in downtown Los Angeles on Thursday.
  • The location is an historic theater the iPhone maker converted over a two-year period.
  • The company shared an early look of the space that will greet customers when doors open.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Apple offered an early look at its newest retail store location at the historic Tower Theater in downtown Los Angeles before it opens to the public on Thursday.

The project was first announced almost two years ago, and the renovation involved manually removing layers of paint and delicately restoring architectural features that are nearly a century old.

“At every corner, Los Angeles bursts with creativity across the arts, music, and entertainment, and we are thrilled to build on our relationship with this special city,” Apple’s senior vice president of Retail + People, Deirdre O’Brien said in a statement. “Apple Tower Theatre honors the rich history and legacy of this entertainment capital.”

First opened in 1927, the Tower Theater was the first to offer such modern features as motion pictures with sound, and “manufactured weather,” also known as air conditioning.

Archival and current views of the Tower Theater Apple Store

Renowned motion-picture theater architect S. Charles Lee designed the space, including several cinematic and classically inspired flourishes.

The proscenium at the Tower Theater Apple Store

The theater closed in 1988 and was largely unused apart from serving as a set for films like Coyote Ugly and The Gangster Squad.

An exterior view of the Tower Theater Apple Store

Source: Los Angeles Theatres

The theater’s original seats were removed for one production years ago, and now the main floor is home to Apple’s latest gadgets.

The main floor of the Tower Theater Apple Store

Source: AmericanTheatre.org

The design team used techniques like laser modeling and forensic paint analysis to document and restore every inch of the building.

A worker restoring an architectural feature for the Tower Theater Apple Store

Each pane of stained glass and every crystal of the chandelier was individually removed and cleaned before being reassembled.

A stained glass window and a chandelier at the Tower Theater Apple Store

A presentation screen in the event area is reminiscent of the theater’s original function…

The event area at the Tower Theater Apple Store

…and the upper balcony now serves as a Genius Bar for personalized help.

A view of the genius bar area at the Tower Theater Apple Store

Apple declined to share the total cost of the project, but several other theater renovations easily topped $30 million.

The grand staircase in the lobby of the Tower Theater Apple Store

The store opens to customers at 10am on Thursday, June 24.

Retail workers on the sales floor at the Tower Theater Apple Store
Read the original article on Business Insider

I needed more than my second Moderna shot to be ready for this OnlyFans orgy

A woman dressed in black is seen surrounded by scantily clad women dressed in pink négligée.
Alina Ratuska surrounded by performers dressed in their kinky bunny looks.

  • The Kinky Rabbit Club has emerged as one of L.A’s most exclusive sex parties as Hot Vax Summer roars to a start.
  • The club’s founder partners with sex workers who post exclusive content from the party on their OnlyFans accounts.
  • Journalist Heather Hauswirth donned a green and gold speckled catsuit to see what it was like.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A crowd of 30- and 40-somethings, mostly semi-nude women, hungrily prowled about the six-million dollar Hollywood Hills mansion dressed in “disco kink.” The theme, Studio 69, was an homage to the legendary 70s playground Studio 54.

I had just watched a buff, brown-haired alpha guy in gold short-shorts and white varsity socks – he told me later he was a researcher at a local university – being pleasured by a man in a shiny speedo and a woman sporting matching metallic star pasties, all in front of a pink Kinky Rabbit statue, the club’s logo. A fluffle of onlookers applauded.

“A mouth is a mouth,” the man told me a few minutes later, stroking my hair behind my ear while we chatted on a damp sofa.

That was pretty much the ethos at the Kinky Rabbit Club, one of L.A’s most exclusive sex parties, emerging from the ashes after a year in Covid lockdown.

A dozen feet from me, another live performance was getting started: a blonde and brunette in tassels and beaded lingerie were scissoring in a glittery bathtub, drenching each other in Champagne. When the bottle popped, it squirted me right in the eye – which was not wide shut. Meanwhile, hand-made pink nipple clamps circulated as party favors.

Two women kneel over a golden bath tub in glittery beaded lingerie.
Only Fans star Kenzie Ann (right) and another performer who calls herself Ashley.

“It’s the golden age for sex workers,” Miss Kenzie Anne, the blonde in the bathtub, had told me while getting her hair and makeup done hours before the debauchery began. Well known in the adult film and in the OnlyFans world, where strippers, adult film stars, and cam girls post their X-rated content behind a subscription-based paywall, Kenzie Anne was the star attraction that night. This was her first live performance outside of her own bedroom, she told me.

Founded by sex club impresario Alina Ratuska, Kinky Rabbit brands itself as a “female-empowered” sex club. Most of the performers were not paid directly but are compensated with something they say is even more valuable – the free use of content created during the party that they would later post and monetize on their OnlyFans accounts.

The platform exploded in popularity during the pandemic, especially after Instagram banned sexual content. Parties like this offer fresh content to help keep their subscribers engaged, they say.

Ratuska said she preferred to work with performers who have OnlyFans accounts because it allows her to cut out the middle men who manage sex workers. “Whatever people want to do, I talk to the girls and make it their thing,” she said. “I make sure the girls feel comfortable and super hot and super empowered.”

A women dressed in a low-cut bodysuit stands in front of a rabbit sculpture.
Alina Ratuska, founder of the Kinky Rabbit Sex Club awaits a night of erotic debauchery.

I came here with a hard-headed plan to do a story about sex workers emerging from the pandemic. After a year of isolation, I – straight and single – was vaxxed, waxed and ready for whatever the hell “hot vax summer” was going to be. But I had no idea what I was in for.

For the occasion, Ratuska had loaned me a green and gold speckled catsuit with a black leather waistband and plunging V-neck that she designed herself. It fit like a latex glove–latex being a popular fashion choice with this crowd. I could barely breathe.

Party-goers drifted to the open bar where they could order drinks like a Kinky Mule or the Fifty Shades of Greyhound.

“I’ll have two shots of anything,” said my new friend, the researcher in gold disco shorts, as he wiped his sweaty brow and flirted with the shirtless bartender. Around us, a few people critiqued his performance. “I’m not sure he got it up the first time,” suggested a woman standing next to me in black bell bottoms, a lace bralette and purple wig. “But they did a good job covering him.”

It was all what you might imagine a wild sex party looks like: attractive people, predominantly women, in outlandish costumes, wontonly frolicking around to a fun and flirty theme. This being 2021, there was an “honors system” that everyone present was fully vaccinated against Covid. No cell phones were allowed. Everyone could be refreshingly straightforward about what they were there for: a night of hot in-person sexual thrills. “I’m over online. This is so much better than a sex party on Zoom…trust me, we’ve tried,” said a woman, wearing shiny disco flairs and a Jimmy Hendrix jacket.

VV
Only Fans star, Vanna Bardot, wore an outfit designed by Ratuska.

After a string of erotic performances set the mood, a cluster of glittery, glistening bodies climbed a stairway.

On the next floor, in the largest of three bedrooms, a black St. Andrews Cross (a 7-foot wooden “X” graced with binding straps) was center-stage. Beyond it, a sliding door led to a balcony overlooking a pool. Below, people were smoking what I could only guess were postcoital cigarettes.

There wasn’t the usual party small talk that warms people up to strangers. It was all very direct; not a lot of foreplay.

“As a bi woman, I find it hard to meet girls who like other girls,” a busty brunette with bright blue eyes in a silver dress told me. “But this party is a place where everything is on the [table]. Where else can you get f**ked by your boyfriend and then have a girl eat you out while you are tied to a St. Andrews Cross? Now I get to have my cake and eat it too, and don’t need to worry about offending anyone–because we all know what we’re here for. Sex.”

A buxom woman, shrink-wrapped in a black minidress with orange lingerie glowing from underneath, looked fetchingly at me as she held a cat o’ nine tails. I walked over to her, and she led me to the Cross. My new friend then made me an offer. Maybe it was the Champagne residue in my eye, or the orgy churning away on the bed behind me, but I acquiesced to her invitation: to flog me on the cross.

A woman is seen wearing a low-cut sparkly catsuit and heels.
The author, Heather Hauswirth

“Let’s tie your wrists,” she said. “Sorry, I haven’t done this in a while,” I quipped. I turned my head to watch her strap my wrists and ankles to the cross, turning my body into a giant “X marks the spot.”

She started to flog me, and she was merciless. I had always thought of myself as a wannabe pain slut, but the leather straps were smacking my thighs instead of my ass. I kept offering my buns, but she never hit the mark. Another woman beelined in my direction, and we locked eyes. She touched my hair, then went in for a kiss. I turned away. It was sensory overload.

I get how such extreme sensations unhinge the mind from pedestrian concerns, not to mention the pent up stresses of a tough year. I was hoping for a cathartic release, but found myself more self-conscious than anything else. And all this, in front of an audience of expectant voyeurs.

As I climbed down from the cross, I resigned myself to the possibility that I wasn’t the sexual Olympian I had imagined I was. I had limits; a comfort zone smaller than most of the revelers around me. And yet, as I left the Kinky Rabbit Club in the early hours of the next morning, I found myself noting that the next party – a Bacchanalia, in the “kingdom of kink” – was only a month away.

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Tesla is one step closer to opening a 1950s-style diner at its Los Angeles supercharger station

Tesla
A Tesla supercharger station at Burbank Town Center, in Burbank on Friday, Sept. 4, 2020 in Burbank, CA.

  • Tesla filed with the US trademark office last week to use its brand assets in “restaurant services.”
  • Elon Musk tweeted the idea in 2018, and Tesla applied for permits, but little has happened since.
  • The company says its superchargers can add 200 miles of range in just 15 minutes.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

It turns out that Elon Musk might not have been kidding around after all when he tweeted a few years ago about combining a diner with a Tesla supercharger station.

“Gonna put an old school drive-in, roller skates & rock restaurant at one of the new Tesla Supercharger locations in LA,” the Tesla CEO posted back in 2018.

A few months later, the company applied for permits for a “Tesla restaurant and supercharger station” in the adjacent city of Santa Monica, then things went mostly quiet.

But last week, Tesla’s filed with the US Patent and Trademark Office seeking to use its name and logo in offering “restaurant services.” Electrek first reported the filings, which are generally reviewed by an attorney after three months.

Food service and gas stations have long shared real estate, and national brands like Sonic and Checkers have shown that drive-up dining remains broadly popular in the US, not to mention local classics like The Varsity in Atlanta or Keller’s in Dallas.

Musk elaborated on his idea in his 2018 tweets, saying the restaurant menu could appear on a Tesla’s center display screen upon arrival, and that there would be a 1950s theme with classic film clips playing.

But the pairing of a supercharger station with a restaurant is a retro-style solution to a growing challenge for electric vehicles: They’re a hassle to charge.

A recent study found that one in five electric vehicle owners switched back to gas-powered cars due to charging issues. One analyst tested charging the Ford Mach-E on a standard household plug for one hour and only got three miles of range.

While so-called Level Two charging is substantially faster, it’s outpaced by Tesla’s new Level Three charging technology, which the company claims can add 200 miles of range in just 15 minutes.

How long does it take to eat a burger?

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