Conversations on LinkedIn nearly doubled since January, and it could be a sign that wealthy Americans are ready to pursue their dream jobs following a pandemic slump

Wang_HeadShot
Dan Wang, Associate Professor of Business Management at Columbia Business School

  • Satya Nadella recently said LinkedIn saw “record engagement” as content shared increased 29%.
  • A Columbia Business School expert said this may mean professionals are considering a job switch.
  • A rise in LinkedIn activity says less about the economy, and more about the shift in US priorities.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

If you’re a burned out professional day-dreaming of quitting your job, you are might find yourself spending more time on LinkedIn.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella said the company saw “record engagement” on LinkedIn, as conversations increased by 43%, content shared increased 29%, and hours learning new skills increased by a whopping 80% in the first three months of 2021.

And despite major job losses following the COVID-19 pandemic, businesses spent 60% more on marketing jobs on LinkedIn over the last year than the previous year – bringing in a total of $3 billion.

“We once again saw record engagement, as LinkedIn’s 756 million members use the network to connect, learn, create content, and find jobs,” Nadella said on a call to investors on April 27.

Though more time spent on LinkedIn might initially suggest an improving job market, Dan Wang, an associate professor at the Columbia Business School who completed a study about LinkedIn learning in January, said the trend has more to do with the changing attitude of wealthy job seekers rather than an indication that the economy is coming back.

“It’s not obvious to me that it’s the availability of jobs that’s driving increased activity on LinkedIn,” Wang said in an interview with Insider.

“Individuals are more contemplative about their career prospects. They were left to reflect more about their careers, their achievements and positions,” he added. “It’s more of these big cognitive shifts that the pandemic has induced that’s simply being reflected in LinkedIn activity.”

Read more: America’s best burnout expert says employees hold the key to reducing workplace stress. Now if only their bosses would listen to them.

A rise in LinkedIn usage could be a sign that the ‘YOLO economy’ is alive and well.

The New York Times’ Kevin Roose recently reported wealthy professionals are leaving their high-intensity jobs in tech and business for passion projects. He coined the new trend the “YOLO (“you only live once”) economy,” as many professionals have realized during the pandemic that life is too short to waste away typing on Excel. Insider has reported on widespread burnout in consulting, tech, media, and other professional industries.

A similar trend happened during the Great Recession in 2008, when white collar workers who lost cushy jobs in finance turned to entrepreneurship. Some today’s hottest companies – including Uber, Venmo, and Instagram – grew out of the financial crisis.

“So it would not surprise me that there would be an explosion of creative energy as well that follows this period,” Wang said.

The opportunity to quit your job and start a company exists for a small fraction of the US workforce. Millions of Americans are at risk of losing their house this year and are behind on rent.

Though jobs are steadily rebounding in the US as vaccination picks up, just 4% of workers in leisure, hospitality, and retail – among the hardest hit during the pandemic – will get their old jobs back. Women, particularly mothers, left the workforce entirely during the pandemic.

Wang said active LinkedIn users tend to have college degrees and a “higher than average level of employability.” These people probably used April stimulus checks on improving their professional prospects, rather than basic necessities.

Economists said the post-pandemic recovery was “K-shaped,” or devastating to lower-paid Americans yet fruitful for the richest. Wang said the desire for white-collar workers to follow their passions is “emblematic” of the K-shaped recovery.

“The pandemic gave folks who are already kind of fairly well to do an opportunity to reevaluate their careers and perhaps in the opportunity to have a boost in their careers as well,” he said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Amazon was ranked by LinkedIn as the best place to grow your career. But the list omitted major factors like pay and race.

LinkedIn office
LinkedIn, which is owned by Microsoft, ranked Amazon as the best company for US workers to grow their careers in 2021.

  • Linkedin published its list of the top US companies for career growth, ranking Amazon first.
  • LinkedIn’s revamped criteria this year included factors like promotion rates and gender diversity.
  • But the list didn’t consider other key factors like pay and racial diversity.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

In his final letter to shareholders as Amazon’s CEO earlier this month, Jeff Bezos downplayed concerns about the company’s working conditions, defending it as “Earth’s best employer and Earth’s safest place to work.”

The letter came on the heels of Amazon’s aggressive anti-union campaign, multiple illegal firings of whistleblowers, a tripling in the number of labor complaints against the company last year, and climbing injury rates that are nearly double the industry standard.

When Amazon announced its quarterly earnings call this week, it leaned on another source to prove that it’s a great place to work: LinkedIn. On Wednesday, the Microsoft-owned job platform published a list ranking “the 50 best workplaces to grow your career in the U.S.” in 2021.

According to LinkedIn’s criteria, Amazon earned the top spot, which the company touted in its earnings release along with high marks on lists by Fortune and Boston Consulting Group.

Amazon did not respond to a request for comment on this story.

LinkedIn did a massive overhaul of its criteria for this year’s list – which it explained in depth in an accompanying blog post – eventually landing on what it said were seven “pillars” that researchers have shown lead to career progression: “ability to advance; skills growth; company stability; external opportunity; company affinity; gender diversity and educational background.”

While any list claiming to rank the “top” anything is ultimately based on subjectively chosen criteria, several seemingly important factors didn’t make the cut, including salary data or any demographic data beyond gender.

LinkedIn confirmed salaries were not factored into the rankings but wouldn’t comment further about salaries on the record.

“In terms of the diversity pillars, we measure gender diversity, specifically, which looks at gender parity within a company, as well as educational background, analyzing the spread of educational attainment among employees. We are working on additional diversity criteria and hope to continue expanding this pillar in future years,” LinkedIn spokesperson Maggie Boezi told Insider in an email.

Amazon paid its median employee $29,007 last year, and the company said this week that it would raise pay by up to $3 per hour for 500,000 employees. But despite lucrative salaries and benefits for corporate employees, research has shown for years that Amazon setting up new warehouses often drives down wages in the area.

Those salary disparities take on added significance when factoring in the racial disparities between Amazon’s warehouse and corporate employees. In 2020, 32.1% of all Amazon employees were white, while 13.6% were Asian, 26.5% were Black, 22.8% were Latinx, 3.6% were multiracial, and 1.5% were Native American.

But the path upward is narrow for employees of color at Amazon.

Among corporate employees, 47% are white, while 34.8% were Asian, 7.2% were Black, 7.5% were Latinx, 3% were multiracial, and 0.5% were Native American. Among senior leadership, 70.7% were white, 20% were Asian, 3.8% were Black, 3.9% were Latinx, 1.4% were multiracial, and 0.2% were Native American.

LinkedIn’s decision to rank Amazon as the best place to grow your career without accounting for racial diversity data may be especially surprising to some members of Amazon’s diversity and inclusion teams, who told Recode that internal Amazon data showed that Black employees are promoted at a lower rate and given worse performance reviews than white coworkers.

Insider’s Allana Akhtar also reported that Amazon lags far behind competitors like Walmart – ranked ninth on LinkedIn’s list – when it comes to Black and Latino representation in upper management.

As for Amazon’s warehouse workers, Bloomberg reported in December that Amazon is “transforming the logistics industry from a career destination with the promise of middle-class wages into entry-level work that’s just a notch above being a burger flipper or convenience store cashier,” citing government data that showed more than 4,000 Amazon employees are on food stamps in just nine states.

Turnover rates at Amazon warehouses are estimated to be as high as 100%, according to the National Employment Law Project.

One possible explanation for why LinkedIn’s list still ranked Amazon first despite the above data may be that its list appeared to focus on white-collar workers.

In her blog post explaining the methodology, LinkedIn senior managing editor Laura Lorenzetti, said that the list “since its inception showed professionals where people like them were most eager to work.”

Boezi, the LinkedIn spokesperson, told Insider that the list included all full-time and part-time employees regardless of job title – except freelancers and interns – and that LinkedIn “regressed our findings against outside sources such as the World Bank and the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and evaluated various scoring mechanisms for every pillar we selected.”

While LinkedIn’s list may not single-handedly change jobseekers’ minds, Amazon’s case reveals how the underlying data that goes into such rankings is far from unbiased.

Read the original article on Business Insider

LinkedIn has boomed to nearly 800 million members, and 5 other key takeaways from Microsoft’s Q3 earnings

Satya Nadella
Satya Nadella, CEO of Microsoft

  • Microsoft’s Q3 revenue hit $41.7 billion, up 19% from last year, thanks to high demand for its cloud services.
  • LinkedIn revenue increased by 25% and is predicted to grow further as the job market rebounds.
  • Demand for Xbox Series X and S consoles “significantly exceeded” demand, CFO Amy Hood said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Microsoft beat revenue expectations in its third quarter thanks to soaring demand for its cloud services as people worked from home during the pandemic, the company said in its earnings call on Tuesday.

Here are the six key takeaways from the call:

1. Microsoft’s revenue hit $41.7 billion, beating expectations

Microsoft said revenue hit $41.7 billion, up 19% from the same period last year, beating predictions of $41.03 billion, according to IBES data from Refinitiv.

Revenue in its “Intelligent Cloud” division was $15.1 billion, up 23%. Azure, the company’s cloud-computing platform, grew revenue by 50%.

“Digital technology will be the foundation for resilience and growth over the next decade,” CEO Satya Nadella said.

2. LinkedIn is doing really well, and we’re spending 80% more hours on it

Revenue for professional networking site LinkedIn increased 25%. The number of conversations on the site rose by 43%, and content being shared rose 29%.

Overall, the hours people spent on LinkedIn was up by 80%.

It now has 756 million members.

Microsoft said it expected continued revenue growth as the advertising and employment markets recover from the pandemic.

3. Teams now has more than 145 million daily active users, nearly double the amount last year

The workplace chat platform Teams has almost doubled its daily active user numbers to more than 145 million since last year.

Nadella said that, even in countries where workers are returning to the office, such as Australia, New Zealand, and South Korea, Teams was still growing.

4. Xbox Series X and S consoles are in high demand, and Minecraft is still adding users

There was “record engagement” in its gaming segment, with revenue up 50%, CFO Amy Hood said.

Xbox hardware revenue climbed 232% thanks to the release of new consoles. Demand for the Series X and S consoles “significantly exceeded” supply, Hood said.

Xbox content and services revenue was up 34%, fueled by Minecraft’s popularity. The sandbox video game has more than 140 million monthly active users, up 30% since last year. Players have spent more than $350 million on add-ons since 2017.

5. Dividends and share buybacks increased from last year

Microsoft returned $10 billion to shareholders through dividends and share repurchases, up 1% compared to the same time last year.

6. The US military is using Microsoft’s AI services

Azure’s artificial intelligence platforms are being used by big public and private organizations, including AT&T, Duolingo, and the US Army.

“We’ve seen dramatic advances in research and development by OpenAI whose models are trained and hosted exclusively on Azure, ” Nadella said.

The US Army will use HoloLens mixed-reality headsets, integrating with Microsoft’s cloud services. The headsets will give troops “next-generation night vision,” the US Army said in a press announcement last month.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Billionaire LinkedIn founder tells businesses to stop funding politicians who support voting rights restrictions

Reid Hoffman
Reid Hoffman.

  • Reid Hoffman said businesses should halt funding to politicians limiting voting rights.
  • The billionaire cofounder of LinkedIn said voting is pro-American and pro-business.
  • Last week, hundreds of businesses declared opposition to restrictive voting laws in a statement.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Reid Hoffman, the billionaire cofounder of LinkedIn, told CNN that businesses should stop funding politicians who support limiting voting rights.

Protecting voting rights and accessibility is “pro-business” and “pro-American,” and not supporting those rights is an easy reason to stop funding any politician, he told the network in an email.

He added that employees should receive paid time off to cast their ballots and that companies should encourage workers and consumers to vote.

Hoffman did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment for the story.

Read more: Corporate America’s response to Georgia’s new voting laws isn’t benevolence. It’s about economics and profit, experts say.

Last week, hundreds of companies, law firms, and nonprofits united to oppose restrictive voter laws in an ad published in The New York Times and Washington Post.

Hoffman, now a partner at the venture capital investment firm Greylock, was one of the business leaders who signed the statement, which said in part: “Voting is the lifeblood of our democracy, and we call upon all Americans to take a nonpartisan stand for this basic and most fundamental right of all Americans.”

The ad came together after Black business leaders urged companies to speak out against a voting law that was enacted in Georgia last month.

The new law, known as the Election Integrity Act of 2021, made ballot drop boxes permanent, but only at select locations during limited hours, shortened the window for requesting absentee ballots, and banned ballot selfies, among other restrictive measures.

Following widespread claims of voter fraud in the 2020 election, legislators from nearly every state have introduced a total of 361 bills with restrictive voting measures, the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University said. Five of those have already been signed into law, with dozens more moving through legislatures, according to the center.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Scraped personal data of 1.3 million Clubhouse users has reportedly leaked online

clubhouse app
  • Over a million Clubhouse users have had their personal data leaked for free, Cyber News reported.
  • The social media app, popular for its audio community, is the latest to have user records posted in a hacker forum.
  • LinkedIn and Facebook user data has also been exposed online within the past week.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The personal data of 1.3 million Clubhouse users has leaked online on a popular hacker forum, according to a Saturday report from Cyber News.

The scraped data of Clubhouse users includes names, social media profile names, and other details.

Clubhouse did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment that was made on Saturday. As Cyber News reported, the exposed data could enable bad actors to target users through phishing schemes or identity theft.

Clubhouse on Sunday pushed back on the Cyber News report, posting on Twitter: “Clubhouse has not been breached or hacked,” it said. “The data referred to is all public profile information from our app, which anyone can access via the app or our API (application programming interface).”

The invite-only social media app launched in March 2020 and has grown into a popular platform and attracted millions of users. Its audio community allows users to tune into conversations, or “rooms,” about various topics. The company is reportedly in talks for a funding round that values the company at $4 billion.

The development comes after two high-profile data breaches surfaced within the past week.

The same publication reported on Tuesday that the personal data of 500 million LinkedIn users – about two-thirds of the platform’s userbase – was scraped and listed for sale online. A LinkedIn spokesperson confirmed to Insider on Thursday that there is indeed a dataset posted of public information that was scraped from its platform. A hacker is attempting to sell the data for a four-digit sum and potentially in the form of bitcoin.

Paul Prudhomme, an analyst at security intelligence company IntSights, told Insider that the exposed data is significant because bad actors could use it to attack companies through their employees’ information.

Days before reports surfaced of the LinkedIn and Clubhouse data leaks, Insider’s Aaron Holmes reported that the full names, location, email addresses, and other sensitive pieces of information of 533 million Facebook users were posted in a forum.

Security researchers told Insider that hackers could use the exposed data to impersonate them or scam them into revealing sensitive login information.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Personal data of 1.3 million Clubhouse users has reportedly leaked online days after LinkedIn and Facebook also suffered data breaches

clubhouse app
  • Over a million Clubhouse users have had their personal data leaked online.
  • The social media app, popular for its audio community, is only the latest to suffer a data breach.
  • LinkedIn and Facebook user data has also been exposed online within the past week.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The personal data of 1.3 million Clubhouse users has leaked online on a popular hacker forum, according to a Saturday report from Cyber News.

The leaked data of Clubhouse users includes names, social media profile names, and other details.

Clubhouse did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment that was made on Saturday. As Cyber News reported, the exposed data could enable bad actors to target users through phishing schemes or identity theft.

The invite-only social media app launched in March 2020 and has grown into a popular platform and attracted millions of users. Its audio community allows users to tune into conversations, or “rooms,” about various topics. The company is reportedly in talks for a funding round that values the company at $4 billion.

Saturday’s report of a Clubhouse data breach is only the latest to surface within the past week.

The same publication reported on Tuesday that the personal data of 500 million LinkedIn users – about two-thirds of the platform’s userbase – was scraped and listed for sale online. A LinkedIn spokesperson confirmed to Insider on Thursday that there is indeed a dataset posted of public information that was scraped from its platform. A hacker is attempting to sell the data for a four-digit sum and potentially in the form of bitcoin.

Paul Prudhomme, an analyst at security intelligence company IntSights, told Insider that the exposed data is significant because bad actors could use it to attack companies through their employees’ information.

Days before reports surfaced of the LinkedIn and Clubhouse data leaks, Insider’s Aaron Holmes reported that the full names, location, email addresses, and other sensitive pieces of information of 533 million Facebook users were posted in a forum.

Security researchers told Insider that hackers could use the exposed data to impersonate them or scam them into revealing sensitive login information.

Read the original article on Business Insider

T-Mobile’s TVision closure points to virtual pay TV’s challenges

Hi and welcome to this weekly edition of Insider Advertising, where we track the big stories in media and advertising.

Remember you can sign up to get this newsletter daily here.

First: We extended our deadline to nominate top ad execs leading the charge on data and privacy. Submit here by April 5.

What we’re following this week:

T-Mobile shuts TVision

Digital media layoffs

Workplace issues at Zimmerman Advertising


T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert
T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert.

Virtual pay TV struggles

While new streaming services launch left and right, T-Mobile is pulling the plug on TVision, its 5-month-old attempt to retain customers with a $10 per month streaming service, Claire Atkinson reported. Key points:

  • Its demise shows the challenges of the virtual pay TV services model that has struggled to find a profitable business.
  • These services historically haven’t offered much of a deal for would-be cord cutters. TVision was troubled from the start, the programming costing far more than it was charging.
  • In the streaming wars, T-Mobile’s loss is a win for YouTube TV and Philo, which it’s offering its customers instead.

Read more: T-Mobile pulled the plug on its streaming video service, TVision, just 5 months after launch

Also read:


nancy dubuc vice ceo
Vice Media CEO Nancy Dubuc.

Digital media takes another hit

Just as things are starting to look up with more people getting vaccinated and offices planning for reopening comes news of layoffs at a handful of digital media darlings, Steven Perlberg reported.

This may have surprised people who may have thought the blood-letting was over after last spring when advertisers hit the breaks, leaving many ad-dependent media companies to cut costs.

But the challenges these companies faced aren’t new:

  • Vice Media and HuffPost, along with other VC-backed media companies, have struggled to reach their backers’ expectations. HuffPost was just acquired, a move that’s usually followed by layoffs as merged companies look to cut duplicative costs.
  • Mel Magazine, an arm of Dollar Shave Club, was known for its distinctive men’s lifestyle coverage. But as a brand-backed publication that didn’t have any ad revenue coming in, its financial purpose was unclear.
  • And Medium, which also announced cuts, has changed its approach to content countless times over the years, shifting from an ad- to subscription-driven model. This time it was to scale back its own publications that it started just a few years earlier.

Subscriptions and advertising support many news outlets very well, of course. These companies didn’t have enough of either, or their execution was flawed.

Some digital media companies could get a lifeline by going public through SPACs. But the underlying business challenges they face aren’t likely to go away.

Read more: Vice Media just laid off a handful of digital staffers

Also read:


Jordan Zimmerman
Jordan Zimmerman, founder and chairman of Zimmerman Advertising in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Zimmerman Advertising complaints

Zimmerman Advertising and its founder Jordan Zimmerman bear all the trappings of success, with billions in revenue and clients like McDonald’s and Nissan.

But some employees said they experienced micromanaging, misogyny, and racism at the Omnicom-owned agency, Lindsay Rittenhouse reports.

From her story:

In April, Zimmerman Advertising – an Omnicom-owned ad agency in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, known for its work with clients like McDonald’s – laid off a batch of employees in the pandemic. That day, the founder and chairman Jordan Zimmerman addressed the remaining staff on a call.

Three people on the call said Zimmerman told employees that, while they were spared, they would need to work “two and a half times harder” or he would replace them with the laid-off employees who had “begged” for their jobs.

Fast-forward to this March, when some employees accused the agency of pressuring them to go back to the office, regardless of whether they had been vaccinated or had high-risk family members. In some cases, employees said management threatened layoffs if they didn’t return.

Read the full story: Employees say they experienced racism and sexism at Zimmerman Advertising, an Omnicom agency known for clients like McDonald’s and Nissan


Other stories we’re reading:

Thanks for reading, and see you next week. And remember you can sign up for this newsletter here.

– Lucia

Read the original article on Business Insider

10 New Insights B2B Marketers Need To Know About LinkedIn In 2021

Closeup image of woman’s blue eye behind black-framed glasses.

 Closeup image of woman’s blue eye behind black-framed glasses.

What has changed at the world’s largest professional social media platform during the pandemic, and how will it shift for B2B marketers in the post-pandemic landscape?

LinkedIn* has already rolled out an impressive assortment of new features in 2021, and we’ve got 10 insights that B2B marketers need to know about them.

Over the course of the pandemic, LinkedIn ads have been among the marketing channels that have grown the most in importance according to report data examining B2B technology marketing strategies, as we covered in a recent edition of the TopRank Marketing news.

LinkedIn also saw a revenue increase of 23 percent during the second quarter of fiscal year 2021, according to earnings release information from parent company Microsoft, led in part by strong advertising performance.

What has lead to this growth?

Let’s jump right in an look at 10 new LinkedIn insights for B2B marketers.

1 — An Inspiring Array Of New Features For Company Pages

LinkedIn has added an inspiring array of new features for company pages on the platform, including several aimed at helping businesses involve their employees in finding and sharing its various types of content.

A new “My Community” tab added to company pages allows businesses to make sharing content from the company or other curated sources simpler, while also providing reach and engagement data to measure the effectiveness of employee advocacy.

Company page administrators have been given new tools for recommending content to employees, along with a unique feature that suggests ways employees can turn what they share into distinctive content.

Employees are 14 times as likely to share their own organization’s page content compared to other brands, according to research from LinkedIn that also shows co-workers are some 60 percent more likely to engage with posts from their teammates.

The LinkedIn company page additions, announced in February, work to strengthen a brand’s community on the platform, with other new features including an expansion of LinkedIn Stories that lets brands utilize destination links for swipe-up interactions.

Other new additions have included increased lead generation functionality within LinkedIn’s product pages.

By making it easy for company employees to share brand content, LinkedIn has made strides in overcoming the notion that nobody looks at company pages — a place where content goes to die.

Each new feature rolled out by LinkedIn offers B2B marketers new opportunities for connection and engagement. If you’ve missed other new LinkedIn additions and are looking for helpful ways to increase engagement by using them, our content marketing manager Nick Nelson explores a variety of options in a helpful article on boosting B2B marketing engagement on LinkedIn.

[bctt tweet=”“If your company’s approach to LinkedIn has been an autopilot, the time is right to buckle down and take advantage of the many opportunities afforded to B2B marketers by the world’s largest professional social network.” @NickNelsonMN” username=”toprank”]

2 — LinkedIn Live Bolsters Brand Video Engagement

The importance of video has skyrocketed during the pandemic, and LinkedIn has accordingly seen sizable increases in utilization of its LinkedIn Live functionality.

Usage statistics show that the professional social network’s LinkedIn Live video streams have increased by 89 percent since March, 2020, along with strong levels of member engagement.

While use of audio social platform Clubhouse has risen, the majority of B2B brands have so far taken a wait-and-see approach. Our informal poll data showed that 52 percent of B2B marketers view Clubhouse as not important in their 2021 marketing strategy, with 28 percent having said that the jury was still out on its importance in their marketing efforts.

LinkedIn Poll Image

What do B2B brands need to ask themselves before utilizing Clubhouse and other trending new platforms? Our CEO and co-founder Lee Odden offers up a sound strategy and shows how partnering with influencers can be key now more than ever in his recent “How B2B Brands Can Boost Confidence in Livestream Video, Podcast and Clubhouse Marketing.”

While most B2B marketers wait for Clubhouse’s impact on business marketing to play out, LinkedIn Live has seen steadily growing implementation among major brands.

LinkedIn Live is being used by more major firms all the time, such as the 5 B2B brands I wrote about that are rocking their LinkedIn Live game, in “Livestream Marketing: 5 B2B Brands Rocking LinkedIn Live,” featuring JPMorgan Chase, CompTIA, Microsoft, NASA, and SAP*.

As more brands have embraced LinkedIn Live, marketers have shared information on how to utilize its numerous features, such as “How to schedule livestreams to Facebook, YouTube, Twitter and LinkedIn.”

[bctt tweet=”“Content Marketers can boost the success of their marketing investment when they optimize content for discovery wherever buyers are looking, subscribing and influenced.” — Lee Odden @LeeOdden” username=”toprank”]

3 — Planning For “The Big Long’’ Requires Patience

LinkedIn has taken a long-term look at B2B marketing trends, in the form of a robust collection of some 30 marketing trends it has researched over the past five years, available in report form in “2030 B2B Trends: Contrarian Ideas For The Next Decade.”

Putting all this data into perspective for use today can be a daunting challenge. Thankfully, however, Ty Heath, director of market engagement at The B2B Institute at LinkedIn recently took the time to share her wealth of knowledge on the report and its most important trends, which I covered in “LinkedIn’s Ty Heath: 3 Enduring B2B Marketing Trends #MPB2B.”

Ty shared the importance of B2B marketers being able to strike just the right balance of short-term activation versus long term branding, and pointed out that one of brand-building’s truest strengths is its effect on long term sales.

Recently LinkedIn’s Peter Weinberg and Jon Lombardo shared their views on the 2030 marketing trends report, looking at why brand investment is key for providing business value, in Marketing Week’s “Why B2B marketers need to bet big on ‘The Big Long’.”

“Brand building requires patience,” Weinberg and Lombardo noted. “Brands are built over decades, not quarters, by constantly investing in repeatable and distinctive creative concepts,” they added.

Another resource LinkedIn has made available for B2B marketers is “5 Principles Of Growth In B2B Marketing,” which examines the art of balancing the long-term brand-building goals with short-term sales activation concerns.

[bctt tweet=”“We can look forward to more memorable B2B marketing messages that connect brand to demand. If you are a creative B2B marketer, that’s something you can get excited about.” — Ty Heath @tyrona” username=”toprank”]

4 — Influence’s Increasing Strengths Well-Showcased Via LinkedIn

The success of LinkedIn Live has come in part due to its ability to drive brand awareness, and a growing number of recent studies have shown that industry subject matter experts and influencers have embraced live-streaming more than ever during the pandemic.

Live-stream content produced by influencers has seen sustained interest during the global health crisis, according to survey data, and B2B influencers in particular have found increased engagement through LinkedIn.

Digging in to some of the details of this type of engagement on LinkedIn, we’ve presented five helpful case study examples in, “5 Case Studies on How to Optimize B2B Influencer Engagement on LinkedIn.”

The natural kinship between influence in B2B marketing and the LinkedIn platform offers brand marketers a number of particularly powerful opportunities, and we recently took a look at them in an in-depth video interview with Garnor Morantes, group marketing manager at LinkedIn, who sat down with Lee in the second episode of our Inside B2B Influence Marketing show.

Inside Influence 2: Garnor Morantes from LinkedIn on the Power of Always-On Influence” explores what always-on influencer marketing is and how LinkedIn has developed an influencer community using an always-on approach, along with numerous other insights.

Garnor was also among the many major brand contributors to our groundbreaking 2020 State of B2B Influencer Marketing Research Report.

Garnor Morantes Image

[bctt tweet=”“Start thinking about who the audience truly is and as a result, who might be able to speak to them better than you can?” — Garnor Morantes of @LinkedIn” username=”toprank”]

5 — Successfully Working With Changes To Apple’s Identifier for Advertising (IDFA) System

The digital marketing industry has had to take steps to adjust to major changes in how marketers implement ad tracking and targeting, as both Google and Apple have begun shifting away from traditional web browser cookie-tracking technology.

LinkedIn announced in March’s “Sharing an update on our plans for IDFA” that it would no longer collect Apple’s Identifier for Advertising (IDFA) data from its Apple iOS apps, in a change that — although affecting the LinkedIn Audience Network (LAN), conversion tracking and matched audiences features — is expected to have only limited campaign impact.

Using first-party data instead, LinkedIn will offer similar functionality to help marketers reach relevant buyer audiences, a change savvy B2B marketers will want to keep tabs on as further information is released in the coming months.

[bctt tweet=”“The natural kinship between influence in B2B marketing and the LinkedIn platform offers brand marketers a number of particularly powerful opportunities.” — Lane R. Ellis @lanerellis” username=”toprank”]

6 — Free Best-Practice Guides Help Point The Way For B2B Content Engagement

LinkedIn has also upped its best-practice and guide publication game during the pandemic, providing a wealth of information for digital marketers looking to achieve the highest levels of success using the platform.

One of the newest offerings comes in the form of advertising campaign planning worksheets and templates, together in a 38-page guide, with the launch of “A Template for Better LinkedIn Campaign Planning,” providing useful resources for a variety of traditional, carousel, video, and other LinkedIn ad types.

LinkedIn has also released a 17-page guide offering B2B marketers tips, statistics and a variety of insight and examples surrounding the production of successful B2B creative assets on its platform, in the helpful “[Pocket Guide] 3 Traits of Engaging B2B Creative.”

Another recent resource for B2B marketers looking to grow engagement on LinkedIn is the platform’s “Return to Grown 2021 Magazine,” featuring case studies, interviews, tips and more.

Some of the guides LinkedIn has published are tailored to specific industries, such as “Why consumer mindset matters in financial services marketing,” yet also offer universal insight of interest to all B2B marketers, including detailed study data showing that LinkedIn members are more likely to have positive feelings after visiting the platform.

LinkedIn Postive Image

A final example of LinkedIn’s helpful guides is a recent examination of take-aways marketers can glean from the pandemic, in “2020 was a creative experiment of two halves – here’s what we learned,” which looks at subjects including how brand distinctiveness drives creative thinking, and creativity’s longstanding bias against overt branding — among numerous other marketing-related topics.

7 — From Black History Month To A Year Of Change

During February’s Black History Month, LinkedIn highlighted an impressive array of initiatives aimed at focusing on and helping to removing barriers to success, including the release of an ongoing series called “Conversations For Change.”

Conversations For Change Screenshot

At TopRank Marketing we also published content centered around Black History Month, including a look at “10 Marketing and Communications Leaders to Inspire You in 2021,” featuring a stellar group of women of color, including LinkedIn’s own Ty Heath and others.

8 — Moving Towards Facilitating Freelance Connections And More

Another area B2B marketers may want to keep tabs on is LinkedIn’s possible move towards offering features that would facilitate freelance connections — an area that has seen significant growth during the pandemic, and a feature that could prove helpful for certain LinkedIn users.

In “LinkedIn’s new Marketplaces will help freelancers find work,” Fortune’s Andrew Marquardt looks into several ways such a LinkedIn feature might work, and the potential such a move would have in providing alternatives to similar functionality provided by existing third-party services Upwork and Fiverr.

As the world’s largest business-oriented social platform, such functionality could enhance LinkedIn in a new area, however marketers will need to wait and see how LinkedIn Marketplace is set to play out during the rest of 2021.

9 — Rising Poll Opportunities

LinkedIn launched the return of its highly-anticipated poll feature in 2020, offering marketers a new platform besides Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram for gathering community sentiment using polls — one that may be the most natural fit for many B2B brands.

Polls offer a unique two-for-one value for B2B marketers, providing quality feedback on what customers want while also offering brands a helpful interactive social media content marketing element.

Since the re-launch of polls on the platform, it has become more common to see polls among the content posted on LinkedIn.

We examined some of the brands that took advantage of LinkedIn’s polling features, in “Social Media Polls For Marketers: 6 B2B Brands Winning With LinkedIn Polls,” which shows examples of some of the ways that brands are innovating through the use of polls.

[bctt tweet=”“Poll data shows what marketers are thinking about when it comes to a variety of important subjects, ranging from everyday tasks to far-reaching future trends.” — Lane R. Ellis @lanerellis” username=”toprank”]

10 — Eye-Raising Statistics Point To Useful LinkedIn Marketing Trends

Each of the nine areas we’ve looked at so far combine to tell a fascinating story about the rise of LinkedIn for B2B marketers during the pandemic — and point to continuing opportunities for post-pandemic marketing.

Helping to highlight specific details about what’s happening with LinkedIn, here are just a few additional statistics that can help inform your own LinkedIn marketing strategy in 2021 and beyond.

  • 45 percent of those who read articles on LinkedIn are high-level decision makers, and the social platform generates 80 percent of overall B2B social media leads (Source: SalesIntel / Hootsuite)
  • Each week LinkedIn’s feeds get some 9 billion content impressions. (Source: Inc.)
  • A user who follows a company on LinkedIn is 81 percent more likely to open an InMail from that brand than a non-follower. (Source: TechJury)

Bring New Focus to Your LinkedIn B2B Marketing

via GIPHY

By incorporating the new LinkedIn features and insight we’ve examined here, you’ll have a sizable head start in bringing new focus to your own B2B marketing efforts on the platform.

Creating trustworthy and award-winning B2B marketing takes significant effort, which leads many firms to choose working with a top digital marketing agency such as TopRank Marketing. Contact us today and let us know how we can help, as we’ve done for businesses ranging from LinkedIn, Dell and 3M to Adobe, Oracle, monday.com and others.

*LinkedIn and SAP are TopRank Marketing clients.

The post 10 New Insights B2B Marketers Need To Know About LinkedIn In 2021 appeared first on B2B Marketing Blog – TopRank®.

The world’s biggest crypto fund manager is hiring 9 ETF-related specialists, in anticipation of approval of the first US crypto ETF

Michael Sonnenshein.JPG
Michael Sonnenshein, managing director of Grayscale Investments.

  • Grayscale Investments is hiring an ETF team, in a sign it expects the US to approve crypto exchange-traded funds.
  • The digital asset manager doesn’t currently have an active filing with the SEC for a crypto-related ETF.
  • Canada has already approved three cryptocurrency ETFs that trade on the Toronto stock exchange.
  • Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell.

Grayscale Investments, the largest digital currency asset manager, has posted nine ETF-related job ads on LinkedIn, in a sign it expects the Securities and Exchange Commission to approve the first US crypto ETF.

Crypto ETFs have been hotly debated in the US ever since the Winklevoss twins’ filing of their bitcoin ETF with the SEC was rejected in 2017. The SEC has so far been arguing that the crypto market is too volatile, lacks sufficient surveillance, and is easily manipulated.

The US regulator is now considering ETF applications from WisdomTree, NYDIG, VanEck, and Valkyrie Digital Assets. Grayscale has filed to launch an ETF in the past, but it does not currently have an active filing with the SEC for a bitcoin, or crypto-related ETF. However, it could push its $35 billion Bitcoin Trust, the largest of its kind, into an ETF.

“We’re not able to provide further detail aside from the fact that we are continuously exploring new opportunities, such as an ETF, in response to customer demand,” Michael Sonnenshein, Grayscale’s CEO and managing director, told Bloomberg. “We were the first to provide exposure to a digital asset through a regulated wrapper, and our goal is to ensure that we lead the market in whatever future product we bring forward as well.”

Grayscale’s new roles require between three and five years experience in financial positions involving exchange-traded funds. The job postings as seen on LinkedIn currently include an ETF market-maker relationship manager, an ETF finance reporting manager, ETF finance support manager, ETF creation and redemption specialist, ETF authorized participant relationship manager, ETF product development specialist, a compliance officer, and two sales director positions.

Regulated ETFs aren’t too far away, as Canada approved three publicly-traded bitcoin ETFs within the last month that trade on the Toronto Stock Exchange.

Ark Invest’s Cathie Wood told CNBC in February she expects the US to greenlight a bitcoin ETF, as she’s confident in President Joe Biden’s pick for SEC chairman, Gary Gensler, who is seen as a positive for cryptocurrencies. The Senate banking committee on Thursday voted in favour of sending Gensler‘s nomination to the floor for confirmation.

Read the original article on Business Insider

From LinkedIn hashtags to résumé keywords, these are the best ways to tailor your application for remote work

Remote worker
Just one in 10 companies expects all their staff to return to the office after the pandemic.

  • When looking for remote jobs, it’s important to tailor your résumé and cover letter accordingly.
  • Highlighting any previous remote work or related soft skills such as Zoom could go a long way.
  • Optimizing your LinkedIn profile and using the relevant hashtags will catch recruiters’ attention.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Remote work might have been hard to come by in the past but times have changed. Although it’s not easy to find a job in today’s market, remote work is increasingly common.

Only one in 10 companies expect all their staff to return to the office after the pandemic and major companies including Google and Salesforce are planning to accommodate remote work in the long term.

There are many similarities between the remote work application process and the standard in-person work application, but there are new factors to take into account.

Here are some specific tips on how to update your résumé, cover letter, and LinkedIn profile to make yourself the perfect candidate for remote work.

Resume
You could make a note of any specific remote work-related skills you might have.

Résumé

Online volunteering, video meetings with clients in other timezones, and working collaboratively online through Google Docs or the Cloud are all part of the remote work experience, said Jennifer Parrish in Remote.Co.

Clearly outlining this in your resume could make all the difference. You could mention it in parentheses after the job title – for example “marketing director (remote).”

Otherwise, you could mention it in the job description by saying something along the lines of: “I remotely managed a team of five employees and increased sales by 20% in the first quarter.”

If you have a lot of experience in working remotely, you may want to create a specific “Remote work” section to highlight this on your résumé. Whatever you choose, don’t assume that your hiring manager knows you worked remotely simply from your job title.

Indeed suggested that you could also make a note of any specific remote work-related skills you might have. You might choose to name specific programs such as Slack, Asana, Trello, Dropbox, and Google Hangouts, or you can be more general and cite video conferencing, email management, cloud storage technology, and office suites.

cover letter
Try highlighting your remote work skills and what you could do for the company.

Cover letter

One important thing is to remember that the company doesn’t want to know why remote working suits you, but rather why you working remotely will be beneficial to them.

Therefore, lines like: “I want to work with you because I can pick up my children from school,” should definitely be avoided.

Instead, try highlighting your remote work skills and what you could do for the company. For example, soft skills such as responsibility, flexibility, time management, and adaptability are even more essential in a remote post – so talk about how you’ve demonstrated them in your previous roles.

A good example or anecdote like this one could go a very long way. “The first couple of weeks of remote working in my previous role were tough. My employees felt demotivated and so I called an impromptu group call. We wrote down all our frustrations on post-it notes and then tore them to shreds, and it helped people realize they weren’t alone.”

linkedin
When a recruiter scans LinkedIn, they’re going to be looking for people working in their specific sector.

LinkedIn

If you scan your LinkedIn network, you’ll find lots of people with headlines like “looking for remote work opportunities.” That’s a wasted opportunity to catch a recruiter’s attention.

When a recruiter scans LinkedIn, they’re going to be looking for people working in their specific sector. So to choose the best possible professional headline, you’ll need to do some research.

Search for the profiles of people who have the jobs you want and note down the keywords they’ve used in their profiles or job descriptions. Adding those to your profile and using hashtags in posts outlining what you’re looking for could mean you pop up in the recruiter’s next search.

In your “About” section, be sure to keep it concise and relevant. The first three lines are what recruiters will be scanning so make sure you grab their attention enough that they’ll want to click the “See more” button.

If you lack remote experience, all is not lost

If you’ve never worked remotely before, don’t be discouraged. You’re still likely to have many of the relevant skills needed for remote work positions, like using Zoom, Dropbox, Google Drive, and Slack.

You can also enhance your résumé with online collaborations. There are always people looking for volunteers for projects or writers for blogs.

Volunteering your time will mean you have remote experience to add to your résumé and recommendations to add to your cover letter and LinkedIn profile. You might even collaborate with someone who’s able to recommend you for a job posting down the line.

Networking is key and so even if you don’t end up gaining much from a project, it’s sure to benefit you in some small way – even if you’re not sure what that is yet.

Read the original article on Business Insider