What is Secure Boot? A guide to your PC’s security check during startup

business professional working on laptop desktop PC in office
Secure Boot is a safety feature built into all modern PC laptops and desktops.

  • Secure Boot is a feature of your PC’s UEFI that only allows approved operating systems to boot up.
  • It’s a security tool that prevents malware from taking over your PC at boot time.
  • While it’s not recommended to disable Secure Boot, you can customize the certificates it uses to authenticate which operating systems are approved on your PC.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Secure Boot is a feature found in the startup software for your computer that’s designed to ensure your computer starts safely and securely by preventing unauthorized software like malware from taking control of your PC at boot-up.

If you’re using Windows 10 and a modern PC with UEFI (Unified Extensible Firmware Interface, the low-level software that enables your computer to boot), then you’re automatically afforded protection from illicit software attempting to take control of your computer when it starts up.

How Secure Boot works

Before Secure Boot, the computer’s BIOS (Basic Input/Output System) would hand off control of the PC to any bootloader that was located in the right location on the hard drive. There was no way for the BIOS to validate or authenticate the software, so anything could boot the PC – Windows, other operating systems like Linux, and even malware.

That’s no longer the case. Secure Boot is a feature in UEFI, which has replaced the BIOS on the vast majority of PCs in use today. While the BIOS was commonly used in computers from the first PC until the 2000s, today virtually all PCs use UEFI. You may have seen the UEFI interface if you had to access the startup menu by pressing a keyboard shortcut (usually F1 or F2) when the computer is first turned on.

Secure Boot establishes what programmers refer to as a “trust relationship” between the UEFI and the operating system that it launches at boot time. To do this, the launch software is signed with pairs of public/private security keys. The operating system’s private key is “whitelisted” by UEFI. If UEFI has approved the key, the software (like Windows 10) can launch.

IT professionals working together on desktop PC
Secure Boot helps your PC launch safely with the proper operating system, safe from malware attacks.

Windows 10 ships with a certificate that’s stored in UEFI; this serves as the key that allows it to boot. Likewise, other reputable operating systems (like Linux) can also acquire a key and register with UEFI, allowing them to boot securely as well.

Conversely, if malware tries to install a bootloader on your PC to take over at startup, it will not have a signed key, and UEFI will not allow it to launch.

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Clubhouse could finally arrive on Android and ditch invite-only joining by the summer, CEO Paul Davison said

clubhouse app 1
In this photo illustration the Clubhouse app logo is seen displayed on a smartphone screen.

  • Invite-only audio app Clubhouse could launch on Android as soon as this summer.
  • CEO and co-founder Paul Davison said it would take the company “a couple of months” to join Android.
  • Clubhouse could also ditch its invite-only feature “in the coming months,” he said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Clubhouse co-founder and CEO Paul Davison said on Monday that the app could launch on Android this summer.

In a town hall meeting, Davison said Clubhouse was working “really hard” to get onto Android, but that it would take “a couple of months,” TechCrunch first reported.

The app is currently only available on iOS, and users can only join if they receive an invite from someone with an account – but Davison also said that the invitation-only feature of the app may be dropped “in the coming months.”

Paul Davison

Davison has previously said that app would eventually be open for everyone to join.

On Monday, he said that “it’s going to be really important that we just open up to everyone,” adding that “Android’s going to be really important.”

Davison’s comments come one month after CNBC reported Clubhouse had hired an Android software developer, suggesting an Android app could be coming soon.

The company wrote in a January blog post that work on the Android app would begin “soon,” but didn’t say when the app would be available for users to download.

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