The 5 best French presses we tested in 2021

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Also called a coffee press, coffee plunger, or cafetière, the French press is as basic and foolproof as coffee-making gets. Toss a roughly estimated amount of coarsely ground coffee into a basin, pour some fresh-off-the-boil water (our experts suggest around 200 degrees Fahrenheit), let it sit for four or five minutes, gently push the plunger down, and serve.

But while French presses are straightforward devices, some function better than others, and you’ll want to keep a few things in mind when shopping for one.

First, consider the beaker’s material. Your main options are glass, plastic, ceramic, or stainless steel. Glass and ceramic are easier to break, but they’re more traditional looking, and won’t impart a faint metallic or plastic taste the way some claim stainless steel and plastic options do. (We, for the record, didn’t detect any of those flavors from either material during our tests.) Stainless steel is durable and retains heat the longest (especially when it’s double-walled and vacuum-sealed), but it’s the most expensive option. Plastic may be able to withstand falls better than glass, but it’ll scratch and eventually crack in the long term.

“When I choose a French press, it’s all down to how easy it is to clean and if the grinds will be properly filtered when I push down the filter,” said Coffee Project NY co-founder Sum Ngai.

We tested nine French presses using both of those metrics, making at least three pots of coffee with three different sizes of grounds in each press, then monitoring the fine particulate and sludge left behind before washing them (you can find a more detailed explanation of our testing methods here). We also noted how sturdy the presses felt, whether their handles were cool to the touch and if the plungers felt tightly-sealed.

Because most of the French presses we tried out were good – it’s hard to botch such a simple gadget – we highlighted the three that will suit most people based on material, ease of use, durability, price, availability of replacement parts, and, to some degree, aesthetics.

Here are the best French presses in 2021

The best French press overall

French Press Bodum Chambord

The Bodum Chambord is about as timeless as French presses get. It’s unfussy and operates smoothly, and replacement parts (screens, braces, etc.) are affordable and easily attainable. 

Pros: Affordable, simple to use, easy to find (also affordable) replacement parts

Cons: Won’t survive a fall from your kitchen counter, those who prefer finer grounds or use blade grinders might find fine particulate in their brew (look to the Espro 7), doesn’t retain heat well

There’s probably no French press more widely recommended than the Bodum Chambord (which, wouldn’t you know it, is by a Portuguese brand), and it’s what you’ll find on most countertops in both coffee shops and home kitchens. It’s also what our friends at Brooklyn Roasting Company exclusively use in their testing lab.

The Chambord‘s borosilicate glass is good at withstanding heat, but doesn’t do much in the way of retaining it (at least not compared to the double-walled, vacuum-sealed stainless steel of our investment pick, the Espro P7). Heat retention doesn’t matter that much in the world of French presses, though; if you’re not going to drink the coffee right away you should pour it into a carafe so it doesn’t sit in the grounds and become bitter. 

While some French presses we tested had plungers that left gaps around the edges, the Chambord‘s was tightly sealed. That being said, a small amount of fine particles did get through — to completely eliminate any speck of grit you’ll have to invest in a press with a micro-filter, like the Espro P7

Cleaning any French press thoroughly is not the easiest task, but we found that plunging soapy hot water through the strainer and checking for stray grounds did the trick, and the Chambord certainly wasn’t among the more difficult French presses to clean. Again, a French press with a micro-filter, which doesn’t have as many crevices in which to catch grounds, will be easier to wash. 

Speaking of grounds, the French press you choose may be informed by the way you prefer to grind your coffee. If you tend to use finer grounds, or if you use a grinder that doesn’t churn out uniform grounds (as is the case with most blade grinders) you might want to look to a press with a finer filter so that you don’t end up with as much fine particulate in your brew.

Can you spend more on a French press? Of course, but the uptick in quality will be fairly marginal. Can you spend less? Yes, but only a little — there is a slightly cheaper version Bodum makes called the Brazil, which is the Chambord with the steel trap swapped for plastic. We recommend the Brazil for budget-minded folks (and those who have a penchant for breaking things), and you can read more about it here

Otherwise, the Chambord is the right price point for most people, and replacement parts are affordable and easy to find. And, when you do drop and break it, picking up a new one (or a new beaker, at least) won’t cost too much, nor will a filter.

Like most other French presses, the Bodum Chambord comes with a one-year limited warranty.

Read our full review of the Bodum Chambord French press here.

The best budget French press

French Press Bodum Brazil

Bodum’s Brazil is, at its core, the very same French press as the Bodum Chambord, just pared down and a bit more durable with plastic in lieu of glass and steel.

Pros: Simple, operates smoothly, durable, easy to find replacement parts

Cons: Perhaps not as elegant as the Chambord, doesn’t retain heat well

While you won’t get the elegance of the Chambord in Bodum’s economy model — the Brazil’s plastic beaker is held in place with a black plastic frame, as opposed to borosilicate glass in gleaming steel — you will get the same exact coffee. That’s because both models contain identical filtering mechanisms. 

I personally have owned several Brazils and Chambords over the past decade, and I’ve found that they produce the same brew. Like with the Chambord, you’ll find a few stray grounds here and there, but that’s standard unless your French press has a micro-filter. 

Again, if you’re working with a blade grinder or a cheaper burr grinder that doesn’t churn out the most consistent grounds, a French press with a finer filter might be in order to keep any significant amount of particulate, and maybe even thick sludge, from working its way into your coffee. That is, unless you like it that way; if so, you’re not alone (see Turkish coffee or cowboy coffee).

Replacing the Brazil’s filter (18-ounce or 32-ounce) is the same as replacing the Chambord’s since they’re identical and won’t sting too much. The glass beaker is also easy to replace, although doing so may cost the same as or even more than buying a whole new press, depending on which size you’re after. 

The Brazil is a more affordable and more durable answer to the slightly more expensive (and alluring) Chambord with the same one-year limited warranty.

The best stainless steel French press

Espro P7

The Espro P7 is an investment piece, but retains heat exponentially better than glass or plastic French presses and comes with a micro-filter that prevents finer particulate from finding its way into your mug.

Pros: Virtually indestructible, fine mesh filter keeps fine particulate out of your coffee, affordable replacement parts, extremely easy to clean

Cons: Some say the dual micro-filters rob your brew of flavor (though we didn’t find that to be the case)

While all of our picks will get the job done and last about as long as you can manage not to drop them, there are a few reasons you might consider investing a bit more in a French press. The main one being, a press with a micro-filter will keep finer particles out of your coffee. 

The Espro P7’s excellent two-part micro-filter system — two very fine mesh baskets attached to the plunger — leaves you without the bit of sludge that invariably ends up at the bottom of most cups of French press coffee. The coffee made in the P7 was the cleanest out of all the presses we tried. 

Outside of buying a press with a micro-filter, the only other way to ensure your French press coffee remains sludge-free is to get a burr grinder that produces uniform grounds without too many fine particles. That’s not to say that a blade grinder won’t grind your beans (if only in a very basic way), but achieving even decent consistency with one is difficult.

A big interest in stainless-steel French presses is heat retention. While they do invariably keep your coffee hotter longer, it’s important to recognize that, as with tea, leaving your coffee steeping (even after pushing the plunger down) leads to a bitter flavor. Unless you’re going to drink your coffee within about 45 minutes, it’s best to decant it into a thermos or pitcher to keep warm and prevent it from over-steeping.

The P7 was the easiest French press to clean thoroughly since coffee grounds don’t get stuck in its extra-fine mesh. Just note that as with most stainless steel cookware and appliances, a scouring pad will scratch up the exterior so use a soft sponge.

This was also the most durable French press we tried due to the stainless steel construction. The brand’s warranty, called the “Friends for Life Guarantee,” only protects against manufacturing flaws. That being said, you’re unlikely to find any, and if something goes wrong with the filter, replacements aren’t terribly expensive (though they’re more than twice the price of Bodum’s). 

So long as you don’t misplace the Espro P7, or drive a car over it, it’s worth the investment, especially for those who are a) constantly breaking their glass French presses or b) looking to banish fine sediment from their coffee mug once and for all.

What we also recommend

French Press Stanley

Bodum Travel: This French press built into a mug is not the only one out there, but it’s the only one we’ve tested so far. It does its job well, but we’d like to compare it to other travel French presses before deciding whether to include it in our guide. 

Coffee Gator: Coffee Gator makes a highly competitive vacuum-sealed, double-walled, stainless steel press, but as with most designs, you’ll find a good deal of sediment at the bottom of your cup. We like the travel container that comes with this press and allows you to pack it for a day on the road or trail, but when looking for a true upgrade, we found a finer filter to be paramount. If all you’re after is something indestructible, look no further.

ColettiColetti’s Boulder Camping French Press is arguably the heaviest-duty French press we’ve tested. It has a large, welded-on handle, an ultra-tight silicone seal (which is great for keeping your coffee hot at camp), and keeps grounds out of your cup with the best of them. It’s not available yet, but we highly recommend it for people who are extra rough on things.

Frieling: Frieling’s French press is well-designed and appointed with high-grade steel. It also now offers a dual-filter setup, so in function, it’s highly competitive with the Espro P7. The only real difference is that it comes with a five-year warranty, compared to Espro’s “Friends for Life Guarantee.” Still, it’s by no means a bad option.

Stanley: If you’re looking for something for camping, boating, or RVing, there’s hardly a better choice than Stanley’s robust line of drinkware. This French press comes in multiple sizes and can just about withstand a tumble into the campfire like the original, if it weren’t for a few plastic modifications, including the handle.

What else we considered

French Press simpli press

Le Creuset: Le Creuset’s ceramic French presses certainly have aesthetic appeal, but in our experience, they’ve been too easily breakable, and oftentimes the filter either doesn’t quite fit in the first place or begins to warp over time, allowing too many grounds to end up in your coffee.

Simpli Press: This is an attractive device if you ask us, but the trap in the bottom, which is supposed to come up with the plunger for easy cleaning, doesn’t catch and gets stuck. Otherwise, the fine filter (akin to the Espro P7’s system) works well.

What we’re looking forward to testing

There are lots of travel French press mugs or mugs with French presses built-in, but we have only tested one from Bodum so far. For our next update, we’re looking forward to trying out the models below.

Bodum Travel Press ($29.99 on sale): Considering Bodum’s success in our testing of regular French presses and the brand’s long-standing status in the world of French press, we’d be remiss not to consider its travel option. With essentially the same components as the Chambord and Brazil, we imagine it will perform well, but with so many other designs within the travel press market, we can’t make any predictions, either.

Espro P1 ($39.95): Essentially our upgrade pick above built into a travel mug, the Espro P1 contains a microfilter that looks as easy to use as its less portable bigger sibling. At a competitive price with other travel French press options, this looks like a strong contender.

GSI Commuter Javapress ($20.73 on sale): Foregoing the plunging rod for a secondary inner mug, the GSI take on the travel French press looks both novel and convenient. We’re usually fans of their camping gear, and their Coffee Rocket earned a top spot in our guide to the best coffee-making gear for camping.

Stanley Classic Travel Mug French Press, 16 oz. ($35): A rugged and utilitarian design, Stanley’s vacuum-sealed double-walled stainless-steel travel mug is the basic design of Stanley’s original (and 100-year-old) model comes with a fine filter, and seems easy to clean.

Otterbox Elevation 20 French Press Lid ($29.99): This is an alternate lid for the brand’s existing thermoses, and it would be interesting to see how it works and if it’s compatible with the Espro P1, which is essentially our stainless steel pick built into a travel mug, and GSI, which foregoes the plunging rod for a secondary inner mug.

Our testing methodology

french press grounds

Before selecting French presses to test, we spoke to Sum Ngai of Coffee Project NY, Jordan Rosenaker of Atlas Coffee Club, and Jim Munson, CEO of Brooklyn Roasting Company to learn what their favorite presses were and what the most critical components of a French press are. 

Here are the criteria we looked for during each test: 

Ease of use: We checked to see if each French press’s plunger worked smoothly, and noted whether or not there were gaps between the presses’ filters and beakers. We also paid attention to the size and placement of the handle size; a poorly-designed handle could leave your knuckles grazing hot glass.

Ability to handle different sizes of coffee grounds: We filled each press three times with 54 grams of coarse grinds and water at 200° Fahrenheit. We used a Kruve sieve to measure the grinds to ensure accuracy and consistency: 1150 micrometers, 1220 micrometers, and 1280 micrometers. We gave each pot a quick stir and let it steep for four to five minutes (four minutes for finer grounds, five minutes for coarser grounds) before evaluating the coffee.

Amount of sludge left behind: While we kept an eye out for residual fine particulate and sludge after decanting each pot into a Kruve carafe, the amount found in each batch was almost identical, save for the finer (600-1000 micrometer) grounds, which left more fine particulate matter in all but our stainless steel pick, the ESPRO P7.

Effort to clean: We aggressively washed each strainer, although we found them all to be fairly sturdy. As mentioned earlier, the P7’s filter was the easiest to clean and coffee grounds didn’t get stuck in its ultra-fine mesh. 

How to make French press coffee

french press method testing

There’s some debate as to the “perfect” way to make French press coffee, and Brooklyn Roasting Company offered a ratio of 16 milliliters of water to 1 gram of coffee for those who want to be technical. That said, the brand’s CEO, Jim Munson, never measures out his grounds and prefers to use what he calls “the grandma method,” which Julia Childs herself taught him. It goes like this: 

  1. Fill a one-liter French press with about an inch of grounds (somewhere in the range of 1100-1200 micrometers, as we watched him).
  2. Fill the carafe with water just off a boil, letting it rest for 30 seconds to a minute before pouring.
  3. Pour the water over the grounds, give it a stir, cover it with the plunger, and let it steep about four minutes before gently plunging and serving.
  4. Pour right away, as it will get bitter if it steeps for too long. 

Here we should mention that your coffee grounds should be anywhere between the size of coarse sand and fine breadcrumbs (or 600 to 1300 micrometers), according to various experts and texts we consulted, including “The Craft and Science of Coffee.”

You can also check out this guide we put together on how to make French press coffee, but it all comes down to personal preference and can be as freeform an art or as exact a science as you’d like.

How to clean a French press

looking forward to Espro P1

Coffee pots of all types are breeding grounds for mold spores and bacteria, so it’s important to clean them regularly. However, French presses — typically consisting of a plate, a spiral, and a layer of mesh — can be tricky to clean, and coffee grounds get stuck inside them easily. Here’s the cleaning method we find the most effective:

  1. Fill the basin or carafe of your French press with hot, soapy water (regular dish soap works here).
  2. Plunge the plunger back and forth to create a froth. This will generally get out most of the grounds.
  3. You can go and pick out any stray grounds, but that might be a bit much for most people, and plunging the hot soapy water takes care of any mold or bacteria anyway.

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The 3 best juicers we tested in 2021

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If you buy fresh juice regularly, you may want to invest in a juicer. The best ones can pulverize an entire farmer’s market haul into smooth, flavorful juice with little foam, easily fit on the counter, won’t wake up the whole house, are simple to clean, and come with a decent warranty (10 years is the industry standard).

There are two basic juicer types on the market: centrifugal and masticating (or slow). The larger, noisier, and more affordable of the two, centrifugal juicers use a high-speed blade and tend to yield less juice and more foam than their slow-juicing counterparts.

Masticating juicers steadily turn an auger that pulverizes fruits and veggies, leaving more nutrients and enzymes intact and producing smoother, silkier, and better-tasting juice overall. For these reasons, this guide focuses solely on slow juicers.

To arrive at our top picks, we juiced everything from hardy root vegetables to leafy greens, and considered the resulting juices’ taste, texture, foam levels, and oxidation rates. We also measured the volume of liquid each machine produced and the amount of pulp left behind, as well as the juicers’ speeds and noise levels. Lastly, with the help of a mechanical engineer, we pulled apart several juicers to see if they were made with identical parts (despite differences in size and price).

We’d also like to note that, while some people claim green juice can help you lose weight and clear the body of “toxins,” these ideas are not medically supported.

“Even if you’re making it yourself, juice is still more processed than a whole fruit or veggie, and studies consistently show that it’s more beneficial to eat foods in their more natural state,” Samantha Cassetty, MS, RD, author of “Sugar Shock” told us. “Our bodies don’t register the calories we drink in the same way they register calories from food, so you don’t get the same level of fullness from juice as you would from eating an apple or veggie.”

However, Cassetty said fresh juice is still an excellent way to add more nutrients to your diet, and based on our testing, the juicers below all perform at the top level.

Here are the best juicers you can buy in 2021

The best juicer overall

hurom hp slow juicer

Not only was the Hurom HP Slow Juicer one of the most powerful models we tested, it was also the most compact and user-friendly.

Pros: Small size, intuitive design, 100% BPA-free plastic, 10-year motor warranty, easy to clean, high juice yield

Cons: 2-year parts warranty, somewhat slow (even by slow juicer standards), juice is slightly less concentrated than its more expensive competitors’

While Hurom’s HP Slow Juicer is the smallest machine we tested, it uses the same powerful motor as models that take up nearly twice the space (like the Omega VSJ843, for example). We discovered this after disassembling and examining several highly-rated juicers with the help of a mechanical engineer — a process that we describe in greater detail under “Our Methodology,” below. 

The HP comes with a fine strainer, a larger strainer to allow some pulp to pass through — always a good idea, nutritionally — and two cleaning brushes. In other words, it has exactly all you need and nothing you don’t. That doesn’t mean the machine is without its conveniences, though; we’re fans of the inner spinning brush that helps clear the strainers while you’re juicing, allowing for a higher yield.

Indeed, the HP did produce a high yield. It pulled the most liquid out of every single fruit or veggie we juiced, and consistently had among the driest discarded pulp (in these respects, it even outperformed our other recommendation from Hurom, the H-AI Self-Feeding Juicer). The resulting juice was clean, bright, and refreshing, and contained little foam, although it wasn’t quite as rich and intense as its pricier competitors’ output. 

When it’s time to clean up, there are no awkward angles to scrub, and that cleaning brush does an excellent job of removing pulp from hard-to-reach spots thanks to a convenient pick built into its handle. Hurom cautions against running the machine’s parts through the dishwasher, although we managed to do so without a problem. (Is this cleaning method a good idea, long-term? Probably not, but we wanted to make sure the HP could handle it in a pinch.) 

A note to those who tend to juice while rushing out the door: if speed is of the essence, Hurom’s HP Slow Juicer may not be the machine for you. It runs at 43 RPM, which is a bit slow even by slow juicer standards. For comparison, the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer and the previously mentioned Hurom H-AI — two models included in this guide — run at 60 RPM, while the Omega Cold Press 365, which we’re currently testing, runs at 90 to 110 RPM. 

Aside from its relatively gentle pace, the only thing that leaves this juicer wanting is a 10-year motor warranty and a 2-year parts warranty — you’ll get better coverage from Kuvings and Omega. 

In the end, the HP’s ease of use, simple clean-up, and compact size make it a clear winner for us. After all, if your juicer is compact enough to live on your countertop instead of a cabinet, you’ll notice — and therefore use — it all the more often.

The best multi-use juicer

kuvings slow juicer

The Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer produces rich, velvety juice, and goes beyond the usual call of duty to act as a citrus juicer and ice cream maker with the help of attachments. 

Pros: Versatile, 10-year warranty on all parts, BPA-free plastic, extra-wide feeding spout

Cons: Heavy, some attachments sold separately, cleanup can be time-consuming

The Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer is a sound investment if you like the idea of an appliance that can do quadruple duty. Not only is it an excellent slow juicer in its own right, it’s designed to accommodate three attachments: smoothie and frozen dessert makers (both included) and a citrus juicer (sold separately).

To use the citrus juicer attachment, you palm halves of citrus over a reamer that’s turned by the machine’s motor. It’s simple and gets the job done, and while we think the price of the attachment is higher than it needs to be, it’s still far more affordable than purchasing a separate appliance. 

During our testing, we used the smoothie strainer to make a berry and banana smoothie that was texturally consistent, foam-free, and silkier than anything we’ve pulled from a blender. The blank strainer for frozen desserts was more difficult to master: we were successful with banana gelato, but not much else. It seems that a particular level of frozenness (and practice) is required to churn out sorbets, gelatos, and ice creams as effortlessly as this YouTuber.

As far as its main duty goes, the Whole Slow Juicer’s 3.2-inch-wide feeding spout can accommodate larger pieces of fruit than our top pick, and at 60 RPM it’s a bit faster, too. The extra speed may come at the expense of maximum juicing; compared to the Hurom HP, the Kuvings squeezed less liquid out of our fruits and vegetables, and its wetter pulp suggested that there was some good stuff left behind in the discard pile. 

That being said, the Whole Slow Juicer produced the richest, most velvety juice we tried during our taste tests, with and without the detachable external strainer that helps catch any residual pulp. 

There is one design quirk we should note, though: the chute makes an awkward turn towards the auger, which means harder fruits and vegetables like carrots and beets get hung up, while softer ones like grapes leave a significant amount of mush in the bend. We had to reverse the auger more times for the Kuvings than for any other juicer, and while we were able to send most of that aforementioned mush back through, it was an extra, messy step.

That turn in the chute also made for more complicated cleanup work, but that’s only nominal when it comes to juicers. Plus, any additional time spent was mostly offset by the Kuvings’ self-cleaning internal strainer, whose basket is lined with pulp-sweeping brushes. Like everything we tested, its parts withstood the dishwasher. 

Small flaws considered, if you want a juicer that does it all, this is the only one we know of that can make smoothies, frozen desserts (with some trial and error), and citrus juice. It’s also BPA-free and includes a 10-year warranty on all parts, which tops all of the other product warranties on our list. 

The best self-feeding juicer

hurom h ai 4x3

Hurom’s H-AI Slow Juicer has a small footprint, is easy to clean, and because it’s self-feeding, does a lot of the work for you.

Pros: Easy to use and clean, space-saving, self-feeding hopper is a time-saver, BPA-free plastic, 10-year warranty on motor

Cons: Only a two-year warranty on parts, some produce gets stuck in self-feeding hopper (though only peaches and pears, in our experience)

A self-feeding juicer like Hurom’s H-AI Slow Juicer can make juicing a good deal easier, and because it takes up so little space, it’s not unreasonable to leave it out and ready for use.

There’s a bit of debate as to whether or not the self-feeding hopper works well, but in our experience over the past two years we’ve only had two problems: once with peaches, and another time with pears. In both instances, the fruits were bordering on overripe and turned into a mush that could not be fed from the hopper into the auger. While it’s true that another juicer might have handled this problem better, most of us aren’t juicing a ton of overripe fruits. Further, if you start to encounter this problem, a good solution (before it’s too late) is to intersperse some harder fruits into the mix to help push the rest through.

Otherwise, everything we put into the hopper made it through to the auger and came out as juice, and the pulp was among the driest from the juicers we’ve tested (aside from our top pick, the Hurom HP). We also ended up with notably less waste from this juicer than any other. 

This machine yielded more juice than the Kuvings — despite the fact that both turn at 60 RPM — thanks to a preparatory blade in the hopper. However, the results weren’t as rich as the Kuvings’ and the H-AI produced a little more foam, although the difference was marginal. 

Because this machine is completely vertically integrated (even the pulp canister is built into it vertically), we found cleanup to be markedly quick. Everything pulls apart easily, and the self-feeding hopper is much more open than the Kuvings’ chute. 

If you find you don’t like the self-feeding hopper, or want to use a chute for softer fruits, there’s a two-inch-wide one in the kit, along with a fine and large strainer, so you have juicing options. 

Every component of this juicer, save for the stand and motor, has been through the washing machine well over 20 times, and we haven’t had any problems to date.

This is an expensive machine, but it has worked flawlessly for us for over two years of rigorous use. If you want a juicer that does everything, the Kuvings might be for you, but if you’re looking to juice with exceptional ease, the Hurom H-AI is tops.

Like the Hurom HP, this juicer comes with a 10-year warranty on the motor and a two-year warranty on the parts. We wish Hurom would extend the full warranty to parts, but that’s about the only shortcoming we can point to in all of the time we’ve been using it.

Our methodology

2lb carrot juice test

To test the juicers’ ability to handle a variety of fruits and vegetables, we ran beets, carrots, kale, and black seedless grapes through each machine. We weighed the produce beforehand to make sure we were putting the exact same amount in each juicer, then measured the volume (fluid ounces) of the resulting juice.

We noted the amount of foam that settled at the top of each cup of juice, the rate of oxidation (some juices browned faster than others), and the amount of pulp left behind. 

And, of course, we measured taste, however subjectively, and found that some juices were more watery than others (we used a fine strainer throughout testing) while others were incredibly rich.

We also pulled apart four juicers after speaking with Duncan Freake, a mechanical engineer at Epam Continuum, who posited that certain parts, including the augers, strainers, and receptacles were the same between Omega and HP. Sure enough, while the parts inside each of the juicers we disassembled weren’t exactly identical, it was clear that they came from the same factory, or used the same components, from Korea. And while both brands advertise that their juicers are made in Korea, they don’t divulge that many of their parts come from the same set of factories as their competitors, Zhejiang Linix Motor Co., Ltd. Granted, this is a common case with many household appliances, and something we found to be true when researching for our guide to the best countertop ice makers, too.

What else we recommend

Breville Juice Fountain Plus: If you do want a centrifugal juicer, this is one of the best in its category. We’ve used it many times in the past, we’ve seen it hold up at several small juice stands, and the price is right. Still, it produces a lot of foam, and it’s a good deal larger than the vertical slow juicers we recommend.

Omega VSJ843: This juicer, down to almost every single part, turned out to be identical to the Hurom HP. The big difference is that it comes with a 15-year warranty on “parts and performance” versus a 10-year warranty on the Hurom juicers’ motors and a two-year warranty on other parts. In the end, the motor warranty is a bigger consideration, because if you break a part (and it’s not due to defect), it’s still on you to replace. We’re going to work on comparing customer service between the two companies for further consideration.

What else we considered

Breville Bluicer: This could be a handy machine if you happen to need a juicer and a blender at once, but it’s large, and comes with a lot of parts you might not want to use (let alone store). We found the juice yield so low and the amount of foam so high, though, that on top of other detrimental factors such as size and noise, we decided against recommending it in this guide.

Hamilton Beach Big Mouth: This centrifugal high-speed juicer is more affordable than the Breville Juice Fountain Plus, but while it worked, it produced a ton of foam.

Smeg Slow Juicer: Smeg’s Slow Juicer had a lot of the same qualities as the Omega VSJ843 or the Hurom HP, but at about $500, you’re mostly paying for its ’50s-vintage appeal.

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Le Creuset has a little-known ‘Specials’ section of its site where you can find discounts on Dutch ovens, nonstick pans, and bakeware – here are the best deals available

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

le creuset teal and  blue cookware
  • Le Creuset, known for its beautiful cookware, has specials you can shop year-round featuring huge discounts.
  • Some of our favorites, including the Mini Cocottes Set, are included in the discounts; we’ve also listed more of our favorite deals below.

Le Creuset is known for its beautiful, well-crafted, and oftentimes, pricey cookware. While we’ve found that they’re worth the price, it definitely helps when you can find some versatile stoneware and more at a discount.

Outside of deal events like Presidents’ Day and Black Friday, you can find solid discounts on some of the Le Creuset lineup on its site, year round. The Specials section holds tons of excellent discounts pretty much all year – so you should never settle for paying retail price for Le Creuset cookware.

This time around, shoppers can also save up to 50% on select Le Creuset cookware and accessories as well, including ramekins, griddles, dinner plates, and more.

Shop the Le Creuset Specials now or keep scrolling for some of our favorite deals in the sale

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We ordered from Omaha Steaks, and it’s a definite step up in quality from what your supermarket sells

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

Omaha Steaks Lifestyle

  • Online food company Omaha Steaks has been in business since 1917 and ships out 4 million orders annually.
  • It sells meat and other foods for as little as $39.99 per bundle, and offers bulk packages to help you stock up.
  • Every cut of meat ships in its own vacuum-sealed package and comes with precise, easy-to-follow cooking instructions.

Filet Mignon Dinner (small)

You’ve heard of Omaha Steaks. It’s the mail order meat company that sent your boss some filet mignon as a thank you from his boss. Or maybe your uncle has been talking about it ever since he got that one box of steaks back in 1998. Or it’s possible that you saw it advertised in some in-flight magazine.

If you’re like many folks out there, you probably think the company sells quality meats but at prices that put their foods outside of your comfort zone. If you only focus on Omaha Steaks’ packages, like the $299 Butcher’s Backyard Basics or the $159 Build Your Own Holiday Feast complete with pork loin roast, savory sides, and sweet desserts, then yeah, you’d be right. On the other hand, you can also order a box of food from Omaha Steaks for less than $40.

What you get from Omaha Steaks

Try a package of four 5-ounce top sirloin steaks (seasoning included). In other words, you get a fine meal for four people at $12.50 per person. And that, friends, is better pricing than you would find for dinner at most restaurants.

The fact is, until you get into the larger packages or the choicest cuts of meat (Filet mignon costs a lot of money, okay?), ordering food from Omaha Steaks isn’t all that much more expensive than getting it from the grocery store, and the selection and quality are better than what most supermarkets offer.

Omaha Steaks Ribeye

And ordering your steaks, pork chops, burgers, lobster tails, and all sorts of other meats and sides from this hundred-year-old company is a whole lot cheaper than dining at a steakhouse. With all the variety Omaha Steaks offers, from entrees and sides to desserts and even wine, it can easily become a one-stop online shop for most of your dinner-making needs.

What the food from Omaha Steaks is like

Insider Reviews contributor Steven John tried out a combo called The Best of Omaha Steaks ($60, temporarily sold out), which came with two four-ounce filet mignons, two four-ounce top sirloins, four pork chops, four jumbo franks, four apple tarts, and a seasoning packet for the meats.

He says, “One night, when my brother and his wife and kids were visiting, I cooked up all the steaks and chops, serving three adults (my wife is a vegetarian) and three kids (four were present, but being five months old, my daughter isn’t really eating steak yet). So six people ate, and I still had the hot dogs and tarts for another time. Assuming those would create the centerpiece of another meal for four, we’re talking about 10 servings of food for $60, or $6 a person. Not bad at all.”

Other members of the Insider Reviews team have tried a variety of meat, sides, and desserts from the company. We loved the taste, not to mention the excuse to indulge in dishes like bacon-wrapped sirloin, crispy steakhouse hash browns, and red velvet cake.

Some of the best deals on the site currently are the Stock-Up Packages and Free Shipping Combos, which will help you get all the protein and sides you need to feed your house for a while – all delivered straight to your door.

Convenience and prep

omaha steaks review

Beyond the value of ordering from Omaha Steaks, there’s plenty to be said for ease of prep.

Everything you get from Omaha Steaks comes carefully wrapped in vacuum-sealed plastic, making freezer storage simple and allowing you to choose the exact portions you want each time. On the back of each box, the company provides step-by-step preparation and cooking instructions, which helped Steven grill some of the best steaks he had cooked in months.

Standard shipping costs range from $17.99 to $21.99 depending on your cart total, and there are expedited shipping options available as well. Right now, you can expect your order to be delivered within eight to nine days with standard shipping.

The bottom line

If you don’t have access to a butcher shop, which will generally be the best place to get your meat locally, consider Omaha Steaks. And if you need a great gift idea for an uncle or your boss, a box of meat is always a fine option.

Shop all meat from Omaha Steaks here

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The 6 best electric and stovetop tea kettles in 2021

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If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

  • The best tea kettles are easy to fill and pour and bring water to a boil quickly and consistently.
  • Our top electric pick has various water temperature settings, a durable design, and an accessible price.
  • While our top stovetop pick features drip-free pouring, large capacity, and other special features.

There’s nothing more comforting than a hot cup of tea, but boiling water and safely pouring it into a mug or teacup is a surprisingly difficult task without a proper kettle. If you want to quickly and easily make boiling water – so you can relax with your tea sooner – you should invest in an electric or stovetop kettle.

Each style has its own merits, and the type you choose comes down to personal preference. Electric kettles are faster and you can heat water to the exact temperature your tea requires. Stovetop kettles have a more classic look and they often whistle loudly to grab your attention.

We’ve included the best of both in our guide, and you can read more about them here.

Here are the best tea kettles

The best electric kettle overall

best tea kettle

The Krups Cool Touch Adjustable Temperature Kettle heats water to the perfect temperature for brewing a variety of teas. It looks sleek and it costs much less than similar kettles.

Pros: Affordable, adjustable temperature settings, easy to use, attractive metal design

Cons: Some users experienced leaking

If you’re serious about your tea and you like to drink all different kinds of tea, you need an adjustable temperature kettle. This 1.7-liter kettle has six preset temperature settings to ensure that you never burn your green tea leaves with scalding hot water ever again.

It’s remarkably easy to select the temperature setting you need with pre-sets for delicate, green, white, oolong, and herbal teas. If you just want black tea, hit “boil” and watch the water go up to 212 degrees Fahrenheit within five minutes or less.  

Believe it or not, using the right temperature is a big deal. Whenever I make green, white, or oolong tea with this kettle, I always set it to the right temperature instead of just hitting the button. The teas’ flavors come out in full force when brewed at the right temperature, and it’s so easy to select the right temperature on the Krups kettle. 

The kettle automatically stops boiling when it hits the temperature you selected or if it runs dry. The kettle will even keep your water warm for a time before automatically shutting off to protect the heating element. 

The kettle is made out of brushed stainless steel, and it looks gorgeous in my kitchen. The kettle jug is unattached, so you can pick it up and pour the water over your tea, oatmeal, or cooking pot without worrying about the length of the cord. The cord is concealed in the base and you can have it as short as you need it to be. 

There’s a big button on the top of the kettle, which pops the lid open when pressed. The handle is big, comfortable, and always stays cool for easy handling and pouring. There is a water window as well, so you can check how much is in there. Krups put the anti-scale filter in the spout of the kettle, and you can remove it if need be.

The best stovetop kettle overall

OXO kettle

If you’re looking for a classic kettle that heats quickly, fills easily, and is simple to pour, the OXO Brew Classic Tea Kettle is an excellent choice.

Pros: Wide bottom for quick heating, easy to fill and pour, large capacity

Cons: Can rust if not properly cleaned

The OXO Brew Classic Tea Kettle has a traditional shape with its wide-bottom body that narrows at the top and a spout that draws from near the bottom of the kettle. More importantly, it has a strong whistle that alerts you when the water is boiling. Once the water boils, you open the spout cover, and the spout offers precise, drip-free pouring.

This kettle is made of high-grade stainless steel that is supposed to be rust-resistant. OXO recommends wiping the kettle down regularly to keep cooking oils from wearing away at the steel. The handle and spout have silicone touch points that resist heat for burn-free use. The handle folds to the side for storage or easy filling. The kettle holds 1.7 quarts, which is a good amount for a big pot of tea.

OXO offers a satisfaction guarantee, so the company will refund or replace your kettle if you are not satisfied for any reason.

The kettle also has a handle that folds out of the way, there’s good interior visibility, and it’s easy to fill thanks to its broad opening.

The best electric kettle on a budget

Secura kettle

The fast-heating Original Secura Stainless Steel Double Wall Electric Water Kettle is about the same price as plastic models, but it’s completely BPA-free.

Pros: Made of durable 100% stainless steel, keeps water warm, shuts off automatically, two-year warranty, easy to clean

Cons: No water gauge to see how much is inside, no variable temperature settings

Sometimes you just want a no-frills appliance that works and comes at an affordable price point. The Original Secura Stainless Steel Double Wall Electric Water Kettle fits the bill as a budget-friendly stainless steel electric kettle that boils water quickly.

It may not have fancy features like variable temperature settings or a water gauge, but it does offer a full stainless steel unibody design and 1500 watts of heating power. The kettle turns off automatically so you don’t boil a dry pot and damage the heating element.

Secura’s kettle is about the same price as cheap plastic ones, but it’s completely BPA-free and no plastic ever touches your water. The stainless steel inner wall is easy to clean after each use, so you can avoid mineral buildup over time. It has a double-wall construction, so the outer layer of plastic stays cool to the touch even as the water boils inside.

As long as you don’t need variable temperatures for tea or want to see the water level inside, the Secura kettle is a real winner — especially at this price point.

The best stovetop kettle on a budget

Cuisinart Kettle

Not only is the Cuisinart Aura Steel Stovetop Tea Kettle inexpensive, it also has a large two-quart capacity that is useful for much more than tea making.

Pros: Limited lifetime warranty, inexpensive, large capacity

Cons: Very loud whistle, can rust without proper cleaning

The Cuisinart Aura is a basic stovetop tea kettle, and sometimes that’s all you need. It gets the job done at a great price point, and if it breaks or rusts, it won’t break your heart.

The Cuisinart Aura features a two-quart-capacity solid stainless steel body — enough for eight cups of tea. The large capacity is also handy for boiling water for oatmeal, instant noodles, or anything else you need to quickly boil water for. This kettle notifies you that your water is boiling and ready with a whistle that increases in intensity. Sometimes it’s a bit too intense and you’ll find yourself running over to the stove to make it stop.

To pour the water, there’s a lever on the handle that you push to open the spout cap, ensuring you’ll never have to put your fingers near hot steam or boiling water to remove a cap. The handle is stationary and made of plastic, and the wide lid allows for easy refilling of the kettle.

To top it off, the entire setup is backed by a lifetime limited warranty.

The best high-end electric kettle

smeg electric kettle

The Smeg ’50s Retro-Style Electric Kettle adds style to any kitchen with its fun old school look, and it’ll heat your water quickly, too.

Pros: Fun 1950s-inspired design, stainless steel, automatic shut off, removable stainless steel filter, water level indicator, lots of color options

Cons: You’re paying for form more than function

Smeg’s ’50s Retro-Style Electric Kettle adds much-needed flair to the traditional kettle with its ’50s color palette and fun design aesthetic. You can get it in multiple color options, including cream, blue, green, red, black, chrome, and pink.

The kettle is made of stainless steel that’s powder-coated for added durability and protection from mineral buildup. If anything goes wrong, Smeg offers a one-year warranty.

Inside, there’s a removable, stainless steel limescale filter that you’ll need to clean every now and then to prevent too much of a deposit from building up. If you have hard water, you’ll have to clean the filter more often. It also has a water level window so you can check how much water is inside.

You are paying a premium for the design, but anyone who loves well-designed appliances or has a retro-inspired kitchen will love this kettle.

The best high-end stovetop kettle

kettle

If you are looking for a stylish tea kettle that heats quickly and stores easily, you will be hard-pressed to find a better option than the Le Creuset Enamel-on-Steel Zen Teakettle.

Pros: Heat-proof handle folds down, loud whistle, can be used with any stove type, including induction

Cons: Expensive, may dribble

The enamel-on-steel body of the Le Creuset Zen Teakettle makes it more resistant to rusting and thus more durable than its counterparts. The kettle holds 1-5/8 quarts of water and has an inverted bowl shape, which helps it heat quickly. The arched handle folds down for storage and filling, and the lid is wide for easy cleaning and filling.

Though the enamel of the kettle is “chip-resistant,” Le Creuset warns that repeated banging may damage the exterior enamel. The Zen Teakettle comes in ten colors, including Marseille, cherry, dune, and palm. Plus, each style comes with a limited five-year warranty.

Additional nice features are its heat-proof handle, loud whistle, and the fact that it can be used on any type of stovetop. However, the price is a bit steep for a kettle.

FAQs

Electric kettles vs. stovetop kettles — which should you buy?

Electric kettles: For real tea fanatics, it can be difficult to get just the right temperature water for your brew, and nuking H2O in the microwave is simply out of the question. That’s where electric kettles come in. They boil water faster than a watched pot on your stove, and the best ones even offer adjustable temperature settings to ensure that the water is just right for your delicate tea leaves.

You can also use electric kettles to boil water quickly for any cause. No matter your needs, it’s good to have a dedicated appliance in your kitchen that boils water quickly.

Stovetop kettles: The hardest part of making tea is remembering that you’re making tea. An electric kettle won’t notify you when the water is ready. Conversely, the whistle of the stovetop kettle demands attention more intensely — you can’t forget you’re making tea with something that whistles

What are kettles made of? 

Most kettles are made of stainless steel, plastic, enamel-on-steel, or some combination of these materials. There are a few glass kettles available, but they receive low marks for performance from both buyers and experts.

Due to research linking bisphenol-A (BPA) and phthalates to cancer, many people are a little squeamish around kettles made out of plastic, especially since heating plastics can cause chemicals to leach into liquids or foods. However, the plastics that have been shown to cause cancer are used to make clear, hard containers or soft, flexible products. Tea kettles don’t fit into either of these categories.

But, if you are concerned about drinking hot water that has come into contact with plastic, make sure you choose a tea kettle that avoids this problem. Each of the kettles in our guide uses plastic sparingly, but never in the main part of the kettle.

What’s the best way to prevent rust or mineral buildup in your kettle?

Though the name may suggest otherwise, stainless steel tea kettles are susceptible to rusting. The best way to combat this is to regularly wash your kettle and dry it completely. If you do notice rust, fill your kettle with a 1:1 ratio of vinegar and water, boil it for a few minutes, empty it, and then wash your kettle per the manufacturer’s specifications. Rusting is less common with enamel-on-steel kettles.

Check out our other tea-lover guides

best travel mugs 4x3
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The 5 best dish drying racks of 2021

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  • A quality dish drying rack effectively separates dishes, is designed for easy water run-off and drying, and is easy to clean.
  • PremiumRacks is our top pick because it’s customizable and can hold more than just dishes.
  • Check out our best dish mats guide, too.

Even if you have a dishwasher, there are some kitchen items that aren’t dishwasher safe. For instance, you should always wash your knives by hand. And, you will extend the life of your cookware by cleaning it with old-fashioned elbow grease.

Aside from bamboo knife blocks and silicone mats, the most popular dish rack materials are stainless steel and hard plastic, though both have their pluses and minuses. Some cheaper brands use stainless steel that may rust, while plastic dish racks are more likely to break. For the most part, you’re unlikely to experience these problems with the dish racks we recommend below.

We rounded up dish racks that are foldable, roll-up, and are ideal for different counter spaces so you can simply wash and dry.

Here are the best dish drying racks of 2021

The best dish drying rack overall

best disk rack

The PremiumRacks Professional Dish Rack can hold twice as many dishes as other racks and can be configured in various ways.

Pros: Holds a lot of dishes, several different configuration options, rust-resistant, one-year warranty if ordered on company’s website

Cons: Difficult to assemble

What sets the PremiumRacks Professional Dish Rack apart from other racks is its customizability. You can choose where to place the cutting board and three cup holder attachments, microfiber mat, knife and wide utensil holders, and the two drainboards. Also, the top shelf is removable and can be positioned either front to back or side to side. However, the customization can also make it tricky to assemble at first.

Because of the rack’s material, it typically resists rust and other oxidative elements, a plus if you live in a coastal area. Though it can hold many dishes and does a solid job of keeping water off the counter, it may not be fit for smaller kitchens. 

In addition, PremiumRacks offers a one-year warranty on all of its dish racks if you order from the company site.

The best roll-up dish drying rack

best over the sink dish rack

If you’re working with limited counter space, consider using the Surpahs Over the Sink Roll-Up Dish Rack to turn your sink into a drainer.

Pros: Can be stored away when not in use, ideal for small spaces, heat-resistant, non-slip silicone design, lifetime warranty

Cons: Small capacity, may not be able to use the sink while dishes are drying

Let’s face it — dish racks are essential for washing and drying dishes, but most take up more counter space than you’d like. The Surpahs Over the Sink Roll-Up Dish Rack combats this with its flexible design that rolls up for storage.

Surpahs‘ silicone construction keeps the unit slip-free and heat-resistant up to 400 degrees. It’s also easy to clean and stays in place, though you may not be able to use the sink when it’s set up atop your sink. 

For extra protection, Surpahs backs its roll-up dish drying rack with a lifetime warranty when shopping on Amazon or from the company site.

The best foldable dish drying rack

best foldable dish rack

The OXO Good Grips Convertible Foldaway Dish Rack is durable and well-designed to organize dishes, glasses, and flatware. 

Pros: Folds up for easy storage, holders for several different kitchen items, rust-resistant; replacement or refund options with OXO Better Guarantee 

Cons: The side drain spout makes it difficult to expel all water

The feature that sets the OXO Good Grips Convertible Foldaway Dish Rack apart from competitors is that the spout, legs, and side walls fold up for compact storage either vertically or horizontally. The rack has two utensil holders that are divided into three compartments each, which keeps flatware separated for easy organization. There are six slots for standing plates and cutting boards. Finally, there is also an array of tines for cups and glassware. Water drains directly into your sink thanks to its side drainage spout, though its location may make it difficult for all of the water to be expelled.

For people with limited kitchen space, this is a great, versatile option. Additionally, its various compartments fit most items in your kitchen and make it easier to put them away once they are dry.

OXO’s Better Guarantee offers replacement or refund options if you’re not happy with your purchase, too.

The best dish drying rack for small countertops

best small dish rack

With its unique angled design and compact footprint, the Chef’n DishGarden Dish Rack is ideal for smaller kitchens.

Pros: Angled design for easy draining, compact enough to fit in a sink

Cons: Water tends to drip on the counter, limited capacity

The Chef’n DishGarden Dish Rack has a  circular design and angled layout that’s ideal for almost any nook and cranny in your kitchen. There are five legs: two front legs that are an inch high, two middle legs that are 1.5 inches, and a back leg that is two inches. This allows water to drain out of the spout, though the dish rack tends to leave water on your counter space.

The prongs are shorter in the back and longer in the front to give the illusion that the whole unit is flat. As a bonus, the rack is small enough to use in-sink, or you can opt to use it with a drying mat.

The best two-tier dish rack

iSPECLE slide image

The iSPECLE Stainless Steel Two-Tier Dish Rack is a foolproof organizer for holding more dishes without taking up extra space. 

Pros: Space-saving design, rust-resistant, can hold up to 110 pounds, adjustable feet, comes with three water trays

Cons: May be too tall to fit under kitchen cabinets, no warranty

If you’re looking to save space and maximize the amount of kitchenware you can dry at a time, the iSPECLE Stainless Steel Two-Tier Dish Rack is one of our most unique picks. It’s able to hold 17 plates and pots on top and 18 bowls at the bottom.

The drying rack comes with three water trays (one underneath the top tray, one at the very bottom, and one underneath the utensil holder on the side) to ensure no water spills onto your countertops. The easy-to-assemble adjustable feet make it ideal for uneven surfaces, too.

Though it’s a great space saver, it may not fit spaces where overhead cabinets hang lower than usual because of its height. And, though there’s no warranty, it’s durable and built to last.

Check out our other dishwashing guides and roundups

best dish rack
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The spurtle is the simple wooden kitchen tool you never knew you needed. Here are the 5 best options in 2021.

  • A spurtle is a wooden stirring tool originally used in Scotland for making porridge.
  • Modernized spurtles are now used for everything from folding batter to mashing avocados.
  • We found traditional spurtles, silicone and bamboo options, and more.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

There’s a good chance you’re wondering just what a spurtle even is. Spurtles are wooden stirring tools that date back to the 15th century in Scotland and were used to make silky, lump-free porridge. While the more traditional version of this item still proves useful, a modern take on the gadget that resembles something between a spoon and a spatula has also become extremely popular. In fact, if you’re a fan of late-night infomercials, you may have even seen the spurtle touted on QVC.

So what can you use a spurtle for? As it turns out, the options are seemingly endless. Not only does the wooden item work as a non-damaging tool for using to stir and reach the edges in pots, pans, or even Instant Pots, but it can also be used for mashing avocados to make guacamole, gently folding batter while baking, spreading sauce or jam, scooping out jars, acting as a sieve, and more. With so many handy uses, the spurtle is a great addition to any kitchen. We found options for traditional spurtles, silicone options, bamboo sets, and more.

Here are the best spurtles

The best overall

rectangle moliy spurtle
These are made of 100% beech wood.

The four-piece Moliy Wooden Spurtles Kitchen Tools Set offers a wide range of spurtle sizes and shapes so you always have the best tool for the job.

What we like: Versatile set, durable, lightweight

This wooden set features four modern spurtles in varying lengths and widths so you can choose the best one depending on your cooking needs. The smallest option is particularly good for jobs like reaching into small jam jars and spreading jelly on toast, while a large option with slats can be used as a makeshift sieve for draining or even to easily separate egg yolks and whites. Meanwhile, the mid-size option is ideal for whisking, flipping, and more. This set is also available as a three-piece set or a five-piece set that also includes a traditional wooden spoon.  

The best traditional

rectangle spurtle
This type of spurtle also works well for stirring doughs and mixing batter.

The Swift Porridge Spurtle has a classic design that works well for oats, soups, and stews.

What we like: Simple, traditional design, won’t break up oats too much

This solid wood spurtle uses the classic Scottish design and is a great choice for traditionalists. If you like to make oatmeal on the stovetop, this tool is specifically designed so it doesn’t break up the oats for a creamy and classic texture. This can be used beyond just porridge and oats for stirring soups, stews, sauces, or even eggs. At just over 11 inches long, it works for deeper saucepans too. Though it’s easy to clean, it’s not dishwasher safe.

The best silicone

rectangle silicone spurtle
Unlike wooden options, this one can go right in the dishwasher.

The Mad Hungry Silicone Two-Piece Set gives you the same functionality as its wooden counterparts with the added convenience of being dishwasher-safe.

What we like: Slotted and non-slotted set, dishwasher safe, heat resistant

Including one standard spurtle and one slotted option, this set can help you easily stir, flip, mash, sift, and serve. Like wooden spurtles, they also won’t damage your cookware like metal or plastic might. However, the silicone design of these sets them apart and means they are more heat resistant than other options and can go right in the dishwasher once you’re done. Choose from six vibrant colors ranging from Harvest Green to Pastel Pink.  

The best bamboo

rectangle bamboo spurtle
These are also available in two- and three-piece sets.

The Crate Collective Bamboo Spurtle Set is lightweight, sturdy, and eco-friendly.

What we like: Eco-friendly, slotted and unslotted set, lightweight, durable

Including a 13-inch spurtle, a slotted 11-inch spurtle, a wide spurtle, and a short, narrow spurtle, this set is made entirely from premium bamboo. The range of options gives you versatility in the kitchen, while the material means that each spurtle is super lightweight but durable. Eco-conscious cooks will also like that bamboo is a more environmentally friendly option than traditional wood. When you’re done, wash with warm water and soap and leave out to dry.  

The best colorful

rectangle marrakesh spurtle
This is sold individually or as part of a matching kitchen utensil set.

Instantly add some pizzazz to any kitchen with the vibrant Baltique Marrakesh Collection 13″ Wooden Spurtle.

What we like: Colorful rainbow design, come by itself or as a set, crafted from birch wood

This slotted spurtle can be proudly displayed on your countertop in a utensil holder rather than shoved to the back of a drawer when it’s not in use. The gorgeous tie-dye pattern instantly adds a pop of color to any kitchen space. This utensil is crafted from layers of colored birch wood to create a rainbow-hued look. You can buy it by itself or as part of a seven-piece kitchen utensil set if you want traditional serving spoons and spatulas that will match. However, be aware you’ll need to handwash this spurtle and you shouldn’t let it soak in water too long. 

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The 5 best measuring cups of 2021

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  • Measuring cups are a must for baking and cooking to ensure ingredients are precisely added.
  • Bellemain‘s set is our favorite for dry ingredients, while Pyrex’s set is the most accurate for wet ingredients.

A good set of measuring cups allows for hassle-free baking of your favorite chocolate chip cookies and lemon blueberry muffins alike. We rounded up the best ones with careful attention to both dry and wet ingredients:

For dry ingredients: Cheap plastic sets and flimsy metal ones never last very long – either the handle snaps off or it bends under the least amount of pressure. We recommend you invest in a good sturdy pair of stainless steel measuring cups or thick plastic ones, though the latter won’t last as long.

For wet ingredients: Look for a sturdy set of glass measuring cups. Plastic measuring cups for wet ingredients always seem to get stained, and the plastic can absorb and transmit unwanted flavors to your ingredients. You should also check for metric measurements, comfortable handles, clear marking, and a good spout for pouring the wet ingredients.

We listed our top picks below.

Here are the best measuring cups of 2021

The best overall for dry ingredients

bellemain measuring cups

The Bellemain 6-Piece Measuring Cup Set ensures accurate measurements for your dry ingredients and will last you for years of baking cakes and pastries.

Pros: Durable construction, accurate measurements

Cons: No markings on the insides of the cups, no warranty

The Bellemain Stainless Steel Measuring Cup Set is made of stainless steel, and thanks to each cup’s flat bottom, they won’t tip over. Each cup is made with dishwasher-safe stainless steel and I haven’t had any issues with bending or pieces snapping off. I also like how the pieces can be stacked inside each other for easy storage.

All cups include both metric and imperial measurements, which are clearly noted on the handles. While there aren’t markings on the inside of the cups, the six-piece set does cover all the standard measurements: 1/4, 1/3, 1/2, 2/3, 3/4, and 1 cup.

The edges aren’t terribly sharp, which is useful for folks without dishwashers (or who just prefer to hand wash their cups). And thanks to the wide handle, you won’t have these measurers slipping out of your hand. Lulu Chang, Former Freelance Writer

Though Bellemain doesn’t offer a structured limited lifetime warranty plan, you can contact the company via its online form

The best overall for wet ingredients

Pyrex measuring cups

The Pyrex 4-Piece Glass Measuring Cup Set is a kitchen staple that is durably-designed and clearly-marked to measure wet ingredients.  

Pros: Durable glass design, doesn’t absorb odors, clear metric and imperial measurements, easy to clean, good spout for pouring liquid ingredients, two-year warranty

Cons: None

When it comes to measuring wet ingredients, there’s only one brand that comes to mind: Pyrex. The company has been making glass measuring cups for wet ingredients for 90 years, and it’s still the top brand among bakers and chefs. The Pyrex 4-Piece Glass Measuring Cup Set is ideal for any recipe with its 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-cup measurers. 

Although these measuring cups are made of glass, they are very sturdy and shouldn’t break easily. The glass is also nonporous, so it doesn’t absorb odors or flavors the way plastic inevitably does, and these cups won’t warp or melt in the presence of hot ingredients. 

Pyrex guarantees that you can pop its measuring cups in the oven, microwave, fridge, freezer, or dishwasher without any problems, so you can get a lot of use out of this set. The company also offers a two-year warranty in case of any defects or problems.

More importantly, though, Pyrex’s measuring cups offer accurate measurements and clear markings in cups, ounces, quarts, and milliliters. The spout pours well without dripping and the handle is comfortable to hold, too.

The best magnetic set

OXO stainless steel measuring cups

The OXO Good Grips Stainless Steel Measuring Cups with Magnetic Snaps is an easy-to-use set that measures dry ingredients with great accuracy.

Pros: Sturdy stainless steel, magnetic stacking cups, clear etched markings, sturdy handles, limited lifetime warranty

Cons: No metric measurements

If you don’t want to pay more than $20 for a set of measuring cups, the OXO Good Grips Stainless Steel Measuring Cups with Magnetic Snaps are your best bet. These durable cups come with excellent grippy handles and clearly etched measurement markings. And, you don’t have to worry about bent or broken handles either, thanks to its thick steel construction.

The handles have magnets inside and, though not terribly strong, they stick together when you stack them (and have enough force to hold the cups in place in your cupboard).

The set comes with 1/4-cup, 1/3-cup, 1/2-cup, and 1-cup measurements, and the only complaint we have with the set is the lack of metric measurements. But, most people won’t need to measure in milliliters, anyway. There’s also a matching set of teaspoons if you want your baking gear to match.

With the OXO Better Guarantee, the brand has you covered with a limited lifetime warranty in case your cups become less sturdy or damaged.

The best on a budget

OXO plastic measuring cups

The OXO Good Grips Plastic Measuring Cups are a comparable yet affordable alternative to other high-end stainless steel sets.

Pros: BPA-free plastic, half measurement lines, comes with a scraper, clear measurement markings, affordable, limited lifetime warranty

Cons: Plastic isn’t as durable, no milliliter markings

The OXO Good Grips Plastic Measuring Cups snap together for easy storage in your cupboard and make it easy to measure dry ingredients for any recipe with clear markings for half and full measurements.

OXO includes a scraper with the cups to level off ingredients as you bake. The measurement of each cup is engraved in the handle and colorful measurements are stamped on the sides. Those marks typically wear off over time, so it’s good that OXO made indelible markings on the handle, too.

The inside of each cup also has a half-measure line for when you need to cut a recipe in half. Like some of our other picks, these cups don’t have milliliter markings but most US buyers won’t need these. And, though the cups are made of plastic, they are BPA-free and relatively sturdy.

And, like our best magnetic set, the OXO Better Guarantee applies to the brand’s plastic set as well. 

The best for scooping

norpro

The Norpro Grip-Ez Stainless Steel Measuring Cups are narrower than most, which makes them perfect for reaching into a jar of sugar or bag of flour without damaging the cup or container.

Pros: Shovel-like shape makes for easy scooping, great grip (for right-handed folks), accurate

Cons: The rubber grip isn’t totally sealed to the handle, which could allow for some buildup; no warranty

Most measuring cups are indistinguishable when it comes to their design, but that’s not the case with the Norpro Grip-Ez Stainless Steel Measuring Cups. Considerably narrower than the other cups you might find, and more closely resembling a large spoon than a cup, I’ve grown particularly fond of this set as it’s extremely useful for scooping dry ingredients.

They perform well in terms of accuracy of measurement, and the “Grip-Ez” aspect of the product’s name comes into play with the rubber coating on the handles, which makes grabbing the cups comfortable. There’s also a small indentation in the handle that allows your pointer finger to rest comfortably as you’re scooping. Be warned though, it’s designed for right-handed folks, and lefties may find the notch a bit less user-friendly.

The Norpro comes in a set of five, so you’ll get 1/8 cup, 1/4 cup, 1/3 cup, 1/2 cup, and 1 cup in your collection. Better still, the 1-cup measure actually features markings on the inside of the cup. Because the rubber grip isn’t completely sealed to the handle, ingredient buildup is possible. Another downside is the product’s lack of warranty coverage, but its two-part steel construction makes it break-resistant. 

Check out our other kitchen guides for baking gear

measuring spoons
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The 4 best slow cookers in 2021

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

Many people like comfort foods, especially during the winter months. Unfortunately, most are time-consuming to prepare and cook. As a result, it’s easy to turn to greasy takeout instead.

But if you’d prefer homemade comfort foods, a slow cooker is the answer for a busy household. This simple kitchen appliance allows you to combine the ingredients in the morning before work, set the cooking time and temperature, and return hours later to a great-tasting, complete meal.

Slow cookers are available in different sizes, with the capacity measured in quarts, usually ranging from one to 10 quarts. Although, sizes of four to six quarts are the most common.

Most slow cookers allow you to cook at low, medium, or high-temperature settings for several hours, and many automatically switch to a warm setting after the cooking time has expired so food won’t overcook. Some advanced slow cookers will even allow you to set an exact cooking temperature and start-time, while others double as pressure cookers. Here are our top picks to fit all your slow cooking needs.

Here are the best slow cookers in 2021

The best overall

the best crock pot overall

The 6-Quart Programmable Cook-and-Carry Crock-Pot is big enough for a crowd with a lockable lid for easy transport and has programmable cooking times.

Pros: Locking lid with gasket, programmable timer, large capacity, stainless steel finish, and modern appearance

Cons: Might cook too hot on low setting

Sometimes, a product is so synonymous with a product category that its brand name becomes a preferred term used in everyday language.

It’s understandable, as Crock-Pot slow cookers were first on the market and have dominated for a long time. The company continues to offer excellent quality slow cookers, including the Crock-Pot Programmable Cook-and-Carry.

You can set cooking times from 30 minutes to 20 hours and leave your worries behind. Just set the timer for your desired cooking time before you head out. The Crock-Pot will cook your dinner, and then automatically switch itself over to the “Warm” setting once the time is up.

The 6-quart capacity is great for larger families and will fit a six-pound roast inside, several pieces of meat along with vegetables, or a whole chicken — and you’ll still have room for carrots and potatoes.

We also like its long timer, modern appearance, handles, and locking lid. That locking lid with a sealing gasket is another fine feature, which prevents spills when traveling with the cooker to a picnic, potluck, or tailgate party.

The Crock-Pot does have the tendency to run too hot on the “Low” setting. Note that both the “Low” and “High” settings of a Crock-Pot reach the same maximum temperature of roughly 210 degrees. It just takes longer to reach the maximum temperature on low. Michelle Ullman and Kyle Schurman

The best high-end slow cooker

all clad slow cooker 4 quart

The 4-Quart All-Clad Slow Cooker with Ceramic Insert looks beautiful on your countertop and cooks everything to perfection without making you do anything.

Pros: Gorgeous, 4-quarts is a good size, decent price, ceramic insert is sturdy, easy to use

Cons: Pricier than some slow cookers

The 4-Quart All-Clad Slow Cooker with Ceramic Insert is the perfect size for cooking meals for a small family or a pork butt for pulled pork. All-Clad is famous for its beautiful high-end stainless steel appliances and cooking utensils, and this slow cooker lives up to the brand’s lofty reputation.

Not only does it look gorgeous on any countertop, but it also works extremely well. The slow cooker is very easy to operate with just a few buttons and no complicated settings. It has a 26-hour programmable timer and warm, low, and high-temperature settings so your food is cooked to perfection.

The removable black ceramic insert and glass lid are easy to hand wash or pop right in the dishwasher. The lid’s handle is made from silicone, so it never gets hot to the touch. You may also leave this slow cooker cooking all day without fear of burning the house down, and will come back to a delicious meal.

I use this slow cooker regularly to make beans, stews, and pulled pork for the meat-eaters in my life. I toss the ingredients in, set the temperature, and let it do its thing while I’m at work or out on the weekends. It makes meals super easy to prepare with minimal effort.

The ceramic insert can break if you handle it too roughly, but if you treat it the way you treat other ceramics like coffee mugs and plates, it won’t — just be careful and don’t smash it against anything.

All-Clad guarantees the slow cooker for two years, so contact the company if you run into problems. — Malarie Gokey

The best programmable slow cooker

best_slow_cookers_ _Fast_Slow_Pro_from_Breville_ _from_Amazon

It’s expensive, but The Fast Slow Pro 6-Quart from Breville successfully slow cooks and pressure-cooks food in one easy-to-use appliance.

Pros: Offers strong pressure cooker and slow cooker functions, eight different slow cooker pre-set modes, excellent build quality, six quarts of capacity works well for many people, large LCD screen is easy to read

Cons: Extremely high price versus other slow cookers, may be too complex for some people

The Fast Slow Pro 6-Quart slow cooker from Breville carries a high price compared to other slow cookers, which means it won’t work for some people. But it justifies the big price tag by offering a multitude of features to cook big meals however you need.

The Breville cooker works as both a pressure cooker and a traditional slow cooker, so you can make just about anything with it. And, by performing the work of multiple appliances, it saves on storage space in the kitchen cabinet.

The Fast Slow Pro makes slow cooking easy with eight different pre-set programmable cooking modes. There’s also a custom time and temperature setting and using the various settings is easy because of the large, clear LCD screen on the side of the unit.

This is a good option for those looking for a multi-use appliance, as it will likely prove too complex for basic cooking needs.

The best mini slow cooker

procter silex slow cooker

If you need a slow cooker that’s better suited for preparing meals for just one or two people, you’ll love the size of the Proctor Silex 1.5-Quart Slow Cooker.

Pros: Small slow cooker is perfect for cooking appetizers for a party, small unit works great in kitchens where storage space is limited, has padded lid and latch strap for transportation, nice size for meals for one or two people

Cons: Will be too small for some families, doesn’t always cook food evenly

Slow cookers often seem like they’re all about cooking big meals for a busy family. But slow cookers don’t discriminate against people cooking for just one or two. The Proctor Silex 1.5-Quart Slow Cooker is a mini slow cooker that’s great for preparing small meals.

This very simple slow cooker includes three temperature settings that are controlled by a knob. The smaller capacity also means a smaller size, which takes up less space in your kitchen than a more traditional slow cooker. This particular cooker is also ideal for an RV, on a large boat, or in other settings with limited storage space.

In addition to meals for one or two, it’s also great for cooking appetizers, dips, sauces, or snacks, and is small enough to carry to a friend’s house. The rubber seal on the lid and the latch strap also helps to prevent spills.

However, it’s worth noting that the Proctor Silex 1.5-Quart slow cooker doesn’t cook as evenly as some larger slow cookers.

Safety considerations for slow cookers

crockpot

Some people are understandably nervous about using a slow cooker, as this appliance is designed to run while no one is home. Others may have a sentimental attachment to the slow cooker grandma used but feel unsure if it’s safe enough by today’s standards.

Before using any slow cooker, read through this list of guidelines and safety measures from NBC News to ensure your unit is safe to use.

  • Clean the base: Keep the portion of the slow cooker with the heating element clean. If a previous recipe has spilled onto the heating element, you need to wipe off the old food and clean it to keep it from burning when cooking the next meal.
  • Electrical cord: Inspect the slow cooker’s power cord carefully. Make sure it hasn’t been melted or frayed. Old slow cookers may have fabric insulation around the electrical cord, which is no longer considered safe.
  • Overcooking: Even on the high setting, slow cookers only reach temperatures of about 250 degrees, so you don’t really have the same concerns about overcooking and burning the food as you might when leaving food unattended in an oven, where temperatures of 350 degrees to 450 degrees are more common.
  • Test the temperature: An older slow cooker may no longer be able to reach a high enough temperature to safely cook raw foods. Test it by filling the slow cooker with room temperature water at least two-thirds of the way. “Cook” the water on the low setting for eight hours and then use a thermometer to ensure the water has reached at least a 185-degree temperature.

Check out our guides to the best Crock-Pots, Instant Pots, and pressure cookers

lunch crock
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ReserveBar is an online store for luxury wine and spirits – I was impressed by its selection of top-shelf liquors and the shipping experience

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reservebar

  • ReserveBar is an online luxury spirit and wine store that specializes in rare bottles, gift sets, and fine drinkware.
  • When it’s a special order – especially an engraving or a last-minute gift – ReserveBar is a go-to.
  • You’re not going to want to shop here for everyday beer or table wine, which you can buy at better prices elsewhere.

Table of Contents: Masthead StickyBlanc De Blancs (small)

This content is intended for readers 21+. Please drink responsibly. If you or anyone you know is dealing with alcohol abuse, get help. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration’s National Helpline at 1-800-662-HELP (4357) provides a free, confidential, 24/7, treatment referral, and information service.

ReserveBar is an online delivery platform offering everything from bottom- and middle-shelf wine and spirits to the very tippy-top (think Armand de Brignac Blanc de Blancs), all available in upscale gift packaging.

Thinking about gifting someone special an engraved bottle of Perrier Jouet Grand Brut? Well, why not toss in a pair of Waterford crystal Champagne flutes? A bottle of Jefferson’s Reserve small-batch bourbon? Why not get it engraved? Of course, no one is going to shame you for treating yourself, but that doesn’t mean you should forego the fancy glasses, bottle holders, and other add-ons.

What is ReserveBar?

ReserveBar can be a wonderful website for finding just the right top-shelf bottle or special gift, especially when it comes to Champagne, wine, liquor, custom engraving, barware bundles, and more.

What to buy from ReserveBar

If you’re seeking out a prodigious bottle of Champagne or Cognac for a special occasion – maybe Remy Martin Louis XIII) – ReserveBar has it. There’s also a whole category dedicated to rare and fine bottles.

Occasionally, you’ll find great promotions, either on shipping or credit when you buy a certain number of bottles at once. At the time of this update, you can get a $25 gift code if you spend $150 or more with the code “MARCH25“.

What to buy elsewhere

We generally won’t look to ReserveBar when restocking the bottom and middle shelves of our liquor cabinet or getting regular old beer or wine.

For example, a fifth of Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey from ReserveBar is $34. That’s not a deal when Drizly’s price is around $25 (price varies depending on your location). It pays to shop for run-of-the-mill brands offered for less elsewhere, and the easiest option may be your local purveyor.

I went through the checkout process for a fifth of Tito’s Handmade Vodka at Wine.com (about $20) and Drizly (about $22) only to find the same bottle for $39 at ReserveBar. The above prices are all without taking into account sites’ shipping and handling charges, as well as taxes (which obviously vary from state to state).

So long as your local retailer isn’t marking up its prices too badly, you probably won’t pay much more than $30 for that same delivery from them, not to mention that it’ll likely arrive within the hour. Support your local retailers when and where you can, but also when and where it makes financial sense for you.

How to shop ReserveBar

reservebar

Before you start shopping, select which state you’d like to have your order shipped to in the top right section of the screen, just below “Customer Service” and to the left of “Corp Gifts.”

Then – and this might be our favorite part about ReserveBar – you can shop by category and subcategory based on everything from vintage to gift sets, limited offerings, and quality. This type of curation is smart and helpful; for example, under Scotch, the drop-down tab lets you choose between “luxury,” “single malt,” and “blended.”

If it’s in your budget, the “Rare and Exceptional” selection is worth a look and potential sip.

Before you order anything, scour the website and check the retailer’s Facebook page, which often posts deals you might not otherwise find.

We ordered from ReserveBar using a gift code on April 15 in the afternoon, and our box arrived on April 21 at midday, through economy or ground shipping. Everything was safe and sound thanks to empty cardboard inserts and bubble-wrap. I went for a couple of gift sets for upcoming occasions as well as one just for me: a bottle of Dom Ruinart Blanc de Blanc 2007, a bottle of Goslings Family Reserve Old Rum with a pair of Dartington glasses, and a bottle of Remy Martin XO, also with a pair of Remy Martin glasses. Prices were comparable elsewhere, and while some items were a few dollars more on ReserveBar, I felt it was worth it when my purchases arrived so elegantly packaged.

It’s important to know that some wines and spirits can’t be shipped to certain states – on the right side of every product page, you’ll find a list of places that a particular bottle can be shipped to. As with any alcohol delivery service, ReserveBar requires someone 21 or older to be present with a valid ID to accept the order.

Does ReserveBar have any deals?

Yes.

While a lot of ReserveBar’s offerings are available on other popular online liquor stores, ReserveBar stands out for its luxury packaging and gift sets, such as a Woodford Reserve’s gift set collab with Sugarfina, as well as its occasional but outstanding deals, like $21 off an Aviation Gin gift set.

Currently, you can get a $25 gift code if you spend $150 or more with the code “MARCH25“.

The bottom line

ReserveBar is the place to go when you want to give a personalized present, or something a little more special than a generic bottle of scotch or Bourdeaux with a nylon bow on it. It’s where you turn for custom engravings, fancy crystal and barware sets, gift baskets full of top-shelf liquors and luxury snacks, and so on. ReserveBar is not geared toward facilitating regular orders, and while you will find a selection of middle- and lower-shelf brands, it will do you well to compare prices before completing your purchase.

Shop premium spirits at ReserveBar

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