Delta, burnout, and wages: What’s affecting Americans who are looking for work right now

Now Hiring man with mask
A man wearing a mask walks past a “now hiring” sign on Melrose Avenue amid the coronavirus pandemic on April 22, 2021 in Los Angeles, California.

  • An Insider and SurveyMonkey survey shows that the virus is holding back Americans looking for work.
  • About 25% said concerns about getting COVID-19 was contributing to challenges in looking for work.
  • Some companies have pushed back reopening plans because of the coronavirus and Delta variant.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Job searching on its own can be a long and exhausting process. Factor in health concerns about the pandemic and the Delta variant, and the job search can become even more frustrating.

That’s according to a recent survey conducted by Insider and SurveyMonkey. The survey asked respondents of varying employment status – employed but looking for a new job, unemployed and looking for work, and unemployed and not looking for work – what is making their job search more difficult right now.

Not everyone has the chance to work from home. Food service and hotel jobs are two examples where many roles have to be done in person. Workers seem to be quitting or leaving behind roles in those industries over COVID-19 fears, low wages, and lack of benefits. The increased health risks of those roles, alongside their historically low pay, may turn off workers and job seekers worried about putting their own health at risk as the pandemic continues.

About a quarter of respondents said worries about getting COVID-19 are contributing to challenges in looking for work

Respondents were asked, “Which of the following reasons, if any, have contributed to difficulties in looking for a job right now?” The biggest factors seem to be coronavirus and the Delta variant. Respondents could select multiple answers.

These health concerns are also seen when looking at the results by gender

Almost 30% of female respondents said concerns about COVID-19 and Delta are making searching for a job difficult. Although 24.5% of male respondents responded they were concerned about getting COVID-19, 24.5% of male respondents responded “compensation at available roles wasn’t adequate” as contributing to difficulties in looking for work.

Out-of-work Americans are also facing pandemic fears

As seen in the following chart, coronavirus and the Delta variant are making it hard to look for work right now for those not working but looking for a job, more so than childcare-related reasons or due to a lack of available jobs. In this same group, about 34% said jobs available that don’t fit their skills have contributed to difficulties in looking for a job.

Not only are Americans feeling burned out during the pandemic, but burnout is also affecting some already-employed workers’ job search. For those who hold a job right now but are looking for a new one, 39% said feeling burned out “have contributed to difficulties in looking for a job right now.”

Some of that difficulty could come from a pandemic-driven mismatch between open roles and the roles that job seekers want. Some industries have recovered faster than others, with leisure and hospitality consistently leading the way in adding jobs (except for Delta-stricken August). But those are primarily in-person and low-wage roles, and may face the same concerns over pandemic exposure.

At the same time, even those roles may be drying up somewhat, with the Delta variant essentially flattening hiring for restaurants, hotels, and retail in August.

Companies are pushing back return to office plans as a result of coronavirus and the Delta variant. Although some employers aimed to welcome workers back by September, some are now pushing back reopenings to next year. Others, like LinkedIn and Microsoft, have abandoned the idea of a firm return to office altogether. Instead, flexibility has had to become the name of the game.

SurveyMonkey Audience polls from a national sample balanced by census data of age and gender. Respondents are incentivized to complete surveys through charitable contributions. Generally speaking, digital polling tends to skew toward people with access to the internet. SurveyMonkey Audience doesn’t try to weight its sample based on race or income. Polling data collected 1,105 respondents August 16-17, 2021 with a 3 percentage point margin of error.

Read the original article on Business Insider

There are just 4 essential skills to add to your resume to find remote work in 2021

interview zoom
New skills are needed to work efficiently with remote teams and to be as productive as possible.

  • Finding a job this year is a very different ballgame from what it was pre-pandemic.
  • Digitization has accelerated, tech is more advanced, and remote work is more common.
  • Here are the skills job advice blog Infoempleo says you need to include on your resume to find work.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

If you’re looking for work, finding a job this year is a very different ballgame from what it was pre-pandemic.

A lot has changed – digitization has accelerated, tech is more advanced than ever, and remote work has become the norm for many.

All these changes mean new skills are needed to work efficiently with remote teams and to be as productive as possible.

You need to make sure not only that you’ve brushed up on the skills that are most sought-after by recruiters but that your resume is up-to-date as well, according to job advice blog Infoempleo.

These are the top four skillsets Infoempleo says you should include if you’re looking for a job while working from home.

1. Digital and programming skills

Since the pandemic started, people with skills in ​​digital marketing, web development, web design, and programming have become even more pivotal to companies than they were previously.

With a growing number of companies moving towards remote working or hybrid working models, it’s crucial to have an understanding of digital tools and programs needed for remote work.

2. Social network skills

Being able to navigate and manage social networks is a professional skill that has been growing in demand for some time, but demand has skyrocketed since the start of the pandemic.

Many companies may not have the budget to allocate an entire role to a social media manager.

As a result, social media skills that complement your core areas of expertise are greatly attractive to recruiters.

3. Tech skills

Tech skills in fields like robotics, augmented reality, the internet of things, or AI can be invaluable to companies in the context of the changes brought about by the pandemic.

Infoempleo stresses, that demand for staff “with knowledge of specific cloud software and collaborative work tools has increased.”

As companies are relying on this tech more and more so, make sure to include any pertinent skills on your resume.

4. Soft skills

Self-discipline, communication skills, and initiative are generally considered to be very sought-after traits but are particularly so if you’re looking to work from home.

These skills are even more essential now that, often, your colleagues and those to whom you report are at a physical distance.

As a result, you need to make it clear on your resume that you’re able to put these skills and qualities to use.

“It’s important that resilience, improved digital skills, and the ability to adapt to change stand out on your resume,” says Infoempleo.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The 4 essential skills to put on your resume to find remote work in 2021

interview zoom
New skills are needed to work efficiently with remote teams and to be as productive as possible.

  • Finding a job this year is a very different ballgame from what it was pre-pandemic.
  • Digitization has accelerated, tech is more advanced, and remote work is more common.
  • Here are the skills job advice blog Infoempleo says you need to include on your resume to find work.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

If you’re looking for work, finding a job this year is a very different ballgame from what it was pre-pandemic.

A lot has changed – digitization has accelerated, tech is more advanced than ever, and remote work has become the norm for many.

All these changes mean new skills are needed to work efficiently with remote teams and to be as productive as possible.

You need to make sure not only that you’ve brushed up on the skills that are most sought-after by recruiters but that your resume is up-to-date as well, according to job advice blog Infoempleo.

These are the top four skillsets Infoempleo says you should include if you’re looking for a job while working from home.

1. Digital and programming skills

Since the pandemic started, people with skills in ​​digital marketing, web development, web design, and programming have become even more pivotal to companies than they were previously.

With a growing number of companies moving towards remote working or hybrid working models, it’s crucial to have an understanding of digital tools and programs needed for remote work.

2. Social network skills

Being able to navigate and manage social networks is a professional skill that has been growing in demand for some time, but demand has skyrocketed since the start of the pandemic.

Many companies may not have the budget to allocate an entire role to a social media manager.

As a result, social media skills that complement your core areas of expertise are greatly attractive to recruiters.

3. Tech skills

Tech skills in fields like robotics, augmented reality, the internet of things, or AI can be invaluable to companies in the context of the changes brought about by the pandemic.

Infoempleo stresses, that demand for staff “with knowledge of specific cloud software and collaborative work tools has increased.”

As companies are relying on this tech more and more so, make sure to include any pertinent skills on your resume.

4. Soft skills

Self-discipline, communication skills, and initiative are generally considered to be very sought-after traits but are particularly so if you’re looking to work from home.

These skills are even more essential now that, often, your colleagues and those to whom you report are at a physical distance.

As a result, you need to make it clear on your resume that you’re able to put these skills and qualities to use.

“It’s important that resilience, improved digital skills, and the ability to adapt to change stand out on your resume,” says Infoempleo.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Industries in desperate need of workers

Reading Time: 6 mins

Between Brexit and the pandemic, certain industries have lost hundreds of workers. Whether people left the UK as a result of the decision to leave the EU or they are having to isolate, there is a serious staff shortage in certain sectors.

In May 2021, job vacancies reached their highest level since before the pandemic. There are currently over 1.1 million vacancies, a 31-month high. As restrictions lift and certain sectors open back up, businesses are beginning to hire once more. Surprisingly, however, research shows one in 20 jobseekers are unable to find work.

So, where have all the workers gone?

As previously mentioned, many workers have left the country as the result of the UK leaving the EU. The recent ‘pingdemic’ is also a factor.  ‘Pingdemic’ refers to the high number of people being ‘pinged’ by the NHS Covid-19 app, telling them to self-isolate. In the week from 14th to the 21st July 2021, nearly 700,000 covid-19 app users were pinged. This is a record high.

This has increased the number of staff having to miss work. In some cases, businesses have been forced to close due to the number of workers being told to isolate.

Now is your time to snap up a job. Whether you’re unemployed, looking to move sectors or in search of something new, now is the time to go job hunting. Here’s a list of some of the industries looking to recruit.

 

HGV and lorry drivers

HGV lorry driver

The Road Haulage Association suggests the shortage of HGV and lorry drivers is reaching ‘crisis point’, with a loss of approximately 100,000 workers since the pandemic began. It is estimated 60,000 of these workers returned to their home countries in the EU due to Covid-19 travel restrictions and the uncertainty of Brexit.

Recently, Tesco had to cancel many online orders due to a reduced number of delivery drivers. Asda has also suffered as the result of staff shortages, with empty shelves the result of supply chain blockages due to reduced lorry drivers.

Both Tesco and Asda are now calling out for new recruits, offering a sign-up bonus of £1,000 to HGV drivers. They join logistics organisations in calling for the government to tackle the labour crisis. It is thought the shortages will peak by the end of August, due to remaining lorry drivers taking summer breaks.

Arla, one of the biggest dairy providers, admitted they were unable to deliver milk to a quarter of UK supermarkets at the end of July. Sainsbury’s was deeply impacted by reduced dairy deliveries, with many of the shelves empty in milk and dairy sections of the supermarket. A spokesperson for Sainsbury’s said they are “working hard to ensure customers can find everything they need”.

One of the largest business groups in the country, Logistics UK has urged a call to action from the government. They have pressed for more incentives from the government to aid in the recruitment process for HGV and lorry drivers.

You can find HGV and lorry driver vacancies on the Asda and Tesco websites.

 

Supermarkets

Debit cards take funds you have - but credit is borrowed

Empty supermarket shelves are in part due to reduced numbers of lorry drivers, but also due to reduced numbers of staff in the supermarkets themselves. According to the BBC, approximately 35,000 supermarket workers are needed across the UK.

The managing director of Iceland supermarkets recently tweeted that covid-19 related absences were growing exponentially week by week, even suggesting within a few weeks, they would be at the highest they had ever been. Absences are 400% higher than a month ago due to rising cases of coronavirus and people being forced to isolate. Iceland are currently looking to recruit an extra 2,000 workers.

Marks and Spencer supermarkets are also feeling the strain, suggesting opening hours may need to be reduced due to low staff numbers. Tesco are looking to hire a whopping 20,000 temporary staff. Asda are looking to fill 5,000 temporary roles also and are helping in hiring those whose jobs have been impacted or lost due to the virus.

Not surprisingly, supermarket giant Aldi are also in search of 5,000 temporary staff and 4,000 permanent staff. This is in an attempt to mitigate the effects of the disrupted workforce. Morrisons and Lidl are following suit, both hiring thousands of new recruits across the UK.

You can search for supermarket roles on Indeed and Reed.

 

Hospitality

How to become a chef

Pub, café and restaurant workers have been hit particularly hard by the ‘pingdemic’. Greene King, a huge chain of pubs across the UK, announced the temporary closure of 33 pubs in July due to the huge number of workers being told to isolate.

Many chains are offering their staff perks as a way to encourage new recruits. Steak house giant Hawksmoor are offering staff rewards of up to £2,000 for recommending friends and family to join their workforce.

Mitchells and Butlers, the company who own huge names such as Harvester, Miller and Carter, and Toby Carvery are struggling to recruit workers. They suggest the reasons for this include EU workers returning home, and national lockdowns causing people to find work outside of the hospitality industry.

This has been an ongoing problem for the hospitality industry as the result of stop and start lockdowns. In May, the number of vacancies in hospitality was at an all-time high. More than 70,000 roles in hospitality were advertised online for 9 consecutive weeks between May and August. Chefs, in particular, are in high demand. As of August 1st 2021, there were over 42,000 vacancies for chefs.

Andrew Hunter, co-founder of job search engine Adzuna has suggested the ‘pingdemic’ is hugely to blame for this. He also stated many people are still on furlough, as well as some workers being concerned about returning to work due to Covid. Hunter further supported the idea that there are fewer EU workers filling positions.

You can search for vacancies in hospitality on Adzuna.

 

Care Sector

Care home company HC One are offering huge welcome bonuses of up to £10,000 for registered night-time care nurses. This is due in part to covid, but also as the result of losing many EU citizens due to Brexit. The private care sector has been hit particularly hard.

Other care groups are offering a decent sum to incentivise people to sign up for care roles. The Priory Group and Elysium Healthcare are offering registered nurses welcome bonuses of £5,000, in a bid to encourage new recruits.

According to care company Blue Leaf, vacancies in the care sector are the highest they have ever been. They also suggested the uncertainty of Brexit has impacted the social care industry greatly. In London, one in seven care workers are from the EU. The referendum result led many EU nationals to feel unwelcome living and working in the UK, with the number of overseas workers reducing by 134,000 in the year between 2017 and 2018 alone.

Care provider Independent Care Group (ICG) has called on the government to help. As of 29th July, there were over 100,000 vacancies in the care sector. ICG note the ageing population and the rising number of people being admitted into care as another reason for the strain on care homes.

Additionally, care providers argue plans to make the Covid-19 vaccine mandatory for care home workers are putting off potential recruits. A commentary by the BMJ suggests the care sector will need half a million new recruits over the next decade in order for the industry to remain sustainable. However, if the 13% of unvaccinated care workers were to leave the profession due to the vaccine mandate, the care industry would suffer hugely.

You can browse care roles on Skills For Care and the NHS website.

 

Construction

How to get work as a mechanic

Between 2017 and 2020, there was a 42% fall in EU-born workers in the construction sector, according to the Financial Times. This is a huge loss for the industry. Construction companies are now calling for urgent steps to be taken to mitigate the looming consequences of reduced workforces.

Such consequences include housing projects being slowed dramatically. A shortage of key building materials, such as timber, again linked to the reduced number of HGV and lorry drivers, is also being blamed for the slowing of building work.

The Guardian recently stated two-thirds of construction businesses said they had to wait longer for the delivery of materials, blaming post-Brexit friction and congestion at ports. Additionally, rising prices of raw materials has impacted the industry.

Richard Harpin, the chief executive of Checkatrade, says there is a shortage of skilled workers in the field. He also added the loss of EU-born workers had deeply impacted the industry.

In May, the demand for construction workers and labourers was at it’s highest for 23 years. However, the number of construction workers in the industry declined at the fastest rate since 2017. An increased demand lack of supply has impacted the construction sector deeply, with smaller businesses being harmed most.

You can find construction roles at Careers In Construction and Indeed.

The post Industries in desperate need of workers appeared first on MoneyMagpie.

The job market is on fire right now. Here are the best tips for finding a career that you love.

working on beach computer vacation
It’s shaping up to be a hot summer for job searching.

  • This summer is the best time to be looking for a new job.
  • Employers are looking to woo workers with signing bonuses and other perks.
  • Insider’s compiled a helpful guide for anyone searching for a new role this summer.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The job market is on fire right now.

After a steep decline at the beginning of the pandemic, employers are finally beginning to hire again. And they’re hiring a lot. On July 16, job postings on Indeed were up 36.4% above where they were on February 1, 2021, the pre-pandemic baseline. There were 9.2 million open jobs in the US at the end of May, the most recently available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicated.

Moving jobs is also a great way to make more money. A 2017 Nomura analysis found that people who had changed jobs earned roughly 1% more year over year than people who stayed with the same employer.

It’s a job seekers’ market, and some employers are working to woo workers with incentives such as bonuses and new employee benefits.

There’s never been a better time to look for a job, and Insider has compiled a helpful guide for anyone looking for a new opportunity.

Table of Contents: Static

Quitting shouldn’t be your first move if you’re unhappy

woman burn out work from home
If you’re feeling burned out, look for small ways to improve your satisfaction at work.

Maybe you don’t want to leave your job, but you’re not exactly thrilled with how things are going. Don’t fret, experts said there are simple tweaks you can make to your workday that may help you feel more fulfilled.

It’s a common problem. Gallup found that 51% of workers in its global analysis of about 112,000 business units were not engaged at work. No wonder 3.6 million US employees left their jobs in May.

But, career experts told Insider, playing to your strengths can help you feel more satisfied at work.

And remember: Don’t be afraid to share feedback with your boss. Chances are that if you’re unhappy, other people are, too.

Read more:

A few small changes can make you happier at a job you don’t like, experts say

The Great American Burnout is just beginning. Here are 5 ways managers can prevent the wave from hitting their teams.

Don’t quit your job. Do these 2 steps to get more money or a new boss instead.

A C-suite executive shared his performance review to all 1,400 people in the company to promote a culture of feedback. Read the email he sent.

WFH employees are more emotionally exhausted than those who work in person. Is going back to the office the solution?

When it’s time for a change

Starbucks Now Hiring sign
There were 9.2 million open roles at the end of May, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said.

Maybe you’ve tried to make things better at your current role, but they aren’t improving. Or maybe you’ve outgrown your role and want to move on.

Regardless, it’s time to launch your job search.

A good first step is to send some networking messages. Blair Heitmann, a LinkedIn career expert, previously told Insider that your network “is your No. 1 asset as a professional over the course of your career.”

You can also make key tweaks to your job-application materials that may draw the attention of recruiters and hiring managers.

And when you’re ready to give your notice, make sure you don’t burn any bridges with your employer. You never know if you may want to return someday.

Read more:

A workplace expert shares the exact steps you should take to quit your job without burning bridges

Use this template from a career coach to revamp your résumé and land a remote job anywhere in the world

Now may be the best time to switch jobs – and make more money

Your best shot at making $100,000 is to work remotely. Here are 6 steps to landing a WFH role you love.

No college degree? No problem. How to land a stable, high-paying job on certificates and trainings alone.

Finding the best opportunities

Job fair Florida
A man handing his résumé to an employer at the 25th annual Central Florida Employment Council Job Fair at the Central Florida Fairgrounds.

Jobs in human resources and diversity and inclusion are skyrocketing right now.

HR professionals, for example, are being recruited relentlessly for high-paying roles, experts previously told Insider. Jobs in diversity and inclusion grew 123% between May and September of last year, Indeed data showed.

But these aren’t the only industries worth checking out. It’s important to explore all of your options to find a role that is the best fit for you.

Read more:

The 2021 job market is going to be unlike anything we’ve seen before. Here’s how recruiters and job seekers should handle it.

Diversity and inclusion professionals are being recruited relentlessly. Top execs in the field share their advice for making a name in the industry.

Jobs in diversity are hotter than ever. DEI execs from companies like Wayfair and LinkedIn share strategies for getting into the field.

If you want a career in sports, media, or video games, join the $44B esports industry. A veteran host explains where to start.

HR professionals are being recruited relentlessly and have their pick of top jobs

Asking (and answering) the right questions

A woman gives two thumbs up while videoconferencing in her home for a remote job interview
Know the right questions to ask during your interview.

You’ve done the work and sent out tons of applications. Now hiring managers are scheduling interviews with you.

The most common interview question is “Tell me about yourself.” Jacques Buffett, a career expert at the online résumé service Zety, said interviewees should use this question to briefly mention their career history and tell stories of past achievements.

But it’s also important to know the right questions to ask hiring managers. This could help you get a clearer sense of the company culture.

Read more:

5 questions companies are asking in interviews right now and how to answer, according to a career expert

What Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Jack Dorsey, and 52 other top executives ask job candidates during interviews

Job seekers have all the power right now. Here are 7 questions you should definitely ask in your next job interview.

How can I tell a hiring manager that I want to be fully remote?

PwC is hiring for 100,000 jobs over the next 5 years. Here’s how to prove you have the top trait they’re looking for: agility.

Remote, in person, or somewhere in between

hybrid work
Hybrid work gives you the option to work partially from the office and partially remote.

Once you’ve accepted a job, you have an opportunity to craft your ideal work life.

Maybe you want to be completely remote or solely in the office. Or maybe you want something in between.

Many employers are still sorting out their plans for returning to the office, but regardless, you’re in a good position to negotiate as much flexibility as you want.

Some companies, such as marketing startup Scroll and Kickstarter, are testing out four-day workweeks.

Read more:

How to craft your ideal work life and get your boss on board

Take this personality quiz to find out if you work best from home, in an office, or something in between

Marketing startup Scroll trialed a 4-day workweek for a month and is already seeing huge gains in revenue and employee mental health

Kickstarter CEO: Why we’re doing a 4-day workweek

If you want to ask your boss to let you work from home forever, use this script

Read the original article on Business Insider

How does work… well, work? Here are the 5 things every employee making a career change in 2021 should know

7 people sit around a table with their laptops and notebooks working
Employees and job seekers will have to look at the workforce from a new perspective to navigate recent changes.

  • Growing rates of burnout have transformed company culture and resulted in a “Great Resignation.”
  • Preferences between in-person and remote work continue to dictate employment decisions.
  • This page will help you decide if it’s time to get a new job and how to apply.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Work from home was supposed to be temporary.

But in the past 15 months, we’ve lived through a pandemic and a global recession, which led to mass burnout and a spike in voluntary resignations. This new normal means hybrid offices and awkward first encounters with coworkers.

One of the many changes 2021 has brought to the US job market – 9.2 million job openings. Job seekers have the advantage while on the hunt, but they need to know how to use it.

Navigating all the changes in our “work life” over the last year would make anyone’s head spin.

Here are five things any worker who feels they are struggling with should know when trying to excel in their career.

Remote work eliminated work-life balance, but some companies are looking to compensate

Mental Health
The pandemic did not just eliminate in-person socialization but also divisions between the home and office.

The pandemic transformed our living rooms into our office spaces – not the healthiest change for those who already struggled with taking their work home with them.

Burnout has left 61% of Americans feeling at least somewhat burnout and more than 80% have reported that COVID-19 has been a source of change in their lives. With the pandemic causing undue stress on everyone, an unhealthy office culture only adds to the pressure.

Employers need to lead the way in implementing wellness techniques that teach their employees how to care for themselves, take their PTO, and take advantage of flexible work environments.

Read more:

Americans don’t take nearly enough vacation days – and experts say it’s because companies think about PTO all wrong

A day off work and ‘Zoom-free Fridays’ aren’t going to cut it. Here’s how to really tackle burnout.

The Great American Burnout is just beginning. Here are 5 ways managers can prevent the wave from hitting their teams.

A few small changes can make you happier at a job you don’t like, experts say

Burnout rates are rising. Zoom-free Fridays and $250,000 bonuses are the tip of the iceberg. Cisco is solving the problem by going deeper into its culture.

LinkedIn’s new VP of flex work shares 3 steps any company can use to create a hybrid work plan for all employees

If the last year has taught you anything, it’s that you have the freedom to leave

A orange sign with pink balloons reads "now hiring."
Workers are leaving their jobs in search of better pay and benefits.

For workers whose companies have failed to help prevent employee burnout, the pandemic has helped them realize one thing – it’s time to quit.

As millions willingly choose to walk away from their jobs, in what economists have coined the “Great Resignation,” some industries have been hit harder than others. In May, 5.3 million people voluntarily left their jobs.

Low pay and unreasonable working conditions across the retail, hospitality, and fast food businesses have created a crisis of, “rage quitting.” While it may feel good to walk out without notice, sometimes it is better to salvage professional connections.

Telling an employer you’re leaving is never easy, but it’s important to be candid.

Read More:

Americans say the pandemic is changing their personalities – and managers need to take notice or risk losing people

Employees are quitting their jobs in record numbers. Here’s how to tell if you’re losing people for the right reasons.

Now may be the best time to switch jobs – and make more money

A workplace expert shares the exact steps you should take to quit your job without burning bridges

Expert advice to guide you in the job hunt

Whether it be because of recession or resignation, a lot of candidates are on the job hunt.

Searching for a new role can be intimidating, but job seekers should always start by identifying which industries are hiring and what connections they have within them. After finding the job posting of your dreams it’s all about perfecting your résumé, cover letter, and interview techniques.

Never underestimate the need to customize your application for every job posting – learn from the experts about how to stand out as the pool of job seekers grows.

Read More:

Use this email template from a LinkedIn career expert to network and find a new job

No college degree? No problem. How to land a stable, high-paying job on certificates and trainings alone.

Job seekers have all the power right now. Here are 7 questions you should definitely ask in your next job interview.

Headed to a job interview? These are the red flags to look for that indicate a company’s culture won’t be right for you

5 questions companies are asking in interviews right now and how to answer, according to a career expert

What Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Jack Dorsey, and 52 other top executives ask job candidates during interviews

Tips and tricks to help you land a coveted remote job

Work from home
“Work from home” has become “work from anywhere” and many employees want the change to stick.

As lockdown dragged on, people were eager to return to in-person socialization, but the same can’t be said for in-person work.

Freelancers and remote workers were quick to open their inboxes to provide their years of expertise to “conventional workers” who had to quickly set up home offices and adjust to Zoom meetings. And some vacation hotspots welcomed remote workers to bring their laptops and soak up the sun and WiFi.

For those who have been sold on remote work, staying at a company that is committed to providing flexibility is a priority. While many companies – such as Apple, Indeed, and Airbnb – have extended their work from home policies through much of 2021, finding a company that is committed to the practice permanently can be difficult. And the demand is high.

To set yourself up for success, learn what companies are hiring remote workers, how to talk to your boss about working from home, and what can make you stand out when applying for a remote job.

Read More:

This chart shows the type of jobs that are still working from home

The city with the most high-paying jobs isn’t a city – it’s remote work. Here are 6 steps to landing a WFH role you love.

Use this template from a career coach to revamp your résumé and land a remote job anywhere in the world

How can I tell a hiring manager that I want to be fully remote?

For those who plan to return to the office, new challenges are arising

A male-presenting and female-presenting coworkers bump elbows while walking past each other in an office.
As offices reopen across the country, in-person office culture slowly returns.

Some employees are eager and nervous to see their coworkers face to face.

But spending over a year using your bed as a midday nap spot makes the transition to a populated office space even more difficult – especially if you’ve never even met your team.

While the change to working in an office again can be intimidating, for some workers it may be exactly what they need to get a break from hectic households and reconnect with their passions.

Read More:

Should you work from home or the office? An HR chief outlines her 3-step framework

7 couples confess how WFH changed their romantic relationships, how they handled unexpected tensions, and what happens now

Feeling burned out? It might be time to return to the office.

Meeting your colleagues IRL for the first time? Here are 6 ways to squash the anxiety and make a good impression.

Read the original article on Business Insider

On Ladders, a jobs site for $100,000-plus opportunities, there’s more remote work paying six figures than ever before

microsoft middle east remote work

The number of remote jobs has skyrocketed during the pandemic, and an increasing number of positions paying six figures are now remote, according to The New York Times’ analysis of data from Ladders, a white-collar job search site for $100,000-plus opportunities.

The share of jobs paying over $100,000 a year to remote workers jumped from around 2% two years ago to 15% now, The New York Times reports.

Ladders, which exclusively offers job opportunities that pay at least $80,000 a year and calls itself the “$100k+ Club,” works like an upper-class Indeed or ZipRecruiter.

Job seekers can browse jobs by location, industry, and pay range.

A screenshot of TheLadders.com, a jobs site for opportunities paying $100,000 or more.
A screenshot of TheLadders.com, a jobs site for opportunities paying $100,000 or more.

The site offers a free account as well as a premium subscription, which costs $24.99 every three months and opens up more jobs to apply to and other features such as curated job matches and the ability to see the salaries and years of experience of other applicants.

The company’s FAQ page – which anyone who has ever obsessively edited a resume will be comforted to know does contain some typos – says 90% of the site’s users have a bachelor’s degree and almost half have master’s degrees or higher.

The company was founded in 2003 by Marc Cenedella, who was previously a senior vice president at HotJobs.com, according to the company website.

Screenshot of job search website
Screenshot of a job posting on Ladders. Ladders allows users to search for jobs that fit their criteria.

The site asks users to fill in basic information about themselves and what they’re looking for in a job before recommending open positions to them.

The site also has options for users to select whether a position is remote only, along with the desired position level, industry, and the years of experience.

Poking around some of those options, a better picture emerges of the compensation range of the typical Ladder user. In a drop-down bar where users are asked to input their compensation at their current job, there is no option under $80,000 – which is $30,000 more than the median US salary of $50,000.

For desired compensation, users can select options ranging from $80,000-plus all the way up to $500,000-plus.

Read the original article on Business Insider

LinkedIn CEO to new grads: ‘It’s not mandatory to know what you want right after graduation’

Ryan Roslansky
Ryan Roslansky.

  • Ryan Roslansky is the CEO of LinkedIn.
  • He says the pandemic has accelerated rapid changes in the workplace, and people will need to keep learning to keep up.
  • Roslansky says graduates might be in a place to help others with their careers in the future and to keep building strong, diverse networks.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Congratulations to the Class of 2021! This is a big accomplishment and a testament to your hard work and the support of those who stood behind you every step of the way.

In your next chapter as a rising professional, you get to discover what you love to do and get better at that step-by-step.

What lies ahead can be life-changing. Some of you will launch new industries, earn Nobel Prizes, start impactful nonprofits, and better your communities. Maybe one of those people is you.

How do you get from here to there?

The first step is realizing that this one-time period of study you just completed is not the end.

In many ways, it’s just the beginning.

You’re navigating your career at a time that’s being shaped by forces unlike anything we’ve seen before – the sudden shift to online education, the push for diversity and equity, the gig economy and new possibilities for working remotely, and so much more.

The good news for all of you starting your job search is that we’re on the road to economic recovery from COVID-19.

Data from our 2021 Grads Guide to Getting Hired shows the hiring rate for fresh college grads returned to pre-COVID levels in October 2020, which suggests that all of you 2021 grads are heading into a healthier job market.

But this is just one moment. The rapid change underway in the workforce is going to be constant. That means you will need to keep learning to keep pace.

Trust me, it’s not the textbook learning you’ve been doing. This is the fun stuff.

Something I wish I knew earlier in my career: you don’t need to have it all figured out at once.

Your job and what you want to do may change – in five years, three years, or next year. You may have a career pivot (or a few), take time off, have setbacks, grow your skills and learn new ones.

graph

At the end of the day, what employers really want to know is whether you can do the job.

So focus less on what job you want in ten years, and more on how you’re going to keep learning over the next ten years.

It can be as simple as taking time to learn something new every day. Listen to a podcast, read articles and books, keep up with trends and thought leaders, or take online courses. Most importantly, build a network of diverse people so you can learn and grow together.

Start with the network you already have of peers, teachers, and mentors, reach out to alumni, or join interest-based groups. These small steps will broaden your network exponentially.

And it works: Members are 4X more likely to get hired when they leverage their networks on LinkedIn while job seeking.

And though you may not believe it now, you’ll soon be in a place to help others with their careers. By building a strong, diverse network you can help others who face significant barriers to opportunity because of their backgrounds, such as where they grew up and who they know.

It’s on all of us to help create a future where two people with equal talent have equal access to opportunity. By giving a chance to one person, we have the potential to help thousands of people.

I’ll leave you with a story that’s been impactful in my own career.

When I was 10, I asked my dad about a Shakespeare quote that had been taped up next to his work phone for years: “When the sea was calm, all ships alike showed mastership in floating.”

He told me that true character and success is defined not by how you act when everything is going your way, rather it’s how you respond when everything isn’t.

I’ve returned to this conversation often because the seas aren’t always calm, something we’ve all learned over the past year.

Congratulations again on this important milestone. Find what you love to do, and get better at it as you go along.

And remember to keep your head up when the seas aren’t calm. Your professional life will be invigorating, exciting, and sometimes challenging – but it will also be life-changing, and maybe even world-changing.

Ryan Roslansky is the CEO of LinkedIn.

Read the original article on Business Insider

From LinkedIn hashtags to résumé keywords, these are the best ways to tailor your application for remote work

Remote worker
Just one in 10 companies expects all their staff to return to the office after the pandemic.

  • When looking for remote jobs, it’s important to tailor your résumé and cover letter accordingly.
  • Highlighting any previous remote work or related soft skills such as Zoom could go a long way.
  • Optimizing your LinkedIn profile and using the relevant hashtags will catch recruiters’ attention.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Remote work might have been hard to come by in the past but times have changed. Although it’s not easy to find a job in today’s market, remote work is increasingly common.

Only one in 10 companies expect all their staff to return to the office after the pandemic and major companies including Google and Salesforce are planning to accommodate remote work in the long term.

There are many similarities between the remote work application process and the standard in-person work application, but there are new factors to take into account.

Here are some specific tips on how to update your résumé, cover letter, and LinkedIn profile to make yourself the perfect candidate for remote work.

Resume
You could make a note of any specific remote work-related skills you might have.

Résumé

Online volunteering, video meetings with clients in other timezones, and working collaboratively online through Google Docs or the Cloud are all part of the remote work experience, said Jennifer Parrish in Remote.Co.

Clearly outlining this in your resume could make all the difference. You could mention it in parentheses after the job title – for example “marketing director (remote).”

Otherwise, you could mention it in the job description by saying something along the lines of: “I remotely managed a team of five employees and increased sales by 20% in the first quarter.”

If you have a lot of experience in working remotely, you may want to create a specific “Remote work” section to highlight this on your résumé. Whatever you choose, don’t assume that your hiring manager knows you worked remotely simply from your job title.

Indeed suggested that you could also make a note of any specific remote work-related skills you might have. You might choose to name specific programs such as Slack, Asana, Trello, Dropbox, and Google Hangouts, or you can be more general and cite video conferencing, email management, cloud storage technology, and office suites.

cover letter
Try highlighting your remote work skills and what you could do for the company.

Cover letter

One important thing is to remember that the company doesn’t want to know why remote working suits you, but rather why you working remotely will be beneficial to them.

Therefore, lines like: “I want to work with you because I can pick up my children from school,” should definitely be avoided.

Instead, try highlighting your remote work skills and what you could do for the company. For example, soft skills such as responsibility, flexibility, time management, and adaptability are even more essential in a remote post – so talk about how you’ve demonstrated them in your previous roles.

A good example or anecdote like this one could go a very long way. “The first couple of weeks of remote working in my previous role were tough. My employees felt demotivated and so I called an impromptu group call. We wrote down all our frustrations on post-it notes and then tore them to shreds, and it helped people realize they weren’t alone.”

linkedin
When a recruiter scans LinkedIn, they’re going to be looking for people working in their specific sector.

LinkedIn

If you scan your LinkedIn network, you’ll find lots of people with headlines like “looking for remote work opportunities.” That’s a wasted opportunity to catch a recruiter’s attention.

When a recruiter scans LinkedIn, they’re going to be looking for people working in their specific sector. So to choose the best possible professional headline, you’ll need to do some research.

Search for the profiles of people who have the jobs you want and note down the keywords they’ve used in their profiles or job descriptions. Adding those to your profile and using hashtags in posts outlining what you’re looking for could mean you pop up in the recruiter’s next search.

In your “About” section, be sure to keep it concise and relevant. The first three lines are what recruiters will be scanning so make sure you grab their attention enough that they’ll want to click the “See more” button.

If you lack remote experience, all is not lost

If you’ve never worked remotely before, don’t be discouraged. You’re still likely to have many of the relevant skills needed for remote work positions, like using Zoom, Dropbox, Google Drive, and Slack.

You can also enhance your résumé with online collaborations. There are always people looking for volunteers for projects or writers for blogs.

Volunteering your time will mean you have remote experience to add to your résumé and recommendations to add to your cover letter and LinkedIn profile. You might even collaborate with someone who’s able to recommend you for a job posting down the line.

Networking is key and so even if you don’t end up gaining much from a project, it’s sure to benefit you in some small way – even if you’re not sure what that is yet.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Working abroad After Brexit: Visas and Taxes Explained

Reading Time: 7 mins

Working abroad after Brexit will change now that the UK has left the European Union. There are currently three quarters of a million British expats living in the EU.

You may still be interested in joining the near one million Brits in the EU despite Brexit. But before you jet off to seek another lifestyle, you’ll need to understand all the new visa and tax requirements. If you’ve already read the rules and found them confusing, then you’re in luck. Here at Money Magpie, we’ve put together an seven-step guide to give you all the information you need.

  1. Who Needs a Visa?
  2. Where to Find Visa Information
  3. Entertainment Visas
  4. Countries That Have Digital Nomad Visas
  5. Where Do You Pay Tax
  6. Your Benefit Entitlement
  7. Your State Pension

Who needs a visa?

You don't need a visa after Brexit for some holidays in 2021 - but will for 2022

Those who’ve planned a holiday to the EU, Iceland, Lichtenstein, Norway or Switzerland in 2021 will be relieved to know that you won’t need a visa. Although, coronavirus restrictions may scupper holiday plans. Keep an eye on the Foreign Office official advice. And, if you’re taking a risk to book ahead – make sure you get travel insurance the same time you book in case the pandemic ruins your plans!

From the 1st January 2022, UK holidaymakers seeking sun and sites in the EU will need to apply for an ETIAS (European Travel Information and Authorisation System). An ETIAS is a three-year visa waiver that will cost £6.35 for those three years. Travellers will be encouraged to apply online. You’ll be required to provide information such as your age, past criminal convictions, and your accommodation address when applying.

UK residents will only be able to spend 90 out of 180 days on holiday in Europe. You may want to stay in the EU for longer, which means you’ll need a visa.

You’ll also need a visa if you’re working abroad after Brexit. In some cases, you may need a work permit by your host country too. Visa’s will be required by UK residents who are attending a conference, providing services for a charity, touring as a musician or relocating to a European branch of your company’s business.

Where to find Visa Information

Currently, an EU-wide visa does not exist. Instead, you’ll have to apply for an individual visa with your host country if you want to work abroad after Brexit.

Those who were working in the EU before 1st January 2021 will be relieved to know that their right to work is protected. However, if you’re working or living in the EU who will have to register as a resident of that country by June.

If you’re a UK resident and you’re still interested in working abroad after Brexit, then you’ll need a job offer from the employer of your desired host country. You’ll need this offer to start on your visa journey. Once you’ve acquired your offer, you should contact the nearest UK-based embassy of your desired host country.

The London Diplomatic List contains all the contact details of every embassy. We recommend contacting the embassy via phone or email given the UK’s current coronavirus restrictions.

The embassy will be able to provide information about what you need to do in order to work in your desired host country.

You can also read the individual country’s requirements via the UK Government’s Living in Guide. Simply search your desired country, here.

VISA example: Italy

Miss X currently lives in Bristol and holds a UK passport. She has been offered a job by an Italian firm who are based in Rome. Miss X decides to accept the company’s job offer.

  • She simply can’t hop on a plane and start work as the freedom of movement between the UK and the EU has ended.
  • Instead, Miss X has to check Italy’s visa requirements via the Where Do You Live tool, which can be accessed, here.
  • Miss X’s Italian employer will need to apply for her work permit.
  • Once her employer receives the work permit, then Miss X will be able to apply for an Italian visa at a UK-based Italian embassy.
  • When Miss X has received the visa, she’ll be able to apply for a residence permit, which will mean Miss X  can live and work in Italy legally.

The visa application process for every country is different, so be sure to check the individual guidance.

EU Blue Card

You might be classified as a highly-qualified worker and able to apply for an EU Blue Card.

This card gives non-EU workers the right to live and work in Europe after Brexit. To apply for an EU Blue Card, you’ll need to hold a higher education degree (e.g. a university degree), work as a paid employee and have a salary that’s one and a half times the average national salary. You’ll also need to present a binding work contract as well as full travel and legal requirements.

Your European employer must submit an application form on your behalf. And, you may be charged an application fee.

Warning! You can’t apply if you’re an entrepreneur or self-employed. It’s also not applicable in Denmark and Ireland.

Entertainment visas

Entertainment visas are needed for working abroad after Brexit

Working abroad after Brexit is now different for UK musicians, artists, bands, actors, and crews who are transporting equipment. Those who work in the above industries will need to seek additional work permits if they want to work in Europe.

British musicians, bands and artists will only be able to tour for 90 days out of an 180 day period. This is very similar to tourist requirements that UK residents have to follow. Entertainers who decide to perform in France and the Netherlands won’t need to obtain additional work permits.

However, if you’d like to perform or work in Germany or Spain, then you’ll need additional work permits. The Incorporated Society of Musicians have complied a full list of work permits that you may need to apply for as a touring musician. This list can be accessed, here.

A number of high profile celebrities have condemned the end of visa-free touring. Government guidance could change in the coming weeks and months in response to the backlash, so always keep abreast of the latest guidance.

Digital Nomad visas

Throughout 2020, the entire world adapted to work from home. If you’re working from home, you might be fantasising about working by the sea and sun in Europe.

The majority of remote workers won’t be able to apply for a traditional visa. Your employer may still be based in the UK or, like may other digital nomads, you may not even have an employer. These two factors stop many remote workers from applying for a visa.

Instead, digital nomad visas legalise the status of travelling professionals

Each country that issues a digital nomad visa, has its own policies and regulations. The countries who have digital nomad visas in the EU include: Germany, the Czech Republic, Portugal, Croatia, Norway and Estonia. There are also a number of other non-EU countries who also have digital-nomad visas. This means you may still be able to work abroad with your laptop after Brexit.

To apply for a digital nomad visa, you’ll need to hold a valid passport and be able to prove that you have a steady income. You’ll also be asked to provide your nationality, any visa history as well as a criminal record. You may also need to pay an application fee as well as additional documents.

Like with other visas, you’ll have to check individual guidance with your desired host country.

Digital Nomad visa example: Germany

  • Miss X is a self-employed writer who has decided to spend some time writing in Munich, Germany.
  • She has several clients in Germany, from a variety of publishers. This means that Miss X has a steady-income and a strong client base.
  • She also holds a valid UK passport and doesn’t have a criminal record.
  • As Miss X is a freelancer, she’ll be able to apply for a digital nomad visa.
  • To apply, Miss X will need to register with the German tax office. She’ll also need to submit a portfolio, bank statements and provide evidence of her expertise.
Warning! For years, remote workers have also found themselves in legal grey areas. Always check the requirements of your desired host country before you attempt to work in that country.

Where do you pay tax?

Working abroad after Brexit could impact how and where you pay taxes

Now you’ve wrapped your head around the visa requirements, you’ll need to understand how tax works if you’re considering working abroad after Brexit.

If you’re not a UK resident, then you won’t need to pay tax on your foreign income. You’re automatically considered a non-UK resident, if you work abroad full time and have spent fewer than 16 days working in the UK.

However, if you are a UK resident, then you’ll need to pay tax in the UK. To work out your resident status, you’ll need to tot up where you spend most of your working days in any tax year. If you’ve spent 183 days in the UK and your only home is in the UK, then you’ll have to pay tax on your foreign income.

To pay taxes on your foreign income, you’ll need to submit a self-assessment tax return. Check out our handy guide on filing a return, here.

Remember! You may be able to claim tax relief if you’re taxed in more than one country. If you think this could be you, check out the UK Government’s guidance.

Your benefit entitlement

After the 1st January 2021, the rules for paying some UK benefits in the EU, EEA and Switzerland have changed.

For those who’ve already received benefits while living in the EU, EEA or Switzerland, you’ll be relieved to hear that you’ll continue to receive these benefits. This is as long as you still meet the other eligibility criteria.

If you’re moving to the UK after this date, you’ll still be able to claim for the following benefits: bereavement Support Payment and other bereavement benefits, industrial injuries benefits, maternity allowance, maternity pay, paternity pay and sick pay. Like before, you will have to prove that you’re eligible for these benefits.

Further, if you’ve made relevant social security contributions in an EU country, you may qualify for UK benefits This includes the New Style Jobseekers Allowance and the New Style Employment and Support Allowance. If you’re working abroad after Brexit, check where you pay social security contributions, here.

The guidance for British expats living in Norway, Iceland, Litchensutein and Switzerland is currently being updated.

Your state pension

You’ll still be able to receive your state pension if you live in the EU, EEA or Switzerland. Your pension will also increase in line with the rate that is paid in the UK.

While this guidance is for UK nationals, you’ll be relived to hear that the rules for state pension apply to everyone. So, if you decide to retire in the EU in the future, you should be able to claim a state pension.

Useful reading

If you found this article useful, then you may also like:

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