Screening filters may be sabotaging your job prospects, but 3 tricks may help your resume get past them

Young woman trying to find a job online.
Your resume’s layout may lead filtering systems to discard your application.

  • Applicant tracking systems (ATS) are software used by firms to sift quickly through resumes.
  • Many strong candidates are shunted aside due to minor issues that lead ATS to filter them out.
  • These three steps will help you get past these bots.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

If you find yourself sending out dozens of resumes every week but you’re still finding your inbox is empty, it’s possible your resume is being filtered out by a type of software called an Applicant Tracking System (ATS).

The use of these systems is on the rise, as companies attempt to filter out unsuitable resumes. 

The problem is that 43% of resumes don’t pass the minimum requirements of the ATS, a study by TopResume found. They either didn’t recognize the resumes or couldn’t read their format, so they were discarded. 

99% of companies listed under the Fortune 500 use this type of software, according to Jobscan.

While it may seem unfair, there’s a reason the software is used in the business world. 

“Knowing how to work with these systems is critical,” job coach Stacey Perkins warns CNBC Make It

The career coach outlined several essential steps to help ensure your resume gets through to human hands.

1. Go for the simplest format

Even if your CV is perfect, if it’s in the wrong format then it won’t get through an ATS. 

An ATS will scan resumes from left to right. So if you go for vertical columns, it’s very likely that some of the information will be lost along the way. Perkins recommends a traditional horizontal format with data spread out and simplified in bullet points.

Many forms or online services accept formats like PDF, DOC, or HTML. However, if you’re unsure, it’s best to send your resume as a Word document. The job coach explains that the vast majority of HTMs recognize it perfectly.

2. Always include keywords

One of the reasons applicant tracking systems were developed, is that hiring managers found many candidates didn’t fit the job description. 

when reviewing resumes, found that many of the candidates were not a good fit for the job in question.

ATS were partly designed as a method of automatically screening candidates so that resumes that didn’t fit the requirements at a given stage were simply discarded.  

This means that if you want your resume to be seen by human eyes, you’ll have to work out what exactly it is that the recruiters want to see.

“Pay special attention to experience level, location, and skills companies are asking for,” advises Nagaraj Nadendla, senior vice president in product development at Oracle. 

He’s in charge of designing these streamlining services. “If a job description specifies 10 years of experience and you only have five,” he says, “you’ll quickly get moved to the bottom of the pile.”

It’s important to study the job description and to look at 10-20 similar ones. List the keywords that are repeated in the job adverts and use these in your own resume.

Make sure you include the words and terms as they appear in the job offers. Avoid acronyms, abbreviations, or slang in another language because the software may not recognize it and therefore may not prioritize you.

Nadendla also suggests that each section should have between three and five of these keywords, but remember that it must still sound natural. 

“Nobody is an expert in everything,” Nadendla says. “Be earnest and precise in what you’re good at.”

3. Talk to a human

Where applying for jobs is concerned, society has instilled in us the idea that asking for help is cowardly, when in fact it’s the smartest decision you can make.

If you fear your resume hasn’t made it past the bots, send a direct email to the person you know will be in charge of hiring you or to the company’s human resources department.

“You might be the best candidate out there,” Perkins says, “but if you submit a resume in the wrong format, your application won’t get read by anyone.” 

It’s a good idea to attach a note to the email explaining your concerns (that you think you may be rejected by the system), your conviction that you are the ideal candidate, and to clarify that your resume was sent in the right format.

“If you don’t submit your resume in the right format, it’ll disappear into a black hole.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

You shouldn’t wear orange to an interview, according to recruiting experts

Two business colleagues discussing a technical problem at their desk in a modern office space.
Recruiters recommend neutral tones – but orange can be associated with unprofessionalism.

  • Recruiters use job interviews to see whether a candidate is the right fit for a company.
  • Your teamwork skills, the way you speak, and the clothes you wear will be closely assessed.
  • Recruiters recommend neutral tones – but orange can be associated with unprofessionalism.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

When interviewing, recruiters pay close attention to various things when they’re considering whether to progress or turn away an applicant, and it can sometimes come down to many little things that build up an “overall impression.”

While a candidate’s history, skills, qualifications, and experience are all crucial to their progression through the various stages of an application, it’s undeniable that most recruiters will – even if unwittingly – judge a book by its cover.

Ultimately, your clothing will play some role in the process, even if only subconsciously. This is why choosing what to wear is, perhaps, almost as important as preparing your answers and questions.

Clothes say a lot about the person wearing them – they’re loaded with connotations.

For example, expensive shoes and sneakers have long been used by the most powerful millennials as a status symbol.

Until you get where you want to be, however, it might be best not to show up to a job interview in a casual outfit, or wearing something too flashy that will distract the recruiter.

These are some of the conclusions reached by a study from job portal CareerBuilder.

The study examined the best and worst colors to wear in a job interview.

In the study, a sample of 2,099 human resources professionals across various industries and company sizes were asked to rate the best colors to wear to a job interview.

It’s not particularly surprising that the majority recommended neutral colors like blue, black, and gray. These three topped the list as the shades most recommended by recruiters.

The least recommended color to wear in a job interview does stand out: orange topped the list of shades to avoid. The reasons for this were that the likelihood of being associated with a lack of professionalism while wearing orange was greater.

However, orange was sometimes associated with creativity, along with other colors such as green, yellow, or purple.

What to wear for a job interview

The best thing to do according to CareerBuilder is to plan your outfit out well ahead of your interview, so you don’t have to throw something on at the last minute.

Of course, you should always choose the clothes that suit you best and feel comfortable, avoiding anything that’s ill-fitting, too restricting, or too baggy.

The best option is to try to adapt the style of the company interviewing you.

You can check the company’s social media profiles to find out if they have a particular dress code.

If you find their dress code is pretty casual, CareerBuilder suggests going for something a little more formal during the interview regardless, as you’ll have plenty of time to whip out the shorts and flip-flops – if you get hired.

In addition, try avoiding flashy accessories or things like big bows, loud patterns, or oversized jewelry.

While there’s some logic to wearing something memorable to make yourself stand out a little, you might distract the interviewer and they may spend more time wondering about your outfit than about your capabilities as a potential employee.

Finally, they recommend meticulousness.

Make sure your shoes are clean, your clothes well ironed, and even the smaller things, like making sure your nails are well-manicured.

Don’t leave anything to chance when it comes to convincing someone you’re the right person for the job.

Read the original article on Business Insider

3 people with decades of experience between them say they can’t find a job after retraining in tech, forcing them to apply to internships and junior roles

Barbara Costa
Barbara Costa wants to start a career in user experience.

  • Insider spoke to 3 millennials who are trying to land jobs in UK tech after retraining.
  • One has worked for Microsoft and Facebook but is now applying for entry level positions.
  • Experienced professionals can become pigeonholed compared to younger graduates, said a recruiter.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Camila Da Silva has worked at some of the world’s largest tech companies, but the 36-year-old has spent the past four months working 10-hour shifts as a waitress while searching for a job in London’s tech sector.

Da Silva is from Brazil, where she previously spent two years at Microsoft – as a business program manager, leading their Blacks at Microsoft leadership development program – and nine months as a Facebook contractor, alongside other roles.

She wanted to expand her career in tech, so came to the UK in 2020 on a scholarship to start a masters degree in Digital Society at the University of Edinburgh. She has applied for about 30 positions since she graduated in early 2021. “I’ve been in so many interviews I can’t even count anymore and everything was no,” she said.

Camila Da Silva.
Camila Da Silva has worked at Facebook and Microsoft.

Some of the positions she’s applied for in London are equivalent to her past experience in project management and as an analyst. But she told Insider that she has now become so desperate she’s started applying for assistant positions, and even internships.

Insider spoke to three millennials who, like Da Silva, have decided to retrain in order to pursue careers in tech. They say they’re struggling to land even junior positions despite their experience.

Despite having more work experience, older graduates can find themselves pigeonholed by recruiters, who might not take into account their previous experience if it doesn’t map to the specific role they’re applying for, Ian Storey, director of Hays Technology, a recruitment firm, told Insider.

“It’s the most candidate-led market I have seen,” Storey said. When the market is so “buoyant” it can lead to higher wages – but also greater competition for roles, he added.

Another London-based job-seeker told Insider that “the fact that you’re applying for internships when you graduated 10 years ago is not an easy pill to swallow.” He said he did not want to be named because he was still job hunting.

He is 33, and has experience as a sound engineer and running a family property business. He said he relied heavily on tech in both roles, but wanted to formalize his qualification through a masters degree in data science, for which he has completed his final project.

“I read about people upskilling into tech but in reality, it is turning out to be a lot more difficult,” he said. Internships he was considering applying for have closed during the pandemic.

In one interview, he said he was asked, “‘You’re my oldest son’s age, why do you want to change roles?” It was the most unpleasant job interview he’s had, he added.

Barbara Costa, 42, is in a slightly different position – she doesn’t have experience in tech. Originally from Brazil, Costa has a Bachelor’s degree in social anthropology, and spent 18 years teaching English as a second language to adults in London. She also worked in ethnographic research.

She recently upskilled, graduating with a masters degree in human computer interaction design from City University in London in July 2021, and is now looking for a role in UX (user experience).

She has two children and a part-time job, and so hasn’t applied for many roles because she has been so busy. However, she is trying to build her portfolio through pro bono work for a charity.

Any roles she has applied for have been graduate roles – despite the fact that she has been told by recruiters and friends who work in the industry that she is qualified for more senior jobs.

“I think it’s all about confidence as well, so I’m building myself up,” said Costa.

All three people remain confident that they will land a role later this year despite their initial difficulties – even if they admit it’s unlikely to be their ideal job.

“My fear and anxiety is every day I wait, I am getting older, ” Costa added. “The longer I wait, the less time I’m going to be doing the job that I want to do.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

The 11 worst mistakes when applying for remote jobs, according to recruitment experts

man conducting online interview with another man using laptop, holding a pen and paper
A lot of the job application process simply comes down to avoiding the obvious mistakes that can frustrate recruiters.

  • Finding a job is an elaborate process, from resumes and cover letters to interviews and offers.
  • There are key mistakes to avoid to keep a recruiter interested and improve your chances.
  • From spelling mistakes to online interviews, here’s what experts say is important to recruiters.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Finding a job isn’t easy, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.

That doesn’t mean there aren’t ways to help you stand out from the crowd and really impress hiring managers.

A lot of the job application process comes down to avoiding the obvious mistakes that can frustrate recruiters in your résumé and during your interviews.

Business Insider España spoke to some recruitment experts to find out what makes and breaks a job application.

1. Using the same application for every job

If you’re using the same résumé and cover letter for every application, you can wave goodbye to your next job offer.

Companies want to know that you’re excited about working in a specific role with them, not that you just want any job.

Director of business and specialized tech and digital recruitment at Michael Page, Daniel Pérez, told Business Insider España that applying for jobs indiscriminately could make you look desperate and affect your credibility.

2. Treating online interviews like ‘face-to-face’ interviews

“Only the format has changed, nothing else,” Pérez said of online interviews. “If we asked interviewees to stand up, how many of them would be wearing pajamas? That tells me this person will only do the bare minimum.”

If you were going to an in-person interview, you’d make sure to look smart and presentable. That’s what an online interviewer is looking for too.

3. Not respecting private messaging etiquette

Private messages should be used as a last resort as they can sometimes give a bad impression.

“It’s as if you’re saying: ‘I need something from you, I’ve applied for this job, and now I’m going to bombard you with messages even though we’ve never been in touch before,'” said Aurora Pulido, a professional development coach.

However, the CEO of the talent institute TEKDI Juan Merodio said it could be an opportunity to show off your creative side.

“If you want to send a message, make it a short one-minute video where you introduce yourself and mention the receiver’s name, so they know it’s just for them,” he said. “It’s a game of attention: that’s what you’re trying to get.”

Pérez warned it was important not to get too enthusiastic.

“If you’re a bit too creative, it can come across as unrealistic,” he said.

4. Giving inconsistent interview answers

There is an endless number of questions an interviewer could ask – and it can be tough to find the right answer.

However, it’s likely the interviewer has already looked you up on social media, so it’s important to be consistent in your personal branding.

The social media manager at InfoJobs, Nilton Navarro, told Business Insider España consistency between your answers in an interview and your social media posts could increase your chances of securing a job by up to 60%.

“The first interview takes place on social media,” he said. “55% of companies look up candidates on social media before interviewing them.”

5. Using inauthentic or insincere references

A good reference can make or break a job application but it must be authentic and original.

If your referee describes you as “promising” or a “hard worker,” it might not be much help as other candidates will have very similar references.

“When I ring up a referee and ask them, ‘What would you change about this person?’ and they tell me, ‘I wouldn’t change anything, they’re an excellent candidate,’ that’s not very reassuring,” said Fernando de Zavala, an associate at recruitment consultant firm NGS Global.

An anecdote about you or a fair character assessment pointing out some of your biggest strengths (and weaknesses) might therefore be much more useful.

6. Using your resume bio to tell your life story

According to TEKDI’s Juan Merodio, you only have 20 seconds to get a recruiter’s attention. So if your résumé bio is too long, chances are it won’t be read.

Sticking to strictly relevant information is very important. You can still use storytelling techniques, drawing all the key points together and ending with a quick note such as “Send me a message on LinkedIn” or “you can write to me at the following email address.”

7. Lying on your resume

Irrelevant information takes up unnecessary space on your résumé. Formatting mistakes are also eyesores that can frustrate recruiters.

Lying on your résumé, however, is a recipe for disaster.

“Putting a lie on your résumé is never ever worth it,” said Lazslo Bock, current CEO of Humu who previously spent 15 years going through résumés at Google.

“Anyone who does it, including executive directors, will be fired.”

8. Leaving spelling errors unamended

From “identity” instead of “identify” to “manger” for “manager,” recruiters have seen it all when it comes to spelling mistakes.

In today’s day and age, they are unforgivable, especially as they are easy to rectify.

“A good résumé opens many doors,” Pérez said. “Know how to do it well and avoid spelling mistakes – I still see them these days and it’s inexcusable.”

9. Forgetting keywords on your résumé

Most large companies use tracking systems to go through résumés, scanning them for keywords. Including them in your résumé is, therefore, a vital stepping stone to an interview.

Active words such as “growing,” “driving,” and “leading” are important to include, as are any key skills that are relevant to the job.

“If there are certain keywords related to the job that recruiters are looking for and they don’t appear in the first 30 seconds they’re reading, they’re probably going to put it aside,” said Pérez.

10. Not ensuring you stand out from other candidates

Why are you the best person for the job?

They might not always ask you directly, but that’s what they’re trying to find out, and there are ways you can show them they should hire you.

Professional development coach Aurora Pulido said candidates could conduct a thorough assessment of their role, analyzing its strengths and weaknesses and outlining what they would do to change it in their first 90 days on the job.

“If you want to stand out from the other candidates, the bare minimum should be having a complete profile,” Pulido added. “LinkedIn is also a living document, so you can add things and give it personality.”

11. Not having a long-term goal

Recruiters don’t just want to know whether you’re cut out for the role you’re interviewing for. They’re also keen to learn about your career development goals and long-term vision.

“A willingness to learn, grow, and evolve is vital to assess whether you have a long-term vision and potential for growth within the company,” said Nilton Navarro of InfoJobs. “So it’s something to bear in mind at the recruitment stage.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

The 3 keys to ensure your resume gets past screening filters

Young woman trying to find a job online.
Your resume’s layout may lead filtering systems to discard your application.

  • Applicant tracking systems (ATS) are software used by firms to sift quickly through resumes.
  • Many strong candidates are shunted aside due to minor issues that lead ATS to filter them out.
  • These three steps will help you get past these bots.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

If you find yourself sending out dozens of resumes every week but you’re still finding your inbox is empty, it’s possible your resume is being filtered out by a type of software called an Applicant Tracking System (ATS).

The use of these systems is on the rise, as companies attempt to filter out unsuitable resumes.

The problem is that 43% of resumes don’t pass the minimum requirements of the ATS, a study by TopResume found. They either didn’t recognize the resumes or couldn’t read their format, so they were discarded.

99% of companies listed under the Fortune 500 use this type of software, according to Jobscan.

While it may seem unfair, there’s a reason the software is used in the business world.

“Knowing how to work with these systems is critical,” job coach Stacey Perkins warns CNBC Make It.

The career coach outlined several essential steps to help ensure your resume gets through to human hands.

1. Go for the simplest format

Even if your CV is perfect, if it’s in the wrong format then it won’t get through an ATS.

An ATS will scan resumes from left to right. So if you go for vertical columns, it’s very likely that some of the information will be lost along the way. Perkins recommends a traditional horizontal format with data spread out and simplified in bullet points.

Many forms or online services accept formats like PDF, DOC, or HTML. However, if you’re unsure, it’s best to send your resume as a Word document. The job coach explains that the vast majority of HTMs recognize it perfectly.

2. Always include keywords

One of the reasons applicant tracking systems were developed, is that hiring managers found many candidates didn’t fit the job description.

when reviewing resumes, found that many of the candidates were not a good fit for the job in question.

ATS were partly designed as a method of automatically screening candidates so that resumes that didn’t fit the requirements at a given stage were simply discarded.

This means that if you want your resume to be seen by human eyes, you’ll have to work out what exactly it is that the recruiters want to see.

“Pay special attention to experience level, location, and skills companies are asking for,” advises Nagaraj Nadendla, senior vice president in product development at Oracle.

He’s in charge of designing these streamlining services. “If a job description specifies 10 years of experience and you only have five,” he says, “you’ll quickly get moved to the bottom of the pile.”

It’s important to study the job description and to look at 10-20 similar ones. List the keywords that are repeated in the job adverts and use these in your own resume.

Make sure you include the words and terms as they appear in the job offers. Avoid acronyms, abbreviations, or slang in another language because the software may not recognize it and therefore may not prioritize you.

Nadendla also suggests that each section should have between three and five of these keywords, but remember that it must still sound natural.

“Nobody is an expert in everything,” Nadendla says. “Be earnest and precise in what you’re good at.”

3. Talk to a human

Where applying for jobs is concerned, society has instilled in us the idea that asking for help is cowardly, when in fact it’s the smartest decision you can make.

If you fear your resume hasn’t made it past the bots, send a direct email to the person you know will be in charge of hiring you or to the company’s human resources department.

“You might be the best candidate out there,” Perkins says, “but if you submit a resume in the wrong format, your application won’t get read by anyone.”

It’s a good idea to attach a note to the email explaining your concerns (that you think you may be rejected by the system), your conviction that you are the ideal candidate, and to clarify that your resume was sent in the right format.

“If you don’t submit your resume in the right format, it’ll disappear into a black hole.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

The job market is on fire right now. Here are the best tips for finding a career that you love.

working on beach computer vacation
It’s shaping up to be a hot summer for job searching.

  • This summer is the best time to be looking for a new job.
  • Employers are looking to woo workers with signing bonuses and other perks.
  • Insider’s compiled a helpful guide for anyone searching for a new role this summer.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The job market is on fire right now.

After a steep decline at the beginning of the pandemic, employers are finally beginning to hire again. And they’re hiring a lot. On July 16, job postings on Indeed were up 36.4% above where they were on February 1, 2021, the pre-pandemic baseline. There were 9.2 million open jobs in the US at the end of May, the most recently available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicated.

Moving jobs is also a great way to make more money. A 2017 Nomura analysis found that people who had changed jobs earned roughly 1% more year over year than people who stayed with the same employer.

It’s a job seekers’ market, and some employers are working to woo workers with incentives such as bonuses and new employee benefits.

There’s never been a better time to look for a job, and Insider has compiled a helpful guide for anyone looking for a new opportunity.

Table of Contents: Static

Quitting shouldn’t be your first move if you’re unhappy

woman burn out work from home
If you’re feeling burned out, look for small ways to improve your satisfaction at work.

Maybe you don’t want to leave your job, but you’re not exactly thrilled with how things are going. Don’t fret, experts said there are simple tweaks you can make to your workday that may help you feel more fulfilled.

It’s a common problem. Gallup found that 51% of workers in its global analysis of about 112,000 business units were not engaged at work. No wonder 3.6 million US employees left their jobs in May.

But, career experts told Insider, playing to your strengths can help you feel more satisfied at work.

And remember: Don’t be afraid to share feedback with your boss. Chances are that if you’re unhappy, other people are, too.

Read more:

A few small changes can make you happier at a job you don’t like, experts say

The Great American Burnout is just beginning. Here are 5 ways managers can prevent the wave from hitting their teams.

Don’t quit your job. Do these 2 steps to get more money or a new boss instead.

A C-suite executive shared his performance review to all 1,400 people in the company to promote a culture of feedback. Read the email he sent.

WFH employees are more emotionally exhausted than those who work in person. Is going back to the office the solution?

When it’s time for a change

Starbucks Now Hiring sign
There were 9.2 million open roles at the end of May, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said.

Maybe you’ve tried to make things better at your current role, but they aren’t improving. Or maybe you’ve outgrown your role and want to move on.

Regardless, it’s time to launch your job search.

A good first step is to send some networking messages. Blair Heitmann, a LinkedIn career expert, previously told Insider that your network “is your No. 1 asset as a professional over the course of your career.”

You can also make key tweaks to your job-application materials that may draw the attention of recruiters and hiring managers.

And when you’re ready to give your notice, make sure you don’t burn any bridges with your employer. You never know if you may want to return someday.

Read more:

A workplace expert shares the exact steps you should take to quit your job without burning bridges

Use this template from a career coach to revamp your résumé and land a remote job anywhere in the world

Now may be the best time to switch jobs – and make more money

Your best shot at making $100,000 is to work remotely. Here are 6 steps to landing a WFH role you love.

No college degree? No problem. How to land a stable, high-paying job on certificates and trainings alone.

Finding the best opportunities

Job fair Florida
A man handing his résumé to an employer at the 25th annual Central Florida Employment Council Job Fair at the Central Florida Fairgrounds.

Jobs in human resources and diversity and inclusion are skyrocketing right now.

HR professionals, for example, are being recruited relentlessly for high-paying roles, experts previously told Insider. Jobs in diversity and inclusion grew 123% between May and September of last year, Indeed data showed.

But these aren’t the only industries worth checking out. It’s important to explore all of your options to find a role that is the best fit for you.

Read more:

The 2021 job market is going to be unlike anything we’ve seen before. Here’s how recruiters and job seekers should handle it.

Diversity and inclusion professionals are being recruited relentlessly. Top execs in the field share their advice for making a name in the industry.

Jobs in diversity are hotter than ever. DEI execs from companies like Wayfair and LinkedIn share strategies for getting into the field.

If you want a career in sports, media, or video games, join the $44B esports industry. A veteran host explains where to start.

HR professionals are being recruited relentlessly and have their pick of top jobs

Asking (and answering) the right questions

A woman gives two thumbs up while videoconferencing in her home for a remote job interview
Know the right questions to ask during your interview.

You’ve done the work and sent out tons of applications. Now hiring managers are scheduling interviews with you.

The most common interview question is “Tell me about yourself.” Jacques Buffett, a career expert at the online résumé service Zety, said interviewees should use this question to briefly mention their career history and tell stories of past achievements.

But it’s also important to know the right questions to ask hiring managers. This could help you get a clearer sense of the company culture.

Read more:

5 questions companies are asking in interviews right now and how to answer, according to a career expert

What Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Jack Dorsey, and 52 other top executives ask job candidates during interviews

Job seekers have all the power right now. Here are 7 questions you should definitely ask in your next job interview.

How can I tell a hiring manager that I want to be fully remote?

PwC is hiring for 100,000 jobs over the next 5 years. Here’s how to prove you have the top trait they’re looking for: agility.

Remote, in person, or somewhere in between

hybrid work
Hybrid work gives you the option to work partially from the office and partially remote.

Once you’ve accepted a job, you have an opportunity to craft your ideal work life.

Maybe you want to be completely remote or solely in the office. Or maybe you want something in between.

Many employers are still sorting out their plans for returning to the office, but regardless, you’re in a good position to negotiate as much flexibility as you want.

Some companies, such as marketing startup Scroll and Kickstarter, are testing out four-day workweeks.

Read more:

How to craft your ideal work life and get your boss on board

Take this personality quiz to find out if you work best from home, in an office, or something in between

Marketing startup Scroll trialed a 4-day workweek for a month and is already seeing huge gains in revenue and employee mental health

Kickstarter CEO: Why we’re doing a 4-day workweek

If you want to ask your boss to let you work from home forever, use this script

Read the original article on Business Insider

A woman who applied for a job at a Michigan boutique store outed its boss for calling her ‘not that cute’ in an accidental email

TikTok user exposes hiring manager after sexist comment
Gracie Lorincz, 21, made a TikTok video about an email she accidentally received from the VP of Operations at Ava Lane Boutique in Auburn Hills, Michigan.

  • A girl who applied for a job at a Michigan boutique store outed its boss for calling her “not that cute” in an email.
  • In a viral TikTok video, Gracie Lorincz said she was hurt after receiving the email accidentally.
  • The owners of the store apologized on Facebook Live and said they’re receiving online abuse.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A hiring manager at a beauty boutique in Auburn Hills, Michigan, has publicly apologized after a prospective employee outed him for saying she shouldn’t be interviewed because she was “not that cute,” according to the New York Post.

Gracie Lorincz, a 21-year-old recent college graduate, posted a TikTok video on Thursday in which she showed an accidental email sent to her by the vice president of operations of family-owned beauty boutique Ava Lane Boutique.

The email, sent by Chuck DeGrendel, says: “This girl is fresh out of college (Hope College) and not that cute. She applied to the sales model position. Are you sure you want me to interview her?” The email was actually meant for DeGrendel’s wife and co-owner, Laura DeGrendel.

Read more: From ‘vanilla’ skirt suits to ‘too-tight’ shirts: Female lawyers describe how it’s impossible to win when it comes to professional dress codes

Lorincz, who applied for a position as a brand representative, posted a screenshot of the email on TikTok alongside the sarcastic caption: “Feeling amazing.”

The video has since gone viral, amassing more than 1.7 million views at the time of writing.

Watch it below.

On their Facebook group, which has since been set to private, Ava Lane Boutique purports to have built an “amazing community of women who empower each other through positivity and fashion.”

The video sparked backlash online and prompted many angry social media fans to inundate the company’s Google Play page with one-star reviews.

Chuck DeGrendel has since made a tearful apology video on Facebook Live video.

“I sent a reply back to Laura that said that she was a recent college grad, and I didn’t feel that she was that cute, so I wasn’t sure if we wanted to proceed with an interview,” Chuck says in the video. “I don’t know why I said that, but I did, and I’m very, very sorry for saying that because it was very unprofessional and really not in line with our core values here, or my core values in general.”

His wife, Laura, also appeared in the apology video and claimed that the family’s phone numbers and address had been shared and that their children were receiving death threats, the Post reported.

Laura claims Lorincz urged her TikTok followers in the video to make these threats, although there is no mention of this.

Lorincz’s mother, Heather Lorincz, told Fox News that the email made her daughter “feel terrible” and that the Facebook Live apology was not enough.

“She is a sweet kid, she is not an attention hog, she is not a social media personality and didn’t anticipate what this turned into,” Heather said, according to Fox News. “I don’t want this woman’s business to suffer. I don’t. But I feel my daughter deserves a real apology, not a Facebook Live.”

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