Jared Kushner is a 21-year-old college student. Jared Kushner also works in Canadian real estate. And they’re ready to reclaim their name from Donald Trump’s son-in-law.

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Jared Kushner stands for a televised interview in 2020.

  • Jared Kushner, former senior advisor to former President Trump, is finally out of the spotlight.
  • For two men also named Jared Kushner, this has mostly come as a relief.
  • “As a person, [Kushner] seems kind of like a scumbag,” one Kushner living in Florida told Insider.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Jared Kushner remembers the first time he saw his name in a magazine.

It was 2009, and Kushner, an elementary school student in Florida, had most certainly not just married Ivanka Trump. But someone with his name had.

“Some relative sent a People magazine to my house, and they were on the cover,” Kushner said, referring to a November cover of the magazine that featured a small photo of Ivanka and Jared as newlyweds.

“I thought it was one of the funniest things in the world. I used to joke with all my friends about it: ‘If you Google me, it says I’m married to Ivanka Trump.'” Back then, he was blissfully ignorant. The only thing he knew about Ivanka was that she was Donald’s daughter.

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Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner wait for the beginning of a cabinet meeting in 2020.

More than a decade later, Kushner – who is now 21, and has no relation to the former senior White House advisor – doesn’t find the situation so funny. Nor is he pleased with the political performance of the man who shares his name.

After five years of being mistaken for former president Donald Trump’s senior advisor, he’s relieved at the thought of finally getting his name back, with Trump out of office and the other Kushner fading from prominence.

“My mindset at this point is eventually he’ll go away,” Kushner, who grew up in Palm Beach County, not far from Mar-a-Lago, said. “I don’t know if people will necessarily forget about him, but he won’t be brought up. And he won’t be brought up with my name, or with me.”

It really is a great sort of icebreaker’

Sharing a name with a widely loathed political figure is one of those things that seems amusing at first, but can quickly descend into chaos and aggravation.

Just ask Bill de Blasio, the Long Island man who has spent the last seven years being bombarded with hate mail intended for the mayor, or Donald R. Trump, the North Carolina guy who’s had to employ several fraud protection services because people keep trying to hack his bank accounts. Other name doppelgängers, like Gerry Sandusky – one letter removed from the convicted sex offender – share similar tales of woe; still others find it mostly funny.

Bill de Blasio Iowa
Bill de Blasio in 2019.

For the 21-year-old Kushner, a college senior, things really ramped up during the 2016 presidential campaign. He enjoyed it at first. Kushner and his family watched NBC News every night, and they’d get a kick every time his name was mentioned. But when people wouldn’t stop bringing up the other Kushner to him, it started to get old.

The coincidence was intensified by the fact that Kushner’s grandfather is named Charles Kushner – just like Jared Kushner’s father, who spent two years in prison for illegal campaign contributions and tax evasion.

“He gets stuff all the time, like people calling their house. He deals with it, too,” Kushner said of his grandfather. When Trump pardoned the other Charles Kushner in December 2020, “I called my grandpa – I was like, ‘Congrats on the pardon.'”

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Charles Kushner and Jared Kushner in 2012.

Meanwhile, in Canada, another man named Jared Kushner has found that his name can be both a blessing and a curse. (A third Jared Kushner, a New York cardiologist, declined to be interviewed.)

Around 2015, he remembered being informed of his name twin by a friend. “She was like, ‘Oh my god, you’re famous, right?’ It just slowly increased from there.”

The Canadian Kushner, 28, works in commercial real estate, where colleagues and clients are sometimes impressed by his name (never mind the other Kushner’s reputation for slumlord practices in the real estate world).

“People are typically pretty excited to get my business card if they’re familiar with the name,” he said. “They’ll send it to their friends, they’ll take a picture of it: ‘Oh, I met Jared Kushner today.'”

In fact, Kushner suspects his name has been a benefit to his career, since it gets real estate people’s attention.

“Some people like the idea of having that conversation and saying, ‘We got Jared Kushner!'” he said. “They’ll choose to call me instead of other people solely based on my name… To some degree, it really is a great sort of icebreaker to have that conversation with clients.”

Both Jared Kushners said their name wreaked havoc on their social media profiles

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Jared Kushner

Now that the Trump presidency is over, both men are excited to get their names back.

In October 2018, when a Kentucky-based man named Brett Kavanagh tweeted, “This is a terrible time to be named Brett Kavanagh,” the Florida Jared Kushner quoted-tweeted his viral post with a knowing comment: “Welcome to the club…”

Indeed, this is a club where people with unfortunate names receive a whole lot of misdirected online hate. On Twitter, “I get tagged with Ivanka and Don Jr.,” said the 21-year-old Kushner. “It’s all these official verified accounts with millions of followers. And then they tag me. I have a profile picture. I look nothing like him. And they still think my account is the other Jared Kushner’s.”

The situation has been exacerbated by the fact that Trump’s son-in-law simply doesn’t tweet, which leaves people wondering which Kushner is that Kushner.

“I get private messages on Facebook,” the 21-year-old Kushner said. “Maybe Instagram sometimes. Usually it’s people who are very upset with him. I feel like it’s usually just yelling about stuff in the Middle East that I don’t even understand. Or just cursing me out.”

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An Instagram message sent to the Floridian Jared Kushner.

In August 2017, for example, he received a rambling Facebook message from a woman in California. “Your father in law is off the rails,” she wrote. “Help us all!! Do not be complicit. This is horrific!”

He usually ignores these messages, but he admitted he once replied to someone on Instagram as though he were the other Kushner, just to mess with him. (The man didn’t reply back.)

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A Facebook message sent to the Floridian Jared Kushner.

Meanwhile, the Canadian Kushner had a Twitter account he used solely to keep up with sports headlines. But he was so bombarded with angry tweets from confused #resisters that the site became nearly unusable for him.

“I was getting tagged in retweets. I was getting direct messages: ‘I need to contact so-and-so, or do this, or take a stand,'” he said. “I had to shut that down. It was kind of getting out of hand. I’ve had people add me on Facebook. I’ve had people add my Snapchat.”

During the early pandemic – when Trump’s son-in-law headed a “shadow task force” and fumbled the administration’s attempts to provide states with desperately needed protective equipment – these messages intensified. In May, someone tagged him in a tweet and wrote, “Wow, 70,000 dead, this is what you call a good job?”

“I guess you could say being threatened on Twitter is probably pretty weird,” he said. “But I’ve kind of been acclimatized to it. People say some pretty egregious things on Twitter.”

The Kushners are somewhat torn on their opinions of Kushner and the former administration

“As a person, [Kushner] seems kind of like a scumbag,” the Floridian Kushner said. Moreover, he felt he hadn’t been the best representative for the Jewish community.

Referencing the white supremacist symbols and Nazi-era flags on display at the January 6 Capitol riot, Kushner, who is also Jewish, said, “I don’t understand how people can see this and still think his administration has been good for the Jewish people in America, in Israel.”

He also described the Trump administration’s handling of the pandemic as “a horrible job.”

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Jared Kushner and former president Donald Trump speak in the press briefing room with members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force on April 2, 2020.

The Canadian Kushner is more conflicted about Trump and his son-in-law.

“I see a lot of things that [Trump] has done that he’s done well,” he says. “And I see a lot of things he’s done that he’s done poorly. I think it’s fair to say at this time that Trump’s a very interesting character. Am I a fan? Probably not.”

Being named Jared Kushner can also ferment confusion in real life, though such encounters tend to be less vitriolic

For the Canada-based Jared Kushner, such encounters regularly happen when he’s traveling to the US.

“I’ve had people make comments to me in airports before,” he said. “Kind of a smirk, a laugh, and ‘Really? This is your name?’ Nothing insulting or harmful. I’ve had a lot of people say, ‘Oh, I guess you’ve had a pretty tough four years, huh.'”

A few months ago, the Florida Kushner went to get tested for COVID-19.

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Jared Kushner returns to the White House after an interview in 2020.

“I handed the person collecting the test my driver’s license. He came back a couple minutes later and he was shocked,” Kushner says. “He was like, ‘Are you really Jared Kushner?’ Like, ‘Is this your real name?’ I get a lot of those kinds of things.”

Then, in January, he was playing golf and was paired with a random partner. “And he came up to me and he said, ‘I think we’ve played together before.’ And then he goes, ‘Trump’s son-in-law, right?'”

Zach Schonfeld is a freelance writer and journalist based in New York. Previously, he was a senior writer for Newsweek. His first book was published in November 2020.

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Trump and Jared Kushner are barely in touch since the former president left office, report says

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Jared Kushner and
then-President Donald Trump at a press briefing on April 2.

  • Jared Kushner and Donald Trump are now barely in contact, CNN reported.
  • Kushner, formerly a confidant, was not at a high-powered meeting to plot Trump’s political future.
  • Two sources said their relationship was fractured, while another denied that it was.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Jared Kushner, once one of President Donald Trump’s closest aides, is barely in his orbit these days, according to CNN.

Trump’s son-in-law was conspicuously absent from a high-powered meeting last week in which the former president planned his appearance at the Conservative Political Action Committee as a broader return to politics, the network reported.

As a senior White House advisor, Kushner had his finger in almost every pie of the Trump administration. John Bolton, the former national security advisor, described him as Trump’s most powerful aide. Trump gushed about him, calling him “my star.”

His sprawling portfolio included developing strategy in the Middle East, getting construction of the border wall back on track, leading a parallel COVID-19 task force, and aiding the president’s reelection campaign.

So for Kushner not to be invited to the roundtable to decide Trump’s political future is unusual. CNN said the gathering included Bill Stepien, Dan Scavino, Donald Trump Jr., and Brad Parscale.

Two unnamed sources described Trump’s relationship with Kushner relationship as fractured. Another source, described as a person who frequently talks with Kushner, denied that there was any break, adding that the two met for lunch on Wednesday.

A person familiar with Kushner’s new life told CNN that Kushner was looking for a fresh start. “Right now, he’s just checked out of politics,” another source told the network.

“That’s about as 180 a turn as he could ever make,” a White House colleague of Kushner’s said. “This was a guy who for four years did everything on behalf of President Trump. He lived that job.”

But now the two barely talk, the report said. Kushner and Ivanka Trump went to live in Miami’s high-end “Billionaire’s Bunker” private island soon after President Joe Biden’s inauguration.

“The drama of politics wore him down,” a person familiar with Kushner’s plans told CNN. “Eventually, Trump wears everyone down.”

Meanwhile, Trump has been heard several times blaming Kushner for his election loss, CNN reported.

Neither the Trump Organization nor Kushner immediately responded to Insider’s requests for comment.

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Trump reportedly granted Secret Service protections to all his adult children and 3 top officials before he left the White House. It will cost US taxpayers millions.

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Outgoing US President Donald Trump waves as he boards Marine One at the White House in Washington, DC, on January 20, 2021

  • Former President Donald Trump granted extended Secret Service protections to his four adult children and their spouses before he left the White House, The Washington Post reported.
  • Former Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, former Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, and former National Security Advisor Robert C. O’Brien will also receive the expensive, full-time security detail.
  • The extended security detail could cost taxpayers millions of dollars, especially given the amount of traveling that the Trump children do related to the family company.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Former President Donald Trump extended Secret Service protections for all of his adult children and their spouses, as well as three top administration officials, just before leaving the White House, The Washington Post reported Wednesday.

The taxpayer-funded security will be extended to Trump’s four adult children and their spouses – Ivanka Trump and husband Jared Kushner, Donald Trump Jr., Eric Trump and wife Lara Trump, and Tiffany Trump, three people familiar with the president’s request told The Post. Trump’s grandchildren will also be included in the protections deriving from that of their parents.

Former Treasury Secretary Steve Mnuchin, former White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows, and former National Security Advisor Robert C. O’Brien were also granted Secret Service protections by the president, according to The Post report.

The extended security detail could cost taxpayers millions of dollars, The Post reported, especially given the amount of traveling that the Trump children do related to the family company, the Trump Organization.

“From 2017 to 2019, government records show, Trump family members took more than 4,500 trips that required the Secret Service to travel alongside them, costing taxpayers tens of millions of dollars,” according to The Post report.

Read more: Biden’s inauguration is unlike any before. Photos show how his ceremony compares to those of previous presidents.

Typically, Trump and his wife Melania are automatically granted the expensive 24-hour protection for their lifetimes, and their 14-year-old son Barron will receive such protections until the age of 16. Former Vice President Mike Pence and his wife Karen Pence are also entitled to full-time security detail post-administration for the next six months.

Trump isn’t the first president to extend Secret Service protections to those who aren’t automatically entitled to receive them. Former presidents Bill Clinton and George W. Bush granted security details to their college-age daughters for a period of time following their terms. Former President Barack Obama extended protections to his daughters Sasha and Malia after he left office, who were in high school and college respectively.

The news of the security detail extension comes on the heels of President Joe Biden being inaugurated as the 46th president of the United States just before noon on Wednesday. Just hours before, Trump and former First Lady Melania Trump left the White House aboard Marine One to Palm Beach, Florida.

The Secret Service is also prepping to grant protections to Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris and their families, including Biden’s two adult children and Harris’ two stepchildren.

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Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner spent $100K of taxpayer money renting a bathroom so Secret Service agents didn’t have to use theirs

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Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump walk on the south lawn of the White House on November 29, 2020.

  • Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner have spent $100,000 on bathroom accommodations for their Secret Service detail after barring the agents from using their bathrooms, The Washington Post reported
  • Law enforcement officials told The Post that the president’s daughter and son-in-law barred the Secret Service from using their 6.5 bathrooms when they first moved into their DC mansion in 2017. 
  • In September 2017, the federal government began renting a $3,000-a-month studio apartment across the street from the Trump-Kushner residence for the agents’ bathroom needs.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Ivanka Trump, President Donald Trump’s eldest daughter, and her husband Jared Kushner, a top aide to the president, have spent about $100,000 on bathroom accommodations for their Secret Service detail after prohibiting the agents from using the bathrooms in their Washington mansion, The Washington Post reported Thursday. 

Law enforcement officials told The Post that the president’s daughter and son-in-law barred the Secret Service from using their 6.5 bathrooms when they first moved into their home in DC’s wealthy Kalorama neighborhood in 2017. Instead, they offered the agents a porta-potty outside on the sidewalk.

But after multiple neighbors complained about the porta-potty, the agents were forced to relieve themselves at a bathroom in former President Barack Obama’s garage nearby, at the vice president’s compound a mile up Massachusetts avenue, and at businesses in the area. 

Finally, in September 2017, the federal government began renting a $3,000-a-month studio apartment across the street from the Trump-Kushner residence for the agents’ bathroom needs. The government has so far spent about $100,000 on rent for the basement apartment and is expected to spend another $44,000 as the apartment has been leased until September 2021.

White House spokesman Judd Deere denied that Trump and Kushner had prohibited their Secret Service detail from using the bathrooms in their house in a statement to The Post. 

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Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner could be on the move – a College Hunks Hauling Junk truck was just spotted outside their Washington, DC mansion

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Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump walk on the south lawn of the White House on November 29, 2020.

  • A moving truck was spotted outside of Ivanka Trump and Jared Kushner’s Washington, DC mansion on Thursday.
  • The truck — a College Hunks Hauling Junk vehicle — could very well just be for trash disposal, but could also suggest that the couple is on the move.
  • The pair reportedly dropped $32 million on an empty lot on a high-security private island in Miami last month.
  • Known as Miami’s “Billionaire Bunker,” the tony private island Indian Creek boasts its own police force and a number of ultrawealthy residents, which may soon include the president’s daughter and son-in-law.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump have been living in a 7,000 square-foot mansion in the ritzy Kalorama neighborhood of Washington, DC since early 2017. The residence reportedly costs them $15,000 per month in rent and features modern finishes and sky-high ceilings.

Weeks before Joe Biden’s inauguration, they might be moving out of it.

Hunter Walker, a DC-based reporter for Yahoo News, posted a photo to Twitter on Thursday, showing what appears to be a moving truck outside the couple’s Kalorama home.

 

The vehicle in question, a bright orange truck emblazoned with the well-known College Hunks Hauling Junk brand, could very well just amount to the couple getting rid of unwanted items  – but could also signal that the couple is gearing up to leave DC following Wednesday’s insurrection.

Trump received extensive criticism for a tweet during the insurrection that appeared to refer to rioters as “American patriots,” which she quickly deleted.

Last month, Kushner and Trump reportedly dropped $32 million on an empty lot in Miami’s “Billionaire Bunker,” tony private island Indian Creek. The island boasts its own police force and a number of superstar residents – the couple bought the property from Julio Iglesias.

The couple would be the latest in a long list of those fleeing big cities for Florida amid the pandemic.

The list includes Kushner’s brother Joshua and his wife, supermodel Karlie Kloss, who reportedly bought a $23.5 million mansion nearby in August. Both properties are within an hour-and-a-half drive of “the winter White House,” Mar-a-Lago, where President Donald Trump is expected to decamp following the end of his term.

The White House didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment from Insider.

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Trump chief of staff Mark Meadows ultimately convinced the President a mask mandate was a bad idea

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President Donald Trump and White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows.

  • Mark Meadows, President Trump’s chief of staff, reportedly convinced Trump not to introduce a nationwide mask mandate, The New York Times reported Thursday.
  • According to the Times, Meadows said such a mandate would alienate Trump’s strongest supporters: “The base will revolt,” he said. 
  • Meadows’ comments convinced Trump to forgo a mask mandate despite polling data showing a majority of Republicans were in favor of one. 
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Mark Meadows, President Donald Trump’s chief of staff, was ultimately the one who convinced the president to forgo a nationwide mask mandate to help fight the coronavirus pandemic, The New York Times reported on Thursday.

According to the report, President Trump’s main pollster, Tony Fabrizio, came to the Oval Office in the middle of the summer for a meeting with Trump and his advisors. Fabrizio reported some surprising news: A majority of voters – including likely Trump supporters – supported mandatory mask-wearing in public. 

Fabrizio’s poll had found that, in July, nearly 70% of voters in states being targeted by Trump’s campaign were in favor of a mask mandate, including more than half of Republicans. The polling data supported an argument made by senior advisors Jared Kushner and Hope Hicks: Trump could portray mask-wearing as Americans’ key to regaining their freedom to attend group gatherings and indoor events. 

But Meadows disagreed. During the same meeting, he argued the politics of such a move would damage the President’s reputation with his most ardent supporters. 

“The base will revolt,” Meadows said, according to The Times.

Several of Trump’s other advisors shared this viewpoint, including White House senior advisor Stephen Miller. Meadows added that he wasn’t sure such a move would be legal, either. 

For Trump, Meadows’ words ended up outweighing the wishes of Kushner and Hicks, and of Fabrizio’s polling data. 

“I’m not doing a mask mandate,” he reportedly said. 

After that, Trump was rarely seen in public wearing a mask, except for after he contracted COVID-19 himself in early October.

Trump lashed out at Jared Kushner for overseeing what he saw as too much testing

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Advisor Jared Kushner (R) looks on as President Donald Trump speaks in the Oval Office.

In addition to Meadows’ involvement in discouraging a mask mandate, the New York Times report also detailed how Trump lashed out at Kushner for what he saw as too much testing for COVID-19.

Kushner helped oversee nationwide testing efforts throughout the year.

According to The Times, during another Oval Office meeting of top aides on August 19, Trump grew angry with increases in COVID-19 testing in the US, which he blamed for higher case numbers.

“You’re killing me! This whole thing is! We’ve got all the damn cases,” Trump reportedly yelled at Kushner.

“I want to do what Mexico does,” Trump continued. “They don’t give you a test till you get to the emergency room and you’re vomiting.”

Trump also criticized Kushner about testing during debate preparation, according to the report.

“I’m going to lose,” Trump said, according to The Times. “And it’s going to be your fault, because of the testing.”

Azmi Haroun contributed reporting.

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Trump pardoned Jared Kushner’s dad Charles, who was convicted of tax crimes, witness tampering, and illegal campaign contributions

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Jared Kushner poses at an event in 2007, flanked by his father Charles Kushner and Barbara Kushner.

  • Alongside 28 other pardons and commutations President Donald Trump granted on Wednesday, Charles Kushner, 66, was given a full pardon.
  • Charles Kushner was investigated by prosecutors for making illegal campaign donations in 2003, and at the time, his brother-in-law and former business partner William Schulder had assisted prosecutors.
  • Once Charles learned of Schulder’s cooperation, he hired a sex worker to attempt to seduce Schulder. The encounter was recorded with a hidden camera and Kushner delivered the tapes to Schulder’s wife as revenge.
  • In the end, Charles pleaded guilty and was charged with 18 counts of assisting in the filing of false tax returns, one count of retaliating against a federal witness, and one count of lying to the Federal Election Commission. He served a 2-year sentence.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump continued his pardon spree on Wednesday, and alongside allies and former campaign officials, he pardoned Charles Kushner, the father of White House senior advisor Jared Kushner, who is also Trump’s son-in-law.

The elder Kushner was convicted in 2005 for preparing false tax returns, witness retaliation, and making false statements to the Federal Election Commission. He pleaded guilty and served 2 years in prison.

In the press release profiling the 26 new pardons and three commutations announced on Wednesday – including GOP strategist Roger Stone and Trump’s former campaign manager Paul Manafort – the White House said that “since completing his sentence in 2006, Mr. Kushner has been devoted to important philanthropic organizations and causes.”

‘One of the most loathsome, disgusting crimes’

Charles Kushner and his father founded Kushner Companies in 1985. Charles ran the New York City real estate company until he was sentenced to prison in 2005.

In 2003, prosecutors investigated him for making illegal campaign donations, and at the time, his brother-in-law and former business partner William Schulder had assisted their probe.

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Charles Kushner in 2004.

Once Charles learned of Schulder’s cooperation, he hired a sex worker to attempt to seduce Schulder and sleep with him, an act that Charles had recorded with a hidden camera. He delivered the tapes to Schulder’s wife as revenge.

In the end, Charles pleaded guilty to 16 counts of tax evasion, one count of retaliating against a federal witness, and one count of lying to the FEC.

He served a 14-month prison sentence in Alabama, where his family visited him on a weekly basis, according to the Real Deal.

Former New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who prosecuted Charles Kushner as then-US attorney for the state, told PBS’s Margaret Hoover on “Firing Line” in 2019 it was “one of the most loathsome, disgusting crimes that I prosecuted.”

Jared Kushner has defended his father, and Kushner Companies has been shrouded in other controversies

Although his father admitted to his crimes, Jared has often defended Charles.

In 2009, Jared told New York Magazine: “His siblings stole every piece of paper from his office, and they took it to the government. Siblings that he literally made wealthy for doing nothing. He gave them interests in the business for nothing. All he did was put the tape together and send it. Was it the right thing to do? At the end of the day, it was a function of saying, ‘You’re trying to make my life miserable? Well, I’m doing the same.'”

That same year, Jared married Ivanka Trump, the president’s eldest daughter. They have both served as White House advisors for Trump’s entire presidency. Prior to serving in the White House, Kusher “transferred large portions of his real estate holdings and the New York Observer to a family trust overseen by his mother, Seryl and sold additional assets to his brother Joshua,” CNN reported at the time.

Kushner Companies, before and after Charles’ and Jared’s tenures, has long been shrouded in controversy.

After Jared assumed the role of CEO in 2008, he sold off many holdings and bought 666 Fifth Avenue, a mixed-use building that has been the source of multiple complaints and investigations.

According to Town and Country, in 2018, Kushner Companies confirmed that the US attorney in Brooklyn had subpoenaed the company regarding its support of a program that allowed foreigners to invest $500,000 to fast-track US residency and citizenship. Kushner Companies sold the skyscraper in August 2018.

Jared Kushner also holds ownership of several Baltimore-area apartment complexes that have been embroiled in housing violations and mismanagement accusations for years.

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Ivanka Trump is eyeing Florida to kick-start her political career and could opt to run for Senate, sources say

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White House Senior Adviser Ivanka Trump introduces her father U.S. President Donald Trump to deliver his acceptance speech as the 2020 Republican presidential nominee during the final event of the Republican National Convention on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, on August 27, 2020.

  • Ivanka Trump is considering the state of Florida as the place to launch her political career, sources close to her told CNN on Friday.
  • The reports come as the first daughter and husband Jared Kushner recently spent over $30 million on a waterfront lot on Indian Creek village, a private island for the super-rich in Miami’s Biscayne Bay.
  • “Ivanka definitely has political ambitions, no question about it,” one source told CNN. “She wants to run for something, but that still needs to be figured out.” 
  • One option for Ivanka Trump could be a run for the US Senate, Adam C. Smith, the former Tampa Bay Times political editor, told CNN.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Ivanka Trump is considering to “run for something” and is eyeing Florida as a potential place to kick-start her political career, sources close to her told CNN on Friday.

The first daughter, who has plenty of experience campaigning for her father, is drawn to The Sunshine State not only because her family owns property there – but also because it offers a good political opportunity, a source told CNN.

Florida voted for President Trump in the 2016 and the 2020 presidential election.

“Ivanka definitely has political ambitions, no question about it,” the source told CNN. “She wants to run for something, but that still needs to be figured out.” 

One possibility for the first daughter could be to run for the US Senate, Adam C. Smith, the former Tampa Bay Times political editor, told CNN.

“Marco Rubio is up for reelection in 2022 and is expected to run again,” he said, according to CNN. “But I wouldn’t think Rubio would deter her if she wanted to run. The last time Marco Rubio ran against a Trump in Florida, in the 2016 presidential primary, Rubio was crushed by 19 percentage points.”

However, Ivanka would need to have resided in Florida for at least two years before the election.

Another source close to the first daughter cautioned against reading too much into her political ambitions, noting that he and Kushner had been looking for a new home in Florida for a while.

indian creek village miami
Indian Creek Village, an exclusive manmade private island in Miami, is home to celebrities and billionaires including Carl Icahn. This week, reports said Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump reportedly spent $30 million on a lot there.

The reports come as the couple, who have three children, recently dropped over $30 million on a waterfront lot on Indian Creek village, a private island in Miami’s Biscayne Bay.

The exclusive island has been nicknamed “Billionaire Bunker” because of its very wealthy residents, including billionaire investor Carl Icahn and supermodel Adriana Lima.

The couple is turning to Florida as New York City’s social elite are likely to reject them, even though both lived in the city before moving to the Capitol.

In a tell-all essay on Vanity Fair last month, the first daughter’s childhood friend, Lysandra Ohrstrom, wrote that she hopes the pair would not be able to reclaim their old social life after Trump’s presidency.

“I expect Ivanka to find a soft landing in Palm Beach instead, where casual white supremacy is de rigueur, and most misdeeds are forgiven if you have enough money,” Ohrstrom wrote.

Kushner and Ivanka Trump are not the only ones considering moving to Florida in the next few months.

President Trump has reportedly asked for renovations to be made to his Mar-a-Lago residence. First Lady Melania Trump is scouting schools in the area for their son Barron, People reported last week.

Sources close to the first lady also said this week that she’s been planning on life after the White House and “just wants to go home.”

The first family is set to move out of the White House on January 20, with Trump plotting a dramatic exit, including flying to Florida on Air Force One to hold a televised farewell rally. 

Ivanka Trump has not yet commented on her plans after the White House but has also not ruled out a future run for office.

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Historian groups sue White House over fears the Trump administration will destroy records before leaving office

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President Trump and Jared Kushner during the G7 summit in Biarritz, France

  • Multiple historian groups are suing the White House over fears that the Trump Administration will improperly maintain records before the transition to President-elect Joe Biden, The Washington Post reported Saturday. 
  • “The archive, historians, and CREW are suing to put some backbone in the law and prevent any bonfire of records in the Rose Garden,” said Tom Blanton, director of the National Security Archive, in a statement announcing the lawsuit. 
  • The lawsuit also targets Trump officials, including the president’s son-in-law and advisor Jared Kushner, for keeping records of communications by taking screenshots, which the groups argue violates the Presidential Records Act.
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Several groups focused on preserving historical records are suing some members of President Donald Trump’s administration, hoping their legal effort will implore the White House to preserve records as power shifts to President-elect Joe Biden.

The groups, which include the American Historical Association, the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, the National Security Archive, and Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, have joined the lawsuit, filed in the US District Court in Washington, DC, calling for the White House to ensure records are properly maintained, The Washington Post first reported Saturday.

The group said in a complaint they feared “there is a growing risk that he will destroy records of his presidency before leaving” due to potential legal battles he faces after he leaves office.

“Presidential records are always at risk because the law that’s supposed to protect them is so weak,” Tom Blanton, director of the National Security Archive, said in a December 1 statement. “The archive, historians, and CREW are suing to put some backbone in the law and prevent any bonfire of records in the Rose Garden.”

According to the Post, the law that requires that White House records be preserved – the Presidental Records Act – requires “the activities, deliberations, decisions, and policies that reflect the performance of the president’s constitutional, statutory, or other official or ceremonial duties” be maintained.

The law was passed not long after Richard Nixon’s turbulent presidency, as a president’s papers were previously viewed as private, according to the report. Under the Presidental Records Act, all records are kept private for at least five years, and some can be kept private for longer.

The lawsuit also takes aim at other Trump administration officials, including Trump’s son-in-law, senior advisor Jared Kushner, who reportedly has maintained records of conversations on private messaging apps like WhatsApp by taking screenshots, according to a 2017 memo from the White House.

The lawsuit alleges that the practice is in violation of the Presidental Records Act because screenshots do not contain metadata or other attachments, according to the report. In 2014, the law was updated to prohibit communications sent on nonofficial messaging platforms, unless they were forwarded to an official account with 20 days or an official account was copied on the communications, as the Post noted.

Several White House officials have used private email addresses for official business, as the Post reported. These individuals include Kushner, Ivanka Trump, former deputy national security adviser K.T. McFarland, and Steve Bannon, the former chief strategist at the White House, The Post said.

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