New January 6 bodycam videos show police trying to help a trampled Trump supporter being brutally beaten with flagpoles and batons by mob

Jan 6 footage
Footage released by the Justice Department on July 9 shows police officers dragged and beaten during the January 6 riot.

  • New January 6 footage shows police officers dragged and beaten by rioters outside the Capitol.
  • CNN reports the officers had been seeking to help a Trump supporter who had collapsed.
  • Prosecutors allege that Jack Whitton led the attack on the officers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

New video footage released by the Justice Department shows police officers who were reportedly trying to help a Trump supporter during the January 6 insurrection being brutally attacked by rioters.

The footage is from bodycams worn by Washington DC police officers and was released by the Justice Department after CNN, NBC4, and other news outlets sued for access.

In court documents in the prosecution of rioters allegedly involved in the attack, the officers in the footage are identified only by initials.

The footage shows officers, identified as AW and BM in a tunnel area outside the Capitol.

CNN reported the officers had stepped from the area to help Trump supporter Rosanne Boyland, who collapsed and was apparently being trampled by the crowd of protesters. Boyland was later have found to have died of a drug overdose.

Prosecutors allege that the footage shows AW being forced to the ground and attacked with his own baton by defendant Jack Whitton. Another officer, BM, was pulled down a flight of stairs and into the mob, where he was beaten with weapons including a flagpole, according to documents.

AW was dragged into the crowd, stripped of police gear, and beaten with weapons. According to the documents rioters “ripped off his helmet, maced him, took his gas mask and MPD-issued cell phone, kicked him, struck him with poles, and stomped on him.”

The footage was released as part of the prosecution of Whitton, a Crossfit instructor from Georgia who has been charged with assault.

AW was seriously injured in the attack, requiring staples for a head injury, while BM received injuries to his face and shoulder.

Other footage, reported CNN, shows an officer identified as CM trying to help colleagues and is grabbed by the head and punched by a rioter.

In other footage, officers are confronted by protesters, one of whom shouts “You’re going to die tonight.” Whitton is alleged to have issued the threat to the officers and later, according to the prosecutors he told an associate “I fed him to the people.”

563 people have been charged with offenses relating to the Capitol riot, whose seriousness some Republicans have sought to downplay in recent months.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Some companies pledged to halt donations to lawmakers who objected to certifying Biden’s election win. They have not kept their promise.

Capitol riot
  • Some corporations pledged not to fund officials who voted against certifying election results.
  • Six months after the Capitol riot, dozens have made donations to PACs, the AP reported.
  • Some companies said PACs assured them the funds won’t go to officials that objected.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Following the January 6 Capitol riots, dozens of large companies pledged not to fund the 147 lawmakers who objected to certifying President Joe Biden’s election win but have since fallen short on that promise, the Associated Press reported.

The GOP lawmakers objected to certifying the vote on false claims made by former President Donald Trump.

Supporters of Trump breached the US Capitol and clashed with law enforcement on January 6 following repeated claims by the former president and his allies that the election was stolen. The riot resulted in the deaths of five people, including a police officer.

Walmart, Pfizer, Intel, General Electric, and AT&T were some of the companies that said they wouldn’t donate to lawmakers who opposed certification but have since donated thousands to political action committees that support them.

The AP reported that the companies claimed donating to PACs is different than directly supporting a lawmaker however, the AP found that most of these companies’ donations prior to the riot were to PACs.

In April, three months after saying they wouldn’t support the 147 lawmakers, Walmart gave $30,000 to the National Republican Congressional Committee, which supports GOP members running in House elections. More than half of House Republicans voted against certification.

“Pledging not to give to a certain person doesn’t mean that much when there are so many other ways that corporate money reaches elected officials,” Daniel Weiner, a former senior counsel at the Federal Election Commission who now works at the Brennan Center for Justice at New York University’s law school, told the AP. “These pledges are largely symbolic.”

Walmart spokesperson Randy Hargrove told Insider: “As we have for the past 10 years on a bipartisan basis, we have given equally to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, the Democratic Senatorial Campaign, the National Republican Congressional Committee, and the National Republican Senatorial Committee.”

A Daily Beast analysis also found that companies like Lockheed Martin, UPS, General Motors, and American Express also broke promises not to donate to lawmakers that objected to certification.

In a statement a few days after the riots, Amex said it would pull funding for elected officials who attempted to “subvert the presidential election results and disrupt the peaceful transition of power.”

Read more: Michigan’s Democrats in Congress face an ethics complaint after hanging with Biden and voting from

However, in April, the company gave the Republican Legislative Victory Fund – which supports Arizona Republican state senators – $2,500. That same group had been working on an audit of all 2.1 million votes cast in Maricopa county, where Biden won.

A spokesperson for AT&T told the AP they donated after being assured the funds won’t go towards officials who objected to certification.

AT&T donated $5,000 to House Conservatives Fund which is led by Mike Johnson, a lawmaker that objected to certifying the vote.

Additionally, campaign finance experts told the AP there’s no way to know if donated funds end up going towards officials who opposed certification.

“It’s completely frustrating from an accountability point of view,” Ciara Torres-Spelliscy, a Stetson University Law School professor who studies corporate campaign finance, told the AP.

Pfizer, Intel, General Electric, AT&T, Lockheed Martin, UPS, General Motors, and American Express did not respond to Insider’s request for comment at the time of publication.

Read the original article on Business Insider

After months of evading a lawsuit related to the Capitol insurrection, Rep. Mo Brooks was finally served

Mo Brooks
In this image from video, Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., speaks as the House reconvenes to debate the objection to confirm the Electoral College vote from Arizona, after protesters stormed into the U.S. Capitol on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021

  • Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell is suing GOP Rep. Mo Brooks over his role in the Capitol Riot.
  • A private investigator left the papers with Brooks’ wife at their home in Alabama, CNN reported.
  • Swalwell said Brooks spent months trying to avoid being served the lawsuit.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

GOP Rep. Mo Brooks was served a lawsuit filed against him by Democratic Rep. Eric Swalwell over the January 6 Capitol insurrection after months of trying to evade it.

“Well, Swalwell FINALLY did his job, served complaint (on my WIFE). HORRIBLE Swalwell’s team committed a CRIME by unlawfully sneaking INTO MY HOUSE & accosting my wife!” Brooks said in a tweet.

Swalwell is suing former President Donald Trump, Donald Trump Jr., Brooks, and Rudy Giuliani for inciting the insurrection. He accused Brooks of dodging being served and said he hired a private detective to track him down.

Brooks denied he was dodging being served and said he was publicly available, CNN reported.

On January 6, Trump supporters stormed the Capitol and clashed with police which resulted in five deaths.

Brooks was one of several GOP politicians who falsely claimed there was voter fraud in the 2020 election.

“Brooks-acting in his personal capacity- conspired with the other Defendants to undermine the election results by alleging, without evidence, that the election had been rigged and by pressuring elected officials, courts, and ultimately Congress to reject the results,” Swalwell’s lawsuit said.

The lawsuit said Brooks “directly incited the violence at the Capitol that followed” when he addressed the crowd before the riot.

“Today is the day American patriots start taking down names and kicking ass,” Brooks told the crowd at a rally right before the riot.

On Sunday, Swalwell’s attorney Matthew Kaiser said a private investigator left the papers with Brooks’ wife at their home in Alabama, CNN reported.

Insider could not reach Brooks’ office for comment at the time of publication but spokesperson Clay Mills told Forbes that Brooks filed a police report over the incident. Mills said there was video proof that the agent went into Brooks’ home without consent.

Another Swalwell attorney, Philip Adonian, told Forbes that Brooks’ allegation that the server entered his home is “utterly false” and said he “lawfully handed the papers to Mo Brooks’ wife at their homeā€¦ which is perfectly legitimate under the federal rules.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

House committee to hold a public hearing on the January 6 insurrection in the wake of a 4th inspector general flash report

Zoe Lofgren
Rep. Zoe Lofgren, D-Calif., speaks during a House Administration Committee hearing on Oversight of the United States Capitol Police on Capitol Hill on Tuesday July 16, 2019

  • A House committee will discuss the findings of the fourth IG flash report on the Capitol siege.
  • The report found “disturbing inadequacies” in the USCP’s preparation and response to the attack, Rep. Lofgren said.
  • The House Administration Committee will hold its fifth public hearing on the January 6 riot.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The House Administration Committee will hold another public hearing on the Capitol riot in the wake of a flash report by the inspector general, which the chairwoman said revealed “disturbing inadequacies” in the Capitol Police’s preparation and response to the attack.

House Administration Chairwoman Rep. Zoe Lofgren announced Wednesday that the committee will host its fifth hearing on the events of January 6 – more than any other congressional committee has held on the matter. The date of the hearing is yet to be set.

US Capitol Police Inspector General Michael Bolton will appear at the hearing to discuss the findings of the latest flash report, which “identified significant deficiencies pertaining to the Department’s Containment and Emergency Response Team and First Responders Unit and made more than 20 recommendations,” according to a statement from Lofgren.

Lofgren said in the statement that Bolton’s “latest flash report reveals, again, disturbing inadequacies in the Department leadership’s preparation for, and response to, the January 6 attack.”

“Examining these latest findings and recommendations will assist the Committee as we contemplate reforms,” she continued.

The report also raised “such significant and troubling concerns” that Bolton delivered an urgent advisory to USCP leadership before the probe was fully complete.

The announcement of the House Administration Committee’s hearing comes after Senate Republicans blocked a bill to create a bipartisan commission to investigate the January 6 insurrection.

“Despite Senate Republicans’ shameful filibuster of a compromise, bipartisan bill to establish an independent commission to investigate the deadly insurrection and attack on the capitol, the American people deserve answers,” Lofgren said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

GOP Rep. Paul Gosar was slammed after praising Ashli Babbitt, who was killed while storming the Capitol on January 6

US Representative Paul Gosar
U.S. Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., speaks during a Congressional field hearing on the Affordable Care Act in Apache Junction, Ariz. Gosar appears to be signaling support for a conspiracy theory that Jeffrey Epstein did not kill himself while awaiting trial on sex trafficking charges.

  • Ashli Babbit was shot and killed by police while storming the Capitol on January 6.
  • GOP Rep. Paul Gosar praised Babbitt and claimed she was “executed.”
  • On Friday, he was slammed for praising her with quotes from a U2 song about Martin Luther King Jr.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

GOP Rep. Paul Gosar was slammed after praising Ashli Babbitt, who was shot and killed by police while storming the Capitol on January 6.

In a tweet, Gosar wrote: “They took her life. They could not take her pride. #onemoreinthenameoflove.”

The message paraphrased lyrics from the song “Pride (In the Name of Love)” by U2, which is about Martin Luther King Jr.

Babbit was one of five people who died after supporters of former President Donald Trump stormed the US Capitol.

She was shot by a Capitol Police officer when she tried to climb through a door where the glass had been broken out in the Speaker’s Lobby outside the chamber where members of the House of Representatives were meeting. The officer fired one round from his service pistol that hit her left shoulder, the agency said.

The Justice Department did not pursue charges against the officer who shot and killed Babbit and said there was insufficient evidence to support criminal charges.

Gosar, a Republican from Arizona, previously defended the rioters, calling them “peaceful patriots.” He’s also claimed Babbitt was “executed.”

So far, 500 people have been arrested for alleged crimes tied to their activity during the Capitol attack.

GOP Rep. Adam Kinzinger, who was one of a few Republicans who voted to impeach Trump over the Capitol insurrection, responded with “Paul you’ve lost your mind.”

“Side note to anyone watching, don’t breach the house floor illegally, especially after warned,” Kinzinger added.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Trump says the January 6 Commission is a ‘Democrat trap’ and tells Republicans to refuse to comply with it

Trump January 6 Commission
Former U.S. President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in Manhattan on May 18, 2021 in New York City.

  • Donald Trump told Republicans not to approve the “Democrat trap” of a commission into the Capitol riot on January 6.
  • “Republicans must get much tougher and much smarter, and stop being used by the Radical Left,” Trump said.
  • The House is due to vote on a commission into Trump’s role in the riot on January 6.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump told Republicans not to approve the “Democrat trap” of a commission into the Capitol riot on January 6, during which a mob of his supporters breached the building in an attempt to overturn the certification of President Joe Biden’s election victory.

“Republicans in the House and Senate should not approve the Democrat trap of the January 6 Commission,” he said in a statement posted to his website.

“It is just more partisan unfairness and unless the murders, riots, and fire bombings in Portland, Minneapolis, Seattle, Chicago, and New York are also going to be studied, this discussion should be ended immediately.”

“Republicans must get much tougher and much smarter, and stop being used by the Radical Left. Hopefully, Mitch McConnell and Kevin McCarthy are listening!”

His comments came after the Problem Solvers Caucus, a key bipartisan group of 58 lawmakers, endorsed the creation of a commission on Tuesday. More than 75% of the group voted in favor of the proposal, Insider’s Charles Davis reported, which they said could help “to ensure an attack like January 6th can never take place again.”

Rep. Kevin McCarthy, the House minority leader, had just hours before announced his opposition to the bill that would establish a commission, which House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced in February.

McCarthy said Pelosi had “refused to negotiate in good faith on basic parameters,” despite the fact she had agreed to most of his demands, Insider’s Eliza Relman reported.

“Given the political misdirections that have marred this process, given the now duplicative and potentially counterproductive nature of this effort, and given the Speaker’s shortsighted scope that does not examine interrelated forms of political violence in America, I cannot support this legislation,” McCarthy said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Trump defense secretary to testify on Pentagon’s delayed response to January 6 riot to Congress, prepared remarks say military has ‘an extremely poor record in supporting domestic law enforcement’: reports

Former acting defense secretary Christopher Miller
citing U.S. Defense Secretary Christopher Miller removes his face mask during a meeting with Lithuania?s Defense Minister Raimundas Karobli at the Pentagon in nearby Arlington, Virginia, U.S., November 13, 2020.

  • Ex-Pentagon chief Christopher Miller will defend the department’s response to the Capitol riot before the House oversight committee, reports say.
  • The National Guard arrived at the Capitol more than four hours after pro-Trump supporters breached the building on January 6.
  • Miller is expected to say he did not immediately deploy armed forces for fear of the possibility of a military coup.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A former Pentagon chief who served during the January 6 riot will defend the Pentagon’s delayed response to the Capitol in a congressional testimony later this week, the Associated Press and Reuters reported Tuesday

Christopher Miller, who served as acting defense secretary under former President Donald Trump on January 6, will appear before the House Oversight Committee on Wednesday in his first public testimony about the insurrection.

Miller is expected to testify alongside former acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and District of Columbia Police Chief Robert Contee III.

In prepared remarks reviewed by the AP and Reuters, Miller expressed concern over the possibility of a military coup if he deployed armed troops to respond to pro-Trump supporters storming the Capitol.

“I am keenly aware of the criticism regarding the Department of Defense’s response,” Miller’s remarks read, according to the Reuters report.

“My concerns regarding the appropriate and limited use of the military in domestic matters were heightened by commentary in the media about the possibility of a military coup or that advisors to the President were advocating the declaration of martial law.”

In his remarks, Miller cites public “hysteria” as a factor in his decision of “limited use” of armed forces to “to support civilian law enforcement.”

He also wrote that the Defense Department has “an extremely poor record in supporting domestic law enforcement,” citing specific scenarios like civil rights demonstrations and protests against the Vietnam War, as well as the Kent State shootings. “And some 51 years ago, on May 4, 1970, Ohio National Guard troops fired at demonstrators at Kent State University and killed four American civilians.”

“I was committed to avoiding repeating these scenarios,” he added.

Miller also notes that “logistical challenges” contributed to the delayed deployment of National Guard troops to the Capitol. National Guard troops arrived at the Capitol more than four hours after rioters breached the building as lawmakers worked to certify President Joe Biden’s win in the 2020 election.

“This isn’t a video game where you can move forces with a flick of the thumb or a movie that glosses over the logistical challenges and the time required to coordinate and synchronize with the multitude of other entities involved, or with complying with the important legal requirements involved in the use of such forces,” the remarks continue.

In his opening statement, Miller wrote that he believes Trump “encouraged the protesters that day,” but it remains unclear if the former acting defense secretary thinks the former president is responsible for the insurrection at the Capitol.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Liz Cheney refuses to say whether Trump should be prosecuted for inciting the Capitol riot

Liz Cheney
Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, in Washington

  • Rep. Liz Cheney refused to say whether former President Donald Trump should be prosecuted for inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.
  • The third highest-ranking House Republican said the decision should be left up to the Department of Justice.
  • She also said the House commission investigating the Jan. 6 riot shouldn’t be expanded to include an investigation of BLM protests.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Rep. Liz Cheney, the third highest-ranking House Republican, refused to say whether former President Donald Trump should be prosecuted for inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

Cheney, who voted to impeach Trump earlier this year, told reporters at a House GOP retreat in Florida that the decision about whether to prosecute Trump should be left up to the Department of Justice. She also said that the bipartisan House commission investigating the Jan. 6 riot shouldn’t be expanded to include an investigation of Black Lives Matter protests, as her fellow GOP leaders are pushing for.

“I’m very concerned, as all my colleagues are, about the violence we saw from BLM and antifa last summer,” she told reporters. “I think it’s very important that the January 6 commission focus on what happened on January 6.”

The Wyoming congresswoman was one of just 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump for “incitement of insurrection” and is the most anti-Trump in GOP leadership.

“The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack,” she said in a January statement about the riot. “There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.”

Cheney, who’s said she won’t support Trump if he becomes the 2024 GOP presidential nominee, has since accused Trump of “embracing insurrection” by continuing to spread lies about the 2020 election.

“The election wasn’t stolen. There was a judicial process in place,” she said earlier this month. “If you attack the judicial process and you attack the rule of law, you aren’t defending the Constitution. You’re at war with the Constitution. And for us as a party going forward, we have to embrace the Constitution and we also have to put forward positive solutions.”

Read the original article on Business Insider