How to delete apps on your iPad, or offload apps to save their data

hands using ipad, tapping apps
Deleting apps on an iPad is so simple it takes only a few taps.

  • You can delete apps on an iPad directly from the home screen or in Settings.
  • When you delete an app on your iPad, you will lose all of its saved data.
  • If you want to remove an app but save its data, you should offload it instead.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

An app-cluttered home screen makes using your iPad much less pleasant when you have to comb through dozens of little icons to find the app you want.

You can delete unwanted apps from your iPad’s home screen to clean up its appearance, free up storage space, and improve your interface experience.

When you delete an app from the home screen, any data stored within the app, such as levels beaten in a game, will be lost.

If you want to delete an app and archive its data, you can instead “offload” the app in Settings. Then, when you re-download the app, your data will be recovered.

Here’s how to delete, remove, or offload apps on your iPad.

How to delete apps on an iPad

1. Press and hold your finger down on the app you want to delete on your iPad home screen.

2. Tap “Delete App” in the pop-up menu that appears.

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Select “Delete App” in the pop-up.

How to offload apps on iPad to save their data

If you want to delete multiple apps at once or save an app’s data before you remove it, you can offload or delete the apps in Settings.

1. Open the Settings app on your iPad.

2. Tap the “General” tab and select “iPad Storage.”

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In “General,” tap “iPad Storage.”

3. Scroll down to find a list of apps and tap the one you want to offload or delete.

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Select an app in the list of apps.

4. Tap “Offload App,” then confirm by hitting “Offload App” again. This will delete the app, but keep its documents and data. You can also select “Delete” instead of “Offload App” if you want to delete multiple apps this way.

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Tap “Offload App” to offload the selected app, or “Delete App” to delete it.

5. You can also choose to let your iPad automatically offload unused apps when it’s low on storage. On the iPad Storage page, tap “Enable” beside “Offload Unused Apps.”

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Tap “Enable” to turn on automatic offloading.

How to delete apps on your iPhone, or hide apps from your Home Screen with iOS 14How to delete apps from iCloud on any device to free up storage space on your iCloud accountHow to delete or hide apps on your Apple TV, and free up space for new appsHow to find and use the new App Library on your iPhone in iOS 14, to organize or browse through all of your apps

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Yes, you can use a mouse with your iPad – here’s how to connect and use a Bluetooth mouse

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It’s easy to connect a wireless mouse to your iPad.

  • You can use a wireless mouse with an iPad that’s running iPadOS 13.4 or later.  
  • To use a mouse on your iPad, you’ll need to pair them using the Bluetooth menu.
  • Once paired, you can use a mouse with your iPad to navigate, make selections, start apps and more.
  • Visit Business Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Over the past few years, Apple has put more and more effort into marketing the iPad as a replacement for your laptop. One major example of this is how new iPads can connect to a wireless computer mouse, and use it in lieu of the touchscreen.

If you have iPadOS 13.4 or later, you can connect a wireless Bluetooth mouse to your iPad. Connecting a mouse lets you navigate through apps, select items, and click buttons without touching the screen.

Note that some wired computer mice can also connect to an iPad, but you might need a special USB-C adapter for them. Check out the manual for the specific mouse you want to use, or contact the manufacturer for more information.

Here’s which iPad models can use a mouse, and how to connect it.

Which iPads can connect with a mouse?

You can use any wireless Bluetooth mouse with any iPad running iPadOS 13.4 or later. And since the iPad has a Bluetooth receiver built into it, you won’t need a Bluetooth dongle.

These iPad models are compatible with iPadOS 13.4 or later, and can use a mouse:

  • iPad Pro (all models)
  • iPad 5th generation or later
  • iPad Air 2 or later
  • iPad Mini 4 or later

 

To make sure you’re running iPadOS 13.4 or later, start the Settings app and tap “General,” then tap “About.” If your iPadOS version is too old, head to the “Software Update” screen and see if a new version is available.

How to connect a wireless mouse to your iPad

1. Turn on your mouse and put it into pairing mode. Generally, there should be a pairing button on the underside of the mouse or in the battery compartment. Press it until you see a blinking light that indicates pairing mode is on. 

2. Start the Settings app on your iPad. 

3. Tap “Bluetooth.”

4. Look for the mouse in the list of devices. When you see it, tap the name of the mouse.

Can you use a mouse with an iPad 2
Find the mouse in the list of Bluetooth devices.

5. In the pop-up window, tap “Pair.” Follow any additional instructions, if necessary, to pair it with the iPad. This may include entering a passcode.

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Tap “Pair” to complete the setup process.

How to use a mouse with an iPad

Once paired, the mouse should work automatically whenever it’s turned on and in range of the iPad. As you move the mouse, you should see a small dot, which is the mouse pointer. 

As it hovers over buttons and icons, you should see them expand or highlight to indicate they’re selected. If you move the pointer into a text field, you should see the I-beam indicating you can type. 

Can you use a mouse with an iPad 4a
The cursor is a gray dot that can be hard to see, but you’ll see items highlight or get larger when the pointer is over them.

If you stop moving the mouse, the dot will disappear so it’s not in the way. To get it back, just move the mouse again. 

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