How to create folders and labels in Gmail to organize your inbox

gmail app
Gmail labels are a great way to keep your email inbox organized.

  • To create and edit folders in Gmail, go to the Labels section in Settings.
  • Gmail uses labels instead of folders to organize emails, but labels function similarly to folders.
  • You can also create a label from an email on both desktop and the Gmail mobile app.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Folders are a must for keeping your email inbox organized. Gmail uses labels instead of folders, but they’re effectively the same thing. But unlike folders, you can apply more than one label to an email in Gmail.

To use a label as a “folder,” use the “Move to” option to move an email or thread out of your inbox and into a label, which you can access in the left panel of your inbox.

All work-related emails for a specific client, for example, can be put into one folder, and wedding planning related emails can be stored in another. You can even nest labels under other labels, which act like subfolders.

Here’s how to do it all.

How to create a folder in Gmail on desktop

1. Go to the Gmail website. Log in to your account if you aren’t already logged in.

2. Click the gear-shaped Settings icon at the top-right of the screen, then select See all settings.

Desktop screenshot of a Gmail inbox with the See all settings option highlighted
Select “See all settings” to create, edit, and delete folders.

3. In the Labels tab, scroll down to the Labels section and click Create new label.

4. Enter the name of the label you want, then click Create. If you want the new label to nest under an existing label (like a subfolder), click the box next to Nest label under and select the folder you want the new label to go into.

Desktop screenshot of the Labels section of Gmail settings with the New label pop-up window
Label names can be a maximum of 225 characters.

How to create a folder in Gmail on the mobile app

1. Open the Gmail app on your iPhone, iPad, or Android. Log in to your account if you aren’t already logged in.

2. Tap the three horizontal lines on the top-left of the screen.

3. Scroll down to the Labels section, then tap Create new.

Screenshot of the Gmail app with the Create new option highlighted
Scroll down past the list of already created labels to make a new one.

4. In the pop-up menu, enter the name of the label you want (225 characters max), then tap Done.

How to apply labels in Gmail

1. In your Gmail inbox on desktop, click the boxes next to the emails you want to label and click the Label icon on the right side of the top toolbar. In your Gmail inbox on the mobile app, tap the circular profile icon of the sender on each email you want to label, then tap the three dots icon, and select Label in the pop-up.

2. On both desktop and mobile, check the boxes corresponding to the labels you want to apply (you can choose more than one). On desktop, click Apply and on mobile tap the check mark to apply the labels.

Desktop screenshot of a Gmail inbox with the Label as menu highlighted
Organize your Gmail inbox by assigning labels to individual or groups of emails.

How to automatically apply labels via filtering

1. In your Gmail inbox on desktop, click the Show search options icon, which looks like three hatched lines, on the right side of the search bar.

2. Set the parameters for the filter. You can filter by From, To, Subject, Has the words, Doesn’t have, Size, and Date.

3. After setting the criteria, click Create Filter.

Desktop screenshot of a Gmail inbox highlighting the Create filter option
Automatic filters can help you organize and find relevant emails quickly without having to manually label individual emails.

4. On the next page, click the box next to Apply the label and choose a label from the drop-down menu.

5. Click Create Filter.

Screenshot of "Apply label" screen in Gmail on desktop
Select “Apply the label” and choose which label in the drop-down.

How to edit or delete a label

On desktop:

1. In your Gmail inbox on desktop,click the gear-shaped Settings icon at the top-right of the screen, then select See all settings.

2. In the Labels tab, scroll down to the Labels section.

3. To edit a label, click on the label name, enter in the new name, then hit the Enter or Return key. Alternatively, click the corresponding edit button in the Actions tab. You can also change a label’s nesting properties in this window.

Desktop screenshot of the Settings section of Gmail with the Edit label option highlighted
Add, delete, and edit labels in this section of the Settings menu.

4. To delete a label, click the corresponding remove button in the Actions tab, then click Delete.

On the mobile app:

1. In the Gmail app, tap the icon of three horizontal lines in the top-left corner, next to the search bar.

2. Scroll down and tap Settings.

3. On the next screen, select the email address you want to apply the change to.

4. Scroll down on the next page and select Label settings in the Labels section.

Screenshot of Settings page in Gmail app
Go to “Label settings.”

5. On the Label Settings page, tap the label you want to edit or delete.

Screenshot of Label Settings page on Gmail mobile app
Select the label you want to edit.

6. Tap the Name field to enter a new name, or tap the Delete [label name] button at the bottom to delete the label.

Screenshot of Label edit page on Gmail app
Here you can rename or delete your label.

How to search by date in Gmail to find older messagesHow to log into your Gmail account on a computer or mobile deviceHow to sort by sender and more in Gmail to find your most important messagesHow to reset and change your Gmail password if you’ve forgotten it, on desktop or mobile

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Apple has unveiled an upgraded version of its most popular iPad and a redesigned iPad Mini

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

iPad Mini screen 2021
The new iPad Mini.

  • Apple has debuted new versions of the iPad and the iPad Mini – both are up for preorder now.
  • The iPad will start at $329 and has better performance and Apple’s latest video-chat technology.
  • The iPad Mini has a new design and improved camera system. It starts at $499.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Apple unveiled revamped versions of two of its fan-favorite iPads during its September 14 keynote address.

At its annual iPhone event on Tuesday, Apple took the wraps off an upgraded version of its low-cost iPad and a redesigned iPad Mini, which cost $329 and $499 respectively.

The latest iPad runs on Apple’s A13 Bionic chip, which makes the device 20% faster than the previous version, Apple says. The new iPad has an upgraded signal processor for improved rear camera performance, as well as a new, 12 megapixel front camera that provides a 122-degree field of view.

Like the iPad Pro, the iPad will run Apple’s Center Stage technology, which follows the user as they move around on video chats.

The latest iPad will start at $329 for the 64 GB version and come in silver and space gray. Customers can preorder it right now and it will be available generally starting September 24.

The new iPad Mini, a smaller yet more premium iPad, is getting a new design with narrower bezels around the display and rounded edges. Apple also removed the home button from the front of the device – it’s now situated at the top of the device, but it still contains Touch ID, Apple’s fingerprint scanning technology.

The iPad Mini will have an improved front and rear camera, with the ability to shoot 4K video and run Apple’s Center Stage technology. The device also supports Apple’s second-generation Apple Pencil.

iPad and iPad Mini price

The latest iPad will start at $329 for the 64GB version and come in silver and space gray. This is an improvement on the starting specification of last year’s 10.2-inch iPad, which came with 32GB of storage to start.

The iPad Mini starts at $499 in purple, pink, gold, and space gray. It too comes with 64GB of storage to start.

iPad and iPad Mini release date

The latest iPad and iPad Mini are available for preorder right now, and both will be available in stores and generally online starting September 24.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Apple just unveiled an upgraded version of its most popular iPad and a redesigned iPad Mini

iPad mini colors at iPhone 13 event
The new colors of the redesigned iPad Mini.

Apple just unveiled revamped version of two of its fan-favorite iPads.

At its annual iPhone event on Tuesday, Apple took the wraps off an upgraded version of its low-cost iPad and a redesigned iPad Mini, which cost $329 and $499 respectively.

The latest iPad runs on Apple’s A13 Bionic chip, which makes the device 20% faster than the previous version, Apple says. The new iPad has an upgraded signal processor for improved rear camera performance, as well as a new, 12 megapixel front camera that provides a 122-degree field of view.

Like the iPad Pro, the iPad will run Apple’s Center Stage technology, which follows the user as they move around on video chats.

The latest iPad will start at $329 for the 64 GB version and come in silver and space gray. Customers can preorder it Tuesday and it will be available next week.

The new iPad Mini, a smaller yet more premium iPad, is getting a new design with narrower bezels around the display and rounded edges. Apple also removed the home button from the front of the device – it’s now situated at the top of the device, but it still contains Touch ID, Apple’s fingerprint scanning technology.

The iPad Mini will have an improved front and rear camera, with the ability to shoot 4K video and run Apple’s Center Stage technology. The device also supports Apple’s second-generation Apple Pencil.

iPad and iPad Mini price

The latest iPad will start at $329 for the 64 GB version and come in silver and space gray.

The iPad Mini starts at $499 in purple, pink, gold, and space gray.

iPad and iPad Mini release date

The latest iPad and iPad Mini will be available for preorder on Tuesday, and both will be available next week.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A judge just ruled a massive blow against Apple’s App Store business

Tim Cook Tim Sweeney 2x1
  • The judge in the case between “Fortnite” maker Epic Games and Apple issued a ruling on Friday.
  • Apple must allow app makers the ability to monetize their apps without paying Apple.
  • Epic has to pay Apple over $3.5 million in owed royalties, and still can’t charge users directly in apps.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

The end of the months-long legal saga between Apple and “Fortnite” maker Epic Games finally came on Friday when Judge Yvonne Gonzalez Rogers issued a ruling with bad news for both parties – and a major blow to Apple’s App Store business.

In Apple’s case, the App Store is being forced to allow app makers the ability to link out and sell items directly to their users via external payment methods. That means app makers will be allowed to directly link out to alternative ways for purchasing, giving them a new way to avoid App Store commissions that can cost as much as 30%.

Apple is, “permanently restrained and enjoined from prohibiting developers from including in their apps and their metadata buttons, external links, or other calls to action that direct customers to purchasing mechanisms, in addition to In-App Purchasing and communicating with customers through points of contact obtained voluntarily from customers through account registration within the app,” the judge wrote in her permanent injunction ruling.

The ruling will go into effect in 90 days unless any motions to delay or reverse the order are successful.

Moreover, the judge chastised Apple for continuing to charge a 30% commission despite years of criticism from app makers. “Unlike those in the computer gaming market,” she wrote, “nothing other than legal action seems to motivate Apple to reconsider pricing and reduce rates.”

While that’s good news for Epic, it wasn’t the total victory Epic was hoping for: The company is being ordered to pay over $3.5 million owed royalties to Apple, and still isn’t able to directly charge “Fortnite” players for items within the game.

Apple charges app makers on its iPhone and iPad App Store a commission for sales, ranging from 15 to 30%, which Epic Games sought to circumvent in an update to its hit game, “Fortnite,” in August 2020.

Fortnite (Epic payment through iOS)
An image of the “Fortnite” update that included the ability to pay Epic Games directly rather than paying through Apple.

A new payment option was introduced in the update that said “Epic direct payment,” which is exactly what it sounds like: Instead of paying Apple, then Apple paying “Fortnite” maker Epic Games, you could pay Epic directly. Epic even charged less for the same virtual items.

By doing this, Epic intentionally circumvented paying Apple the cut it takes from app makers for selling through its digital storefronts. It was this move that caused “Fortnite” to be kicked off the App Store last year, and subsequently sparked a lawsuit between Epic and Apple.

In the suit, Epic Games accused Apple of operating a monopoly with its iOS App Store – a charge the judge on Friday disagreed with, ruling that Apple’s practices were not monopolistic.

The smartphone is an “essential computing device,” Epic CEO Tim Sweeney argued in a letter to Apple leadership, and opening up the platform would give iPhone users, “the rights and freedoms enjoyed on the world’s leading open computing platforms including Windows and macOS.”

In a better world, Sweeney argued, iPhone users could choose from a variety of App Stores with competing libraries of content and sales – a world where games like “Fortnite” could offer players the ability to pay less by purchasing stuff directly from Epic, or to download another store entirely (like, say, Epic’s own digital storefront, the Epic Games Store).

In defense, Apple argued that Epic’s foundational assertion is incorrect: The App Store is intentionally operated as a “walled garden,” the company says, because it protects users from harm.

Without Apple vetting each app before publishing, “the health of Apple’s ecosystem” is at risk, Apple Chief Legal Counsel Douglas Vetter argued. Moreover, Apple said that Epic knowingly, intentionally violated developer agreements it signed.

“Today the Court has affirmed what we’ve known all along: the App Store is not in violation of antitrust law,” Apple said in a statement sent to Insider. “As the Court recognized ‘success is not illegal.’ Apple faces rigorous competition in every segment in which we do business, and we believe customers and developers choose us because our products and services are the best in the world. We remain committed to ensuring the App Store is a safe and trusted marketplace that supports a thriving developer community and more than 2.1 million US jobs, and where the rules apply equally to everyone.”

Epic Games did not immediately respond to a request for comment, but Epic Games CEO Tim Sweeney took to Twitter to respond.

“Today’s ruling isn’t a win for developers or for consumers. Epic is fighting for fair competition among in-app payment methods and app stores for a billion consumers,” he wrote. “‘Fortnite’ will return to the iOS App Store when and where Epic can offer in-app payment in fair competition with Apple in-app payment, passing along the savings to consumers.”

Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The most basic Apple iPad is the ultimate ‘dad’ computer because it fits into every part of my life as a father working from home

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

IPad with Smart Keyboard
  • Since working from home, I have used the basic iPad more than I ever thought I would use a tablet.
  • The iPad has been handy when working away from the desk, playing games or watching videos with my son, and more.
  • While I recommend an iPad with more storage, even the $329 model can do everything I’ve done and then some.

10.2-inch iPad (2019) (small)

Apple has been trying to get its customers to think of the iPad as the next evolution of the mobile computer for a long time now. Admittedly, being a computing geek at heart, I have resisted that narrative pretty strongly.

However, being a father to a 3-year-old (and receiving the basic, $329 iPad from my wife as a 2020 Father’s Day gift), has drastically changed my outlook on the iPad as an incredibly versatile device – even for getting real work done in a pinch.

Here’s a look at all the ways even the most affordable iPad has been a major upgrade in my life, and could be for you, too.

First off, to lay some groundwork, this is the $329 iPad model with 32GB of storage. However, the Smart Keyboard cover attachment is not included, and costs an additional $159.

iPad with keyboard open to Insider Reviews

Frankly, the Smart Keyboard or a similar product is all but essential for more than just typing on iPad. It’s also a convenient stand for watching movies or playing games.

IPad Smart Keyboard closeup

Not only is the keyboard handy for typing out emails or editing articles (most content management systems support iPad in the Safari browser), but for typing super-fast text messages to friends and family using Apple devices.

iPad and Keyboard seen from the side on a table

iPad supports nearly every facet of my working day: Google Workspace apps for editing drafts as well as tracking articles and metrics; Trello for additional project tracking; Slack for daily instant communication, and more.

Documents open on an iPad

However, where the basic iPad falls short is for video meetings. The portrait orientation of the FaceTime camera isn’t conducive to how I use the iPad almost constantly: in a horizontal landscape orientation for typing. I’d say my coworkers have learned to deal during those afternoon meetings.

Reporter Joe Osborne in a GoogleMeet from his iPad

This is news to no one with children, but when I’m not working the iPad is an incredible, safe distraction device if you need just a few minutes to yourself or to get a chore done.

Child watching iPad video

Parental controls vary between the specific video and game apps, but you can easily lock down in-app purchases and app downloads before giving your kid unfettered access to your debit card.

IPad settings screen

Speaking of which, I even use the iPad to do online banking and bill payments. Because of the locked-down nature of Apple’s software in that apps have very little communication with other apps, if at all in some cases, I feel safer doing banking on this device than just any old laptop.

PFFCU APP LOGIN on an iPad

Of course, the iPad’s entertainment capabilities get even better when you share them with your kids. From sharing the screen to watch a movie to playing same-screen multiplayer games, there’s a ton to do to get involved in your kid’s interests.

Child playing iPhone game

You could even load the iPad up with the latest age-appropriate educational apps to squeeze some learning in – especially if your child isn’t currently in daycare or early schooling for health concerns.

IMAGE OF IPAD EDUCATION APP

The iPad comes in handy for more personal, esoteric reasons as well, such as serving as my comic book reader whenever I want to read up on the comic history informing my favorite Marvel shows and movies.

IMAGE OF MARVEL READER APP against a dark wooden floor

And finally, the iPad has been incredibly helpful in one of my biggest passions: running games of Dungeons & Dragons for my friends from behind the screen. Not that I’m doing much at all of this these days, but the iPad is more than ready to be my grimoire of tales and tricks once we’re all able to get together again safely.

IPad D&D tool

10.2-inch iPad (2019) (button)

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How to set up parental controls on your child’s iPhone or iPad to restrict screen time, explicit content, or purchases

Father and daughter relaxing on couch, dad looking at phone
There’s a wide range of parental restrictions you can set on your child’s iPhone.

  • iPhone parental controls can keep your child away from sensitive content and regulate screen time.
  • You can also control purchases and set content and privacy restrictions.
  • Parental controls can all be accessed via the Screen Time section of your Settings app.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

When it comes to keeping your kids safe, technology is an important consideration. If you have Apple devices, including iPhones and iPads, in the house, you have access to a robust set of resources for controlling what your kids can do on their own devices. You just have to know how to set them up.

Here’s what you’ll need to do.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

Set content and privacy restrictions using Screen Time

Before you can start, you must have Screen Time for Family set up on your device.

1. Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.

2. Tap Screen Time.

Screenshot of iPhone Settings main page
In Settings, go to “Screen Time.”

3. Tap Turn on Screen Time.

4. After reading a summary of what the Screen Time feature can offer, tap Continue.

5. If you’re setting up parental controls on your kid’s iPhone, select This is My Child’s iPhone.

Screenshot of Screen Time page asking if this is your child's phone
Select who’s phone you’re using at the bottom.

6. Tap Downtime, then configure the hours you want your kid’s iPhone to be offline. For example, you might want to prevent them from playing games or using social media after dinner. Regardless of what hours you choose, calls and text messages will still get through.

Screenshot of Screen Time page in iPhone Settings
From the Screen Time page, select “Downtime.”

7. Tap the back button, then select App Limits. From there, you can choose how long your child can use various kinds of apps. For example, you can limit social media apps and games to two hours a day, then tap Set App Limit.

Screenshot of Screen Time page with "App Limits" highlighted
In “App Limits,” you can set a time limit for certain apps.

8. Tap the back button again and select Content & Privacy Restrictions. Then toggle on the Content & Privacy Restrictions option and create a passcode so that you have access to the Screen Time parental controls, but your child does not.

Screenshot of Content & Privacy Restrictions page in iPhone Settings
Toggle on the button at the top of the page.

Control iTunes and App Store purchases

Prevent purchases and downloads

1. Open the Settings app on your iPhone or iPad.

2. Tap Screen Time.

3. Select Content & Privacy Restrictions. You might be asked to enter your passcode at this point.

Screenshot of Screen Time page in Settings
Go to “Content & Privacy Restrictions.”

4. Tap iTunes & App Store Purchases.

Screenshot of Content & Privacy Restrictions page in Settings
Select “iTunes & App Store Purchases.”

5. Choose Don’t Allow where desired.

Enable ‘Ask to Buy’

This process must be done on your device – not your child’s device. Once set up, you, acting as the family organizer, are able to approve or deny requests from your child to make purchases, like buying a new app for their phone.

1. Open your Settings app.

2. Select your name at the top of the screen.

3. Tap Family Sharing.

Screenshot of Apple ID page in Settings
Go to “Family Sharing.”

4. Select Ask to Buy.

Screenshot of Family Sharing page in Settings
On the Family Sharing page, select “Ask To Buy.”

5. Tap the name of your desired family member.

6. Use the toggle button to turn on or turn off Ask to Buy.

Specify which websites your child is allowed to visit

1. Open the Settings app and then tap Screen Time.

2. On the Screen Time page, tap Content & Privacy Restrictions. You might need to enter your Screen Time passcode.

3. If it’s not already turned on, swipe the button for Content & Privacy Restrictions to the right.

4. Tap Content Restrictions.

Screenshot of "Content Restrictions" button in Settings
Select “Content Restrictions.”

5. In the Web Content section, tap Web Content.

Screenshot of "Web Content" section in Settings
From the Content Restrictions page, go to “Web Content.”

6. Depending on how restrictive you want to be, tap Limit Adult Websites or Allowed Websites Only. Once you make that selection, you can fine-tune the controls by adding websites to the list of allowed (or not allowed) sites.

Prevent explicit content

1. Go into your Settings app.

2. Tap Screen Time.

3. Tap Content & Privacy Restrictions.

Screenshot of Screen Time page in Settings
Go to “Content & Privacy Restrictions.”

4. Select Content Restrictions.

5. Choose the settings you want.

Screenshot of Content Restrictions page in Settings
Choose what content you’d like to restrict or allow.

From this screen, you can restrict:

  • Ability to play music, music videos, podcasts, and news containing explicit content.
  • Ability to find and view music videos.
  • Ability to share what they’re listening to with friends, and see what their friends are listening to.
  • Movies, TV shows, book content and apps with specific ratings.

Disable built-in apps

1. Go into your Settings app and tap Screen Time.

2. Select Content & Privacy Restrictions.

3. Enter your Screen Time passcode, as directed.

4. Select Allowed Apps.

Screenshot of Allowed Apps button in Settings
From the Content & Privacy Restrictions page, go to “Allowed Apps.”

5. Toggle off the apps that you want to disable.

Note: Disabling these apps doesn’t delete them, it simply hides them from your child’s home screen.

Restrict Siri web searches

1. Go into your Settings app.

2. Tap Screen Time.

3. Select Content & Privacy Restrictions.

4. Tap Content Restrictions.

5. Scroll down to Siri, then choose your settings. You can prevent Siri from searching the web when you ask a question, and prevent Siri from displaying any explicit language from within this setting.

Screenshot of Siri restrictions section in Settings
In the Siri section, choose what kind of content you want to allow.

How to block websites on a Mac computer using Parental Controls in your Safari browserHow to turn off the password requirement on your Mac computer for quicker login accessHow to manually update the carrier settings on your iPhone to improve its performance and cellular connection7 ways to fix your iPhone when it has no service

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How to fix a disabled iPad by connecting to iTunes or Finder

apple ipad 4
You can’t get into a disabled iPad without the password or resetting it.

  • If your iPad says it’s disabled, you’ll need to connect it to Finder or iTunes to restore it.
  • Typing the wrong passcode too many times will disable your iPad temporarily or permanently.
  • Once you connect your disabled iPad to Finder or iTunes, you’ll have to erase and recover all of its data.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Passwords and passcodes help protect our devices from falling into the wrong hands. But it also means that if you enter your own iPad’s passcode wrong too many times, you’re the one who’ll be locked out.

If your iPad says it’s disabled, it means that you’re totally locked out. At this point, the only way to re-enable your iPad is to either wait (assuming it’s given you a time limit) or reset the iPad using your computer. And if you don’t know your password, resetting the iPad is your only option.

How to restore a disabled iPad with Finder or iTunes

The exact steps to restore your iPad will depend on which iPad model you own, and whether you have a Mac or PC.

1. Turn off your iPad. You can do this on an iPad with a Home button by holding the Lock button at the top of the iPad, then swiping on the Power Off slider that appears. On an iPad without a Home button, hold the Lock button and either Volume button, then swipe the Power Off slider.

2. Plug your iPad into a computer and then put it into Recovery Mode.

  • If you have an iPad with a Home button, press and hold both the Home and the Lock buttons at the same time until you see the Recovery Mode screen appear.
  • If you have an iPad without a Home button – this type of iPad uses Face ID – quickly press and release the Volume Up button, press and release the Volume Down button, and then hold the Lock button until you see the Recovery Mode screen appear.
The Recovery Mode screen on an iPad, which displays a link to Apple's support page, and icons showing a charging cable connecting to a laptop.
Put your iPad into Recovery Mode.

3. If you’re on a PC, open iTunes and click the tiny iPad icon in the top-left. If you’re on a Mac, open a Finder window and click your iPad’s name in the sidebar.

4. You should see a pop-up explaining that your iPad has encountered a problem and needs to either be updated or restored. Select Restore, and confirm your choice.

A Mac screen telling the user that their iPad has an error, and needs to be updated or restored. The "Restore" option is highlighted.
You’ll want to restore your iPad, not just update it.

5. Keep your iPad connected and wait for your PC or Mac to restore the device. Depending on your computer and internet speeds, this could take a few minutes.

A Mac finder window showing a progress bar for an iPad being restored.
The restoration and update could take a while.

6. Once it’s done, your iPad should restart automatically. At this point, it should act as if you’re setting it up for the first time. Go through the steps to set it up, and if you have a backup saved to iCloud, use that to recover your data.

Alternatively, you can open Find My on the iCloud website, select your iPad, and click Erase. As long as your iPad is connected to the internet, this should delete everything on it – including the passcode.

The Find My browser app, displaying a map of New York City and Long Island, with a green dot to mark where the selected iPad is. In a side menu, the "Erase iPad" option is highlighted.
You can erase your iPad remotely with Find My.

How to put your iPhone or iPad in DFU mode to fix it as a last resortHow to buy more iCloud storage for your iPhone, and what you’ll pay for each storage planHow to turn off auto-brightness on your iPhone or iPadHow to clean your iPad’s screen without damaging it

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to put your iPhone or iPad in DFU mode to fix it as a last resort

charging iphone close up
If your iPhone or iPad’s technical issues aren’t solved from a reset or restore, you can try using DFU mode.

  • DFU mode is a way to recover your iPhone or iPad using a computer.
  • To put an iPhone or iPad into DFU mode, you’ll need to use either iTunes or Finder.
  • DFU mode works differently on iPhones and iPads with Face ID, compared to older models.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Your iPhone or iPad can sometimes run into technical issues, requiring the device to be reset or restored.

However, if it can’t be recovered through its settings, this can complicate efforts and require the use of iTunes or Finder to restore the device’s operating system and firmware.

Here’s how you can use DFU mode and a computer to restore your iPhone or iPad when it cannot recover itself.

What is DFU mode?

Device Firmware Update mode – or DFU mode for short – is a state that an iPhone or iPad can be put in to get your device back into working order.

DFU mode is similar to the BIOS on Windows computers or Recovery Mode on a Mac. It exists “below” the operating system level – iOS – but can still communicate with iTunes or Finder on a Windows or Mac computer.

In DFU mode, your iOS device is accessible to iTunes or Finder at a more privileged level. This allows for more to be changed than normal. However, going into DFU mode on its own does not change anything on the iPhone or iPad.

Put an iPhone or iPad in DFU mode

To put an iPhone or iPad into DFU mode, follow the instructions based on which model you have.

iPhone or iPad with Face ID

iphone
iPhones X generation or later and iPads 11 Pro generation or later support Face ID.

1. Turn off your iPhone or iPad and plug it into your Mac or Windows computer.

2. Make sure that iTunes or Finder are running.

3. Press and hold the side button on your device for three seconds.

4. While continuing to hold the side button, press and hold volume down. Hold both buttons for 10 seconds.

5. Release the side button but continue holding volume down for another five seconds.

6. Release volume down. If the screen is illuminated but blank, your iPhone has now entered DFU mode.

To exit DFU mode, quickly press the Volume Up button, then quickly press the Volume Down button, then hold down the Side button until the device reboots.

iPhone 7

iphone 7 and 7 plus
The iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Pro have a different process for entering and exiting DFU mode than other iPhone models.

1. Turn off your iPhone and plug it into your Mac or Windows computer.

2. Make sure that iTunes or Finder are running.

3. Press and hold the side button of your iPhone for three seconds.

4. While continuing to hold the side button, press and hold down the Home button. Hold both buttons for 10 seconds.

5. Release both buttons. If the screen is illuminated but blank, your iPhone has now entered DFU mode.

To exit DFU mode, hold down the Side button and Volume Down button until the device reboots.

iPhone 6s or earlier

iphone 6s
To enter DFU mode on iPhones generation 6S or earlier, you’ll use the Home and side buttons.

1. Turn off your iPhone and plug it into your Mac or Windows computer.

2. Make sure that iTunes or Finder are running.

3. Press and hold the side button of your iPhone for three seconds.

4. While continuing to hold the side button, press and hold down the Home button. Hold both buttons for 10 seconds.

5. Release the side button but continue holding down the Home button for an additional five seconds.

6. Release the Home button. If the screen is illuminated but blank, your iPhone has now entered DFU mode.

To exit DFU mode, hold the Home button and the Lock button until the device reboots.

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Should I buy an Apple iPad? Our experts share all the reasons why you should get the 10.2-inch tablet

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Pattern of Apple iPad Standard 10.2 Inch 4x3

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

The Insider Reviews Team has experts who spend their days researching, reviewing, and writing about all kinds of products. When it comes to popular products, especially from Apple, our experts have opinions as to whether or not you should buy something.

Sometimes we can agree to disagree, but in the case of the iPad standard model, our experts all have the same opinion: This is an iPad that you should definitely buy. Keep scrolling to read all the reasons why we unanimously recommend the standard model iPad.

2020 iPad 10.2-inch (8th Gen) (medium)

Why you should buy the iPad

Our senior Tech reporter Antonio Villas-Boas thinks that the simple nature of the standard model iPad is perfect for day-to-day use. Plus, he shares that the price is fair for what you get.

“The $330 standard 10.2-inch iPad doesn’t have the bells and whistles as the iPad Air or iPad Pro, like mouse support, liquid retina displays, or super powerful processors, but it’s arguably all most people need in a tablet. For $330, the 10.2-inch iPad runs all your apps, browses the web, plays your games, and streams your videos with ease, and more expensive models wouldn’t do those things much better. It’s the ‘people’s iPad.'”

In similar praise, Joe Osborne, the senior editor of Tech, notes that the versatility of the standard iPad model, especially while working from home.

“Having received the most recent iPad base model as a Christmas gift, I’ve used it for just about everything. From watching videos and playing games with my son to squeezing in work when away from my desk, using the Magic Keyboard attachment, it’s one of my most-used devices in the house. I would strongly recommend opting for a higher storage option than the standard 32GB, however, as it’s become a bottleneck in my daily use.”

For on-the-go use, our Deals editor Tercius Bufete shares a tip on how to make the standard model iPad even more versatile and useful.

“For anyone working at home with a MacBook, the iPad is an incredibly useful productivity tool. Sidecar is an incredible application that lets you use the iPad as a portable, second monitor for your Mac. That alone is worth the purchase price alone, but when you factor in all of the tablet things the iPad is capable of, you should buy it.”

Why you shouldn’t buy the iPad

While our team highly recommends the iPad, it is lacking functions like multi-user support. Plus, the standard model only has 32GB of storage and we don’t think that’s enough.

While it isn’t exactly a reason to skip it, the standard model’s design is dated compared to its sleeker cousins, the iPad Air and the iPad Pro.

Frequently asked questions

How much does the iPad cost?

This 10.2 inch iPad varies in cost depending on storage and cellular ability from Apple. The standard model with 32GB starts at $330 without cellular and $459 with cellular. The price increases with more storage to $439 for 128GB without cellular, and $559 with cellular. Check out our guide for iPad prices to compare how much each model costs.

There are also ways to get cheaper prices on iPad models, including the standard one. Take a look at our guide to find the best deals on iPad going on now.

What alternatives should be considered?

If you aren’t sold on the iPad yet, you can go with an Android tablet such as the Amazon Fire Tablet. However, Bufete still argues that the iPad is still superior.

“Unless you want to go the complete budget route and pick up the Amazon Fire Tablet, the iPad is the undisputed king of tablets. No other tablet receives the same kind of software update cycle that the iPad receives. For that reason alone, it’s the only game in town.”

Fire HD 8 Tablet (medium)

Standard iPad vs iPad Pro: What is the difference?

The standard iPad is the cheapest option for around $330, and the iPad Pro is the most expensive of the iPads starting at $658 for the iPad Pro 11 inch. Our team thinks that the standard iPad is perfect for everyday use and in our review of the iPad Pro, we noted that this version is ideal for someone who uses it for work. For work-from-home lifestyles, the iPad Pro has an option to split the screen to have multiple apps open at once

The iPad Pro has a larger screen, with options to purchase an 11 inch or 12.9 inch screen. It also has a more advanaced hardware with the A12Z processor, wherein the iPad has an A12 processor that is similar to the function of an iPhone. The rear camera on the iPad Pro is better than the standard iPad, with a dual-lens system and LiDAR depth sensing.

What types of iPads are there?

Right now, you can buy the standard iPad, the iPad Pro, the iPad Mini, or the iPad Air. To help you compare and decide which iPad is best for you, we created a guide to the best iPads available now.

2020 iPad 10.2-inch (8th Gen) (medium)Pro (5th Gen. 2021) (medium)iPad Mini (5th Gen, 64GB) (medium)iPad Air 2020 (4th Gen, 64GB) (medium)

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6 iPad accessories to help you get the most out of your Apple tablet

Collage of the best iPad accessories, including an Apple pencil, AirPods, Logitech keyboard, and Steel Series Nimbus Controller 4x3

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  • Accessories can help you use your iPad as a sketchbook, laptop, or game console.
  • Our favorite iPad accessories include ESR cases, Logitech keyboards, and Apple’s AirPods Pro.
  • Make sure the accessory is compatible with your specific iPad model before buying.

There’s plenty that your iPad can do right out of the box, but accessories can make your iPad even more useful. That’s especially true if you’re using it for working or playing video games.

Whether you’re using your iPad as a portable work machine, a digital sketch pad, or a secondary gaming device, there’s something in this guide for everyone. All of the products in this guide have been tested by our team of writers.

Apple makes plenty of iPad accessories, but there are also worthwhile options from third parties like Logitech, ESR, and SteelSeries among others. When shopping for iPad accessories, make sure they’re compatible with the specific iPad model you own.

Here are our favorite iPad accessories.

The best iPad case

Pink iPad Case ESR

ESR iPad cases

iPad Cases (button)

There are plenty of iPad cases out there, but ESR’s cases stand out for their variety and affordable prices. Whether you prioritize protection style, or convenience, there’s usually something for everyone in ESR’s lineup. 

One of our favorites is the Sentry Magnetic Kickstand Case, which includes raised edges for extra protection and a kickstand that allows for seven viewing angles. The version for the 10.2-inch iPad only costs $21.69 at the time of writing, although the pricing will definitely vary depending on the model. The ESR Ascend Trifold Hard Case for the iPad Pro even has a special flap for protecting your Apple Pencil while you’re charging it. 

All told, ESR provides plenty of choice and value to make its cases worth a look. 

The best wireless earbuds for iPad

airpods pro

Apple AirPods Pro

AirPods Pro (button)

Apple’s AirPods Pro are pricier than many competitors, but they offer great noise cancellation, crisp sound quality, and seamless pairing with Apple devices. You can expect deeper bass and better noise cancellation than you’d get on cheaper (yet still very good) earbuds like the $120 second-generation Amazon Echo Buds and $150 Beats Studio Buds

The AirPods Pro are close competitors to Sony’s WF-1000XM4 wireless earbuds, but there are a few reasons why AirPods are usually a better choice for Apple device users. Not only do they quickly pair with your iPad or iPhone, but you’ll also get Apple-specific features like the ability for Siri to read reminders, notifications, and text messages. 

They also support spatial audio, which provides a surround sound effect when watching supported content in apps like Apple TV Plus, Disney Plus, and HBO Max. That makes them a particularly compelling choice for those who really plan to use their iPad for entertainment first and foremost. 

The best iPad stylus

Apple Pencil

Apple Pencil

Pencil (2nd Generation) (button)

If you frequently sketch or jot down notes on your iPad, you’ll have a lot to gain from using the Apple Pencil. Insider Reviews has tested styluses from companies such as Wacom, Adonit, and 53 over the years, and none of them feel quite as fluid and accurate as the Apple Pencil. 

There’s essentially no lag, and the tip is pressure sensitive in the same way as a regular pencil. That means you can press down harder to make darker markings, or sketch lightly for a softer effect.

Which one you purchase depends on the iPad model you own. The $129 second-generation Apple Pencil comes with a sleeker design and magnetically attaches to your iPad for charging and pairing. It’s compatible with the fourth-generation iPad Pro, 11-inch iPad Pro, and the third-generation and newer models of the 12.9-inch iPad Pro. 

The $99 first-generation Apple Pencil, which has a longer design and must be plugged into a Lightning port to charge, works with other iPad models. 

The best universal charging cable for iPad

Anker PowerLine II 3-in-1 Cable

Anker PowerLine II 3-in-1 Cable

Powerline II 3-in-1 Cable (button)

The iPad is a great travel companion, especially on long flights. But no one likes carrying around multiple cables for your phone and tablet. That’s where Anker’s PowerLine II 3-in-1 cable comes in handy.

It includes charging tips for USB-C, Lightning, and micro-USB all in one. It’s a particularly good choice for those who have an iPad that charges via USB-C instead of Lightning, that way you don’t have to pack an extra Lightning cable for your iPhone.

It’s not quite as durable or lengthy as some of the other Lightning and charging cables we’ve tested. But its versatility, lifetime warranty, and solid build quality make it the best universal charging cable we’ve tried so far. 

The best iPad keyboard

Logitech K380

Logitech K380 Bluetooth Keyboard

K380 Multi-Device Bluetooth Keyboard (button)

If you use your iPad for working and taking notes, a keyboard is a must. We love the Logitech K380 for its responsive and accurate typing experience, sleek design, and ability to remember  up to three device connections at a time.

Best of all: it’s very affordable at just $36.98 at the time of writing. At that price it’s much cheaper than most keyboard cases, making it the perfect companion if you already have a case you enjoy. Plus, it’ll work with any iPad regardless of the model since it’s a standalone Bluetooth keyboard.

Our reviewer Michelle Rae Uy called it “a delight” to type on, even saying that its bounce can rival that of Dell’s flagship laptops. The only downside? It’s not rechargeable and instead requires two AAA alkaline batteries. However, it comes with two batteries out of the box that should last for up to two years. 

If you prefer a keyboard case over a standalone Bluetooth keyboard, we recommend the Logitech Combo Touch

The best game controller for iPad

SteelSeries Nimbus+ Bluetooth

SteelSeries Nimbus+

Nimbus+ Gaming Controller (button)

The SteelSeries Nimbus+ is the best controller you can buy if you love playing games on your iPad. 

For one, it’s versatile enough to be used as a standalone controller or with an iPhone mount to turn your phone into a handheld console. It also borrows some design cues from Microsoft and Sony, making it feel familiar to most gamers. You’ll also get four months of Apple Arcade for free when purchasing the controller, and the battery lasts for up to 50 hours.

However, it uses a Lightning port for charging, so you’ll have to keep your iPhone’s power cord handy if you own an iPad Pro or fourth-generation iPad Air. Although our reviewer Nathaniel Mott says it offers the best experience across Apple devices, there are some minor downsides to consider. The buttons are a bit slick, the visual battery indicator makes the controller look less attractive, and the iPhone mount can be a bit finicky. All that said, this remains the best iPhone game controller to date.

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