A toilet tube on SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spaceship broke and sprayed pee under the floor during its first tourist flight

crew dragon endeavour crew 2 spacex iss arrival
The Crew Dragon Endeavour approaches the International Space Station with astronauts on board, April 24, 2021.

SpaceX’s first tourist flight seemed to go swimmingly last month, but there was a hidden problem beneath the floorboards.

That issue came from the bathroom – the toilet tucked away in the Crew Dragon spaceship’s ceiling, which is shrouded in proprietary secrecy. A tube carrying urine from that toilet broke loose in an area beneath the spaceship’s cabin floor, releasing its contents onto a fan. That fan is used to create suction for the toilet, which is necessary because when you’re doing in microgravity, there’s no force pulling waste in any one direction. The fan then sprayed the pee all over the hidden compartment.

Even though all of this happened in microgravity, the pee didn’t drift into the cabin. That kept it away from the spaceship’s four passengers: billionaire Jared Isaacman, geoscientist Dr. Sian Proctor, physician-assistant Hayley Arceneaux, and engineer Chris Sembroski. While they orbited Earth for three days, on a mission called Inspiration4, they didn’t notice the issue, SpaceX representatives told reporters on Monday.

inspiration4 crew poses in front of falcon 9 rocket that's laying sideways on runway at night
The Inspiration4 crew poses in front of the Falcon 9 rocket and Crew Dragon spaceship that will launch them into space.

“We didn’t really even notice it, the crew didn’t even notice it, until we got back,” SpaceX official Bill Gerstenmaier said in a press conference Monday, according to The New York Times. “When we got the vehicle back, we looked under the floor and saw the fact that there was contamination underneath the floor of Inspiration4.”

A mechanical issue with the toilet fan had, however, set off an alarm while Inspiration4 was in orbit, prompting the passengers to troubleshoot, Isaacman told CNN Business in September. He did not reveal how they solved the problem. Upon the spaceship’s return to Earth, SpaceX technicians opened the cabin floor to investigate the fan issue. That’s when they discovered the pee leak.

As SpaceX CEO Elon Musk has promised on Twitter, the toilet system is getting an upgrade. SpaceX is redesigning the leaky tube beneath Crew Dragon’s floor for its next launch, which will carry four NASA astronauts to the International Space Station this weekend. With the new upgrade, the tube shouldn’t come “unglued” again, Gerstenmaier said.

Pee is also loose in another SpaceX spaceship

Another Crew Dragon capsule is currently attached to the space station, since it carried four astronauts to the space station in April and is waiting to carry them back to Earth in the coming weeks. But it has the same plumbing system as the capsule that suffered a leak.

crew 2 astronauts crew dragon spaceship
The Crew-2 astronauts during a training session in Hawthorne, California. Left to right: Thomas Pesquet, Megan McArthur, Shane Kimbrough, and Akihiko Hoshide.

Fearing the same toilet troubles, SpaceX asked the astronauts on the space station to snake a camera on a cable into the pee-tube compartment beneath the floor. Sure enough, they discovered the same issue as Inspiration4.

“Yes, there was some indication of some contamination under the floor,” Gerstenmaier said.

That could be a more serious issue for this spaceship, which has been in Earth’s orbit for nearly six months, and has presumably been carrying loose urine the whole time.

After astronauts pee, that urine gets mixed with a substance called Oxone, which removes ammonia so that it doesn’t build up in the air. But Oxone can be corrosive, so SpaceX is investigating the possibility that the Oxone-pee mixture could have damaged the spaceship after months of floating around beneath its cabin floor.

Photo by BRITTA PEDERSEN:POOL:AFP via Getty Images
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk

SpaceX engineers tested this theory on the ground, Gerstenmaier said, according to the Times, by gathering some aluminum parts similar to those on the spaceship and soaking them in an oxone-urine mixture. The engineers put those parts in a chamber that imitates the humidity conditions of the space station. They left them there for “an extended period of time,” Gerstenmaier said, though he did not specify for how long.

So far, SpaceX has not found significant corrosion in those samples.

“Luckily, or, on purpose, we chose an aluminum alloy that is very insensitive to corrosion,” Gerstenmaier said.

He also noted that there is less urine inside the Crew Dragon capsule that’s attached to the ISS, since those astronauts were only on the spaceship for about 24 hours before they docked to the space station.

SpaceX’s on-the-ground testing is still ongoing.

“We’ll double check things, we’ll triple checks things, and we got a couple more samples we’ll pull out of the chambers and inspect,” Gerstenmaier said, according to CNN. “But we’ll be ready to go and make sure the crew is safe to return.”

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SpaceX astronaut says she was sick for the first 2 days of Inspiration4’s mission and thought the spaceflight wasn’t long enough, a report says

inspiration4 crew members screaming joy floating weightless inside plane
Dr. Sian Proctor, on the far right, told National Geographic she felt sick during the first part of her mission.

  • Dr. Sian Proctor, a SpaceX astronaut, told National Geographic she felt sick for two days in space.
  • Proctor also said SpaceX’s three-day mission around the Earth wasn’t long enough.
  • She said her head was “a little stuffy” on the second day, National Geographic reported.

A SpaceX astronaut who took part in the company’s Inspiration4 mission a month ago said she was sick for the first two days in space, National Geographic reported Friday.

Dr. Sian Proctor, one of the four crew members onboard SpaceX’s first all-civilian mission, told National Geographic that she started feeling unwell on the first day.

“Space sickness is one of those things that a lot of people suffer from,” Proctor said in the interview. “You’re just not on your game.”

Astronauts can experience motion sickness when they’re in space due to the weightlessness which they feel with zero-gravity.

Proctor told National Geographic that she felt better on the second day but her head was “a little stuffy.”

“But man, I woke up the third day, and I was humming, and everything was perfect,” Proctor told the publication. “I had adapted, I was good, and I was like, ‘What? I have to come home?! No, no, no!'”

The Inspiration4 mission launched on September 16, sending four civilian astronauts into orbit for three days onboard SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft.

“I would go for longer. Three days was not enough,” the geoscientist and science communication specialist told National Geographic.

“I think, ideally, a five-day mission in the Dragon capsule with the cupola would be perfect,” Proctor added.

The cupola is a glass dome roof located at the nose of the Crew Dragon spacecraft, which the astronauts looked out of to see Earth from space. Proctor told National Geographic that this was “the best feature of our spaceflight.”

The toilet, which malfunctioned mid-flight, was also located in the cupola. Proctor said in the interview that it was “a waste fan issue,” which the crew members quickly fixed. “I think it was made into an event that was bigger than it actually was,” she added.

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Elon Musk said SpaceX’s first-ever civilian crew had ‘challenges’ with the toilet, and promised an upgrade for the next flight

Elon Musk SpaceX
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk.

  • Elon Musk said the next SpaceX civilian mission would have a better toilet.
  • SpaceX successfully completed its first all-civilian mission, Inspiration4, last week.
  • Musk said on Twitter there had been “challenges” with the toilet, without elaborating.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Elon Musk said on Twitter that SpaceX plans to upgrade the amenities for its next space-tourist flight, including the toilet.

The Inspiration4 crew, made up of four non-astronauts, took off on Wednesday aboard SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spacecraft. They landed back on Earth on Saturday evening.

Elon Musk tweeted on Monday saying he’d met the crew in person in Florida, and then answered questions from Twitter users about the company’s plans for the next mission.

Responding to one user, Musk said the next flight would have “upgraded toilets,” adding, “we had some challenges with it this flight.”

The billionaire did not elaborate on what these challenges were, or how exactly the toilets would be upgraded.

Jared Isaacman, one of the passengers on Inspiration4, told Insider in July the toilet for Crew Dragon was located on the ceiling of the spacecraft and featured a glass dome, meaning crewmembers had a 360-degree view while using the bathroom.

“It’s not a ton of privacy. But you do have this kind of privacy curtain that cuts across the top of the spacecraft, so you can kind of separate yourself from everyone else,” Isaacman said.

Isaacman added that learning to use the toilet on the spacecraft was part of the civilian astronauts’ rigorous pre-flight training.

crew dragon spaceship above earth with glass dome cupola beneath nosecone
An illustration of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spaceship with a glass dome or “cupola” at its nose – containing the toilet.

Musk also said the next flight would have a small oven for heating food, and WiFi provided by Starlink, SpaceX’s satellite internet project.

The crew for the Inspiration4 mission took cold pizza on their three-day flight. While in space they chatted with Musk and actor Tom Cruise.

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Elon Musk promises to donate $50 million to the Inspiration4 fundraiser for a children’s hospital, helping it smash its $200 million goal

Musk   Photo by Hannibal Hanschke Pool:Getty Images
SpaceX CEO Elon Musk.

  • Elon Musk pledged to donate millions for a fundraiser for St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital.
  • The goal of the Inspiration4 spaceflight by Musk’s company, SpaceX, was to raise $200 million.
  • “Count me in for $50M,” Musk said in a tweet on Saturday.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Elon Musk vowed to donate $50 million to SpaceX’s Inspiration4 fundraiser for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

“Count me in for $50M,” Musk said in a tweet on Saturday upon the crew’s re-entry back to Earth.

The main goal of the Inspiration4 mission was to raise $200 million for St. Jude, where one of the crew members works as a physician assistant.

The fundraiser had raised $160 million before Musk pledged to contribute to the campaign.

The historic Insipiration4 launched Wednesday evening from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

It had four people on board: Jared Isaacman, a billionaire businessman; Hayley Arceneaux, a physician assistant and childhood cancer survivor; Chris Sembroski, an Air Force veteran; and Dr. Sian Proctor, a geoscientist and science communication specialist.

Isaacman, commander of the spaceflight, donated $100 million to St. Jude. The mission had raised another $60.2 million before Musk’s pledge surpassed the goal, raising the total to more than $210 million, CNBC reported.

Following his donation, the crew expressed their gratitude toward Musk on Twitter.

“This brings tears to my eyes. Thank you @elonmusk for this generous donation toward our $200 million dollar fundraising goal for @StJude!!!” said Arceneaux.

As Insider’s Kate Duffy reported, the crew will auction off items they took on their three-day trip around the Earth to further raise money for the hospital. These include a ukulele, artwork, and NFTs.

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SpaceX’s first space tourists have returned to Earth, splashing down inside the Crew Dragon spaceship

inspiration4 crew members in spacesuits side by side with image of parachutes lowering crew dragon spaceship into ocean splashdown
The Inspiration4 crew splashed down after a three-day spaceflight.

SpaceX and its four passengers have emerged victorious at the conclusion of the world’s first all-tourist flight to orbit.

The company’s Crew Dragon spaceship splashed down off the coast of Florida on Saturday at 7:06 p.m. ET, carrying four amateur spacefarers: billionaire businessman Jared Isaacman, geoscientist and science communicator Dr. Sian Proctor, physician-assistant Hayley Arceneaux, and engineer Chris Sembroski. None of them are professional astronauts.

“That was a heck of a ride for us, and we’re just getting started,” Isaacman said on the livestream after the splashdown.

The unlikely quartet came together after Isaacman chartered the flight from SpaceX and gave away three seats through a raffle and fund-raising partnership with St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. He called the mission Inspiration4.

The motley crew spent three days orbiting Earth aboard the Dragon capsule. They flew as high as 367 miles (590 kilometers) – farther from the planet than anyone has traveled since the Space Shuttle era. They took cognitive tests and scanned their organs with an ultrasound for scientific research. Sembroski played ukelele. Proctor made art. They all admired the views

On Saturday evening, the Crew Dragon fired its thrusters to push itself into a high-speed plummet to Earth. Tiles on the spaceship’s underbelly protected its passengers as friction superheated the atmosphere around it to a 3,500-degree-Fahrenheit plasma.

A few miles above Earth’s surface, parachutes ballooned from the capsule, likely giving the passengers a significant jolt as the spaceship slowed its fall.

The Crew Dragon dropped into the Atlantic Ocean and bobbed there like a toasted marshmallow, caked in soot from the fiery descent. It’s not the first time this particular capsule, named Resilience, has weathered such a fall: It’s the same ship that flew SpaceX’s first full astronaut crew to the International Space Station for NASA last year, then brought them home in May.

Recovery crews in boats swarmed the scene to pull the spaceship out of the water and help the travelers climb out.

SpaceX has opened the doors to private space tourism

Inspiration4 passengers sit inside crew dragon spaceship seats wearing white spacesuits
The Inspiration4 crew inside a model Crew Dragon spaceship. Left to right: Chris Sembroski, Sian Proctor, Jared Isaacman, and Hayley Arceneaux.

The Inspiration4 crew’s safe return is a major step in a new era of space tourism.

NASA didn’t run this mission; SpaceX did, to Isaacman’s specifications. He chose the length of the flight, the altitude, the crew, and their activities in orbit. He even contributed his own idea – a climb up Mount Rainier – to their nearly six-month training regimen.

SpaceX already has another tourist flight lined up for January. For that mission, called AX-1, the company Axiom Space chartered a Crew Dragon to take customers to the space station for eight days.

The AX-1 crew includes real-estate investor Larry Connor, Canadian investor Mark Pathy, and former Israeli fighter pilot Eytan Stibbe. Axiom Space’s vice president, former NASA astronaut Michael López-Alegría, will command the mission.

Ax1 crew members: Commander Michael López-Alegría, mission pilot Larry Connor, mission specialist Mark Pathy, mission specialist Eytan Stibbe
The Ax-1 crew members, left to right: Michael López-Alegría, Larry Connor, Mark Pathy, and Eytan Stibbe.

For now, SpaceX is the only entity that can launch people to orbit from the US. In October, it’s set to launch another astronaut crew for NASA – the third of six Crew Dragon flights the agency has purchased.

SpaceX developed this spaceship through NASA’s Commercial Crew Program, a competition that awarded funding to facilitate the development of commercial spacecraft.

The program also funded Boeing to develop a human-rated spaceship, but that vehicle has been bogged down in technical issues and delays. It still needs to complete an uncrewed test flight to the ISS before it can fly people.

inspiration4 rocket launch streak of light arcing through the sky
The Inspiration4 mission launches from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida, September 15, 2021.

In the meantime, SpaceX ended the US’s nine-year hiatus in domestic human spaceflight in May 2020, when Crew Dragon flew two NASA astronauts to the ISS. NASA has also tapped SpaceX to land its next astronauts on the moon.

Elon Musk, who founded SpaceX in 2002, aims to someday send the company’s vehicles all the way to Mars and build a settlement there.

Isaacman shares that vision.

“I’m a true believer,” Isaacman said in a February press conference. “I drank the Kool-Aid in terms of the grand ambition for humankind being a multi-planetary species. And I think that we all want to live in a Star Wars, Star Trek world where people are jumping in their spacecraft, and I know that that’s going to come. But there has to be that first step, which is what Inspiration4 represents.”

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SpaceX’s Inspiration4 crew members take call from Tom Cruise while soaring miles above the Earth

Inspiration4 passengers sit inside crew dragon spaceship seats wearing white spacesuits
The Inspiration4 crew sits inside a model Crew Dragon spaceship. Left to right: Chris Sembroski, Sian Proctor, Jared Isaacman, and Hayley Arceneaux.

SpaceX’s Inspiration4 crew spoke with actor Tom Cruise on Thursday to share details about their experience on the civilian mission.

The Inspiration4 Twitter account shared a “Top Gun” GIF followed by a caption that wrote: “Rook, Nova, Hanks, and Leo spoke to @TomCruise sharing their experience from space. Maverick, you can be our wingman anytime.”

Maverick is the call sign character Cruise plays in the film.

No specific details of the conversation between Cruise and the crew were released, AP reported.

Aside from Cruise, the four crew members – Isaacman, Hayley Arceneaux, Sian Proctor, and Chris Sembroski – chatted to SpaceX CEO Elon Musk.

In a tweet on Thursday, Musk announced that he had spoken to them. “All is well,” Musk said in his Twitter post, without mentioning any specific details about the conversation.

The crew also spoke to patients at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, on Thursday, according to a tweet the hospital sent on Friday morning.

Inspiration4 is raising money for the hospital by auctioning off items, including a ukulele and an issue of TIME magazine, which they took into space.

It is the first spaceflight carrying private crew, which launched on Wednesday from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida aboard a Crew Dragon spaceship.

In space, the crew members will conduct scientific research, make art, and enjoy the views.

The flight is slated to end Saturday, culminating in a splashdown in the Atlantic Ocean.

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SpaceX’s first tourist crew brought a spacesuit-wearing puppy plushie to orbit

hayley arceneaux holds plush dog in spacesuit aboard crew dragon spaceship
A screengrab from a live broadcast from the Crew Dragon spaceship shows Hayley Arceneaux holding up Jude the plush dog, September 17, 2021.

When SpaceX’s first tourist crew rocketed into Earth’s orbit, they brought a fluffy stowaway with them.

The Inspiration4 mission blasted off from Cape Canaveral, Florida on Wednesday. SpaceX’s live broadcast from a camera inside the spaceship showed four amateurs pressed into their seats by the rocket’s force: billionaire businessman Jared Isaacman, geoscientist and science communicator Dr. Sian Proctor, physician-assistant Hayley Arceneaux, and engineer Chris Sembroski.

They would soon become the first people to reach Earth’s orbit without a single professional astronaut on board.

As the Crew Dragon spaceship settled into its path around Earth, a plush doll started floating around the cabin. It was a golden retriever. In later footage, it was wearing a spacesuit, quite similar to the SpaceX pressure suits that the human passengers wore.

plush golden retriever dog floats around insider crew dragon spaceship with four passengers in spacesuits
A screengrab from SpaceX’s live launch broadcast shows a plush dog floating around inside Crew Dragon, September 15, 2021.

It turns out that toy is based on two real-life dogs – Puggle and Huckleberry – that work for St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. The golden retriever and goldendoodle help comfort children who are undergoing cancer treatment. They came to the hospital from service-dog school in 2019.

Puggle and Huckleberry “sit with the kids when they’re scared, they climb up in bed with the kids,” Arceneaux said on a video broadcast from the Crew Dragon. “They’ll even go through the MRI machine or the CAT scan machine before the kids do, to show them that it’s not so scary. And so we wanted to bring one of these really sweet dogs to space.”

Today, Arceneaux works at St. Jude as a physician-assistant. But she first got familiar with the hospital as a child, when she received treatment for bone cancer. As a result, she has a rod in her leg and is now the first person in space with a prosthetic.

“Because of my cancer, knowing that I’m sitting here today and getting to represent all these other kids, this is the biggest honor of my life,” Arceneaux said in a press conference on Tuesday.

The plush pup is on sale to raise money for St. Jude

Isaacman aims to raise $200 million for St. Jude’s pediatric-cancer research by asking for donations online and auctioning items related to the flight. That’s in addition to $100 million he’s already donated himself.

As of Friday evening, the Inspiration4 mission had raised nearly $52 million.

Inspiration4 passengers sit inside crew dragon spaceship seats wearing white spacesuits
The Inspiration4 crew sits inside a model Crew Dragon spaceship. Left to right: Chris Sembroski, Sian Proctor, Jared Isaacman, and Hayley Arceneaux.

The machine-washable polyester pup, named Jude, is available to purchase on the St. Jude website for $24, with all proceeds going to the hospital. As of Friday evening, the service-dog plush was out of stock.

It’s a tradition that astronauts bring a cute plush toy to space with them as a “zero-gravity indicator.” When it starts floating, they know they’re in orbit. It’s also tradition that these toys sell out after making their orbital appearances. Previous SpaceX astronaut missions have carried a sparkly dinosaur, a Baby Yoda doll, and a penguin named Guin Guin.

Jude the plush dog and his human crewmates are scheduled to return to Earth on Saturday, splashing down off the coast of Florida at 7:06 p.m. ET.

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SpaceX’s all-civilian crew chatted with Elon Musk and shared photos of Earth from the spaceship’s glass-dome bathroom on their first full day in space

Inspiration4 passengers sit inside crew dragon spaceship seats wearing white spacesuits
The Inspiration4 crew sits inside a model Crew Dragon spaceship. Left to right: Chris Sembroski, Sian Proctor, Jared Isaacman, and Hayley Arceneaux.

  • SpaceX’s first all-civilian crew spoke to Elon Musk on their first full day in space.
  • They also shared photos of the view from the spaceship’s bathroom, which has a glass dome.
  • The Inspiration4 crew is carrying out scientific research during a three-day trip in space.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

SpaceX’s four-person civilian crew spoke with Elon Musk and shared photos of the view from the spaceship’s glass-dome bathroom on their first full day in space.

The photos show the four passengers, who completed a five-month training program for the Inspiration4 mission, looking out of the spaceship’s glass dome – known as the cupola – and floating inside the Crew Dragon spacecraft.

This glass dome is where the toilet is, crew member Jared Isaacman, who purchased the four seats for the mission, told Insider’s Morgan McFall-Johnsen in July.

SpaceX CEO Musk tweeted on Thursday that he had spoken with Isaacman, Hayley Arceneaux, Sian Proctor, and Chris Sembroski, the four people on board.

“All is well,” Musk said in his Twitter post. He didn’t mention what was discussed.

SpaceX’s first spaceflight carrying private crew launched on Wednesday from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The four space travelers spoke to patients at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis, Tennessee, on Thursday, according to a tweet the hospital sent on Friday morning.

Inspiration4 is raising money for the hospital by auctioning off items, including a ukulele and an issue of TIME magazine, which they took into space.

After Wednesday’s launch, SpaceX tweeted on Thursday that the crew carried out their first round of scientific research and orbited around the Earth five-and-a-half times. The crew are set to conduct further research as part of their three-day mission, SpaceX said.

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Sam Adams will craft beer using hops sent into Earth’s orbit on SpaceX’s Inspiration4

sam adams space beer
  • Sam Adams will brewing a beer out of the hops sent into orbit onboard SpaceX’s Inspiration4.
  • The company arranged to exclusively obtain the supply after a Twitter callout from SpaceX and Jared Isaacman.
  • Breweries and agricultural scientists have sent ingredients to space before to analyze the effects of microgravity on beer production.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Besides a ukulele, some poetry, and NFTs, the all-civilian crew of SpaceX’s Inspiration4 mission also brought along 66 pounds of hops, which will be given to Samuel Adams Boston Brewery to concoct a limited-edition “space beer.”

Jared Isaacman, the billionaire owner of Fast4Company funding the Inspiration4 mission, sent a tweet in August calling to auction off the hops load to a brewery to benefit St. Jude children’s hospital.

“Space hops! Far out,” the Sam Adams Twitter account tweeted back. “We’ll take this to the brewery team.”

The company got its head brewer, David Grinell, on the phone with the Inspiration4 team prior to Wednesday’s launch to iron out the details of the beer production, a spokesperson told Insider.

As part of the hops acquisition, Sam Adams has also agreed to donate $100,000 to St. Jude toward a goal set by Isaacman. Isaacman aims to raise a total of $200 million for St. Jude for pediatric-cancer research.

“We’ve actually always talked about sending beer to space,” Matt Withington, director or marketing at Sam Adams told Insider. “Jared’s tweet, and the immediate response from our drinkers, signaled the right moment for us to jump on and fulfill this dream.”

SpaceX’s first all-civilian crew launched from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Wednesday. The four crew members will spend three days in Earth’s orbit performing scientific research, making art, and taking in the views.

Insider calculated the cost to transport a pound of cargo on the Crew Dragon spaceship is about $5,500, according to numbers provided by Space.com. That makes the cost of sending the 66 pounds of hops around $361,000. Sam Adams has not yet determined a price for the brewed beer once the hops come back down to Earth.

This is far from the first crew to take part in this alcohol space race. Coors sponsored an experiment in 1994 to test fermentation in space. Japanese brewer Sapporo produced a $110 six-pack using barley seeds send up to space by Japanese and Russian researchers in 2006. Anheuser-Busch has sent several samples of barley to the International Space Station, the latest in 2019, to determine the effects of microgravity on barley seeds. 12 bottles of Bordeaux wine were also sent to space in 2019, which were expected to be valued at $1 million per bottle.

Scientists and brewing experts are still unsure about the definitive effects of a microgravity environment ingredients used to make beer. One University of Colorado research project found that beer brewed in space can contain a higher level of alcohol than on the ground. The Boston brewery says it is excited to see what kind of beer it can brew with Inspriation4’s hops.

The currently unnamed Sam Adams-produced beer, which the company says will probably be a traditional West Coast IPA, will go on sale later this fall, according to the company.

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NASA video shows the cramped quarters where SpaceX’s 4 civilian passengers will live for 3 days

Inspiration4 passengers sit inside crew dragon spaceship seats wearing white spacesuits
The Inspiration4 crew sits inside a model Crew Dragon spaceship. Left to right: Chris Sembroski, Sian Proctor, Jared Isaacman, and Hayley Arceneaux.

SpaceX just launched four people, none of whom are professional astronauts, into Earth’s orbit.

Now that crew is set to circle the planet for three days aboard the company’s Crew Dragon spaceship. The inside of the capsule will probably get cramped. With four seats, control displays, and storage, the four passengers will have about enough space to move around as they would inside a walk-in closet.

Billionaire Jared Isaacman chartered the flight from SpaceX and called the mission Inspiration4. He gave the other three seats to Hayley Arceneaux, who survived bone cancer as a child and now works at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital; Chris Sembroski, an Air Force veteran who works for Lockheed Martin; and Dr. Sian Proctor, a geoscientist who serves as an analogue astronaut in simulations of long-term Mars missions.

In training for their mission, the Inspiration4 crew spent 30 hours inside the capsule together for a simulation at SpaceX headquarters in Hawthorne, California. During that time, they were cramped in a very small space. Gravity holding them down only made it smaller.

“We’re literally sleeping right next to each other,” Proctor told Axios reporter Miriam Kramer. “You’re doing so many mental tasks and physical exertion that, even though it was not comfortable, I still fell asleep.”

Now that they’re in orbit, and they’re all floating in microgravity, they can take advantage of the vertical space inside the capsule too. But even then, it will be cramped. Just watch these four astronauts giving a tour of Crew Dragon, high above Earth, in November:

Those astronauts were only inside the spaceship for about one day. Their Crew Dragon docked with the International Space Station, where the astronauts lived and worked for six months before climbing back aboard the spaceship and returning to Earth.

But unlike those astronauts, the Inspiration4 crew will have a glass dome at the nose of their spaceship. Because they don’t need to dock to the space station, SpaceX replaced that docking port with this cupola. The passengers can stick their heads into the dome and get the full experience of drifting through space.

crew dragon spaceship above earth with glass dome cupola beneath nosecone
An illustration of SpaceX’s Crew Dragon spaceship with a glass dome “cupola” at its nose.

Incidentally, that’s also where the spaceship’s toilet is.

“When people do inevitably have to use the bathroom, they’re going to have one hell of a view,” Isaacman told Insider in June.

This Crew Dragon will feel roomy compared to what SpaceX has in store. In the future, the company plans to launch as many as seven people aboard the spaceship.

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