DOJ and House lawyers will not represent Rep. Mo Brooks in a Capitol riots lawsuit filed by Rep. Eric Swalwell

Mo Brooks
Mo Brooks

  • The US government will not represent Rep. Mo Brooks in a Capitol riot lawsuit filed by Rep. Eric Swalwell.
  • The Office of the General Counsel for the House of Representatives said that it would not be appropriate to represent Brooks in this scenario.
  • The Department of Justice said that Brooks was not acting within the scope of his employment when he told protestors to “start taking down names and kicking ass.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Office of the General Counsel for the House of Representatives said in a filing on Tuesday that it will not represent Rep. Mo Brooks in a lawsuit filed by Rep. Eric Swalwell.

Swalwell alleged in his original complaint that Brooks helped “incite the violence at the Capitol” when he told Capitol protesters to “start taking down names and kicking ass.”

Brooks said in a filing that he was acting within the scope of his employment when he gave his speech on January 6, a move that if successful would grant him a form of legal immunity via the Westfall Act.

General Counsel Douglas N. Letter wrote on Tuesday, however, that it would not be appropriate to represent Brooks in this lawsuit as the case does not challenge an “institutional action of the House or any of its component entities.”

The Department of Justice also denied Brooks’ claim on Tuesday that he was acting within the scope of his employment and requested that he not be granted immunity. The DOJ and House counsel’s filings are not binding and a judge could still say that Brooks was acting in the scope of his employment and receive immunity.

It took Swalwell several months to serve the original complaint against Brooks because Swalwell’s team could not locate the representative, though Brooks denied hiding from Swalwell.

Swalwell ultimately hired a private investigator to locate Brooks. The complaint was ultimately served to his wife at their home.

“Well, Swalwell FINALLY did his job, served complaint (on my WIFE). HORRIBLE Swalwell’s team committed a CRIME by unlawfully sneaking INTO MY HOUSE & accosting my wife!” Brooks said in a tweet.

There are precedents to this decision

House counsel pointed to a previous legal spat between former House Minority Leader John Boehner and Rep. Jim McDermott where both parties used private attorneys.

McDermott obtained and leaked an illegal recording of a call between Boehner and former House Speaker Newt Gingrich to the press, leading to a lawsuit from Boehner. An appeals court ultimately awarded Boehner over $1 million in damages and said McDermott “unlawfully” obtained the recording in violation of his official duties.

Additionally, according to Ryan Goodman, the former special counsel to the general counsel of the Department of Defense, the DOJ filing also suggests that former President Donald Trump may also not be granted immunity via the Westfall Act.

The DOJ is currently defending Trump in a lawsuit from writer E. Jean Carroll who alleges the former president raped her.

The General Counsel’s full filing is below

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Employees aren’t as optimistic about company diversity efforts as managers. Consultants explain why, and how to change that.

Shot of a young businessman looking stressed while using a smartphone during a late night in a modern office

One year after a wave of civil rights protests pushed CEOs to double down on diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI), Insider surveyed workers on how they think corporate leaders are doing to fulfill their promises.

As part of a series called Cost of Inequity, Insider conducted a survey of over 1,000 professionals, the majority of American workers think business leaders are motivated to improve DEI in the workplace. However, managers are significantly more hopeful than rank-and-file employees.

About 74% of managers said they think their employer’s executive team cares about improving diversity, compared to 63% of workers.

As corporate America faces increasing pressure from investors, employees, and customers to make good on DEI promises, addressing the gap between manager and employee sentiment is crucial. DEI consultants said that leaders who drive employee engagement around DEI goals will be more successful in their goals.

Why managers feel more engaged

Kerryn Agyekum
Kerryn Agyekum, principal of diversity, equity, inclusion and justice at The Raben Group, a DEI consultancy, said companies need to boost employee buy in on DEI efforts.

For Kerryn Agyekum, DEI principal at consultancy The Raben Group, the findings were not surprising.

Individuals who are largely at the worker or individual contributor level are more likely to be from historically marginalized groups, she explained. Data shows managers and leaders, across a variety of industries, are more likely to be white.

“It’s not surprising that workers, individuals who do not have that power or privilege like managers do, have a very different perspective around whether or not an organization’s diversity, equity, or inclusion efforts are having an impact,” Agyekum said. “They are waiting to see results.”

There will be a gap in sentiment until managers are able to really bring about change in their organizations, the DEI consultant said.

Cynthia Orduña, DEI consultant at consultancy Peoplism, credited the gap in enthusiasm to a communication problem. Oftentimes leaders communicate their DEI efforts to managers, but not to all of their employees, so employees aren’t as up to date, she explained.

Leadership can be very scared to be transparent about what’s going on in the background in terms of new diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives…They’re afraid of not getting things right. Cynthia Orduña

“Leadership can be very scared to be transparent about what’s going on in the background in terms of new diversity, equity, and inclusion initiatives,” she said. “They’re afraid of not getting things right.”

If employees aren’t aware of what’s going on, however, they’re more likely to think that their executive team doesn’t care about DEI efforts.

Orduña said that 63% of workers thinking their executives care about DEI was somewhat disappointing.

“It’s more about, how do we get that number to be 75% 85%?” she said. “If a good chunk of employees don’t think their executives care about DEI, that’s a story.”

Managers were also more likely than their direct-reports to say their company has clear channels for participation in DEI efforts. Some 76% of managers said there were distinct ways to get involved, compared to 68% of workers.

Agyekum said that many managers are being tasked with changing their behaviors, reaching new DEI goals, and having new conversations with their employees. They feel there are concrete ways to participate in DEI efforts, she explained.

However, employees may define “concrete ways of participating” differently. They may be waiting to see more people like themselves in positions of power, they may be waiting for their salary to increase as a result of a pay equity report, they may be waiting to be compensated for their ERG work.

“I think the differentiator is in the definition,” Agyekum said. “Managers and workers may define ‘concrete ways of participating in DEI efforts’ differently.”

When asked about the results of their company DEI strategies, respondents gave a mixed range of outcomes:

Increasing employee engagement

In order to increase employee buy-in on DEI efforts, leaders and managers need to drive results, Agyekum said.

Cynthia Orduña's headshot
DEI consultant Cynthia Orduña said managers need to communicate their diversity efforts more to employees.

She explained that a “war room approach to DEI,” where diversity is treated just as importantly as profits, will communicate to employees that diversity is truly a core tenant of a company’s values.

“If you have managers that are doing well on diversity and inclusion, hold them up as the gold standard and reward them accordingly,” the DEI consultant said. “At the same time, hold folks accountable for not making progress.”

At the same time, leaders and managers need to increase the level of communication around DEI.

More leaders need to be vulnerable and share their DEI journey with workers, Orduña said. Keeping employees informed of what’s going on and sharing ways to get involved in the process will drive engagement. Insider’s survey also found that 50% of respondents said their managers are not incentivized to hit DEI goals and/or hire more BIPOC employees. The other half indicated a mix of bonuses and promotions for making more diverse hires.

There’s a lot of strength, I think, in admitting to people that you don’t have all the answers Cynthia Orduña

“You can even say ‘We don’t have all the answers, but we’re going to work as a team to figure it out.'”

In addition to communicating your company’s future plans, it’s important to make sure your employees stay informed on what you’re already doing.

For example, don’t just email once about employee resource groups (ERGS), have ERG leaders speak at company events and send multiple emails about their progress, the DEI consultant suggested. When it comes to new trainings you have, incentivize participation in them and have leaders talk about them in town halls.

C-suite executives should also encourage managers to tell their direct reports about their DEI work.

“It’s about creating mini-cultures that foster inclusion and psychological safety,” Orduña said.

Psychological safety is an environment where people from all backgrounds can feel safe enough to be their whole, true selves at work, without fear of judgment or punishment.

“Don’t be afraid to be vulnerable,” she said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

College rankings have made school less affordable, less equitable, and more miserable for students. The pandemic exposed just how broken the system is.

Silhouettes of people struggling to hold up a giant U.S. News & World Report logo on a red background
The incentives around college rankings forced universities to take actions during the pandemic that made student experiences worse and more expensive.

  • College rankings don’t measure aspects of universities that are the most beneficial for students.
  • They’re mainly based on factors that are determined by wealth, access, privilege, and selectivity.
  • The pandemic showed how truly broken the system is, yielding worse experiences for students.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Early September is a blisteringly busy time for colleges and universities, with the start of the new semester and a whole new class of students kicking off the year of studies. But while everyone else is celebrating the start of something new, administrators are wracking their nerves over the results of something old, something they devote a considerable amount of prep to – their own big exam, the one that makes up an enormous amount of their grade: Will this be the year they take a big hit on the US News and World Report rankings?

Though circulation was down to 1.1 million in 2010 from 2 million in 2005, the once-powerful newsweekly commands an outsized presence in our popular understanding of universities.

“US News, of course, was the first one to really monetize rankings. They made huge big business out of rankings,” said Susan Paterno, author of the new book, “Game On: Why College Admission Is Rigged and How to Beat the System“.

When US News develops a rating, they select what is valuable in higher education. When they decide what’s valuable, colleges react, and try to get the numbers up. And when getting the numbers are this important, when they’re translated into a zero-sum ranking against their peers, colleges are incentivized to do things that make the college experience worse and more expensive for students, applicants, and faculty in order to appease that algorithm.

The birth of rankings

In the 1980s, two businesses emerged that would change higher education permanently: the test prep business, which was largely forged by Stanley Kaplan, who founded the company bearing his last name, and the beginning of the US News and World Report rankings.

As US News began to assign scores to universities using the test scores of admitted students as a proxy for quality, colleges began to desire more and more applicants who tested high.

The universities offered merit-based scholarships and financial incentives to those students, and as a result affluent parents of college applicants would pay for test prep for their kids to get those incentives.

“Even though that metric had nothing to do with the quality of the education that the particular college or university was providing – it was really just a number that describes kids in high school – that metric became the foundation that US News used to measure quality,” Paterno said. “But it was a bogus measure, really.”

Only 20% of the score on its Best Colleges rankings comes from academic instruction and faculty resources.

Optimizing this 20% may still lead to negative outcomes for students. Paying faculty more can raise the sticker price of colleges. Optimizing class size to appease US News can lead to things like capping classes and thus limiting the number of large, efficient lectures, or constraining the ability of students to get into entry-level courses.

It appears US News has more influence on class size than many professors. In 2014, Northeastern University’s former president Richard Freeland told Boston Magazine in 2014, “You get credit for the number of classes you have under 20 [students], so we lowered our caps on a lot of our classes to 19 just to make sure.”

How the pandemic and college ratings caused a perfect storm

When the pandemic set in, the college experience imploded overnight. All the academic and interpersonal hallmarks of a college education – landscaped verdant campuses, faculty-student mentoring, research opportunities, everything from sports to labs to parties to dorms – was all flattened to the width of an LCD screen.

Everyone was paying full sticker price to go to the same college, Zoom University.

During the pandemic, students needed academic flexibility. Thanks to the rigors of rankings, they did not get it.

professor gestures to students on video call
Associate Professor Carol Dysinger of New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts conducts a remote office hour for filmmaking grad students at her Brooklyn apartment on May 29, 2020.

When graduation and retention is 35% of their score, colleges simply could not afford to have students transfer out, or defer their graduation, or pause their enrollment, because that could have a disastrous impact on their completion rate.

One-fifth of the score comes from a survey sent out to admissions offices asking for assessments of peer universities, and another fifth is an implicit reckoning of institutional wealth – per-student spending, alumni giving, admitted student selectivity. Improving per-student spending also has the knock-on effect of pushing colleges to spend more, which has to be paid for by tuition.

“If you look at how US News ranks, they had no definition of academic excellence, so they created one,” Paterno said. “And how did they create that? They didn’t measure actual learning at all. Instead, they measured students’ selectivity, test scores and grades, institutional resources.”

“And that’s: how wealthy are you?”

Robert Morse, chief data strategist at US News, disputed the incentives Paterno described.

“It’s an incorrect premise to say that our methodology only incentivizes colleges to enroll affluent students. Schools will do better in the U.S. News Best Colleges ranking if they enroll and graduate high proportions of Pell Grant students vs those that only enroll very small percentages of Pell Grant students,” Morse said in an email.

Five percent of the US News score is related to Pell Grant student performance.

“It is also an incorrect assertion to imply that graduation rates only represent institutional wealth,” Morse said. “Graduation rates are highly important to students and their parents. When a student enrolls in a school their intent is to graduate with a diploma. If a school is only graduating half their students, that is an important indicator of poor outcomes and is independent of the type of students and their economic background.”

girl adjusts graduation cap at college wearing a sash that says zoom university
Katherine Koeppel, 22, a psychology major who graduated from USC in May, on campus in Los Angeles on July 2, 2020. She had a Zoom logo embroidered onto her sash, a reminder of how she attended class her last semester because of the pandemic.

Bad for students, worse for applicants

The rankings make life even worse for applicants. The incentives are obvious, Paterno says: If you have two applicants of equal academic merit, and one comes from difficult circumstances and the other is affluent, who is more likely to graduate in four years? With 35% of the university’s score at stake, this isn’t hypothetical.

“Graduation rates are a very controversial metric,” Paterno said, “because it it gives colleges incentives to reject students they think won’t complete.”

During a pandemic – and especially during a year in which the number of college applications are through the roof – which applicants stood to gain and which stood to lose?

Another 5% is a newer figure that discerns how much money graduates owe. Making this a factor is an excellent way to push universities into accepting more wealthy or affluent people who don’t need to take loans.

“They don’t really want to accept students with hardships that might cause them to drop out,” Paterno said.

The pandemic turned the college application process from a merely Kafkaesque nightmare to an abattoir of despair.

Having dropped their testing requirements, universities received an onslaught of applications. One survey of applicants from consulting firm Art & Science Group found 20% were on some kind of wait list. While just 18% of middle- or lower-income kids were on a wait list, 32% of applicants from higher-income households were.

Some wait lists are still active today: the Applying to College subreddit inventories this anxiety, with applicants venting about “extended waitlists” in the University of California system, at Johns Hopkins, Duke, and more.

The US News applicant performance rating, worth 7%, doesn’t measure the quality of the instruction at the college but rather the standardized testing and class ranking of the people who are admitted. Even that, Paterno said, is a proxy for finances, namely the budget to recruit and advertise and offer scholarships to desirable high performers.

student with a face mask attends a college class in their dorm on zoom
Freshman Kyalynn Moore-Wilson sits at a desk in her dorm room before joining a Zoom meeting for an Introduction to Psychology course as classes begin amid the coronavirus pandemic at the University of New Mexico on August 17, 2020.

The incentives for colleges and universities are clear: with 35% of the score derived from the fraction who stick around, make it incredibly financially painful for students to take a break during the pandemic and don’t gamble on students who are financially precarious. With 20% derived from money, don’t cut tuition or offer breaks. With 5% from graduate indebtedness, only take the richest applicants. Remember, you’ve got a reputation to maintain: that’s 20% of your score, after all.

Is there a good rating system out there?

The current rating system that Paterno argues is fundamentally broken is, even still, the result of years of improvements.

This includes the removal of the acceptance rate, which was responsible for lots of applicant misery and a heap of third-party mailers going out to applicants the universities knew would likely fail to make the grade. In order to get their acceptance rate down, colleges and universities would mount colossal ad campaigns and direct mail to drive the applicant counts up.

Developing a new and improved rating system is fraught, as the Obama administration learned during a 2013 rollout of a federal college rating system that was eventually scrapped.

Even the best-intentioned arbiters face an uphill battle in trying to assign an arbitrary rating and ranking to a college, probably because the idea of reducing a colossal institution to a fragmentary rank completely misunderstands what a university actually is, and further sets up incentives that undermine their abilities to accomplish their actual mission.

There’s no indication that the market for ratings is slowing down. Following the outstanding commercial success of their college rankings, US News has since expanded to medical schools, law schools, and even high schools.

If anything, the market for ratings is only growing – their database now includes preschools and elementary schools, too.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Congress passed a $16 billion program to save entertainment venues rocked by the pandemic. It became a mismanaged fiasco, with thousands of businesses still waiting for relief.

A theater announces one year of closure.
The Paramount Theatre, which is operated by the non-profit Seattle Theatre Group arts organization, displays a sign on March 15, 2021 to mark the one-year anniversary of the date it closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Congress passed a $16 billion bipartisan relief package for venues months ago.
  • The rollout has been a slow, bug-ridden disaster, and thousands of venues don’t have their money.
  • “Each day these venues don’t get their money they’re going out of business,” Rep. Roger Williams said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Walter Kinzie, the owner of Austin-based concert promoter Encore Live, was loading in for a 28-band festival at SXSW in Austin in early March 2020 when the pandemic hit. Kinzie has a Texan unflappability and an aura of capability, the kind of guy who can fly halfway across the world with two employees and orchestrate a multi-night event juggling dozens of contractors.

His company, based out of the rustic Stockyards neighborhood of Ft. Worth, was among the first to shut down. In the months that followed, the live music, theater, and venue industry would have to buckle down, and starve out a pandemic that made the very fundamentals of their business unworkable.

“I lost 92.5% of my business in four days,” Kinzie told Insider. “A business I built over a decade was gone in four days. I lost my house, I lost my cars, I lost my office building, I lost all of my investments and my savings account, just to keep my employees working. It cost me everything.”

“But it will be worth it.”

In December, Congress passed and President Donald Trump signed a bill allocating $16 billion in emergency relief grants to the venues and stages decimated by the pandemic. The bipartisan bill ensured that the money would be allocated by the Small Business Administration to venues that had lost a large amount of their business owing to the pandemic.

Seven months later, after what operators described as a fiasco of an implementation, only a fifth of that money has actually been awarded, and more than 10,000 applicants are still waiting for their money.

Eris in Brooklyn on a Friday Night
Eris in Brooklyn on June 25, 2021. Forced to close by the pandemic, many venues have begun to re-open.

While other businesses like restaurants and office workers were able to adjust, by serving customers outside or having staff work from home, the live events industry was gutted nearly completely. The independent and fragmented nature of the live events business – where a single event can require the work of dozens of contractor companies, from ticketing to lighting to performers to catering to security and more – may make the industry a significant employer, but also made less able to seek out the aid it needed, compared to industries where just a few large corporations control a substantial amount of the business.

“I talk to friends who run arts organizations in other countries, and they’re just horrified,” said Angela Buccinni Butch, who owns The Muse, a venue where performers in acrobatic circus events train and perform.

“Every penny makes a difference in how these venues will emerge from this, because the fact is we cannot rely on our government.”

Venues are going for broke

Ben Lillie, who owns Caveat, a New York venue for comedy and music that put on 60 shows a month pre-pandemic, was looking at the best month of business in March 2020. “I was talking to a bankruptcy lawyer six months ago just to see about our options if we did have to shut it down, but luckily we didn’t.”

At The Muse, Broadway shows would rehearse there before they hit the road, and if you’ve ever watched a television commercial with an acrobatic element, there’s a pretty solid chance The Muse had a hand in it. Prior to the pandemic, the space was bustling.

“You’d always find people flying through the air,” Butch said . “Now we’re a warehouse that mostly sits empty all the time, because we’re waiting on funding to come through.”

Jonathan Corbett, who owns performing arts venue Eris in Brooklyn, went so far as to build a kitchen in his nightclub, just to be able to reopen when outdoor dining came back.

“I never expected to find myself as a restaurateur, and there I was,” Corbett said.

movie theater empty

The federal government rolled out three programs to help out venues. The first was PPP, the Paycheck Protection Program, which offered forgivable loans that, for venues bound to be closed for over a year, functioned mostly as a helpful stopgap. Next were Economic Impact Disaster Loans, or EIDL. Those were larger, but they weren’t forgivable, and for a typical venue were signed over to landlords or creditors pretty quickly.

That’s where SVOG, or the Shuttered Venue Operator Grant program, was supposed to come in.

“This was a business that was devastated by COVID,” said Rep. Roger Williams, the House GOP architect of the SVOG bill. “It was the first to shut down and the last to open. Thousands and thousands of jobs were affected.”

The lack of capital for the venues is stymieing the recovery of the US’s entire entertainment sector. Prior to the pandemic, The Muse had between 50 and 100 people on payroll each month.

“We’ve lost half our staff because we can’t put offers on the table,” Butch said. “It’s prevented us from doing realistic negotiations with the landlords to resolve back rent. It’s prevented a lot of things. We are aiming to re-open in September and we are just praying this funding comes through.”

“The truth is, we have a bankruptcy meeting next week because if it doesn’t come through, that is what we’re looking at.”

Jonathan Corbett standing outside of performing arts venue Eris in Brooklyn
Jonathan Corbett, outside his Brooklyn performing arts venue, Eris.

The difficulties

Following the passage of the bill in December, operators expected a speedy response on par with the PPP program.

“I was hopeful it would follow the PPP and the EIDL timeline, which was probably two months,” Corbett said. “I was expecting February, March. They didn’t even have the application out until the end of April.”

The venue operators, who had been desperate for the money in December, would have to wait months in order to even apply. By February, 1,500 small operators had flocked to a Facebook group Kinzie organized, sensing an issue.

On April 7, an Inspector General report sounded the alarm on the SVOG program: “Currently, the program office has one designated official and its staff are on temporary detail. At this time, SBA has not formalized a plan for staffing this office relative to the volume of applications expected.”

“To put it simply, it has just been a complete mishandling of the program by SBA,” said a congressional aide familiar with the program. “They were able to roll out PPP on a timeline, but were vastly underprepared for this even though they had the resources.”

SVOG was turning into a disaster. “The restaurant revitalization fund was passed later and paid out earlier,” Corbett said.

A red tape nightmare

The FAQ document the SBA produced in early January identifying how to apply was eight pages in length. After 10 revisions, by April the document was a sprawling 41 pages.

“They kept on changing these manuals and what they were going to ask for and how to present things,” Butch said. “They made it clear if you made any mistakes on your application it would be dismissed right away.”

When the portal to apply opened on April 8, the system was taken down within an hour due to fundamental problems in the construction of the application form. According to an aide familiar with the program, SBA didn’t conduct appropriate stress tests for the portal.

Operators cited a document upload field as a key bug. When applicants attempted to upload a floor plan or other mandatory document, the system would crash and send the applicant to a Salesforce landing page. Later reports would identify contractor Salesforce as a source of the trouble, and the bug was related to an unregistered license. That, among other issues, delayed the portal launch two weeks, to April 24.

Neither the Small Business Administration nor the Office of Disaster assistance replied to a request for comment. A Salesforce spokesperson referred questions to the SBA.

A perfect storm

A marquee at the Hollywood Bowl concert venue bears a coronavirus-related message, Friday, March 27, 2020, in Los Angeles.
A marquee at the Hollywood Bowl concert venue bears a coronavirus-related message in Los Angeles on March 27, 2020.

The first thing that operators heard was silence, often for a month. When the SBA did reach out, it was often with problems with the applications.

“It required some IRS forms that had to be filled out in a pretty specific manner, in a manner that was inconsistent with the SBA’s instructions,” Corbett said. “There were people who were told they were dead. Not just a couple – that was a problem that was pretty broad. There were other people who were told they were on some kind of government do-not-pay list.”

The complex nature of the live events business, where 20 different independent contractors can have skin in the game on a single live event, made it all the more difficult for the federal government to actually understand who should qualify.

“The industry had limited resources to begin with, inadequate folks to advise the federal government, and a change in administration, I think it created this perfect storm,” Kinzie said.

The boiling point

When the first decisions went out on June 1, just 31 grants out of 13,619 were awarded. A week later, on June 9, that rose to a mere 90 grants out of the then-14,020 submitted, or 0.64% of grants.

“I don’t think there was any urgency created with the Biden administration to get this money out, and that was a big problem,” said Rep. Williams. “Like I was telling everybody at the SBA – this isn’t political, it doesn’t matter if I’m a Democrat or a Republican, this is a job creator, it’s a law, we need to get it going.”

The venue operators then began pushing the SBA publicly. Following scrutiny from the House and Senate architects of SVOG, which included Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, the administrator overseeing the program was swapped out, and Katie Frost, who had worked to implement the Restaurant Revitalization Fund, was placed in charge. Venue operators said the pace of decisions increased substantially thereafter.

“This legislation’s got Roger Williams and Chuck Schumer on it for crying out loud, we ought to be doing better than this,” Williams said. “We’re going to keep fighting to get this money, because each day these venues don’t get their money they’re going out of business. Jobs are being lost. I want to get these people paid rather than infighting with the agency.”

An open sign listing upcoming shows at a venue
Thousands of venues are still waiting for the relief they applied for.

The current status

Now, the money is starting to flow.

As of Tuesday, $3.2 billion of the $11.7 billion requested has been awarded. While just 28% of applicants have received their money, another 43% have had their application reach a decision.

But thousands of applicants are still in a state of limbo, unable to plan.

“Does it hamper the recovery? Absolutely,” Corbett said. “I would love to put money into a lot of different things.”

When Insider spoke to Kinzie, he was in Barcelona at the Mobile World Congress, a conference for the digital communications industry that usually attracts more than 100,000 attendees. A few hours earlier, the band Bon Jovi exited the stage following a performance Kinzie had organized. It’s his first live in-person event since March of 2020.

“Frick, it feels good,” Kinzie said. “I’m kind of emotional thinking about it. It feels good to be working again.”

Butch, who had been meeting with a bankruptcy attorney as recently as two weeks ago, got notified that The Muse had their grant application approved last Friday.

“We do not have a sense of when the funding will come through but have been awarded,” she said in an email. “We know of many others who have had trouble receiving the money so we are waiting to make sure it hits the account before we cheer too much.”

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4 takeaways from New York City’s attempt to use ranked-choice voting to pick its next crop of politicians

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams points his right finger in the air outside of his Brooklyn campaign office in Prospect Lefferts Gardens.
New York City Democratic Mayoral Candidate Eric Adams.

  • This past June, New York City became the largest city to use ranked choice voting.
  • The Board of Elections messed up on messaging and tabulation, but in the end the system worked.
  • While the mayor race was a fiasco, ranked choice was huge for contentious city council races.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Ranked-choice voting worked as intended, but its New York City debut didn’t go off without a few hitches.

Ranked-choice voting is a type of ballot that asks voters to list their choices – In New York’s case, five – in their order of preference. When the votes are in, the lowest-ranked candidate has their ballots reallocated to their voters’ second choices, and then so on and so forth until someone breaks 50%. This means a second runoff election is unnecessary – the runoff is done instantly – and that the winner with the broadest support eventually wins.

For the 2021 mayor race, Democrats had a long list of options, but the most popular candidates were Eric Adams, Maya Wiley, Kathryn Garcia, Andrew Yang, Scott Stringer, Ray McGuire, Dianne Morales, and Shaun Donovan.

Some voters may have found themselves doing more homework than they anticipated ahead of filling out their five choices for mayor in the Democratic primary. Still, the elimination system worked exactly as it was supposed to once it became clear no one would finish the first round as an outright winner with at least 50% of the vote.

The real drama and chaos that came with counting the votes was solely the result of an underprepared City Board of Elections, not an inherent feature of the ranked-choice systemGotham voters approved in 2019.

1. Ranked-choice worked, but in the process illustrated how divided New York City’s Democratic voters are

At a rather unprecedented scale in American politics, ranked-choice voting showed how a divided party could choose a candidate if enough voters indicated they could at least live with their second, third, fourth, or fifth choice.

Of the approximately 937,000 votes cast, only 139,459 ballots became “exhausted” by the final round, meaning that only about 15% of voters did not rank either of the final two contenders – former NYPD officer currently serving as Brooklyn borough president Eric Adams and former City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.

Ranked-choice voting also had nothing to do with the lackluster showing among further left candidates in the race. Voters were left split after City Comptroller Scott Stringer locked up most of the key progressive endorsements early on, only to have his campaign sink to fifth place.

It was Stringer’s lack of charisma, unoriginal messaging, and a pair of sexual assault allegations – both of which he denies – that sunk his campaign. Stringer’s demise left the progressive wing of the party adrift with minimal options, and it was far too late in the cycle to effectively consolidate around any of them, despite a strong late push from Maya Wiley.

Andrew Yang walks past his reflection in a window.
Former New York City mayoral candidate Andrew Yang.

2. Some candidates eventually played strategically, but probably too late in the game. They’ll be better next time

Key to Garcia making it until the final round was a gamble she took late in the campaign by appearing at events with Andrew Yang, who finished in fourth.

Garcia had won a critical endorsement from The New York Times editorial board but was still running in third place through most of the early rounds. Once Yang was out of the race, enough of his voters ranked Garcia second that she was able to vault over Wiley and compete with Adams for the top spot, ultimately falling fewer than 10,000 votes short.

While the Yang campaign did actively strategize around ranked-choice voting to some extent – whether through a big gamble like the Garcia quasi-alliance or by playing pickup basketball with 11th place finisher Paperboy Prince – most of the campaign strategy ended up being more conventional.

Garcia wouldn’t even fully commit to a true alliance with Yang, and no other candidates experimented with joint campaigning beside them.

The next time around, if there’s a full campaign calendar instead of months of Zoom forums, mid-to-lower-tier campaigns may embrace forming alliances and coalitions as a low-risk, high-reward strategy.

Bill de Blasio

3. Ranked-choice didn’t upend the fundamentals of elected politics in New York, but did stave off a costly, laborious runoff

Adams won the primary by executing on his campaign’s simple but effective formula of winning as many labor endorsements as possible and shoring up a base of outer-borough Black voters, particularly homeowners and union members.

His coalition was similar to the one that vaulted outgoing Mayor Bill de Blasio over the finish line in 2013, ceding ground in Manhattan and gentrified Brooklyn while running up the score among predominately Black precincts in Brooklyn, Queens, and the Bronx.

Ranked-choice voting didn’t change the fact that a relatively small slice of New York’s overall population will have an effective say in their mayor, given Democrats outnumbering Republicans by around seven to one in registrations.

However, Adams avoided what would have been a costly runoff under the old system, saving not only his own campaign’s money, but also matching funds from the city and other outlays to produce another voting day before Election Day in November.

In 2013, de Blasio won the primary and, by extension, the de facto claim to the mayor’s office with just 260,473 votes. Adams only got around 253,000 from the first round of voting. Now, he can securely claim the mantle of his party, having secured over half the vote when all was said and done, not a mere plurality.

Democratic New York City mayoral candidate Kathryn Garcia enters a debate, backed by supporters.
Democratic New York City mayoral candidate and former NYC Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia.

4. Ranked-choice really shines down ballot

Besides the top-tier races, the ranked-choice system absolutely bears out looking down ballot.

Take, for instance, the open City Council district in Queens’ 26th District. There are fifteen contenders for the Democratic nomination in the 26th, all of whom have similar, though not identical, politics.

Looking at just the first-round results, in a first-past-the-post system, Julie Won, winner of the primary, would have done so with just 18.5% of the vote, less than a percentage point above her nearest rival, Amit S. Bagga. Just over 3,300 people would have selected the winner of a district representing over 161,000 people.

Thanks to the ranked-choice system, after a dozen rounds of reallocating votes, Won remains the victor, but can now claim the seat with a decisive 56% of the vote, beating Bagga by over 13 percentage points. A complicated, complex field simplified with a single trip to the ballot box.

The rollout of ranked-choice voting may have been a hassle and unnecessarily stressful in the counting process, but everywhere else, it found a winner in precisely the way voters said they wanted it to back when they passed it in 2019.

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RESULTS: Eric Adams projected winner of New York City Mayor Democratic primary

From left: Shaun Donovan, Andrew Yang, Ray McGuire, Kathryn Garcia, Eric Adams, and Maya Wiley with New York City's skyline tint blue in the background.
  • Eric Adams is now projected to win the Democratic nomination for New York City Mayor.
  • New York City voters are selecting Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor.
  • New York is using ranked-choice voting for the first time, so the winner may not be known for weeks.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The latest tallies of New York City’s ranked-choice Democratic mayoral primary election show Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams narrowly leading former New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia by just 8,426 votes, 50.5% to 49.5%, with most absentee votes now counted. Given the outstanding vote and Adams’ lead, he is projected to be the winner of the primary.

The latest results include over 122,000 absentee ballots and some provisional ballots cast in-person. Out of the total 125,794 absentee ballots cast in the mayoral primary, 3,669 had problems with the signature on the outer envelope that voters will need to fix in order for their ballots to count, the city’s Board of Elections announced Tuesday.

Voters went to the polls through June 22 to pick Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor in the race to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is term-limited.

The winner of the crowded Democratic primary field will be the favorite in November’s general election, with Democrats heavily outnumbering registered Republicans across the five boroughs.

The Board of Elections released unofficial, un-ranked election results based on in-person votes only on Election Night, then ran the first ranked-choice tabulations a week later on June 29, also based on only in-person votes.

But it didn’t go off without some drama along the way: officials had to remove, recalculate, and re-release the first set of ranked-choice vote tabulations for the city’s mayoral race after a major mishap ensued when an employee in Queens accidentally included 135,000 test votes in the ranked-choice runoff results released on June 29, an embarrassment for the embattled city Board of Elections.

Several candidates, however, found themselves eliminated from contention just based on the unranked, election night results.

Shortly before 11 p.m. on the night of June 22, former presidential candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech in front of supporters.

“I am not going to be the next Mayor of New York City,” Yang said, sitting in fourth place.

Here are the unofficial, ranked tenth-round election results that show how the candidates stand before absentee and provisional ballots were added to the tally:

A voter receives her ballot in New York City's June 22 mayoral election
A voter receives her ballot at Frank McCourt High School, in New York, Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Why it took weeks to learn results.

While tabulating ranked-choice votes is done via software and is not particularly arduous on its own, it’s taking weeks to know the final results of the mayor’s race because of New York’s procedures for counting absentee ballots.

New York continued to allow voters to vote absentee due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and state law allows a lot of time for ballots to be accepted and mistakes with voters’ ballots to be rectified.

Absentee ballots were accepted through June 29 as long as they were postmarked by Election Day, and voters have until July 9 to fix or “cure” issues, like missing signatures on the outer envelopes of their ballots, under a new state law.

Military and overseas absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day were also accepted through July 5.

Then, ranked-choice voting comes into play. In the mayoral, borough president, and city council races, voters have the option to rank up to five candidates in order of their preference after New York City voters approved a ballot initiative to enact ranked-choice voting in 2019.

Ranked-choice voting ensures that the candidate who eventually wins does so with a majority of the vote.

Since no candidate won over 50% of the vote outright in the Democratic mayoral primary, the votes earned by the candidate who comes in last place are redistributed up to the next-best performing candidate. The process then continues up the chain until one candidate finally earns a majority of the vote.

The Board of Elections is expected to finish up final ranked-choice rounds with complete absentee and provisional results during the week of July 12.

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams at a campaign event
Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams greets supporters during a campaign event, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York

How the campaign shaped up during the pandemic.

The primary’s early months were dominated by Zoom forums.

Nonprofit organizations, unions, and other local groups held discussions that were less debates than opportunities for the candidates to repeat their campaign promises and sharpen their messaging.

Another factor making this campaign rather unusual was the general lack of public polling, with several pollsters saying they were uncomfortable simulating ranked-choice voting with any accuracy.

By May, in-person campaign events began to heat up, and eventually the candidates were able to meet in-person for a handful of televised debates.

Yang started the race as the frontrunner, but as more polling became available in the final weeks, he began to slip into second, third, and even fourth place in some surveys.

However, Yang remained competitive throughout, and an Ipsos poll released on the eve of the primary showed him in second place behind Adams.

Adams cleaned up with labor endorsements around the city, while Yang received a first of its kind joint-endorsement from Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish community leaders. The borough president’s momentum was complicated by a scandal involving his primary residence, when a Politico investigation found Adams may have been living in either New Jersey or his office instead of a Bedford-Stuyvesant brownstone that he officially listed.

Garcia began to surge following her New York Times Editorial Board endorsement, and Wiley was able to capitalize on late support from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Outside of the top four, several progressive candidates failed to gain traction, most notably City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer was accused by two women of sexually assaulting them in the early 2000s. He denied both allegations, but saw a mass defection of endorsements.

The latest twist in the race came in the final weekend, when Yang and Garcia campaigned together to “promote ranked-choice voting,” but not as a co-endorsement. Adams accused them of trying to prevent a person of color from becoming mayor, to which Yang replied that he’s been Asian his whole life.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The FBI seized a LEGO set of the US Capitol building from a January 6 riot suspect

US Capitol made of LEGO
Modelbuilders put-up Christmas decorations on a replica of the Capitol Building in Mini-Land at Legoland California in Carlsbad, California.

  • Robert Morss was arrested June 11 on suspicion of taking part in the January 6 US Capitol assault.
  • The FBI confiscated Morss’ LEGO set of the US Capitol during his arrest.
  • It’s not clear how Morss used it, or whether it factored into his alleged involvement in the riot.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Investigators took a fully constructed LEGO set of the US Capitol when arresting an alleged January 6 rioter at his home, according to the Department of Justice.

Robert Morss was arrested on June 11 and charged with four separate counts of breaking into the Capitol building, organizing a shield wall of rioters against police, and entering the building through a broken window.

An anonymous witness told investigators Morss is a military veteran and may “struggle with some mental health issues due to” it. Morss wore tan camouflage and military-style gear while at the Capitol. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette identified him as a substitute social studies teacher in the Shaler Area School District.

But while Morss’ employment and military history is known, it’s unclear if he used the Capitol LEGO set as a teaching tool or to plan his approach on January 6. DOJ filings say officers found items Morss took to the Capitol in his home such as a “Don’t Tread on Me” flag, a neck gaiter, tourniquet, and the military clothing. He also possessed a handgun, shotgun, and rifle at the time of his arrest as well as a notebook that included “Step by Step To Create Hometown Militia.” The steps included “Battle Drills,” “Ambush,” and “Formations.”

US prosecutors argued on July 2 Morss should continue to be held in pre-trial detention because of what authorities found at the time of his arrest, and said “the government respectfully submits that there are no conditions or combinations of conditions which can effectively ensure the safety of another person.”

Exactly six months after the attempted insurrection, Insider has tracked over 540 arrests along with 13 guilty pleas. The FBI released a new cache of videos on Tuesday in an attempt to identify more of the January 6 protestors.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks said he represented ‘the will’ of his constituents when he told Capitol protesters to ‘start taking down names and kicking ass’

UNITED STATES - SEPTEMBER 7: Rep. Mo Brooks, R-Ala., speaks with reporters as he leaves the House Republican Conference meeting in the Capitol on Wednesday morning, Sept. 7, 2016. (Photo By Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)
Rep. Mo Brooks (R-Ala.).

  • Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks said he “represented the will” of his constituents when speaking against the presidential election certification.
  • Brooks told protesters to “start taking down names and kicking ass” hours before rioters breached the Capitol.
  • Swalwell claimed on Friday that Brooks missed his deadline to file a response, but court filings show Brooks filed on time.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Alabama Rep. Mo Brooks said he “represented the will” of his constituents when he told Capitol protestors to “start taking down names and kicking ass” just hours before rioters breached the Capitol, according to a recent court filing.

The lawsuit against Brooks is a part of a larger suit against former President Donald, Donald Trump Jr., and Rudy Giuliani from California Rep. Eric Swalwell that alleges the defendants were responsible for thousands of rioters breaking into the Capitol building and disrupting the certification of the presidential election.

Brooks filed a motion in Swalwell’s suit to say he was acting within the scope of his employment during the speech. He cited his congressional district’s support for Trump and said that it was only his desire to represent his constituents because of “overwhelming” evidence that many states experienced voter fraud. While several states have audited their election tallies, zero states have provided a scintilla of evidence to support widespread voter fraud.

Swalwell alleges in his original complaint that Brooks was acting in his personal capacity when making a speech on January 6, but Brooks noted that his job requires him to make speeches in public and to push legislators to take positions on public policy.

Swalwell claimed on Friday that Brooks missed his window to respond to the lawsuit and the courts needed to issue a default judgment against him, however, online filings in the court’s PACER system show that Brooks filed his response several days before the June 27 cutoff.

It took Swalwell several months to serve the original complaint against Brooks because Swalwell’s team could not locate the representative, though Brooks denied hiding from Swalwell.

“I am avoiding no one,” he told CNN. “I have altered my conduct not one iota since Swalwell’s politically motivated, meritless lawsuit was filed.”

Swalwell ultimately hired a private investigator to locate Brooks. The complaint was ultimately served to his wife at their home.

“Well, Swalwell FINALLY did his job, served complaint (on my WIFE). HORRIBLE Swalwell’s team committed a CRIME by unlawfully sneaking INTO MY HOUSE & accosting my wife!” Brooks said in a tweet.

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Biden says Florida condo collapse survivors and victims’ families are ‘going through hell’ after meeting with them in Surfside

Joe biden looks at camera
President Joe Biden speaks about the collapse of the 12-story Champlain Towers South condo building last week in Surfside, Florida, following a meeting with families of victims in Miami, Florida.

  • Biden expressed sympathy for those affected by the Florida condominium crash on Thursday.
  • Biden and First Lady Jill Biden met with the families affected by the tragedy that day.
  • There have been 18 confirmed deaths from the collapse and as many as 145 people are still missing.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

President Joe Biden delivered somber remarks expressing sympathy for those affected by the Florida condominium crash after meeting with victims’ families in Surfside on Thursday.

“They’re going through hell,” Biden told reporters of the families. “Jill and I want them to know that we’re with them and the country’s with them.”

The president reiterated that the search for the remaining 145 missing people will continue, although efforts were halted on Thursday amid concerns about the stability of the standing portion of the building. He said the victims’ families are hopeful, but “realistic.”

“They know that the chances are, as each day goes by, diminished slightly,” Biden said. “But at a minimum, at a minimum, they want to recover the bodies. They want to recover the bodies.”

He mentioned that he spoke with one woman whose husband and baby boy are missing and noted how difficult it is for families not to know whether their loved ones are dead or alive. Biden mentioned his own experience of loss when his first wife and baby daughter were killed in a car accident in 1972 and how excruciating it was not knowing whether his two sons, Beau and Hunter, would survive their serious injuries.

“It’s bad enough to lose somebody, but the really hard part is to not know if they’re surviving or not,” he said.

Biden met with first responders earlier on Thursday and praised Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis, a Republican, and other state and federal lawmakers for their “total, complete cooperation.”

“There’s no disagreement, no bickering, everyone’s on the same team,” he said. “The one thing that made me feel good about this is the cohesion that exists.”

The president urged first responders to accept mental health care if necessary in the aftermath of the dangerous and traumatic search and rescue efforts.

“There’s going to be a lot of pain and suffering and even need for psychological help in the days and months that follow, so we’re not going anywhere,” he told a group of first-responders he and Jill met with. “Tell me what you need.”

The Champlain Towers South building collapsed in the early morning of June 24. Five lawsuits have been filed so far against the condominium association alleging negligence and failure to maintain the building and have provided a glimpse of the condominium’s condition before it collapsed.

A structural engineer found “major structural damage” and “abundant” cracked concrete in a 2018 inspection report that said about 8% of the concrete slabs in the garage and plaza experienced “concrete deterioration.” A tourist recorded a video of water streaming into the garage from the ceiling just 12 minutes before the building caved in.

There have been 18 confirmed deaths so far from the condominium collapse.

Biden said there is still no “definitive judgment” on the causes of the building collapse, only “rational speculation.”

He added that “many” Surfside survivors and families mentioned that they think climate change and worsening tropical storms may have played a role in the building’s deteriorating structure.

“Interesting to me – I didn’t raise it – but how many of the survivors and how many of the families talked about the impact of global warming,” Biden told reporters. “They talked about sea levels rising and the combination of that and the concern about incoming tropical storms.”

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RESULTS: New York City to re-tally ranked choice rounds after major tabulation errors included dummy votes

From left: Shaun Donovan, Andrew Yang, Ray McGuire, Kathryn Garcia, Eric Adams, and Maya Wiley with New York City's skyline tint blue in the background.
  • New York City voters are selecting Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor.
  • New York is using ranked-choice voting for the first time, so the winner may not be known for weeks.
  • Eric Adams’ initial lead was cut down by Kathryn Garcia and Maya Wiley.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

New York City officials have retracted the most recent vote count and the first set of ranked-choice vote tabulations for the city’s mayoral race after accidentally including 135,000 dummy test votes in the ranked-choice runoff tallies it conducted and released on Tuesday.

The Board of Elections removed the previous results from the first set of ranked-choice runoff rounds from its website and announced in a statement late Tuesday night that it will re-upload the election night results (which include in-person votes and no absentee ballots so far), re-generate the cast vote record, and re-tally ranked-choice rounds.

Unofficial and incomplete election night results only had Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams holding a commanding lead, followed by former New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, and civil rights attorney Maya Wiley.

The Board of Elections ran the first round of ranked-choice voting based on the results of in-person votes only. These results will remain incomplete and unofficial, however, since the over 124,000 absentee ballots cast in the Democratic primary won’t yet counted and factored into the tally until later on.

Voters went to the polls through June 22 to pick Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor in the race to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is term-limited.

The winner of the crowded Democratic primary field will be the favorite in November’s general election, with Democrats heavily outnumbering registered Republicans across the five boroughs.

Ranked-choice voting is being used for the first time in the city’s history for these races, complicating predictions and the logistics of counting the votes.

Shortly before 11 p.m. on the night of June 22, former presidential candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech in front of supporters.

“I am not going to be the next Mayor of New York City,” Yang said, sitting in fourth place.

Here are the unofficial, ranked tenth-round election results that show how the candidates stand before absentee and provisional ballots are added to the tally:

A voter receives her ballot in New York City's June 22 mayoral election
A voter receives her ballot at Frank McCourt High School, in New York, Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Why we may not know the winner for two more weeks.

While tabulating ranked-choice votes is done via software and is not particularly arduous on its own, it’s taking weeks to know the final results of the mayor’s race because of New York’s procedures for counting absentee ballots.

New York is continuing to allow voters to vote absentee due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and state law allows a lot of time for ballots to be accepted and mistakes with voters’ ballots to be rectified.

Absentee ballots are accepted through June 29 as long as they’re postmarked by Election Day, and voters have another week on top of that to fix or “cure” issues, like missing signatures on the outer envelopes of their ballots, under a new state law. Military and overseas absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day are also accepted through July 5.

Then, ranked-choice voting comes into play. In the mayoral, borough president, and city council races, voters have the option to rank up to five candidates in order of their preference after New York City voters approved a ballot initiative to enact ranked-choice voting in 2019.

Ranked-choice voting ensures that the candidate who eventually wins does so with a majority of the vote.

Since no candidate won over 50% of the vote outright in the Democratic mayoral primary, the votes earned by the candidate who comes in last place are redistributed up to the next-best performing candidate. The process then continues up the chain until one candidate finally earns a majority of the vote.

Here’s a likely timeline for the results, according to THE CITY and The New York Times:

  • June 22: Unofficial, first-round election night results before ranked-choice rounds are released. These results will only include in-person votes, not absentee or provisional ballots.
  • June 29: Board of Elections runs the first round of ranked-choice voting, also without full absentee and provisional results. These results will remain unofficial.
  • July 6: Ranked-choice tallies are updated with absentee and provisional ballots as they’re counted and accepted.
  • July 12: The Board of Elections is expected to finish up final ranked-choice rounds with complete absentee and provisional results.

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams at a campaign event
Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams greets supporters during a campaign event, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York

How the campaign shaped up during the pandemic.

The primary’s early months were dominated by Zoom forums.

Nonprofit organizations, unions, and other local groups held discussions that were less debates than opportunities for the candidates to repeat their campaign promises and sharpen their messaging.

Another factor making this campaign rather unusual was the general lack of public polling, with several pollsters saying they were uncomfortable simulating ranked-choice voting with any accuracy.

By May, in-person campaign events began to heat up, and eventually the candidates were able to meet in-person for a handful of televised debates.

Yang started the race as the frontrunner, but as more polling became available in the final weeks, he began to slip into second, third, and even fourth place in some surveys.

However, Yang remained competitive throughout, and an Ipsos poll released on the eve of the primary showed him in second place behind Adams.

Adams cleaned up with labor endorsements around the city, while Yang received a first of its kind joint-endorsement from Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish community leaders. The borough president’s momentum was complicated by a scandal involving his primary residence, when a Politico investigation found Adams may have been living in either New Jersey or his office instead of a Bedford-Stuyvesant brownstone that he officially listed.

Garcia began to surge following her New York Times Editorial Board endorsement, and Wiley was able to capitalize on late support from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Outside of the top four, several progressive candidates failed to gain traction, most notably City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer was accused by two women of sexually assaulting them in the early 2000s. He denied both allegations, but saw a mass defection of endorsements.

The latest twist in the race came in the final weekend, when Yang and Garcia campaigned together to “promote ranked-choice voting,” but not as a co-endorsement. Adams accused them of trying to prevent a person of color from becoming mayor, to which Yang replied that he’s been Asian his whole life.

Read the original article on Business Insider