How TikTok is changing the music industry

Gia Woods performs onstage in a white and grey outfit in front of a pink background at the "Thrive With Pride" concert.
Gia Woods.

  • TikTok has become a go-to platform for discovering new music.
  • Record labels, music marketers, artists, and other creators are all flooding the app with songs.
  • Here’s a full breakdown of Insider’s recent coverage on TikTok’s impact on the music industry.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

TikTok is an essential promotional tool for music artists and record labels.

Songs can rise up organically on the app even if they’ve been outside the mainstream for decades. Marketers can also hire influencers to try to make a song take off, sparking a wave of user-generated posts from their fans. And some artists even write songs that directly reference TikTok trends in the hope that it will help it gain steam on the app.

“TikTok has really become a critical part of artist storytelling,” Kristen Bender, SVP of digital strategy and business development at Universal Music Group, told Insider during a webinar on TikTok’s impact on the music industry. “Since we signed our deal with TikTok earlier this year, our labels have been extremely leaned into the platform.”

Watch a full replay of Insider’s webinar on TikTok’s impact on the music industry, featuring execs from TikTok, Universal Music Group, and UnitedMasters

The industry’s attention on TikTok isn’t unfounded. Songs that trend on TikTok often end up charting on the Billboard 100 or Spotify Viral 50. And 67% of the app’s users are more likely to seek out songs on music-streaming services after hearing them on TikTok, according to a November study conducted for TikTok by the music-analytics company MRC Data.

Song promo deals between music marketers and influencers have also become an important source of income for TikTok creators. Some users can earn hundreds or even thousands of dollars for a single video where they promote an artist’s track.

“Music marketing on TikTok is huge,” Jesse Callahan, founder of the upstart marketing firm Montford Agency, told Insider. “It’s a big way that labels have brought artists into the spotlight the last couple of years. It’s also a big way that creators have made a lot of money.”

Read more about the different rates for song promos for TikTok creators who have a few hundred thousand followers or up to 10 millions fans

TikTok music industry power players 4x3

How record labels, artists, and marketers use TikTok as a promotional tool

TikTok has become a hub for labels to promote both new releases and back catalog tracks. And a new cohort of social-media music marketers has sprung up to support promotional efforts on the app.

Check out Insider’s power list of the 24 music marketers, artists, digital creators, record labels, and other industry insiders who are using TikTok to help define popular music

Many record labels have teams dedicated to monitoring the app so they can help fan the flames on a trending song when it starts to take off.

“Our entire music catalog is effectively tracked on a daily basis,” said Andy McGrath, the senior vice president of marketing at Legacy Recordings, a division within Sony Music focused on the label’s catalog of songs dating back decades. “We’re constantly monitoring actions, reactions, and trends that happen on TikTok.”

Read more about how Sony’s marketing team jumps into action when an old song begins to trend

Surfaces duo Forrest Frank and Colin Padalecki
Surfaces duo Forrest Frank and Colin Padalecki.

While some songs take off on TikTok accidentally, as was the case with Matthew Wilder’s 1983 song “Break My Stride” or Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams,” other times, record labels and marketers pay TikTok influencers to promote a particular song in a video.

The media company Flighthouse helped boost the popularity of Surfaces’ “Sunday Best” almost a year after the song was first released by creating a user-generated video trend around the track.

The company hired about 20 TikTok influencers to amplify its efforts.

“When Flighthouse gets hold of a record, it’s kind of incumbent upon us to create context for a song, especially for TikTok,” Sher Chaudhary, Flighthouse’s strategy lead, told Insider last year.

Read more about Flighthouse’s music marketing strategies

It’s impossible to predict what video or music trends will take off on TikTok.

RCA Records’ SVP of digital marketing Tarek Al-Hamdouni said the label’s promotional strategy involves a fair amount of experimentation with each campaign. The company will often work with an influencer agency to find somewhere between 10 and 30 lower-follower-count influencers to promote a new track in videos and then go after trends that stick.

“We actually give them the freedom to post what they’d like with that content,” he said. “If you see one or two posts start to overperform based on a consistent creative, what we can do is go find those bigger influencers and get them on board with the trend. In the best-case scenario, your micro-influencer campaign is so successful that it creates the trend on its own and then the bigger influencers are going to jump on board organically.”

Read more about RCA Records’ strategy for promoting songs on TikTok

Tiagz - TikTok music artist
Tiagz.

While TikTok is often a go-to platform for promoting a newly released track, some artists incorporate the app even earlier in their creative process.

The Canadian rapper Tiagz (Tiago Garcia-Arenas) built a following of 4.2 million fans on the app by writing songs that directly referenced the app’s popular memes and trends, effectively gaming its search and content recommendation algorithms.

“I tried to understand the platform,” Tiagz told Insider. “I kept doing these memes because I saw that it worked.”

Read more about how Tiagz used TikTok to land a record deal with Epic Records

Not all song trends on TikTok happen serendipitously or via external music marketing campaigns.

TikTok also has an internal music division dedicated to monitoring music trends on the app. The team has a series of “promo levers” it uses to boost the popularity of songs. The company can add new tracks to playlists in the “Sounds” section of its app and apply keywords on the back end to optimize song discoverability in the app’s search interface.

Read more about how TikTok’s music team shapes trends on the app

The music trio Taylor Red appear outside on a roof with their arms linked.
The music trio Taylor Red have 8.6 million followers on TikTok.

How TikTok creators can make money from working with music industry professionals

Music marketers regularly pay TikTok influencers to promote songs. The practice has become so common that there are entire agencies dedicated to song promotions on the app.

For the app’s creators, it can be an easy way to monetize their following without having to create a sponsored post for a brand.

“We’ve still found that TikTok remains the most engaged, the most used, and the most rewarding per dollar spent,” Griffin Haddrill, an artist manager and cofounder of the marketing agency VRTCL, told Insider.

As TikTok’s user base has grown and content has become more saturated, marketers are turning more to micro influencers over superstars for song campaigns.

“The price point for mega stars is extremely high,” Zach Friedman, a cofounder at the upstart record label Homemade Projects, told Insider. “The way the TikTok algorithm works, it’s hard to know what’s going to be successful. Instead of paying a premium for a D’Amelio, you could pay a micro influencer $200 and their TikTok could get 10 million views. Because of this, it’s better to cast a wider net.”

Read more about why some marketers are choosing micro influencers to promote new tracks

Read the original article on Business Insider

How much money influencers make using affiliate marketing programs

Tori Dunlap
Tori Dunlap is a personal finance influencer

  • Influencers frequently share links to their Instagram Stories or below their YouTube videos.
  • Those links are often affiliate links that let creators earn a commission on sales.
  • We spoke with creators about how much money they earn using affiliate marketing.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Those “swipe-ups” on Instagram Stories or the links below a YouTube video aren’t just for the convenience of sharing a link – they’re how many influencers make money.

When someone makes a purchase on a website after clicking through a trackable link or using a specific code, the influencer who posted it can earn a commission from that sale. That’s called affiliate marketing.

Influencers often use affiliate marketing as a way to earn income outside of sponsored posts or ad revenue on videos. It’s also a way that emerging “nano” and “micro” influencers (with between 1,000 and 100,000 followers) start making money and working with sponsors as content creators.

How lucrative affiliate marketing is for an influencer depends on several factors such as their following size, engagement, and which industry they are in. It also depends on the commission rates brands and platforms put in place.

For instance, some finance influencers can make a decent portion of their income from affiliate links alone. They might work with investing apps like Robinhood or Acorns.

Read more details about how much money finance apps and companies pay influencers through affiliate marketing

One personal-finance influencer, Tori Dunlap, told Insider she made more than $200,000 in eight months.

Finance isn’t the only well-paid category.

Skincare influencer Vi Lai said recently she was earning more than $5,000 each month from affiliate links. Still, other influencers say they earn a few hundred dollars here and there.

From brands like Amazon to third-party affiliate marketing platforms, there’s a handful of ways for influencers to earn a commission from promoting products on social media.

Read more about how much money one influencer makes using Amazon affiliate links

Some influencers have even started texting their followers with links to their favorite products as a way to drive sales. And platforms like Instagram are also tapping into this space with their own native affiliate marketing programs.

Read more details about the affiliate marketing tools Instagram is developing

Insider has talked with many influencers and industry experts about affiliate marketing. Here’s a rundown of what they told us they have earned.

How much money do influencers make using affiliate marketing?

We spoke with a handful of influencers about how they incorporate affiliate links into their content. Several detailed their monthly earnings. They ranged from about $50 per month to more than $25,000 per month.

Here’s how much money 8 creators make from affiliates:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How much influencers get paid on Instagram, TikTok, and YouTube

Charli Prangley
Charli Prangley.

  • Influencers get paid a number of ways, from sponsorships to ad revenue.
  • How much creators earn depends on factors like following size, engagement, and content category.
  • We spoke with dozens of influencers who shared how much money they’d earned on social media.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Influencers earn money a number of ways, from sponsorships to selling merchandise.

How much money different creators make depends on a variety of factors, from content category to what platform the influencer is prominent on.

For Jehava Brown, a stay-at-home mom who runs a full-time influencer business, her monthly income comes from working with brands like Walmart, Amazon, and Disney on paid partnerships.

Brown has 196,000 followers on Instagram. She recently told Insider that she charges an average $5,000 for a single Instagram post and $3,000 for an Instagram Story.

Insider has spoken with dozens of other influencers on Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok about how much each of them makes from videos, sponsorships, and other revenue streams.

Here’s a breakdown of our coverage:

Jehava Brown
Jehava Brown.

How much influencers earn from brand deals

Many influencers rely on sponsored content – from a set of Instagram posts and Stories to a dedicated YouTube video promoting a company – to earn money.

Rates for these types of brand deals vary based on an influencer’s engagement rate, platform, and other factors like usage rights.

Here’s a breakdown of our coverage of how much influencers make for brand deals and sponsorships.

YouTube

Instagram

TikTok

How much influencers earn from affiliate links

Some influencers use platforms like LiketoKnow.it and ShopStyle to generate affiliate links, or discount codes provided by brands, to earn a percentage of sales.

Read more about how much influencers make from affiliates:

How much influencers make selling direct-to-consumer products and merch

Social-media stars are increasingly leveraging their presence online to create consumer products to sell directly to their followers.

Influencer-lead DTC brands first began popping up earnest in 2012, with companies like the fitness program, “EmFitChallenge”; the phone case company, Wildflower Cases; and the cold-press juice line, Suja.

Read more:

How much influencers make reselling clothing

Resale apps like Poshmark, Depop, and Etsy have become lucrative small businesses for many creators, particularly on Instagram.

Read more:

How much influencers make promoting songs, especially on TikTok

One of the most popular ways to earn money as a TikToker is by promoting songs in videos. Music marketers and record labels regularly pay TikTok users to post on the app in an attempt to make a new track go viral.

Read more about how TikTok creators make money from song promotions:

Tomi Obebe
Tomi Obebe.

How influencers make money directly from Instagram

Getting tips via Instagram Badges

In 2020, Instagram announced “Badges,” which allows fans to tip creators who livestream on the app. Instagram also started paying some creators who use Badges with “Bonuses” in June.

Read more:

Graham Stephan
Graham Stephan.

How influencers make money directly from YouTube

Many YouTube creators earn money off the ads that play in their videos and receive a monthly payout.

Creators who are part of the Partner Program can monetize their videos with Google-placed ads. Creators must have at least 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 watch hours in the past year to apply for the Partner Program. Google then pays creators 55% of the revenue their channels earn from the ads that run on them.

Here’s a breakdown of how much money YouTubers make in a month from the Partner Program:

YouTube’s central creator monetization metric is called revenue per mille (RPM). That rate shows how much revenue a creator earns per every 1,000 video views (after YouTube’s 45% cut). No creator consistently makes the same rate, which depends on factors like the viewers and advertisers the video attracts.

Here’s a breakdown of how much money some YouTubers have made for 1,000 views (RPM), for 100,000 views, 1 million views, and the most they’ve made from a single video:

Symphony Clarke Thrift TikTok
Symphony Clarke.

How influencers make money directly from TikTok

To earn money directly from TikTok, users must be 18 years or older, meet a baseline of 10,000 followers, and have accrued at least 100,000 video views in the last 30 days. Once they reach that threshold, they can apply for TikTok’s Creator Fund through the app.

Read more about how much TikTok creators make from the Creator Fund:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How Instagram nano influencers make money with under 10,000 followers

Jen Lauren
Jen Lauren is a “nano” influencer on Instagram and YouTube.

  • “Nano” influencers are generally defined as having fewer than 10,000 followers on Instagram.
  • And some have turned their social-media hobbies into part-time jobs or side hustles.
  • Here’s how several creators earn money as nano influencers on Instagram.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nano” influencers may only have a few thousand followers, but that’s not keeping them from turning a social-media hobby into a paying side hustle.

Take Jen Lauren as an example.

Lauren is a part-time lifestyle influencer who now has 3,600 Instagram followers and about 4,000 YouTube subscribers (a few hundred more than when she was interviewed by Insider). She makes money as a creator on Instagram and YouTube through brand sponsorships, affiliate links, and YouTube’s Partner Program.

For one sponsored Instagram post, Lauren will charge about $350, she told Insider in November when she had just under 3,000 followers.

A recent report from HypeAuditor that surveyed 1,865 influencers outlined just how much nano influencers like Lauren charge per Instagram post and earn, on average, each month.

Nano influencers have become increasingly important to brands and influencer-marketing agencies because of their niche content and highly engaged audiences. They also typically have lower rates than influencers with hundreds of thousands or millions of followers.

And platforms specialized in helping nano influencers connect with brands, like Heartbeat, have emerged.

While reaching 10,000 followers on Instagram is a major milestone for aspiring influencers – getting on more brands’ radars, building a bigger audience, and having access to Instagram’s swipe-up feature in Stories – some nano influencers are making money in spite of their smaller follower counts.

So how much money are nano influencers actually earning?

Here’s a comprehensive list of Insider’s coverage of how nano influencers are building businesses:

How much money 4 nano influencers charge for brand deals on Instagram:

Examples of real media kits that 3 nano influencers use to pitch brands:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to make money on Instagram as a nano influencer with under 10,000 followers

Jen Lauren
Jen Lauren is a “nano” influencer on Instagram and YouTube.

  • “Nano” influencers are generally defined as having fewer than 10,000 followers on Instagram.
  • And some have turned their social-media hobbies into part-time jobs or side hustles.
  • Here’s how several creators earn money as nano influencers on Instagram.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Nano” influencers may only have a few thousand followers, but that’s not keeping them from turning a social-media hobby into a paying side hustle.

Take Jen Lauren as an example.

Lauren is a part-time lifestyle influencer who now has 3,600 Instagram followers and about 4,000 YouTube subscribers (a few hundred more than when she was interviewed by Insider). She makes money as a creator on Instagram and YouTube through brand sponsorships, affiliate links, and YouTube’s Partner Program.

For one sponsored Instagram post, Lauren will charge about $350, she told Insider in November when she had just under 3,000 followers.

A recent report from HypeAuditor that surveyed 1,865 influencers outlined just how much nano influencers like Lauren charge per Instagram post and earn, on average, each month.

Nano influencers have become increasingly important to brands and influencer-marketing agencies because of their niche content and highly engaged audiences. They also typically have lower rates than influencers with hundreds of thousands or millions of followers.

And platforms specialized in helping nano influencers connect with brands, like Heartbeat, have emerged.

While reaching 10,000 followers on Instagram is a major milestone for aspiring influencers – getting on more brands’ radars, building a bigger audience, and having access to Instagram’s swipe-up feature in Stories – some nano influencers are making money in spite of their smaller follower counts.

So how much money are nano influencers actually earning?

Here’s a comprehensive list of Insider’s coverage of how nano influencers are building businesses:

How much money 4 nano influencers charge for brand deals on Instagram:

Examples of real media kits that 3 nano influencers use to pitch brands:

Read the original article on Business Insider

Mediakix insiders say the agency has missed some payments to influencers and seen a staff exodus

Mediakix is an influencer marketing agency that worked with thousands of influencers.
Mediakix is an influencer marketing agency that worked with thousands of influencers.

  • Mediakix had been a prominent influencer-marketing agency. Then it started to unravel.
  • Mediakix has lost most of its staff, missed some payments, and disconnected its phone, sources said.
  • Read Insider’s investigation into what happened at the agency.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Mediakix had been a fixture in the influencer industry for nearly a decade.

But in the last several months, the stature Mediakix took years to build started to crumble when the agency stopped paying some of its influencers, sources told Insider.

The influencer-marketing agency was founded by Evan Asano in 2011 and was based out of Santa Monica, California. For years, Mediakix had been connecting brands with influencers for paid campaigns on social-media platforms like Instagram, YouTube, and TikTok. The agency’s data reports about the industry and social media were also frequently cited by publications – including Insider.

Then in early 2020, the agency was acquired by a holding company named Stadiumred Group. At the time, Stadiumred group had a few other advertising agencies in its portfolio. Just as the acquisition took hold, however, the COVID-19 pandemic flipped the advertising and marketing industries on their heads.

As the influencer-marketing industry started to rebound later in 2020, Mediakix faced a series of new obstacles.

So what was really going down inside of Mediakix?

Here is a glimpse into the unraveling of one of the leading influencer-marketing agencies in the creator industry:

  • In 2020, Mediakix started missing some payments to influencers it worked with, sources told Insider.
  • But apparently, it wasn’t just influencers not being paid. About a year after the Stadiumred acquisition, Mediakix (and Stadiumred) also began to miss some payments to some staffers, sources said.
  • Insider spoke with 10 former staffers at either Mediakix or Stadiumred. The former staffers at the two companies painted a clearer picture of what was happening inside of Mediakix behind closed doors.
  • By the end of May, only one Mediakix staffer remained, the sources said. Asano, Mediakix’s founder, went on leave months earlier and an exodus of Mediakix staffers soon followed.
  • “I had no power,” one former Mediakix employee told Insider. “And on top of being paid late, ethically, I wanted to leave.”

  • Two sources told Insider that they were informed via communications from a Mediakix email that the agency was insolvent.
  • And as of June, Mediakix’s office phone line remained disconnected.

Read more about Mediakix and how the prominent influencer-marketing agency unraveled in our investigation

Read the original article on Business Insider

How to create an influencer media kit to get brand deals

Marina Mogilko
Marina Mogilko

  • Social-media influencers use media kits to pitch themselves to brands.
  • These documents often provide metrics and some kits also include pay rates.
  • We spoke with a dozen creators who shared the exact media kits they use.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Many social-media creators rely on brand deals as their main source of income.

Influencers can offer advertisers a range of content types – like in-feed posts on Instagram, a 30-second TikTok, or a mention on YouTube.

Brands are hiring creators with nano (fewer than 10,000 followers) to mega audiences across a wide range of categories.

To land these deals, some influencers will use a media kit to showcase their value to a company.

Many media kits include:

  • A cover page
  • Audience metrics, like core follower demographics
  • A list of advertisers the influencer has worked with
  • Past campaign case studies
  • Pay rates
  • And contact information

Some influencers will send a media kit to every advertiser they work with. They keep this document up-to-date by adding new metrics and collaborations every few months.

Marina Mogilko
Mogilko uses a 24-page media kit.

Here are 12 examples of real media kits that influencers use to land brand deals

YouTube:

Roberto Blake
Roberto Blake

Instagram:

Alexa Collins - Instagram influencer
Alexa Collins

TikTok:

“I think it’s super important if you want to take this seriously,” Macy Mariano said of media kits. “I send them now to everyone I get in touch with. It’s just a good way to express who you are and what you’ve done so they can see your past and current work.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

How much money Instagram influencers earn

Tyler Chanel influencer sustainability
Tyler Chanel is a “micro” influencer with under 15,000 Instagram followers.

  • Influencers on Instagram earn money in a multitude of ways.
  • From sponsored content to getting tips on IG Live, creators balance several streams of income.
  • We spoke with dozens of creators who shared how much money they earn.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Instagram and influencers go hand-in-hand.

The Facebook-owned social-media platform has become a primary stage for influencers launching their careers. And they don’t need millions of followers to earn money on Instagram.

As more brands turn to smaller creators like “nano” or “micro” influencers with under 100,000 followers, establishing a career as a creator is no longer a pipe dream.

But it’s not so straightforward to start earning money on Instagram. Unlike YouTube, Instagram doesn’t yet have a comparable payment system in place like YouTube’s Partner Program. Typically, influencers rely on sponsored content to make a living. From posting a picture to the main feed with #ad to sharing swipe-up links in a series of Stories, sponsored content takes on many different shapes.

Rates for these types of brands also vary.

Each deal has to account for an influencer’s following, engagement metrics, and niche, while also calculating added fees like exclusivity, usage rights, and timing.

Sponsored content, however, isn’t the only income generator for these influencers – although it is generally the most lucrative.

Influencers also make money on Instagram through commissions on affiliate links, selling merchandise and DTC products, and monetization tools the platform is slowly rolling out.

Insider has spoken with dozens of Instagram influencers about how much money they charge brands for sponsored content and how else they make a living using the app.

Here’s a comprehensive breakdown of Insider’s Instagram money log series:

How much money Instagram influencers make from brand deals

Working with brands on sponsored content is how many influencers earn an income on Instagram.

But how much money do influencers actually charge for these deals?

Here’s a full breakdown of our coverage:

“Macro” and “Mega” influencers

Micro influencers

Nano influencers

How influencers earn money beyond brand deals

From earning a small commission through affiliate links to getting tipped by followers on an Instagram Live, there’s a menu of supplementary sources of income for creators on Instagram.

How much money do influencers make through links or selling their own products?

Affiliate marketing

Influencers use platforms like LiketoKnow.it and ShopStyle to generate affiliate links, or discount codes provided by brands, to earn a percentage of sales.

Read more:

Getting tips via Instagram Badges

In 2020, Instagram announced “Badges”, which allows fans to tip creators who livestream on the app. Instagram also started paying some creators who use Badges with “Bonuses” in June.

Read more:

Selling direct-to-consumer products and merch

Influencers can sell their own products and merchandise directly through Instagram’s shopping features, or leverage their audience to promote their own brands and DTC products.

Read more:

Reselling clothing

Resale apps like Poshmark, Depop, and Etsy have become lucrative small businesses for many Instagram creators.

Read more:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How much money YouTube stars earn, according to dozens of creators

Kelly Stamps is a minimalist lifestyle YouTuber
Kelly Stamps has earned thousands of dollars from YouTube’s AdSense program since 2019.

  • YouTube creators who are part of the Partner Program can monetize their videos with ads.
  • The amount of money different creators make per video varies based on a variety of factors.
  • We spoke with dozens of creators who shared how much money they’ve earned on YouTube.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

This is the latest installment of Insider’s YouTube money logs, where creators break down how much they earn.

Social-media creators who are part of the YouTube Partner Program can earn money off their videos with Google-placed ads.

To start earning money directly from YouTube, creators must have at least 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 watch hours in the past year. Once they reach that threshold, they can apply for YouTube’s Partner Program, which allows creators to start monetizing their channels through ads, subscriptions, and channel memberships.

Creators on YouTube can earn their money a number of ways, from sponsorships to selling merchandise.

But revenue from Google ads is a big chunk of many YouTube stars’ incomes.

Insider has spoken with dozens of YouTube creators about how much each of them make per month, on videos with 100 thousand or 1 million views, and other financial topics.

Here’s a comprehensive breakdown of Insider’s YouTube money logs series:

How much money YouTubers make a month

Many YouTube creators earn money off the ads that play in their videos and receive a monthly payout.

So how much do YouTubers generally make per month?

Here’s a full breakdown of our coverage:

How much money YouTubers make per 1,000 views (RPM)

For every 1,000 ad views, advertisers pay a certain rate to YouTube. YouTube then takes 45% and the creator gets the rest.

Some subjects, like talking about money on YouTube, often can boost a creator’s ad rate by attracting a lucrative audience.

How much do creators earn per 1,000 views (called the RPM rate)?

Here’s a full breakdown of our coverage:

How much money YouTubers make on a single video

Creators on YouTube often have no idea how much money they will earn off a single video after they upload it to the platform.

Many creators also try to avoid swearing or copyrighted music in their content because those factors can increase a video’s chance of getting flagged by YouTube and demonetized.

So if a creator does everything right in the eyes of YouTube, how much can they expect to make at the top end?

We asked 17 YouTube creators what the most money they’d made of a single video was.

Read the full post: YouTube stars reveal the most money they’ve made from a single video

How much money YouTubers make for 100,000 views

How much money a single YouTube video with 100,000 views makes from Google-placed ads depends on the content of the video and the audience who watches.

The amount of money a video will earn also depends on its watch time, length, and video type, among other factors.

Here’s a full breakdown of our coverage:

How much money YouTubers make for 1 million views

Though making money from YouTube depends on a variety of factors, amassing 1 million views can often net a creator a big payday.

Here’s a full breakdown of our coverage:

Read the original article on Business Insider

How the influencer-marketing agency Mediakix unraveled

User not found pop-up on Instagram.
When directed to the Mediakix Instagram account, a “user not found” error pops up.

Hi, this is Amanda Perelli and welcome back to Insider Influencers, our weekly rundown on the business of influencers, creators, and social-media platforms. Sign up for the newsletter here.

In this week’s edition:

But before we get started, I want to first introduce a new reporter on the business of influencers team, Michael Espinosa!

Michael is based in New York City and you can reach him at mespinosa@insider.com and on Twitter @Michael__Esp. He will be covering the business of gaming influencers, esports, and livestreaming.

Send tips to aperelli@insider.com or DM me on Twitter at @arperelli.


Mediakix influencer marketing agency
Mediakix

The influencer-marketing agency Mediakix has lost most of its staff, missed some payments, and disconnected its phone

Mediakix, a prominent influencer-marketing agency, was acquired by Stadiumred Group in 2020.

But about a year later, Mediakix began to miss some payments to staffers and influencers, sources said.

Sydney Bradley reported that most Mediakix staffers have now left the company and its phone line is seemingly disconnected.

Insider spoke with 10 former staffers of Mediakix or Stadiumred; most spoke on the condition of anonymity.

Here are three takeaways from the investigation:

  • Starting as early as December 2020, influencers began posting to social media platforms like Twitter claiming they had not been paid by Mediakix.

  • Tweets posted by several influencers continued into 2021 through May, and agents and managers were talking about Mediakix, too.

  • Mediakix had about a dozen staffers in early 2021. But two sources said that all but one staffer had left Mediakix by the end of May.

“I had no power,” a former Mediakix employee told Insider. “And on top of being paid late, ethically, I wanted to leave.”

Evan Asano, who founded MediaKix in 2011, left the company in early 2021. He provided a comment to Insider about Mediakix, but did not substantially address specific details.

“I am frustrated and saddened by the recent media coverage reporting allegations that Mediakix is not fulfilling its contracts with influencers,” Asano wrote.

Stadiumred and its founder and CEO, Claude Zdanow, did not wish to provide any comment on the record.

Check out the full investigation, which outlines how Mediakix lost most of its staff, here.

Bryce Hall and Austin McBroom fight during LiveXLive’s "Social Gloves: Battle Of The Platforms"
Influencers Bryce Hall and Austin McBroom fight at Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium during LiveXLive’s “Social Gloves: Battle Of The Platforms” on June 12, 2021.

Influencer boxing has meant big paydays for creators but challenges for broadcasters

Influencer boxing can be lucrative for creators, but can be a mess to run for event organizers.

Companies like Triller, Showtime, and LiveXLive are all vying to take control of the emerging category.

Dan Whateley wrote about how all three companies have run into hurdles as they’ve embarked on their first influencer fights.

Here are three key points:

  • Last week, Showtime had to issue refunds to some viewers of its pay-per-view fight between YouTuber Logan Paul and boxing legend Floyd Mayweather after they encountered technical issues with its stream.

  • Last month, Triller Fight Club, the boxing division of the short-form video app Triller, filed a lawsuit seeking millions in damages and claiming internet users illegally streamed and broadcasted its fight between YouTuber Jake Paul and Ben Askren.

  • Whether the category will end up being profitable for these companies is a big unknown.

While influencers aren’t professional boxers, they are masters at marketing – an asset for exhibitors looking to sell PPV fights.

LiveXLive said it’s already considering other ways to pit social-media stars against each other in live PPV competitions.

Read more on why influencer boxing can be lucrative for creators, here.

Preston - TikTok

How much money a TikTok star with 1.6 million followers makes, from brand deals to the ‘Creator Fund’

Preston Seo is a TikTok creator who films videos about personal finance and entrepreneurship.

Seo started posting videos earlier this year, and now he has about 1.6 million followers.

I spoke with Seo about how much he makes from affiliate links, sponsorships, and TikTok’s Creator Fund.

He earned more from affiliate links in 2021 than the other revenue streams he shared with Insider, which were verified with documentation Seo provided:

  • May: $13,644

  • April: $4,578

“What it comes down to, is your audience and numbers,” he said. “Understanding your metrics is super important when negotiating. Know your worth and stick to that.”

Check out how much he earned from the Creator Fund and brand sponsorships, here.

Kelly Stamps is a minimalist lifestyle YouTuber
Stamps has earned thousands of dollars from YouTube’s AdSense program since 2019.

How much a ‘minimalism-lifestyle’ YouTuber with 600,000 subscribers earns each month

Kelly Stamps is a YouTuber who films videos about minimalist-lifestyle and personal-development.

Stamps has 600,000 subscribers and last year she’d saved just enough money from YouTube to leave her family home and quit college.

Molly Innes spoke with Stamps about how much she makes per month from ads on YouTube.

Stamps broke down her monthly YouTube ad earnings for 2021 so far:

  • January: $11,134

  • February: $13,959

  • March: $15,562

“It’s still a challenge finding my niche,” Stamps said about her channel, which ranges in content from showing her minimalist belongings to personal-finance tips.

Read more about Stamps and how she approaches YouTube, here.


More influencer industry news:


TikTok star Addison Rae at the 2020 Billboard Music Awards
TikTok star Addison Rae.

JOIN OUR LIVE EVENT ON JULY 8: How TikTok has transformed the music industry

My colleague Dan Whateley is hosting a webinar featuring execs from TikTok, Universal Music Group, and UnitedMasters for a conversation about TikTok’s role in the music industry, and how social media is slated to make an even bigger impact on popular culture in 2021.

The 30-minute chat is scheduled for July 8 at 1 pm ET/10 am PST. If you’d like to submit a question to be answered, please fill out this brief form.

Sign up for the event here.


creatorscape 2021

CreatorScape 2021

Influence.co published its 2021 CreatorScape, a comprehensive breakdown of the creator economy including categories like link in bio, crypto, fintech, newsletters, and audience building.

Check out the full map here.


Creator economy hires, signings, and launches:

TikTok creators Josh Richards and Griffin Johnson first rose to fame by posting fratty videos while living in Sway LA, a TikTok content house. But the pair, along with some of their TikTok friends, have spent the past year building up businesses outside of social media.

Recently, they launched a venture fund called Animal Capital. And this week, the duo announced they’re partnering with Hawke Media’s Erik Huberman to start a boutique marketing agency focused on Gen-Z consumers dubbed “HawkeZ.”

On Monday, Richards tweeted that the agency’s first client was Crocs.

Every week, Insider gives a rundown of news on hires, promotions, and other creator economy announcements. This week includes promotions at A3 Artists Agency, new gaming creator signings at WME, and former NBA star Magic Johnson joining Cameo’s board.

Read the full rundown of creator industry moves, here.


Kim and Kourtney Kardashian
Kim and Kourtney Kardashian.

Here’s what else we’re reading:

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