Chinese TikTok star Xiao Qiumei dies after falling 160 feet from a crane while recording a livestream video

AsiaWire
Xiao Qiumei, an influencer from China, died after a fall.

  • Xiao Qiumei, an influencer who was popular on the Chinese version of TikTok, died after a fall.
  • The Sun reported that the 23-year-old was filming herself in a crane cabin when she fell.
  • Xiao was known for regularly sharing videos of her job as a crane operator on social media.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Xiao Qiumei, an influencer from China, reportedly died after falling from a 160-foot tower crane while recording herself for a social media video in the city of Quzhou, China.

The Sun reported that the 23-year-old was speaking into a camera in what appears to be a crane cabin when she fell.

Footage obtained by the outlet shows the camera suddenly switched to blurry images of equipment flying past the lens.

The Sun reported that witnesses saw Xiao fall to the ground with her phone still in her hand on Tuesday 20 at around 5:40 p.m. when most of her co-workers went home.

Xiao was the mother of two children and a tower crane operator. According to the Sun, the family confirmed her death, stating that she fell as a result of a misstep.

She was well known on social media sites, including the Chinese version of TikTok, known as Douyin, for regularly sharing videos of her daily life and profession with a large amount of followers, according to the Sun and other outlets.

Earlier this month, an influencer from Hong Kong reportedly died after falling from a waterfall while taking a picture. While taking photos near the waterfall on the Tsing Dai stream, Sophia Cheung slipped and plunged into a 16-foot-deep pool, The Daily Mail reported.

A Mexican fitness influencer also recently died after undergoing a botched medical procedure to treat excessive underarm sweating, according to reports. She suffered from a cardiac arrest while being anaesthetized, the New York Post reported.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How Apple’s targeting clampdown could reshape advertising

Hi and welcome to the Insider Advertising newsletter, where we break down the big news in advertising and media news, including:

Apple’s ad targeting changes;

Instagram’s new creator tools;

Edelman’s new US CEO Lisa Ross.

If you got this newsletter forwarded, sign up for your own here.


Apple CEO Tim Cook
Apple CEO Tim Cook.


Apple targeting controls arrive

Apple released its long-awaited software change that, among other things, requires developers to get users’ permission to track them across other sites and apps – but it’s already been having ripple effects:

  • Advertisers are fretting about how Apple’s policy will limit campaign measurement and attribution, especially on Facebook.
  • The change could wipe out as much as 7% – or $5 billion – of Facebook’s total revenue in the second quarter of 2021, estimated mobile consultant Eric Seufert.
  • There’s opportunity for others as marketers lean more on first-party data like email addresses and look for help solving issues like measurement and identity. We identified 12 companies best positioned to ride out Apple’s privacy changes.
  • The software change has made some companies attractive M&A targets by others seeking to build out mobile advertising and measurement capabilities.
  • Meanwhile, As Apple tightens the screws on ad tracking, it’s preparing a new ad format of its own. Its Suggested Apps ad format opens up a potentially lucrative new revenue stream as other tech platforms like Facebook and Snap, have said Apple’s changes could hurt their businesses.
  • Apple has made privacy central to its brand. Nevertheless, a 2015 iAd pitchdeck obtained by Insider shows how it was happy to promote personalized advertising on the back of iTunes data, including segments such as their age, gender, and past interactions with ads.

GettyImages 1228027515
Instagram

Instagram’s new creator tools

New monetization features are pivotal for Instagram and Facebook as they compete for creators with platforms like YouTube and TikTok.

Sydney Bradley got the details on new ways the companies are trying to help creators make money, including:

  • Putting more resources toward creator shops and commerce using Instagram’s shopping features.
  • Introducing native-to-Instagram affiliate-marketing tools that will let creators “get a cut” from the sales they are driving on Instagram.

Read the rest here: Mark Zuckerberg outlined new tools Instagram is building to help creators make money


Lisa Ross

Meet Edelman’s Lisa Ross

Sean Czarnecki caught up with the new US chief of Edelman, the world’s biggest PR firm. Ross, the first Black woman to lead a major PR agency, is charged with overseeing the firm’s biggest regional business and bolstering its diversity efforts. From his interview:

Hiring is not the problem. Retention is where we struggle in terms of creating a culture where people feel like they belong and can contribute and don’t have to code-switch.

I also think sponsorship is important. We have recently been more intentional about conducting talent reviews to help identify career paths, promote from within, and provide additional opportunities for exposure and learning.

While we focus on all employees, it is important to ensure specific focus on areas where we need to increase representation.

Read the rest here: Lisa Ross just became Edelman’s US CEO. She talks about facing discrimination in her rise to the top, dealing with burnout, and how she plans to not just hire but retain people of color.


Other stories we’re reading:

That’s it for today. Thanks for reading, and see you next week!

– Lucia

Read the original article on Business Insider

Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. His latest challenge: convincing the world to suffer on purpose.

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins’ thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of “Can’t Hurt Me,” Goggins’ memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to “Stay hard!” And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand – inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: “David Goggins is in my head daily.”

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers – his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits – is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren’t a runner, you exercised. If you weren’t a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he’s found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

“It’s just really empowering,” said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins’ list of accomplishments. Petersen – a runner and triathlete – was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. “People are starting to embrace that it’s OK if you suffer, and that you’re tougher than you think.”

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins’ calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he’s offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins’ fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest – through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored – could carve out a lucrative “business of toughness” over the coming years.

“I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don’t even know about,” Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. “It’s my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, ‘Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.’ And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story.” (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins’ cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

“She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze,” Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, “Can’t Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds.” “And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they’d give me pain killers and I didn’t want to mask this pain. I’d just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life.”

brent gleeson & david goggins
Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

david goggins
Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson
Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he’d once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He’s completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins’ core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into “going the distance,” not winning the race. He speaks often of the “40% rule,” which says that when people typically give up, they’re really only 40% depleted.

“The reason it’s so powerful,” Goggins wrote in “Can’t Hurt Me,” “is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success.”

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins’ first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

“I damn sure wasn’t going to get into college based on academics,” Goggins wrote in “Can’t Hurt Me.” “All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana.” He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And “when that glory faded,” about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

“He’s always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage,” said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including “Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life.” “It’s that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people.”

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

David Goggins by Brandon Rogers:US Navy
Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Not just transformation – multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

“I try to be as real as I can,” Goggins said, “because we’re all fucking suffering in this world. We’re all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That’s why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person.”

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word “influencer,” staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success – and sometimes his stress.

“My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that’s not real,” he told Rogan. “I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can’t mass-produce something, man.”

Instead, he’s started giving talks. He’s spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as “Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great” and “Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable.”

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, “Can’t Hurt Me.” He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down “at the last minute” and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins’ press representative did not respond to Insider’s request to confirm these figures.)

“It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life,” Goggins said in the event, “because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand.”

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline’s Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times’ bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

“That’s spectacular for any book,” said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn’t what gets him up in the morning. “I’m not driven by the business,” he told Rogan. “I’m a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I’m fucking straight.”

To be sure, Goggins isn’t the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including “Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win.” Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: “WARPATH.”

Many of Goggins’ followers also find strength in Jocko, as he’s better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. “I’ve never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint,” Gleeson said. “Never seen it before.”

david goggins moab 240
Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

david goggins moab 240
Goggins’ finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

Goggins isn’t for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins’ appeal has been the mythic quality that’s followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published “Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet.” Itzler never used the SEAL’s name in the book, but word soon got out that the “toughest man” was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins’ Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who’s ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, “Wow, this guy is absolutely wild” – in a good way, she said. “I’ve never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable.” She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. “Our society promotes pure extreme,” said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. “We’re fanatic about crazy shit. We’re big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits.”

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. “People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you’re lazy, you’re lazy. You’re not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that.”

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he’s motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying “Can’t Hurt Me” and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn’t seem so bad.

“There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small,” he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. “I’m, like, ‘Honestly? I read David Goggins’ book.'”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. He wants you to love suffering as much as he does.

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins’ thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of “Can’t Hurt Me,” Goggins’ memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to “Stay hard!” And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand – inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: “David Goggins is in my head daily.”

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers – his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits – is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren’t a runner, you exercised. If you weren’t a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he’s found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

“It’s just really empowering,” said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins’ list of accomplishments. Petersen – a runner and triathlete – was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. “People are starting to embrace that it’s OK if you suffer, and that you’re tougher than you think.”

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins’ calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he’s offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins’ fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest – through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored – could carve out a lucrative “business of toughness” over the coming years.

“I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don’t even know about,” Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. “It’s my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, ‘Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.’ And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story.” (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins’ cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

“She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze,” Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, “Can’t Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds.” “And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they’d give me pain killers and I didn’t want to mask this pain. I’d just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life.”

brent gleeson & david goggins
Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

david goggins
Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson
Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he’d once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He’s completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins’ core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into “going the distance,” not winning the race. He speaks often of the “40% rule,” which says that when people typically give up, they’re really only 40% depleted.

“The reason it’s so powerful,” Goggins wrote in “Can’t Hurt Me,” “is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success.”

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins’ first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

“I damn sure wasn’t going to get into college based on academics,” Goggins wrote in “Can’t Hurt Me.” “All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana.” He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And “when that glory faded,” about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

“He’s always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage,” said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including “Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life.” “It’s that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people.”

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

David Goggins by Brandon Rogers:US Navy
Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Not just transformation – multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

“I try to be as real as I can,” Goggins said, “because we’re all fucking suffering in this world. We’re all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That’s why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person.”

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word “influencer,” staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success – and sometimes his stress.

“My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that’s not real,” he told Rogan. “I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can’t mass-produce something, man.”

Instead, he’s started giving talks. He’s spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as “Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great” and “Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable.”

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, “Can’t Hurt Me.” He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down “at the last minute” and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins’ press representative did not respond to Insider’s request to confirm these figures.)

“It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life,” Goggins said in the event, “because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand.”

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline’s Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times’ bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

“That’s spectacular for any book,” said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn’t what gets him up in the morning. “I’m not driven by the business,” he told Rogan. “I’m a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I’m fucking straight.”

To be sure, Goggins isn’t the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including “Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win.” Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: “WARPATH.”

Many of Goggins’ followers also find strength in Jocko, as he’s better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. “I’ve never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint,” Gleeson said. “Never seen it before.”

david goggins moab 240
Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

david goggins moab 240
Goggins’ finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

Goggins isn’t for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins’ appeal has been the mythic quality that’s followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published “Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet.” Itzler never used the SEAL’s name in the book, but word soon got out that the “toughest man” was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins’ Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who’s ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, “Wow, this guy is absolutely wild” – in a good way, she said. “I’ve never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable.” She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. “Our society promotes pure extreme,” said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. “We’re fanatic about crazy shit. We’re big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits.”

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. “People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you’re lazy, you’re lazy. You’re not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that.”

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he’s motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying “Can’t Hurt Me” and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn’t seem so bad.

“There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small,” he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. “I’m, like, ‘Honestly? I read David Goggins’ book.'”

Read the original article on Business Insider

T-Mobile’s TVision closure points to virtual pay TV’s challenges

Hi and welcome to this weekly edition of Insider Advertising, where we track the big stories in media and advertising.

Remember you can sign up to get this newsletter daily here.

First: We extended our deadline to nominate top ad execs leading the charge on data and privacy. Submit here by April 5.

What we’re following this week:

T-Mobile shuts TVision

Digital media layoffs

Workplace issues at Zimmerman Advertising


T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert
T-Mobile CEO Mike Sievert.

Virtual pay TV struggles

While new streaming services launch left and right, T-Mobile is pulling the plug on TVision, its 5-month-old attempt to retain customers with a $10 per month streaming service, Claire Atkinson reported. Key points:

  • Its demise shows the challenges of the virtual pay TV services model that has struggled to find a profitable business.
  • These services historically haven’t offered much of a deal for would-be cord cutters. TVision was troubled from the start, the programming costing far more than it was charging.
  • In the streaming wars, T-Mobile’s loss is a win for YouTube TV and Philo, which it’s offering its customers instead.

Read more: T-Mobile pulled the plug on its streaming video service, TVision, just 5 months after launch

Also read:


nancy dubuc vice ceo
Vice Media CEO Nancy Dubuc.

Digital media takes another hit

Just as things are starting to look up with more people getting vaccinated and offices planning for reopening comes news of layoffs at a handful of digital media darlings, Steven Perlberg reported.

This may have surprised people who may have thought the blood-letting was over after last spring when advertisers hit the breaks, leaving many ad-dependent media companies to cut costs.

But the challenges these companies faced aren’t new:

  • Vice Media and HuffPost, along with other VC-backed media companies, have struggled to reach their backers’ expectations. HuffPost was just acquired, a move that’s usually followed by layoffs as merged companies look to cut duplicative costs.
  • Mel Magazine, an arm of Dollar Shave Club, was known for its distinctive men’s lifestyle coverage. But as a brand-backed publication that didn’t have any ad revenue coming in, its financial purpose was unclear.
  • And Medium, which also announced cuts, has changed its approach to content countless times over the years, shifting from an ad- to subscription-driven model. This time it was to scale back its own publications that it started just a few years earlier.

Subscriptions and advertising support many news outlets very well, of course. These companies didn’t have enough of either, or their execution was flawed.

Some digital media companies could get a lifeline by going public through SPACs. But the underlying business challenges they face aren’t likely to go away.

Read more: Vice Media just laid off a handful of digital staffers

Also read:


Jordan Zimmerman
Jordan Zimmerman, founder and chairman of Zimmerman Advertising in Fort Lauderdale, Florida.

Zimmerman Advertising complaints

Zimmerman Advertising and its founder Jordan Zimmerman bear all the trappings of success, with billions in revenue and clients like McDonald’s and Nissan.

But some employees said they experienced micromanaging, misogyny, and racism at the Omnicom-owned agency, Lindsay Rittenhouse reports.

From her story:

In April, Zimmerman Advertising – an Omnicom-owned ad agency in Fort Lauderdale, Florida, known for its work with clients like McDonald’s – laid off a batch of employees in the pandemic. That day, the founder and chairman Jordan Zimmerman addressed the remaining staff on a call.

Three people on the call said Zimmerman told employees that, while they were spared, they would need to work “two and a half times harder” or he would replace them with the laid-off employees who had “begged” for their jobs.

Fast-forward to this March, when some employees accused the agency of pressuring them to go back to the office, regardless of whether they had been vaccinated or had high-risk family members. In some cases, employees said management threatened layoffs if they didn’t return.

Read the full story: Employees say they experienced racism and sexism at Zimmerman Advertising, an Omnicom agency known for clients like McDonald’s and Nissan


Other stories we’re reading:

Thanks for reading, and see you next week. And remember you can sign up for this newsletter here.

– Lucia

Read the original article on Business Insider

Clubhouse is inviting influencers to apply for a ‘accelerator program’

clubhouse app 2
In this photo illustration the Clubhouse logo seen displayed on a smartphone screen.

Buzzy audio chat app Clubhouse announced on Sunday that it is opening applications for an influencer accelerator program.

Gizmodo reported on the new program first. Clubhouse later confirmed it on Twitter alongside other developments from the weekend’s “Town Hall” – weekly public forums where the company announces weekly updates – like invite-by-phone-number functionality.

“Clubhouse Creator First,” will give 20 creators “resources they need to bring their ideas and creativity to life.” Influencers can apply through March 31 of this year.

The application asks prospective Clubhouse influencers which platforms they’re currently active on, from Substack to TikTok. The form also asks them to identify which services Clubhouse would be helpful to provide, from advice on monetization to help with booking guests.

You don’t have to be an influencer to join Clubhouse, which is currently in “private beta mode.” But you do either have to know someone already on the app or get on the waitlist. Here’s Insider’s complete guide to how to sign up.

Other social media apps have partnered with influencers in the past. As TechCrunch reported in 2018, Snapchat launched a program called “Snapchat Storytellers” to pair up brands with the app’s most popular creators.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Marketers are reportedly underpaying Black influencers compared to white people with less followers

fitness influencer
A big following doesn’t mean an influencer is qualified to be sharing advice.

  • Bloomberg’s Businessweek found that Black influencers are underpaid compared to white peers.
  • Sometimes they’re even paid less compared to white creators that mimic their content, the report found.
  • Black influencers told Bloomberg they would get paid in products as opposed to cash.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

White people who are popular on social media tend to make more money than Black stars, according to Bloomberg’s BusinessWeek.

The same is true for when Black influencers have more followers or are doing creative work that’s later appropriated by white people, the report found, citing interviews with dozens of influencers. Sometimes they’re not paid but instead given products from brands.

In one example Bloomberg reported, 22-year-old Sydnee McRae, who is Black, has more than 1 million followers on TikTok, most of whom took interest in her account after she made a “viral” dance video that choreographed a dance to “Captain Hook” by Megan Thee Stallion.

It led to a $700 deal with the Universal Music Group to promote rapper Lil Tecca’s “Out of Love.” A white influencer, Addison Rae Easterling, was paid thousands by Lil Tecca just to emulate it. Easterling has more followers than McRae, totaling more than 78 million, but white influencers with smaller followings typically make $5,000 for dances. McRae is still getting $500.

Read more: How much money nano influencers make, according to 5 creators

There are several similar examples highlighted by Black influencers in the report, including McRae, Stacy Thiru (1.4 million TikTok followers), Kenny Knox (843,000 Instagram followers), Jordan Craig (52,000 Instagram followers), Layla Qasim (2.4 million TikTok followers), Dare Ajibare (1 million TikTok followers), and Challan Trishann (915,200 TikTok followers).

The disparity goes against the meritocratic promises of the social media platforms, where supposedly anyone can get famous, and disadvantages Black creators in a market worth $10 billion each year, the report said.

Their accounts are also heavily monitored, with Knox losing a Target gig for using the N-word in a recent video. Other white influencers like Felix Kjellberg appeared to get away with worse, including anti-Semitic jokes, filming dead bodies, and throwing un-masked parties during the coronavirus pandemic.

Read more: The top 17 influencer marketers at brands who plan creative campaigns and partner effectively with creators on Instagram, TikTok, and YouTube

Since the racial reckoning of 2020, marketers seemed more willing to work with Black influencers and engage in conversations about inequity, the report found. Previously Black creators were told not to post about Black Lives Matter or law enforcement.

In June, Instagram’s product chief said the company was taking a harder look at whether its algorithms held a bias against Black people. About two years prior, an Instagram employee who worked with the influencer partnerships team, resigned over concerns about the disenfranchisement of Black people on the platform.

But creators are skeptical about whether the brands are actually changing their ways, Bloomberg reported.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Meet Afghanistan’s fearless Gen Z influencers, who are blowing up on TikTok and have more Instagram followers than the president

Ayeda Shadab twirl
Ayeda Shadab does a photo shoot at a scenic overlook in Herat, Afghanistan.

  • A group of women in Afghanistan are breaking through as Gen Z influencers on TikTok, Instagram, and YouTube. 
  • As tastemakers, they’re offering a fresh point of view on what it means to be Afghan women. 
  • More Afghans get getting online, and dozens of women have 50,000 or more followers on at least one social platform.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

A generation of Afghan women in their 20s have mastered the art of living their lives on social media. 

Digital natives as much as any young person in Istanbul or Los Angeles, they are doing more than shaping what’s cool in Afghanistan. Over Instagram, TikTok, YouTube and Facebook, these influencers are proving they are more than the “post 9/11” generation, as they’ve been labeled for 20 years. Afghanistan is what they make of it. 

Mixing traditional and streetwear styles, they blast Travis Scott, Rihanna, Nina Simone, and Afghan musicians like Ahmad Zahir. They post selfies in front of Kabul’s graffiti walls and carefully timed videos of the Turkish chef putting on an elaborate show in the city’s new high-end steakhouse. They make Tik-Toks of Megan Thee Stallion’ Savage challenge and redub Bollywood clips to poke fun at their own country. 

Put simply, they’re young, gifted and Afghan. 

By broadcasting to the public, these influencers are taking real risks — but also reaping big rewards. In Afghanistan, they’ve earned reputations as tastemakers who are sought out by savvy business owners for their marketing power. They work out for free at Kabul’s flashy new high-tech gym. 

But in a country still at war, safety is a serious concern. Recently, there has been a pattern of targeted killings aimed at the nation’s journalists, rights workers, politicians and other influential figures. No influencer has been targeted so far, but it’s a threat that’s never far from their minds. 

Ayeda Shadab is one of Afghanistan’s social media stars. 

The 26-year-old posts several times a day, and she has more followers on Instagram than the country’s president, Ashraf Ghani. She models the dresses for sale in her luxury Kabul boutique and shares glossy selfies from her trips around the country. Her devoted followers flood the comments with style questions, words of encouragement, and the occasional unfriendly directive to cover her hair. 

“Our intention is to show people the possibilities, that they can live life as they want,” she told Insider. “There is always fear in your heart, that’s just part of living in Afghanistan. But we have to stand up and live our lives.” 

On a recent trip to Herat, the historic city in western Afghanistan best known for its sprawling Citadel, Shadab documented her every move, excited to find fresh content for her 220,000-plus Instagram followers. 

The trouble was that everything she wanted to do seemed needlessly dangerous in a city known for kidnappings and where, just recently, police officers were killed by IEDs planted near the hotel where she was staying.

But Shadab was undeterred.  

 

One evening during the trip, Shadab and her crew drove to the Roof of Herat, a scenic overlook with panoramic views of the city that’s a popular sunset hangout spot. As they pulled in, her friends (and this journalist, at work on this story) began to wonder if it was a good idea to stage a shoot in such a public place. 

Just behind the lookout was a mosque belonging to a controversial mullah who had taken out billboards across Herat reprimanding women for inappropriate attire. Nearby was a guest house owned by a local jihadi warlord who only a decade ago had criticized the city’s rock bands for carrying guitars, not guns.

For the occasion, Shadab wore an embroidered top with billowing sleeves and a skirt that fanned out into kaleidoscopic waves of color. Before stepping out of the Lexus and onto the dirt and gravel road, she slipped into a pair of Manolo Blahniks she had bought during a recent trip to Dubai. 

Not too far away, groups of men idled in their cars and rickshaws smoking hashish. Two beggar boys were asking Shadab for coins, not remotely comprehending that they might be getting in the way of her Likes.

While Shadab twirled and grinned for the camera, a group of young men hopped out of a Land Cruiser with black government plates. They started doing their own braggadocious photoshoot, with one brandishing an AK-47 for the camera. 

Ayeda Shadab looks out
Ayeda Shadab

Sensing the tension passing between Shadab’s crew, one of the men called out, “Don’t worry, we’ll be right here. We won’t get in your shots!” But they kept staring. 

Shadab continued posing, oblivious to everything except the camera. 

And then something happened that confirmed Shadab’s confidence and left her friends in fits of laughter.

With sudden recognition, the young man with the AK-47 called out, “That’s Ayeda, she’s on Instagram!” 

For the rest of the trip “That’s Ayeda!” became a running gag among the group. Including, a few days later, at Herat International Airport, when workers stopped her for a selfie. 

“We follow you!” an airport policeman said as Shadab and her friends headed towards the departures gate. 

As for the adventure that night at the lookout, it earned Shadab more than 12,000 likes. 

The number of Afghans online lags far behind other countries, but they’re catching up. 

Just 14% of the population uses the internet as a source of news and information, according to the Asia Foundation’s 2019 “Survey of the Afghan People.” In 2015, only 25% of households could get online using a cellphone with Internet access, but that number was up to nearly half in 2019.

Mariam Wardak, an Afghan-American who is working with Facebook to bring the anti-bullying and anti-extremism “We Think Digital” campaign to Afghanistan, said she has signed up 14 Afghan women, including Shadab, to be digital ambassadors. 

Ayeda Shadab dance citadel
Ayeda Shadab exploring the historic Citadel in Herat, Afghanistan.

She has identified 60 Afghan women with 50,000 or more followers, Wardak told Insider, adding: “They are building cultural tolerance in our society one post at a time.” 

Shadab sees herself principally as a businesswoman. 

In fact, the main reason she joined social media was to ramp up business for her boutique, which has become one of Kabul’s hottest shops since she opened it a year ago. As a student in Malaysia and China, she would post pictures of herself online and Kabul women would reply by asking her to bring the looks back to sell in Afghanistan. 

“It was my followers who said we need a physical shop to come to,” she said.  

On the racks, denim jackets adorned with traditional embroidery from northern Afghanistan hang alongside voluminous dresses with subtly-dropped necklines. There are brightly-colored full-length faux fur coats that have appeared on the accounts of several other influencers. Her purchases from Herat — like the second-hand velvet dresses she found at the antiques market —  will be repurposed into original designs.

“My entire business is reliant on my social media,” she said. “Sometimes I fear what will happen to my business if Instagram ever shuts down.” 

As the number of influencers grows, Shadab’s shop has become a place where they run into one another.

One of them is Sadiqa Madadgar, a former contestant on the popular reality singing competition Afghan Star.

She ended up placing seventh, but she stayed on social media, and now has a combined following of 239,000 on Instagram, TikTok, Facebook and YouTube. (One performance, in particular, has been viewed millions of times. 

Where Shadab is seen as aspirational, Madadgar, who’s 22, is approachable. YouTube videos that show her cutting open a melon or describing a recent leg injury to a friend get tens of thousands of views. In showing her struggles with basic household chores in her modest Kabul apartment, she has become the girl next door.

Most YouTubers have professional studios with special lighting, specific backdrops, HD cameras and Pro-level computers to shoot and their videos on. Madadgar does it all with the most basic of tools. Each of these videos are shot, edited and published directly from her iPhone.

She’s also known for being deeply religious, and has become a model for how to broadcast your life over social media while maintaining a sense of modesty. 

Sadiqa Madadgar in the shop
Sadiqa Madadgar trying on a dress in Ayeda Shadab’s Kabul shop.

“When I first went on Afghan Star, everyone said ‘there’s no way you can remain a good Muslim girl and be a singer,'” Madadgar said. “So I set out to prove them wrong.”

After her first appearance on the show in 2018, Madadgar received a frantic phone call from her mother in Quetta, who was incensed to see her daughter (who had moved to Kabul to study dentistry) singing on live TV. 

“I’m still the same girl,” Madagar remembers telling her mother. “I didn’t do anything bad, say anything disrespectful or wear anything inappropriate.” 

Madadgar has found it much more difficult to monetize her following compared to Shadab. Yes, she enjoys the social perks and freebies, but what she really wants is to fund her music career, which means raising enough to record an album and film some music videos.

One recent morning, needing a dress for a photo shoot, Madadgar came into Shadab’s shop with a couple of friends. The staff recognized her immediately and began to pull gowns from the racks. With an armored car idling outside, she spent 30 minutes trying on different looks. 

 

Finally, Madadgar decided on a burgundy dress with an embellished belt and fully-covered sleeves. With that settled, she rushes out and into the waiting car. 

“Oh, she didn’t buy it. She’s just borrowing it,” Wardak, the “We Think Digital” leader, would later explain. “Sadiqa being photographed in it will help the business.” 

Shadab’s success depends on posting a steady stream of content.

She is constantly looking for potential photo ops and video setups. 

One evening during her trip to Herat, after a day spent rushing between photo shoots at the city’s historic sites, Shadab relaxed in a wood and glass gazebo in the garden of the high-end ARG Hotel. 

She was scrolling through the images they’d taken that day, wishing that they had been able to accomplish more. In this conservative city, there had often been nowhere for her to change modestly into different outfits, and so they lost time in traffic as they went back and forth to the safety of her hotel room.  

The confidence that exudes from Shadab in person is also evident from what she posts online. What she wants most of all, she said, is for her followers, especially other young women, to understand is that she is an educated female entrepreneur who has built her own business on her own terms.

There are of course sexist and hateful comments that she has to reckon with too, including from people telling her she should cover her hair more. But for the most part she dismissed that as part of living your life online.

A post shared by Ro Ya Heydari (@roya_heydari)

 

“It’s so strange, all of these people are so curious about our lives,” she continued. “They want to know what this boy or this girl is doing, but then, instead of supporting you, they use that same content to attack you.”

Still, for Shadab it was all worth it. Trips like this offered new content, yes. But Shadab also saw them as a chance to show off her country. When she and her friends were growing up, most of the images of Afghanistan came from foreign war photographers. The country’s story was often reduced to violence and tragedy. 

But today, with just a mobile phone and an Internet connection, influencers like Shadab can show another side to their country – the banalities, the beauty, the luxury and the laughs – that war and displacement couldn’t steal from them. 

Shadab sips from a glass of saffron tea, scrolling through her comments. Suddenly, she lets out a heavy sigh. 

Her friends, each busy with their own stories and tweets, turn to look at her.

“Listen to this,” she says, and begins to read an Instagram DM.

“Thank you for showing my homeland that I haven’t seen in 11 years,” she reads aloud. Her friends sigh along with her. Shadab continues: “I miss it. You’re very lucky.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Make Money from Your Appearance

Reading Time: 6 mins

Whether you like it or not, our looks take up a lot of our time and energy. Rather than see this as a drain on your finances, why not make money from your appearance instead?

Don’t worry, you don’t have to have model looks to be able to make money from your appearance. Although, modelling of course is one of your options!

  1. Make Money From Your Appearance in TV and Film
  2. Make Money Modelling
  3. Become a Hand or Foot Model
  4. Make Money From Your Appearance as a Life Drawing Model
  5. Become an Influencer or Vlogger to Make Money
  6. Try Personal Training Online
  7. Become a Celebrity Lookalike or Impersonator

Make Money From Your Appearance in TV and Film

Make money as a TV extra

There’s plenty of ways to make money from your appearance in TV and Film – and who doesn’t want to see their name in lights?

Become an Extra

Becoming an extra is remarkably easy. You don’t need any professional training, just a few well-lit photos of yourself, and an idea of your measurements and you’re good to go.

It’s not always glamorous – you’re often working for long hours, with early call times, and wrapping late – but it can be great fun and a good way to make some extra cash.

Usually as an extra you’ll only be needed for a maximum of a couple of days on each production and work is booked on day-by-day requirements.

You can usually expect to make between £80 and £100 for a 10 hour shift, but this can increase if you’re needed to work nights or have any interactions with the main cast.

For more information on becoming an extra click here.

Be a Body Double

Body doubles are models that act in scenes that actors don’t want to do, like nude scenes.

To be cast as a body double you must share the basic physical attributes of the actor, such as height, weight, body type and hair colour.

If you are interested in being a body double, your first step should be to join an agency who can help you find work. For UK-based roles, GBM Casting is a good starting point.

Become a Stunt Double

OK, this one isn’t for everyone and won’t happen overnight. But, if you love an adrenaline rush why not try stunt doubling?

You’ll usually need to apply to the British Stunt Register’s Stunt Grading Scheme. You’ll need qualifications and skills across at least 6 different sporting areas in 4 of the following groups:

  • Fighting – martial arts or boxing
  • Falling – trampolining or high diving
  • Riding and driving – horse riding, driving cars or riding motorcycles
  • Agility and strength – gymnastics or rock climbing
  • Water – swimming or sub-aqua

Make Money Modelling

Make money with your appearance as a model

Modelling is the obvious choice when it comes to making money from your appearance. Don’t be put off by the Victoria Secrets runways, though. You don’t have to be Cara Delevingne to make money from modelling.

For most agencies where good looks are required, requirements are generally height (for women, the shortest height requirement is around 5’6” and for men it is usually 5’10), slim for catalogue modelling, toned and rubenesque for plus size.

Character modelling is excellent whatever your size if you have interesting or unique features from being very short to having a lot of tattoos or piercings.

Agencies will state on their website how to contact them. Usually, you fill out an online form with your measurement details and attach a photograph.

Rates vary wildly depending on your experience and the client you are working for, but you can make around £40 an hour.

Unfortunately, the industry is rife with scams, so stay alert. Fake photographers and scouts are always taking advantage of wannabe models. Never agree to pay to get a job!

Do your research and don’t be sucked into any scam agencies or studios. Think their client list is too good to be true? It probably is.

Become a Hand or Foot Model

All it takes to be a hand or foot model is blemish-free skin and even nail beds.

But you will need to check with specific agencies, such as Hired Hands. Body modelling agencies can also work with bottoms and legs for advertising campaigns, jewellery, accessories or retail products.

Your body parts need to be well maintained. A paper cut on your finger will mean you won’t get the gig!

Body part modelling also uses models as faces for makeup campaigns, so you can even model your eyes or lips alone.

Make Money From Your Appearance as a Life Drawing Model

Make money as a life drawing document

Life modelling is simple. You get your kit off and pose while artists paint you. You can make around £10 an hour doing it.

Before you jump in however, you need to consider if it is really for yo

  • You’ll have to be comfortable with people staring intensely at you whilst you’re naked!
  • Sessions tend to go on for about three hours, with a couple of breaks, so you’ll have to be ok holding the same position for a while.

It’s not uncommon to be asked to model with someone of the opposite sex.

If you’re happy with all of this, then your first port of call should be local art colleges and education centres. Also keep an eye out for adverts in shop windows, newspapers and online.

Many are currently running sessions on Zoom, so you’ll be able to pose from your own home.

There’s also a great website – The Arts Model Register – which acts as a sort of unofficial modelling union and features jobs from all over the country.

Make Money from your appearance as a social media influencer

This will take some commitment and won’t make you thousands straight away, but it can be a great way to make money from your appearance.
If you have a social media following of 1000+ you could class yourself as a micro influencer.

From here, you can start reaching out to brands to collaborate on partnerships. Not all brands will pay you, but you should at least get some free samples.

As your following grows and you become more established brands might start reaching out to you directly and offering a larger payment.

Developing a niche helps you gain a following and means brands are more likely to want to work with you. To make money from your appearance you could focus on makeup or fashion perhaps.

Try Personal Training Online

This is the perfect option for anyone that loves to keep themselves fit. Personal training allows you to share this passion with others, while making some cash. Of course, it will be easier to get clients if you’re physically fit yourself.

Gyms may be closed at the moment, but that doesn’t mean you can’t still become a personal trainer. There’s a lot of demand for online sessions.

You MUST be legally registered with insurance and be fully qualified to protect yourself from claims.

The National Register of Personal Trainers recommends certain companies who offer personal training qualifications.

It is also worth checking out the Register for Exercise Professionals, who offer qualifications and can equip you with all the tools you need to get started.

Become a Celebrity Lookalike or Impersonator

If you’re friends are always telling you that you look like a certain celebrity, then this could be the job for you. If not, a bit of makeup and some props could have you looking the spitting image of a celebrity in no time.

You’ll need to get into character and take some pictures first, to make sure you resemble the celebrity and to promote your services.

If you’re serious about getting started, check out the agency Lookalikes. You can contact them and they may then take you on and help you get bookings as a lookalike.

Pay can range from £350 upwards for a day’s work. This will normally depend on your character and how popular they are, but will also be down to your location.

To make the top rates you will need to be a very close likeness to a celebrity and maybe even have some special skills, like being able to sing, too.

More Ways to Make Money

If you’re not confident with your appearance, there are plenty of other ways to make money! One of the best approaches is to invest your spare capital in various ways – it’s a long game, but the payoff is worth it (compared to low interest rate savings accounts).

The post Make Money from Your Appearance appeared first on MoneyMagpie.

A Twitch streamer made $16,000 filming himself asleep and letting viewers disturb him with loud noises

Asian Andy YouTube
Asian Andy made $16,000 in just one night on his Twitch livestream.

  • Some influencers are making up to $16,000 on Twitch “sleep streams.” 
  • Asian Andy enabled text-to-speech recognition so viewers could play music and issue commands. 
  • Other sleep influencers include Alex Shannon, who travels the world to sleep in luxurious locations.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Making money in your sleep sounds too good to be true, given many of us find it hard enough to earn a living while we’re awake.

But many influencers are jumping on a new trend that’s rising in popularity – the “sleep stream.” 

Among the most well-known sleep streamers is Asian Andy.

The 26-year-old from Los Angeles made $16,000 in just one night on his Twitch livestream – although he didn’t get much sleep in the process.

Like many other influencers, Andy set up text-to-speech recognition for his live stream, meaning every time there was a donation, music played and the message was read aloud.

A lot of viewers used their messages to get Alexa to play loud music, imitate a dog barking, or make his alarm clock go off.

One recurring theme in Andy’s August livestream was viewers telling him someone was at the window, leading to over-the-top reactions.

Andy himself was shocked at his viewers’ generosity.

“Thank you so much,” he said at the end of his Twitch live stream, which he later posted to YouTube. “I used to drive [an] Uber for $16 an hour.”

Twitch largely started as a gaming platform, with some users making as much as $200,000 a year.

It now has a Twitch Affiliate Program for those who are serious about making a career out of gaming – even congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has used Twitch to increase voter participation and fundraise for charities.

Andy, who’s known for his antics including tearing off his shirt in Starbucks and whenever someone says “Ascend,” has over 40,000 subscribers on Twitter and Instagram, and one million on YouTube.

Alex Shannon
Alex Shannon has been traveling the world to sleep in some of the most luxurious locations.

However, he’s not the only influencer making money with his eyes closed.

Ice Poseidon made $5,000 in eight hours for trying to sleep in 2017, according to VICE. Like Andy, he used text-to-speech recognition so his viewers could disrupt his sleep.

There are others whose content is devoted solely to sleep – like Alex Shannon, the “world’s first sleep influencer.”

Since 2018, Shannon has been traveling the world to sleep in some of the most luxurious locations.

Some have also made use of their sleep-related quirks.

Canadian YouTuber Tyler Krause, who goes by pillowtalkTK, recorded himself talking and walking in his sleep while his girlfriend reacted.

With all the content out there, it looks like sleep influencing won’t be going to bed anytime soon.

Read the original article on Business Insider