For some influencers, yesterday’s Facebook outage was a snow day. Others almost lost thousands in brand deals

Tori Mistick
For some influencers, the outage hurt their bottom line. But for others, it was a welcomed snow-day from online life.

  • On Monday, Facebook experienced a mass outage that rendered its apps unusable for over five hours.
  • Social media influencers, who rely on Instagram and Facebook for income, were notably impacted.
  • Some said they enjoyed their time off while others said the outage posed a serious threat to her earnings.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

On Monday, Facebook’s apps, which include Facebook, Instagram, and WhatsApp, experienced an outage for around six hours. In a blogpost late yesterday, Santosh Janardhan, Facebook’s VP of infrastructure, informed users that “configuration changes” on the company’s routers were to blame.

The outage affected Facebook’s 80 million users – prominent among them social media influencers, who rely heavily on apps like Instagram and Facebook to not only connect with their followers, but also for their income. For some influencers, the outage hurt their bottom line. But for others, it was a welcomed snow-day from online life.

Brittany DiCapua, a 28-year-old Instagram food influencer and blogger, said that she realized the site was down around 11:30 a.m. on Monday morning. At first, she thought it was just her account, but after texting other influencers, she realized that it was a widespread issue. “Some of us were joking that it was a ‘day off’ for us,” DiCapua said. “It kind of felt like a break to not live and breathe on social media.”

Brittany DiCapua
DiCapua, a food influencer, says she enjoyed her time away from social media.

DiCapua wasn’t initially bothered by the outage, because Instagram and Facebook have been down for short periods of time in the past. However, she became more concerned when it spanned for more than an hour. “For a minute I thought, ‘What if these platforms actually don’t come back?'” DiCapua said. “It reminded me that social media could be gone in a day, and so many of us make our livelihoods from it.”

For most Instagram influencers, including DiCapua, revenue largely stems from advertisements and brand deals. DiCapua speculates that she could have lost $2,000 to $4,000 if she had planned content for the day. In the past, DiCapua has worked with brands like Amazon, Bud Light, and Lexus. “If it was national fry day, it would have been different,” she said. Other influencers like Tori Mistick weren’t as lucky. Mistick, an influencer in the pet space, had sponsored posts due on Monday. “The outage pushed back other collaborations and partnerships I have planned for the month,” Mistick said. “I can’t get paid unless I publish content for a sponsored campaign, so a shutdown like this has the potential to delay thousands of dollars of income for me.”

On Monday evening, Facebook, Instagram, WhatsApp and Messengers slowly came back online, although many users initially had trouble accessing some of the app’s functionalities. During the downtime, DiCapua spent the day making content on TikTok and planning future posts when Instagram finally returned. “TikTok isn’t owned by Facebook, so I figured that I could still interact with people there,” DiCapua said. “It gave me the opportunity to cover all my social media bases.”

Although she was relieved when Instagram came back online, Mistick said her engagement has been lower today. “Instagram does appear to still be buggy today,” she said. To make matters worse, Mistick says her content output has also been affected. “Now I have to post more content than usual in a tighter frame, which may impact my reach and engagement.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

A creepy virtual influencer looks so human, her skin changes with her surroundings

ayayi virtual influencer
  • Ayayi is a non-human influencer that looks just like a real person.
  • Her skin texture changes depending on the lighting and surroundings, just as a real person’s would.
  • She’s already starting to work with brands like Guerlain.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

For some time now, companies have been creating their own virtual influencers.

It is what it says on the tin – an animation in human form, developed either to promote a company’s own products or to act as an influencer that they can use to negotiate advertising rates with brands.

A post shared by @ayayi.iiiii

However, if there’s one thing most of these new virtual influencers have in common, it’s that most of them couldn’t always pass for real people.Now, though, another virtual influencer named Ayayi has joined the list and her appearance is eerily realistic.

One of the things that stands out the most about the influencer is the texture of her skin, as it changes depending on the lighting and surroundings, just as a real person’s would.

Ayayi’s appearance does sometimes look artificial but is still very realistic, especially considering that it was created by a computer program.

A post shared by @ayayi.iiiii

Big brands will now pay large sums of money to fund their design and animation.

There are a lot of virtual influencers who have already starred in campaigns for prestigious brands like Chanel or Prada.

For now, she has a few photos on Instagram, and about 1,000 followers – although her presence and popularity are growing in China.

This virtual influencer has a long way to go, but she’s already starting to work with brands like Guerlain.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The 22-year-old MAGA influencer running Rudy Giuliani’s communications team has been replaced by a former Hooters spokesperson

Rudy Giuliani, an attorney for President Donald Trump, center, poses for photos with OAN correspondent Chanel Rion, left, and his assistant Christianné Allen, outside the White House, Wednesday, July 1, 2020, in Washington.
Rudy Giuliani, an attorney for President Donald Trump, center, poses for photos with OAN correspondent Chanel Rion, left, and his assistant Christianné Allen, outside the White House, Wednesday, July 1, 2020, in Washington.

  • Christianné Allen has worked for Giuliani since September 2019, and quit in August 2021.
  • Allen’s replacement, Todd Shapiro, has represented Lindsay Lohan, Hooters, and rapper Flava Flav.
  • Giuliani is currently under federal investigation and facing a defamation lawsuit from Dominion Voting Systems.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Christianné Allen resigned from her position as communications director for Rudy Giuliani, whose mounting legal troubles include a defamation lawsuit from Dominion Voting Systems and a federal investigation into whether he violated foreign lobbying laws through his work in Ukraine, the Daily Beast reported.

Allen, who has worked for Giuliani since September 2019, told the Daily Beast that she will be replaced by Todd Shapiro, a former spokesperson for Lindsay Lohan’s family whose website lists an array of clients, including rapper Flavor Flav and Hooters of Long Island and New Jersey.

Recent developments in the federal case against Giuliani were revealed to NBC New York on August 27 when the former New York mayor said the FBI wants his emails and texts going back to 1995. He also said in the interview that he is not an alcoholic and claims he functions “more effectively than 90 percent of the population.”

At the time of her hiring, Politico reported that representatives of the entities Allen listed on her résumé said her titles were “embroidered at best, and completely untrue at the most.” Allen was 20 years old when she began working for Giuliani and was still in the process of completing her communications degree online at Liberty University, according to Politico.

Insider has reached out to Allen and Giuliani for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The lawyers making money behind the scenes of emerging fields like crypto, cannabis, and the influencer economy

back view of a lawyer holding legal documents against a blue background with motifs of bitcoin, marijuana, and the instagram logo
Lawyers are in the background of every emerging industry, drafting contracts and interpreting laws.

  • Entrepreneurs are making billions of dollars in emerging industries like cannabis and crypto.
  • Lawyers are behind the scenes, inking deals, and navigating ever-changing regulatory landscapes.
  • Insider tracked down the most powerful attorneys shaping the highest growth industries.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

19 crypto and blockchain-focused lawyers who are inking deals, fighting lawsuits, and navigating fast-evolving regulations

Digital assets have boomed over the past decade, moving from a niche hobby to a mainstream investment. Big names like MassMutual, MicroStrategy, and Tesla have bought Bitcoin; PayPal and Square’s CashApp have made it easy to buy crypto with the tap of a finger; and major financial players like BNY Mellon and Visa and Mastercard have said they’re planning to offer custody and transaction services for certain digital assets.

Meanwhile, lawyers have been riding the wave, helping clients reimagine finance while avoiding lawsuits, scandals, and enforcement actions.

Read the full story here.

The top law firms putting together blockbuster cannabis deals worth billions

As more states legalize recreational cannabis use, companies are scrambling to capture new markets and scale up. But cannabis is still federally illegal in the US, and that’s where lawyers come in.

Insider pulled the 10 largest cannabis-industry deals worldwide since the start of 2020, including M&A, capital raises, and debt financing, and pinpointed which law firms worked on them.

Read the full story here.

The top lawyers who work with YouTube, TikTok, and Instagram creators

Social media isn’t just an idle pastime: it fuels a $15 billion influencer industry. As digital creators eat up more attention in entertainment, law firms that once focused on representing TV and movie stars are now chasing after YouTubers and TikTokers.

To better understand how influencers are transforming entertainment law, Insider compiled a list of the leading law firms that represent digital creators across YouTube, Instagram, and other social-media platforms.

Read the full story here.

The bankers, brokers, and big money transforming litigation finance from a lawyer’s hustle to a multibillion-dollar asset class

Commercial litigation funding, in which investors advance money to businesses for the costs of lawsuits, is booming. Litigation funders now have $11.3 billion invested or ready to invest in US commercial litigation, according to a recent estimate by Westfleet Advisors.

Insider spoke to dozens of funders, lawyers, and finance professionals to learn the names of lawyers and companies transforming the industry.

Read the full story here.

The top lawyers, advisors, salespeople behind the SPAC boom

SPACs raised more than $80 billion in 2020, more than five-times the previous year’s total. Insider spoke with more than a dozen people in the industry to identify the biggest lawyers and bankers behind the SPAC boom.

Read the full story here.

18 immigration lawyers who help tech startups land top talent from abroad

Immigration lawyers hold the keys to a startup’s No. 1 competitive advantage: its people. They help growing companies hire the best talent from anywhere, steering them through a daunting US immigration system that places higher scrutiny on startups than big corporations. Insider reporters identified the top immigration attorneys helping startups and their founders secure work visas.

Read the full story here.

Read the original article on Business Insider

A Clubhouse influencer with more than 120,000 followers died less than 2 weeks after being hospitalized in LA with COVID-19

Photo of Jin Yu, Clubhouse influencer and tech investor who died of COVID-19
Jin Yu, Clubhouse influencer and tech investor, had been taken to an intensive care unit.

  • Jin Yu died of COVID-19 less than two weeks after being sent to a hospital in LA, his sister said.
  • Yu was a Clubhouse influencer who was cofounder of the 246,000-member “Talk Nerdy to Me” room.
  • His sister posted daily updates of Yu’s condition on a GoFundMe site, which hit more than $135,000.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Jin Yu, a popular Clubhouse influencer, died of COVID-19 less than two weeks after being sent to hospital with the virus, according to his family.

Yu’s sister, Julie Yu-Meier, on Tuesday announced on a GoFundMe page that the tech entrepreneur and investor, known as WOLFxLION on Clubhouse, died in a Los Angeles hospital that day.

“This afternoon Jin passed almost immediately after the ECMO was stopped,” Yu-Meier wrote in a post. “He was surrounded by his entire family and passed as peacefully as possible.”

Yu-Meier posted daily updates of Yu’s condition on the site, which she created on July 31 to raise money for Yu’s medical treatment. Since then, the fund has reached more than $135,000, with the highest donation being $25,000.

Yu, who had more than 120,000 followers on Clubhouse, was taken to hospital on August 1, according to his sister’s post. She said that Yu was put in an intensive care unit and was transferred to a ECMO machine, which pumps blood outside the body to oxygenate it, replacing the role of the heart and lungs.

Nine days later, Yu-Meier said that his lungs took “a turn for the worst” and there were more complications.

On Tuesday, she announced that Yu had died. “I am at a loss of words as my heart is shattered in this moment but we wanted all of you to know,” she said in a post.

Yu was the cofounder of the Talk Nerdy to Me Clubhouse room, which has more than 246,000 members. He was also the chief growth officer of tech company Vetz, according to his LinkedIn profile.

Read the original article on Business Insider

YouTube star Albert Dyrlund dies after falling 656 feet from a mountain while recording a video

Albert Dyrlund
Albert Dyrlund.

  • Albert Dyrlund, an influencer who was popular on YouTube and Instagram, died after a fall.
  • Newsweek reported that the 22-year-old was filming a video in the Italian Alps when he fell.
  • Dyrlund was known for regularly sharing music videos and comedy sketches on social media.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Albert Dyrlund, a YouTuber from Denmark, reportedly died after falling 656 feet while filming a video in the Italian Alps.

Newsweek reported that the 22-year-old was recording a video for his YouTube channel on Mount Seceda in Val Gardena, Italy, when he fell.

A rescue helicopter was reportedly sent to save Dyrlund but could not save him in time, Italian broadcaster, Rai reported.

According to Newsweek, the family confirmed his death to a Danish news outlet, TV2, while requesting privacy for his family. His mother, Vibe Jørger Jensen, told the outlet: “We are in great grief, but I would like his fans to know.”

Denmark’s ministry of foreign affairs also confirmed Dyrlund’s death to Ekstra Bladet, a Danish newspaper.

Dyrlund was well known on social-media sites including YouTube and Instagram for regularly sharing music videos and comedy sketches. He had hundreds of thousands of followers and subscribers on the two platforms.

His most recent content included a music video called “Summer.” Other hits of his included “Emoji,” “Friends forever,” and “Ulla.”

In 2018, Dyrlund starred in an award-winning comedy film called “Team Albert,” about a high school student’s attempt to become a YouTube star in one day.

Following Dyrlund’s death, fans posted tributes on Twitter. “I’m completely out of it. I am ready to cry and empty of words. I can not understand it. I will forever remember all our memories,” said fellow Danish YouTuber Rasmus Brohave.

Another fan tweeted: “We’ve lost a big Danish youtuber Albert Dyrlund, 22 yrs. He died while filming a youtube video on a cliff in Italy.”

She added: “Please be careful when making risky videos. Its not worth it.”

Earlier this month, an influencer from China died after falling from a crane while recording herself for a social-media post. The Sun reported that the 23-year-old was speaking into a camera when she fell. She often shared clips of her job as a crane operator on the Chinese TikTok platform and others, The Sun reported.

An influencer from Hong Kong also recently died after falling from a waterfall while taking a picture. While standing near the waterfall on the Tsing Dai stream, Sophia Cheung slipped and plunged into a 16-foot-deep pool, The Daily Mail reported.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Chinese TikTok star Xiao Qiumei dies after falling 160 feet from a crane while recording a livestream video

AsiaWire
Xiao Qiumei, an influencer from China, died after a fall.

  • Xiao Qiumei, an influencer who was popular on the Chinese version of TikTok, died after a fall.
  • The Sun reported that the 23-year-old was filming herself in a crane cabin when she fell.
  • Xiao was known for regularly sharing videos of her job as a crane operator on social media.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Xiao Qiumei, an influencer from China, reportedly died after falling from a 160-foot tower crane while recording herself for a social media video in the city of Quzhou, China.

The Sun reported that the 23-year-old was speaking into a camera in what appears to be a crane cabin when she fell.

Footage obtained by the outlet shows the camera suddenly switched to blurry images of equipment flying past the lens.

The Sun reported that witnesses saw Xiao fall to the ground with her phone still in her hand on Tuesday 20 at around 5:40 p.m. when most of her co-workers went home.

Xiao was the mother of two children and a tower crane operator. According to the Sun, the family confirmed her death, stating that she fell as a result of a misstep.

She was well known on social media sites, including the Chinese version of TikTok, known as Douyin, for regularly sharing videos of her daily life and profession with a large amount of followers, according to the Sun and other outlets.

Earlier this month, an influencer from Hong Kong reportedly died after falling from a waterfall while taking a picture. While taking photos near the waterfall on the Tsing Dai stream, Sophia Cheung slipped and plunged into a 16-foot-deep pool, The Daily Mail reported.

A Mexican fitness influencer also recently died after undergoing a botched medical procedure to treat excessive underarm sweating, according to reports. She suffered from a cardiac arrest while being anaesthetized, the New York Post reported.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How Apple’s targeting clampdown could reshape advertising

Hi and welcome to the Insider Advertising newsletter, where we break down the big news in advertising and media news, including:

Apple’s ad targeting changes;

Instagram’s new creator tools;

Edelman’s new US CEO Lisa Ross.

If you got this newsletter forwarded, sign up for your own here.


Apple CEO Tim Cook
Apple CEO Tim Cook.


Apple targeting controls arrive

Apple released its long-awaited software change that, among other things, requires developers to get users’ permission to track them across other sites and apps – but it’s already been having ripple effects:

  • Advertisers are fretting about how Apple’s policy will limit campaign measurement and attribution, especially on Facebook.
  • The change could wipe out as much as 7% – or $5 billion – of Facebook’s total revenue in the second quarter of 2021, estimated mobile consultant Eric Seufert.
  • There’s opportunity for others as marketers lean more on first-party data like email addresses and look for help solving issues like measurement and identity. We identified 12 companies best positioned to ride out Apple’s privacy changes.
  • The software change has made some companies attractive M&A targets by others seeking to build out mobile advertising and measurement capabilities.
  • Meanwhile, As Apple tightens the screws on ad tracking, it’s preparing a new ad format of its own. Its Suggested Apps ad format opens up a potentially lucrative new revenue stream as other tech platforms like Facebook and Snap, have said Apple’s changes could hurt their businesses.
  • Apple has made privacy central to its brand. Nevertheless, a 2015 iAd pitchdeck obtained by Insider shows how it was happy to promote personalized advertising on the back of iTunes data, including segments such as their age, gender, and past interactions with ads.

GettyImages 1228027515
Instagram

Instagram’s new creator tools

New monetization features are pivotal for Instagram and Facebook as they compete for creators with platforms like YouTube and TikTok.

Sydney Bradley got the details on new ways the companies are trying to help creators make money, including:

  • Putting more resources toward creator shops and commerce using Instagram’s shopping features.
  • Introducing native-to-Instagram affiliate-marketing tools that will let creators “get a cut” from the sales they are driving on Instagram.

Read the rest here: Mark Zuckerberg outlined new tools Instagram is building to help creators make money


Lisa Ross

Meet Edelman’s Lisa Ross

Sean Czarnecki caught up with the new US chief of Edelman, the world’s biggest PR firm. Ross, the first Black woman to lead a major PR agency, is charged with overseeing the firm’s biggest regional business and bolstering its diversity efforts. From his interview:

Hiring is not the problem. Retention is where we struggle in terms of creating a culture where people feel like they belong and can contribute and don’t have to code-switch.

I also think sponsorship is important. We have recently been more intentional about conducting talent reviews to help identify career paths, promote from within, and provide additional opportunities for exposure and learning.

While we focus on all employees, it is important to ensure specific focus on areas where we need to increase representation.

Read the rest here: Lisa Ross just became Edelman’s US CEO. She talks about facing discrimination in her rise to the top, dealing with burnout, and how she plans to not just hire but retain people of color.


Other stories we’re reading:

That’s it for today. Thanks for reading, and see you next week!

– Lucia

Read the original article on Business Insider

Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. His latest challenge: convincing the world to suffer on purpose.

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins’ thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of “Can’t Hurt Me,” Goggins’ memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to “Stay hard!” And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand – inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: “David Goggins is in my head daily.”

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers – his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits – is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren’t a runner, you exercised. If you weren’t a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he’s found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

“It’s just really empowering,” said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins’ list of accomplishments. Petersen – a runner and triathlete – was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. “People are starting to embrace that it’s OK if you suffer, and that you’re tougher than you think.”

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins’ calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he’s offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins’ fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest – through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored – could carve out a lucrative “business of toughness” over the coming years.

“I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don’t even know about,” Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. “It’s my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, ‘Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.’ And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story.” (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins’ cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

“She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze,” Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, “Can’t Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds.” “And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they’d give me pain killers and I didn’t want to mask this pain. I’d just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life.”

brent gleeson & david goggins
Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

david goggins
Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson
Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he’d once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He’s completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins’ core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into “going the distance,” not winning the race. He speaks often of the “40% rule,” which says that when people typically give up, they’re really only 40% depleted.

“The reason it’s so powerful,” Goggins wrote in “Can’t Hurt Me,” “is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success.”

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins’ first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

“I damn sure wasn’t going to get into college based on academics,” Goggins wrote in “Can’t Hurt Me.” “All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana.” He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And “when that glory faded,” about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

“He’s always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage,” said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including “Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life.” “It’s that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people.”

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

David Goggins by Brandon Rogers:US Navy
Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Not just transformation – multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

“I try to be as real as I can,” Goggins said, “because we’re all fucking suffering in this world. We’re all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That’s why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person.”

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word “influencer,” staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success – and sometimes his stress.

“My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that’s not real,” he told Rogan. “I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can’t mass-produce something, man.”

Instead, he’s started giving talks. He’s spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as “Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great” and “Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable.”

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, “Can’t Hurt Me.” He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down “at the last minute” and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins’ press representative did not respond to Insider’s request to confirm these figures.)

“It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life,” Goggins said in the event, “because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand.”

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline’s Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times’ bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

“That’s spectacular for any book,” said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn’t what gets him up in the morning. “I’m not driven by the business,” he told Rogan. “I’m a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I’m fucking straight.”

To be sure, Goggins isn’t the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including “Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win.” Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: “WARPATH.”

Many of Goggins’ followers also find strength in Jocko, as he’s better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. “I’ve never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint,” Gleeson said. “Never seen it before.”

david goggins moab 240
Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

david goggins moab 240
Goggins’ finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

Goggins isn’t for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins’ appeal has been the mythic quality that’s followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published “Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet.” Itzler never used the SEAL’s name in the book, but word soon got out that the “toughest man” was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins’ Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who’s ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, “Wow, this guy is absolutely wild” – in a good way, she said. “I’ve never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable.” She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. “Our society promotes pure extreme,” said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. “We’re fanatic about crazy shit. We’re big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits.”

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. “People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you’re lazy, you’re lazy. You’re not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that.”

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he’s motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying “Can’t Hurt Me” and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn’t seem so bad.

“There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small,” he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. “I’m, like, ‘Honestly? I read David Goggins’ book.'”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Ex-Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner David Goggins is the toughest man on the planet. He wants you to love suffering as much as he does.

david goggins turning joys of suffering into business model 2x1

Everywhere Devin Featherstone goes, David Goggins follows. It starts in the morning when Featherstone opens his eyes and catches Goggins’ thousand-yard stare from the book jacket of “Can’t Hurt Me,” Goggins’ memoir, on his nightstand.

Throughout the day, Featherstone, 36, a firefighter and an avid runner in Calgary, Alberta, ingests YouTube videos and podcast clips of the former Navy SEAL and ultramarathoner, who reminds him to “Stay hard!” And as night falls, and Featherstone crawls back into bed beside his wife, there Goggins remains on the nightstand – inert, gazing blankly into the darkness.

Featherstone acknowledges the reality plainly: “David Goggins is in my head daily.”

The sway that Goggins, who is 46, has over his followers – his ability to occupy their thoughts and persuade them to push past their limits – is hard to overstate. Last month, he oversaw the Goggins Challenge, a two-day test of physical fitness that ran March 5-7. Across 90 countries, tens of thousands of weekend warriors ran four miles every four hours, for 48 hours straight. If you weren’t a runner, you exercised. If you weren’t a gym rat, you just got sweaty. It was free to enter, and if you wanted a T-shirt, you paid $35.

Devin Featherstone did it in full firefighter gear because why not.

While Goggins ended up donating more than $200,000 in profits from the T-shirt sales to charity, for individual people there is still no good reason to do challenges like these. But Goggins regularly inspires such action. Drawing on stories of his difficult past, mixed with expletive-ridden calls to reject creature comforts, he’s found a way to become equal parts drill sergeant, life coach, and superhero for his community of nearly 4 million highly engaged Instagram followers.

“It’s just really empowering,” said Jenny Petersen, a 48-year-old nurse and runner from Lincoln, Nebraska, speaking of Goggins’ list of accomplishments. Petersen – a runner and triathlete – was among those who completed the Goggins Challenge. “People are starting to embrace that it’s OK if you suffer, and that you’re tougher than you think.”

After more than a year of both mental and physical anguish wrought by COVID-19, Goggins’ calls to embrace discomfort may seem ill-timed. But for the newly converted and die-hards alike, he’s offering people more than motivation: an opportunity to reclaim control of their suffering, and practice it on their own terms.

Goggins’ fan base is growing fast, and there are promising signs his ability to monetize that interest – through a bestselling memoir, corporate speaking engagements, merchandise, and avenues yet-to-be explored – could carve out a lucrative “business of toughness” over the coming years.

“I discovered a whole nother part of your fucking brain that a lot of people don’t even know about,” Goggins told Joe Rogan in a 2018 podcast episode. “It’s my job now to take these weak people, in the category that I was in, and say, ‘Uh-uh. Stop reading the bullshit. Stop listening to the bullshit.’ And if my story of success can impact somebody, it is my job, it is my duty, to share the story.” (Goggins declined to be interviewed for this article.)

Achievements born from adversity

It was November 1, 2005, and a 6-foot-2, 245-pound linebacker of a Navy SEAL was on the starting line of a 24-hour footrace in Southern California. Goggins had signed up for the San Diego 1-Day, an event he entered as a qualifying race for a separate ultramarathon in which he hoped to raise money for charity.

He was no fleet-footed runner. In the lead-up to the race, Goggins’ cardiovascular training included just 20 minutes spent on the elliptical every Sunday. The task ahead of him: Complete 100 laps of the one-mile track before the 24 hours were up.

The race nearly broke Goggins, who describes the hellacious experience in his book and on podcasts as the most painful day of his life. He broke all the small bones in his feet. His kidneys shut down. By the time he got home, having run 101 miles in under 19 hours, he was smeared with blood, urine, and feces, and was unable to walk under his own weight. His wife at the time begged him to go to the hospital.

“She kept talking, shouting, crying, trying to reach me through the haze,” Goggins wrote in his 2018 memoir, “Can’t Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds.” “And I heard most of what she said, but I knew if we went to the hospital they’d give me pain killers and I didn’t want to mask this pain. I’d just accomplished the most amazing feat in my entire life.”

brent gleeson & david goggins
Navy SEAL training in 2001. Brent Gleeson, second from left. David Goggins, second from right.

david goggins
Goggins during Navy SEAL training.

David Goggins & Brent Gleeson
Goggins and Gleeson at the SEAL training graduation in 2001.

As Goggins described it, that race obliterated any sense of physical limits he’d once had.

Two months after the San Diego 1-Day, he ran the Hurt 100, a 100-mile trail race with 24,500 feet of climbing through hills in Hawaii. In 2006, he completed seven more races of 30 miles or more. In 2007, he completed 14 more, including a third-place finish at the Badwater 135, a race longer than five normal marathons that cuts through the sneaker-melting heat of Death Valley. He’s completed two dozen more ultras in the 14 years since.

Goggins has also competed in the Ironman World Championship, finishing the 140.6-mile triathlon in 11 hours and 24 minutes. And in 2013, he broke the Guinness World Record for most pullups completed in 24 hours with 4,030. He broke the record with seven hours to spare.

For people such as Petersen and Featherstone, Goggins’ core appeal is his mental toughness, which Goggins said he channels into “going the distance,” not winning the race. He speaks often of the “40% rule,” which says that when people typically give up, they’re really only 40% depleted.

“The reason it’s so powerful,” Goggins wrote in “Can’t Hurt Me,” “is that if you follow it, you will unlock your mind to new levels of performance and excellence in sports and in life, and your rewards will run far deeper than mere material success.”

The San Diego 1-Day marked Goggins’ first step on the road to becoming an endurance athlete, but overcoming adversity stretches back to his childhood. Growing up Black in the small, predominantly white town of Brazil, Indiana, he faced virulent racism and struggled with a learning disability, speech impediment, and low self-esteem.

“I damn sure wasn’t going to get into college based on academics,” Goggins wrote in “Can’t Hurt Me.” “All I knew was that I had to get the fuck out of Brazil, Indiana.” He saw the military as his best chance and took the requisite entrance exam three times. On his third try, he met the minimum standard for the Air Force.

To date, Goggins is the only person to complete training as a Navy SEAL, Army Ranger, and Air Force Tactical Air Controller. And “when that glory faded,” about 20 years ago, Goggins set his sights on ultramarathon running, said Brent Gleeson, a former Navy SEAL who graduated from SEAL training with Goggins in 2001.

“He’s always striving, as he would say, to recertify himself as a savage,” said Gleeson, who is now an entrepreneur and the author of several books, including “Embrace the Suck: The Navy SEAL Way to an Extraordinary Life.” “It’s that continual journey, and I think that inadvertently started to spark something in other people.”

Even in middle age, Goggins seems to have no plans of slowing down. In October, at 45 years old, he ran 238 miles in 62 hours, 21 minutes, and 29 seconds as part of the Moab 240 in Utah. It was good enough for a second-place finish.

David Goggins by Brandon Rogers:US Navy
Goggins ran the Badwater 135 in 2007, in a string of 14 ultramarathon races that year.

Not just transformation – multiplication

But now the 46-year-old veteran is increasingly turning his attention toward brand-building. In 2016, Goggins, along with his team, founded Goggins LLC as a way to start investing in himself, as he told Rogan on his first of two podcast appearances.

“I try to be as real as I can,” Goggins said, “because we’re all fucking suffering in this world. We’re all hurting. And I try to take away all titles you wanna give me to let you know that I did not come from that shit. That’s why I have to be so authentic and so real about my own insecurities and my own faults, and being a fucked-up person.”

Influencers strive to be as authentic as possible; it can make or break a nascent brand. Fortunately for Goggins, who may never even use the word “influencer,” staying true to himself and his story has been the greatest source of his success – and sometimes his stress.

“My biggest fear in life is, people can read right through a motherfucker that’s not real,” he told Rogan. “I do it all the time. A lot of people have these great quotes, and they mass-produce. I can’t mass-produce something, man.”

Instead, he’s started giving talks. He’s spoken at companies such as Cisco and Microsoft and at pro sports teams such as the Seattle Seahawks and the New York Giants. (Because of COVID-19, he has not given a talk since March 2020, a spokesperson confirmed.) Clips from these talks carry titles such as “Stop Talking Yourself Out of Being Great” and “Get Comfortable With Being Uncomfortable.”

There is ample room for Goggins to grow in these spaces: Together, the self-improvement and motivational-speaking markets are worth about $15 billion. And they are expected to grow between 4% and 6% over the next few years, according to research from Marketdata Enterprises.

In 2018, he and his co-author, Adam Skolnick, self-published his memoir, “Can’t Hurt Me.” He said in a 2019 Facebook Live event that, despite being offered an advance of $300,000, he turned it down “at the last minute” and decided instead to invest $800,000 of his own money in self-publishing. (Goggins’ press representative did not respond to Insider’s request to confirm these figures.)

“It was the best decision, business-wise, I ever made in my entire life,” Goggins said in the event, “because I had the mental toughness and also the ability to know what was right for me and my brand.”

The book ended up selling 900,000 copies across print and digital within the first four months, Deadline’s Patrick Hipes reported. It stayed on The New York Times’ bestseller list for 14 weeks and has sold more than 3 million copies to date. According to Bookscan data, roughly 300,000 of those copies are from the two bound editions.

“That’s spectacular for any book,” said Giles Anderson, the owner and founder of Anderson Literary Agency.

Still, even as a businessman, Goggins is adamant that money isn’t what gets him up in the morning. “I’m not driven by the business,” he told Rogan. “I’m a minimalist motherfucker. Gimme a backpack, a fucking ground to sleep on, a pullup bar, some fucking running shoes, and a Subway sandwich, and I’m fucking straight.”

To be sure, Goggins isn’t the only tough-as-nails influencer. Plenty have come before him, Tony Robbins perhaps looming the largest, literally, over the past two decades. Nor is Goggins the only veteran turned life coach to break onto the scene in recent years.

Jocko Willink is a retired naval officer, a podcaster, and the author of several books, including “Extreme Ownership: How Navy SEALs Lead and Win.” Willink is well known on Instagram, where he has nearly 2 million followers, for posting gritty, black-and-white close-ups of his digital watch displaying ungodly wake-up times. A recent photo showed the time as 4:25:41. The caption: “WARPATH.”

Many of Goggins’ followers also find strength in Jocko, as he’s better known. But where Jocko has posted more than 4,700 times, Goggins has just 335 posts to his name, and each one is a viral sensation in its own right. His videos regularly pull in more than a million views.

To retired SEAL Gleeson, who previously founded and ran a digital-media agency for 11 years, the growth and engagement Goggins has achieved are nothing short of anomalous. “I’ve never seen an explosion of rapid growth from a social-media-brand standpoint,” Gleeson said. “Never seen it before.”

david goggins moab 240
Goggins ran the Moab 240 in October, finishing second.

david goggins moab 240
Goggins’ finishing time at the Moab 240 was 62 hours, 21 minutes.

Goggins isn’t for everyone … yet

Part of Goggins’ appeal has been the mythic quality that’s followed him ever since stories began to surface on YouTube about six years ago. In 2015, the entrepreneur Jesse Itzler published “Living With a SEAL: 31 Days Training With the Toughest Man on the Planet.” Itzler never used the SEAL’s name in the book, but word soon got out that the “toughest man” was in fact David Goggins. More videos emerged; rumors swirled. Have you heard of David Goggins? The man himself began appearing on podcasts, news shows, and social media.

All that organic growth has created a reputation that some find intriguing. For instance, a month after the official Goggins Challenge weekend in March, a handful of New York City-based runners embarked on the challenge to raise money for charity the weekend of April 9. For others, who may be landing on Goggins’ Instagram page for the first time, the catalog of running videos, in which our hero yells at the camera for a minute straight, may seem intimidating. But for every Goggins nonbeliever, there is often a friend close by who’s ready to dispel the myths and spread the gospel.

Joelle Tomlinson, a morning-news host in Calgary, and a friend of Featherstone, regularly runs ultramarathons. When she came across Goggins, in 2020, by way of a running partner, she first thought, “Wow, this guy is absolutely wild” – in a good way, she said. “I’ve never heard of anyone like this. I think he has completely made this recreational suffering more achievable.” She said she was eager to pick up a copy of his book.

But then there are people such as Jacy Cunningham, a 32-year-old professional trainer in Maryland, who admire Goggins for his intensity but find less value in glorifying it as a way of life. “Our society promotes pure extreme,” said Cunningham, who runs his own business on a holistic form of fitness called the Jacy Method. “We’re fanatic about crazy shit. We’re big on pushing ourselves to crazy limits.”

Devin Featherstone said an increasingly comfortable world is to blame. “People are driving more toward that in-your-face attitude of how Goggins tells you straight up: If you’re lazy, you’re lazy. You’re not candy-coating it, and I think more and more people need that.”

Still, even a superfan such as Featherstone said he’s motivated most by his family and his values, and that he taps the fearless warrior in his head only when times get tough. As a dad to a 5-year-old son, he knows the misery of a 4 a.m. wake-up. But after studying “Can’t Hurt Me” and listening to clip after clip, Featherstone said cleaning a mess or settling a dispute doesn’t seem so bad.

“There are things that I would bitch and complain about that were really small,” he said. Now, not so much, and people have even asked where his inner peace comes from. “I’m, like, ‘Honestly? I read David Goggins’ book.'”

Read the original article on Business Insider