The 5 best ice cream makers we tested in 2021

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

  • If you love ice cream so much that you want to make your own from scratch, you’ll need a good ice cream maker.
  • A machine with a canister you pre-freeze is best for occasional ice cream makers, but a self-refrigerating machine with a compressor is better for regular use.
  • Cuisinart’s ICE-30 Pure Indulgence, which requires pre-freezing, is our top pick because it’s easy to use and can produce two quarts in one go.

In the immortal words of the 1927 song, “I scream, you scream, we all scream for ice cream.” Considering that the average American eats more than 23 pounds of ice cream per year, according to the International Dairy Foods Association, it’s a sentiment that just about all of us agree with.

Although it’s easy to get a scoop at your local ice cream shop, pick up a pint at the supermarket, or even order your favorite flavors online, there’s something undeniably special about ice cream you make yourself. That’s why we tested and did the research to find the best ice cream makers you can buy, from hand-crank ice and rock salt options to programmable self-refrigerating machines (you can read more about the different types of ice cream makers here).

Here are the best ice cream makers in 2021

The best ice cream maker overall

Our pick for the best ice cream maker overall, the Cuisinart's Pure Indulgence in stainless steel next to three ice cream sandwiches.

While most frozen-bowl ice cream makers only make a quart or so per batch, the Cuisinart ICE-30 Pure Indulgence produces up to two quarts of sweet, sweet goodness.

Pros: Large batch, easy to use and clean 

Cons: Loud, some complaints about icy or not-quite-frozen results

If you make ice cream for the family — or let’s be honest, if you just want a really, really big bowl of ice cream for yourself — you can’t go wrong with the Cuisinart ICE-30 Pure Indulgence. This baby cranks out up to two quarts of ice cream per batch, so you’ll have enough to share, although you might not want to.

This is a frozen-bowl machine, so you’ll have to remember to freeze the metal bowl for at least 12 hours before using it, but it’s really better to freeze the bowl for a full day. Go ahead and store the bowl in your freezer when not in use if you plan on using the ice cream maker frequently.

Once your bowl is frozen and your ingredients added, the machine takes over for you. Churning is automatic, and ice cream, frozen yogurt, or sorbet is ready in around half an hour. That’s not so long to wait for delicious, creamy goodness.

Some Amazon shoppers have complained about the results being too icy or not-entirely-frozen, and the loudness of the machine (to be fair, that’s a fairly common complaint about nearly all automatic ice cream makers). If you find the ice cream to be a bit liquidy, pop it in the freezer for a bit to firm it up.

The best budget ice cream maker

best cheap ice cream maker

There’s no reason to spend big bucks when the Hamilton Beach 4-Quart Automatic Ice Cream Maker turns out such good ice cream at a bargain price.

Pros: Budget price, large batch

Cons: You’ll need rock salt and a lot of ice

If you want ice cream and lots of it, but you aren’t interested in spending a lot of money or taking up a lot of storage space, and you don’t mind needing to keep rock salt on hand, you’ll love the Hamilton Beach 4-Quart Automatic Ice Cream Maker.

There’s no need to pre-chill the bowl with this machine. It uses rock salt and ice, which you add to the outer container, to freeze the ingredients. Those go in an inner bowl, where a paddle automatically churns the batter until it’s frozen. You can produce delicious and creamy ice cream, frozen yogurt, sherbet, and gelato with this machine in roughly 45 minutes.

The best fast ice cream maker

Our pick for best fast ice cream maker, the Chef'N Bowl with pink ice cream being scraped up by a pink spatula.

If the dish is frozen in advance, you can have ice cream in minutes with the Chef’n Sweet Spot Instant Ice Cream Maker.

Pros: No need for electricity, quick results, easy to use, fun for kids

Cons: Bowl must be frozen before use, small batches of ice cream, expensive for what it is

No electricity, no rock salt, and no lengthy churning. Just pour your ice cream batter onto the pre-frozen surface of the Chef’n Sweet Spot Instant Ice Cream Maker, mix with the included spoon, and in just a few minutes, you’ll be enjoying your frozen dessert.

Basically, this is a quick-freeze shallow metal bowl, so the Chef’n Sweet Spot Instant Ice Cream Maker is super-easy to use. You do have to plan in advance because the bowl must be frozen at least overnight, but once it’s frozen, you should be able to mix up a couple of batches of fresh ice cream before you need to refreeze the bowl.

You can make up to three cups of ice cream in a 30-minute session or use the device for adding mix-ins to softened commercial ice cream.

The best ice cream maker with a compressor

Three people, two men and a young girl, in a kitchen with the Cuisinart Ice Cream Maker.

The Cuisinart ICE-100 Compressor Ice Cream Maker mixes and freezes your ice cream for you, so all you have to do is turn it on, add ingredients, and enjoy your frozen dessert within the hour.

Pros: No need to freeze the bowl, large batches, countdown timer

Cons: Expensive, takes up storage space, some complaints of machine not working

Compressor ice cream makers are the top of the line when it comes to homemade ice cream. These machines house their own freezer mechanism, so there’s no need for you to pre-freeze a bowl, use rock salt, mix the batter by hand, or do any other hard work, other than deciding which delicious ice cream, gelato, or sorbet recipe you want to make.

The Cuisinart ICE-100 Compressor Ice Cream Maker is a state-of-the-art unit. The LED screen shows you exactly how many minutes are left until ice cream time, and it even has a 10-minute “keep cool” function if you won’t be able to get to your dessert right away (like that’s ever going to happen).

You can make up to 1.5 quarts of frozen dessert per session, and if you need more, go ahead and make it. There’s no need to wait for a bowl to chill in the freezer before making your next batch.

The best upgrade ice cream maker

The top of the stainless steel Breville Smart Scoop, showing a hand turning the knob below the LED screen.

If you think you’re going to become an ice cream, fro yo, and sorbet gourmet, go with the top-of-the-line Breville BCI600XL Smart Scoop Ice Cream Maker.

Pros: produces high-quality ice cream, wide range of automatic settings, pre-cooling feature, keeps your ice cream frozen up to three hours 

Cons: Expensive, bulky, parts need to be hand-washed

In my testing, Breville’s Smart Scoop produced the creamiest ice cream with the texture closest to what you’d find in a high-end scoop shop: rich, easy to serve, and free of ice crystals. 

What really sets this compressor machine apart is its vast range of automatic options, which, for a certain type of person — one who approaches new hobbies with equally high levels of enthusiasm and unearned confidence — can inspire hours-long deep-dives into gianduja gelato recipes and midnight orders of ube powder and frozen passionfruit pulp.

To start, it has 12 hardness settings, from super-soft sorbet to dense ice cream, and a unique “cool down” function that brings the Smart Scoop to the perfect temperature before you even add your ice cream base. I found the buttons to be intuitive, and getting started took a matter of seconds. I’d feel confident letting a kid use it. 

The machine beeps and flashes the words “add mix-ins” across its easy-to-read LCD screen when it’s time to do just that, and your chocolate chips or chopped strawberries can be tossed in easily through the flip-back lid. 

Once the Smart Scoop senses that your dessert has reached its perfect consistency, it’ll stop churning and play a little ice cream truck song to let you know it’s ready. And, if you happen to miss the machine’s serenade it will automatically enter “keep cool” mode, meaning your frozen treat will stay at a constant temperature for the next three hours. Aside from these sound effects, which can be turned off, the machine operates at a quiet hum. 

I should note that while it turned out smooth, perfectly-churned ice cream, I had to run my Smart Scoop on the hardest setting more than once to get there. The whole process took about an hour (45 minutes to complete the initial cycle, plus an additional 15) using David Lebovitz’s recipe for chocolate ice cream, although the results were worth the wait. With most other machines, you have to freeze your ice cream before you can enjoy it, but the batches I made in the Smart Scoop were ready to eat immediately. 

Cleanup is relatively easy, although I did find that you need to use a little force to detach the (somewhat sharp-edged) metal bucket from the base. The parts aren’t dishwasher safe, except for the paddle, which should only be placed on the top rack. This is a bulky machine — about 15 by 11 inches and 30 pounds — which is something to keep in mind if you have a small kitchen. 

Time to talk about the price. At $500, the Breville Smart Scoop is certainly a splurge. But let’s do some ice cream math. A pint of Haagen Dazs costs about $5. Assuming a family of four buys one pint per week (a pretty conservative estimate), the machine will just about pay for itself in two years. (I say “just about” because I’m not factoring in the price of the milk, cream, and egg yolks you need to make ice cream from scratch.) And if that family prefers a premium brand like Jeni’s or Ample Hills, the Smart Scoop will pay for itself in half that time. So, if you’re serious about making ice cream and want a high-quality, easy-to-use machine that lends itself to all kinds of frozen dessert experimentation, it’s a solid investment. — Caitlin Petreycik, Home and Kitchen Editor

The best frozen dessert maker

Adult woman and young girl using the Yonanas frozen dessert maker, shown with fresh fruit.

If you’re trying to eat healthier or avoid dairy, you’ll love the way the Yonanas Frozen Dessert Maker turns bananas and other fruit into soft-serve “ice cream” without the fat and added sugar.

Pros: Great for those with lactose intolerance, healthy “ice cream” substitute, very easy to use

Cons: Noisy, fruit sticks inside the chute

Yes, it has a silly name, and yes, technically it’s not ice cream. But why nitpick when the results taste so good? With the Yonanas Frozen Dessert Maker, your overripe bananas, mangoes, berries, or just about any other fruit are quickly converted into creamy, smooth soft-serve desserts.

The process is simple, but your fruit does need to be frozen and slightly thawed before using the machine. You then push the fruit into the chute, turn on the spinning blade, and push down on the plunger. Voilà, you’ve got a bowlful of nature’s goodness.

There are some shopper complaints. The device is noisy, and smushed fruit tends to stick inside the chute, meaning you’ll need to disassemble the device and scoop it out with a spoon. But those seem small annoyances compared to the joy of a delicious, healthy dessert.

What we’re testing next

The Whynter Ice Cream Maker is stainless steel, with a bowl of ice cream and various mix ins next to it.

For our next update, we’re looking forward to trying out the models below. 

Whynter ICM 15LS Automatic Ice Cream Maker($219.43): One of the more affordable compressor machines on the market, Whynter’s ICM 15LS may not have as many bells and whistles as the Breville Smart Scoop, but fans praise its smooth ice cream and fast cycle. 

Whynter ICM 201SB Upright Automatic Ice Cream Maker ($324.55): The Whynter 201SB has a larger capacity than the brand’s 15LS, as well as a more powerful motor and additional programmable features, but we’re curious to see if it produces better ice cream. 

Lello 4080 Lusso Mussino ($735.13): This machine churns ice cream incredibly fast, which means there’s less time for ice crystals to form, but we’re curious to see if it’s a worthy investment for those who plan to make ice cream often. 

Cuisinart ICE-70 ($149.95): A newer version of our current top pick, Cuisinart’s ICE-30, the ICE-70 promises a faster run time and more options for customization. 

What type of ice cream maker should I get?

Before you start shopping, here’s a rundown of the three main types on the market. Consider your budget, how frequently you plan on making ice cream, the amount of real estate in your freezer, and the size of the crowd you’re planning to feed before making a decision. 

Ice and rock salt

The most traditional — and, occasionally, the most physically taxing — ice cream makers, these machines feature an inner metal container surrounded by ice and rock salt in an outer bucket. (The rock salt lowers the temperature so that the ice cream mixture in the container will freeze; ice alone isn’t cold enough.) Some models operate by hand-crank — a feature that either provides old-timey fun or a workout that goes against the very nature of ice cream, depending on how you look at it — but most are powered by electric motors these days. It’s important to note that many motorized models can’t be opened to add mix-ins while churning. 

Pre-frozen

If you plan on making ice cream once or twice a week, a machine with a canister that you freeze is an affordable option. These types of ice cream makers do require a degree of advanced planning, though; the canister, which is filled with liquid coolant, typically needs to be placed in the freezer up to 24 hours in advance.

A pro tip: turn the machine on and get the paddle moving before you pour in the ice cream base. The motion will prevent the mixture from immediately freezing against the sides of the canister. 

Self-refrigerating

Also called compressors, these self-refrigerating machines are the easiest to use. They often require nothing more than pouring in your ice cream mixture, flipping a switch, and waiting 30 to 40 minutes. Unfortunately, that kind of convenience comes with a high price tag, and compressor models are often noisier and bulkier than their pre-frozen and bucket-style counterparts. Still, they’re a solid investment if you’re serious about frozen desserts. 

 

Does homemade ice cream really taste the same as store-bought?

Vanilla ice cream being scooped.

Yes and no. You may find that the stuff you make at home freezes harder than store-bought ice cream. That’s because commercial-grade ice cream makers are powerful enough to run at super-high speeds, meaning they can whip extra air (called overrun) into ice cream in a way that home machines just can’t.

Plus, your typical supermarket pint often comes with a long list of unpronounceable ingredients that make it easier to scoop. That being said, many people prefer the denser, richer texture of homemade ice cream — to retain a little softness, just scoop it straight from the machine or let it rest on the counter for 10 minutes prior to serving. 

Tips for making the best ice cream at home

ice cream

If you want delicious ice cream, you need to start with good ingredients. Go for real vanilla bean, quality mix-ins, and fresh cream. All ingredients should be as fresh as possible. If you’re shopping for groceries online, here are the best places we’ve tested and recommend.

Your ingredients should all be cold before pouring them into the ice cream maker. Once you’ve added your ingredients to the ice cream maker’s bowl, start the churning cycle right away. This helps prevent ice crystals or graininess.

While you can cut back calories by using low-fat milk, you won’t achieve the same creamy results, or the wonderful “mouth feel” that makes ice cream so good.

If you’re adding chocolate chips, nuts, or other solid mix-ins, fold them in near the end of the churning cycle. Chop any mix-ins into small pieces.

Finally, don’t refreeze partially melted ice cream because doing so creates ice crystals.

Read the original article on Business Insider

I taste-tested over 20 vegan ice cream brands to find the best ones – these 6 topped my list

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Wildgood vegan ice cream sitting in bowls with spoons
  • Ice cream is the perfect summer treat, and vegan options are more abundant than ever.
  • Sure, you may have heard of Oatly and So Delicious, but the world of artisan vegan ice cream is vast.
  • Here are 6 vegan ice cream brands you probably haven’t heard of but need to try this summer.
  • My picks include an olive oil ice cream, macadamia nut milk ice cream, and coconut meat ice cream.

I am a full-time food journalist and eat more ice cream than anyone I know. Over the years, I’ve published stories about the best ice cream parlors in the United States, gourmet soft serve, ice cream sandwiches and artisan ice cream makers that began shipping their ice cream nationally during the pandemic. I’ve even been invited to judge gelato festivals and weighed in on new flavors by cult favorite ice cream makers at company headquarters. Last summer, I received 60 pints of ice cream from nearly a dozen different brands delivered on the same day and all the liquid nitrogen fog permeated my entire house.

Recently, I’ve discovered more and more great plant-based ice creams popping up. I’ve tasted through flavors from more than 20 different vegan ice cream brands and have learned that vegan ice cream can be just as delightful and delicious as dairy ice cream. Even if you’re not vegan, trying plant-based ice creams offer unique flavor combinations you won’t find in dairy ice cream.

Sure, I’ve tried the usual vegan ice cream suspects you find in grocery stores, but I’ve been truly delighted by the small-batch artisanal brands, many of which are charting new territory in the world of plant-based ice cream. Below you’ll find six bespoke vegan ice cream brands that I love; many you probably haven’t heard of before.

Here are 6 vegan ice cream brands worth trying this summer:

The first and only macadamia milk ice cream

four pints of Mauna Loa macadamia milk ice cream on a blue background

Mauna Loa Macadamia Milk Non-Dairy Frozen Dessert, $9.99 per pint, available on Instacart and Mauna Loa

Most vegan ice creams are made with coconut, cashew, soy or almond milk bases, but Hawaii’s most famous producer of macadamia nuts, Mauna Loa, has upped the ante, debuting the first and only macadamia milk-based frozen dessert this summer. 

Higher in monounsaturated fat and lower in carbs than other popular nuts, macadamia makes for an ultra creamy base that’s also keto-diet friendly. Flavors like Kona coffee, vanilla orchid and mango liliko’i showcase more of Hawaii’s natural bounty and there’s even the cheeky Rocky Road to Hana, named for the famous winding drive on Maui. This is the most decadent flavor of all — a fudgy chocolate base studded with soft marshmallows and crunchy macadamias instead of almonds. 

While you can purchase pints online, they’re also available at Sprouts in 23 states and Albertsons and Safeway locations in California, Texas, New Mexico, Hawaii and Seattle.

A small batch oat milk ice cream with inventive mix-ins

chocolate vegan ice cream from Whipped Urban Dessert Lab

Whipped Urban Dessert Lab Ice Crème, $16.50 per half pint, available on Goldbelly

Oat milk is the plant-based milk alternative of choice among baristas for its thick, creamy texture in lattes and cappuccinos, so it’s no surprise that it also makes a rich ice cream base. Sisters Courtney Blagrove and Zan B.R. make their own oat milk for their new line of oat milk “ice crème” at Whipped Urban Dessert Lab. This stuff is better than Oatly and chock full of mix-ins like strawberry shortcake crumbles, chocolate cookie chunks, and cinnamon apple crisp.

This is the first ice cream brand that I’ve seen where the pint packaging is labeled upside down too. Apparently, storing ice cream (or ice crème!) upside down in the freezer helps prevent freezer burn because any partially melted bits will collect on the lid, which keeps ice crystals from forming. 

Next time I’m in New York, my first stop will be Whipped Urban Dessert Lab’s Lower East Side storefront to try a swirl of sweet creme and chocolate twist at the world’s first oat milk soft serve shop.

A modern Mediterranean plant-based gelato

Pints of Wildgood vegan ice cream sit partially open with scoops removed

Wildgood Plant-Based Non-Dairy Frozen Dessert, $9 per pint, available on Instacart and Wildgood

Olive oil has been a cornerstone of the Mediterranean diet for millennia, but could it also be the secret to rich, creamy vegan ice cream that’s low in saturated fat? Rather than using nut milk, Wildgood relies on a blend of extra virgin olive oil, pea protein and chicory root fiber, sweetened with fructose, to achieve a soft and creamy consistency straight out of the freezer. All of the olive oil comes from Greek ice cream maker Sotiris Tsichlopoulos’ family’s ancient groves in Corfu.

For an ice cream so low in saturated fat and calories, Wildgood is surprisingly rich and you can really taste the olive oil in each flavor, adding a sophisticated savory undertone. Chocolate hazelnut is a favorite, reminiscent of the best gianduja chocolate spread I’ve ever tried in Piedmont. 

With such a short ingredient list, the quality of each ingredient is paramount. Simple flavors without many mix-ins allow ingredients like Alphonso mango, California pistachios and Oregon hazelnuts to shine. 

Wildgood is available in eight flavors so far, and you can find it on Instacart or order online to ship anywhere in the continental United States.

A boozy vegan ice cream

A pint of smores vegan ice cream from Scoops on Tap sits in front of a fireplace

Scoops On Tap, $22.25 per pint, available on Goldbelly

Scoops on Tap was created by two friends who love craft beer and ice cream and wanted to blend them together for a line of beer- and spirit-infused ice creams. Up until recently, their product was only available at farmers market and specialty retailers in Southern California, but now they’re shipping pints nationally with Goldbelly.

After Hours vanilla bourbon is a year-round favorite that I most enjoy with a shot of espresso poured over top and sprinkled liberally with toasted cacao nibs. The sumptuously smooth texture is a combination of a coconut cream and oat milk and don’t worry — it’s less than 5% ABV. 

Seasonally, many more plant-based boozy ice creams are available, like Cocosaurus Rex, a toasted coconut ice cream with a fair trade dark chocolate fudge swirl infused with a coconut stout, and Madeline, a lemon and grape sorbet steeped on toasted oak chips infused with a grape sour ale. The latter is perfect as a refreshing float with prosecco if you wish to add more booze to the equation.

A plant-based option with superfood boosts

Containers of Sacred Serve vegan ice cream against a light blue background

Sacred Serve Plant-Based Gelato, $10 per carton, available Sacred Serve

Hand harvested certified organic and fair-trade young coconut meat, plus coconut sugar and raw coconut oil forms the holy coconut trinity that is the base of all Sacred Serve gelato flavors. Superfoods like matcha green tea, Afghan saffron, chaga mushrooms and raw cacao are blended in for an ingredient list that’s so nutritious you’re almost suspicious that these could possibly taste good — until you take the first bite. This gelato is subtly sweet with a super creamy texture. 

Sacred Serve’s newest flavor is a reinvention of childhood favorite cookies and cream with tigernut cookies instead of typical Oreos. The cookie crumble is darkened with activated charcoal and made with prebiotic-rich tigernut flour and adaptogenic mucuna. 

The gelato is rock hard when you first pull it from the freezer, so you need to let it sit at room temperature for 10 minutes or so to melt to a creamy consistency. You can find Sacred Serve in more than 150 stores across the country including Whole Foods, Foxtrot, Plum Market and Erewhon.

Really good vegan ice cream sandwiches

Vegan ice cream sandwiches from Green Girl Bakeshop

Green Girl Bakeshop Dairy Free Gluten Free Cookie Sandwiches, $96 for a pack of 12 ice cream sandwiches, available at Green Girl Bakeshop

Lisa Stoy’s plant-based gelatos all have four ingredients or less, starting with a coconut milk base sweetened with maple syrup, plus fresh mint, vanilla beans, cardamom, turmeric or cacao depending on the flavor. The ice cream sandwiches at Green Girl Bakeshop have just the right ratio of cookie to ice cream, keeping the focus squarely on the ice cream with the cookies playing a supporting role.

Depending on the flavor, the ice cream is sandwiched between gluten-free chocolate chip, dark chocolate, or ginger cookies, made with cassava flour and applesauce. It almost sounds too healthy to be a cookie, but they freeze nicely, remaining soft enough to bite into without the ice cream squishing out the sides. The golden turmeric ice cream with ginger cookies and the classic vanilla bean ice cream sandwich with chocolate chip cookies are the best of the bunch.

Our testing methodology

I’m a food journalist with a predilection for ice cream and I’ve been known to regularly finish a pint in one sitting. Recently, I have been eating a predominantly plant-based diet and made it my mission to find the best plant-based ice creams that are just as satisfying as the dairy ice cream I’ve known and loved.

Flavor: Favorite flavors vary widely among ice cream lovers, so I included ice creams that recreated classic flavors impeccably as well as innovating new flavors. Most of all, I should be able to easily discern the flavor in a blind taste test and the ice cream shouldn’t taste muddied or cloyingly sweet. You should be able to eat a full scoop without feeling like you’ve developed a cavity.  

Texture: A great plant-based ice cream should mimic the decadently smooth and satisfying mouthfeel of premium dairy ice cream. I chose ice creams that didn’t taste watery or gummy and didn’t develop too many ice crystals.

Ingredients: The best plant-based ice creams use high-quality ingredients, and I looked for shorter ingredient lists made with real foods rather than ice creams filled with emulsifiers and sweetened with corn syrup or glucose syrup. For example, Oatly’s frozen dessert, which includes dextrose, dried glucose syrup and rapeseed oil, did not make the cut.

Check out our other vegan and vegetarian food guides

Best vegan and vegetarian BBQ foods roundup 4x3

 

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Biden tells Republicans who oppose a Capitol riot commission to ‘eat some chocolate chocolate chip’ ice cream

President Joe Biden poses for a photo with a girl after getting an ice cream at Honey Hut Ice Cream in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 27, 2021.
President Joe Biden poses for a photo with a girl after getting an ice cream at Honey Hut Ice Cream in Cleveland, Ohio, on May 27, 2021.

  • President Joe Biden made a surprise stop on Thursday at Honey Hut ice cream shop in Cleveland, Ohio.
  • With an ice cream cone in hand, he said he “couldn’t imagine” why Republicans are opposed to a bipartisan commission to investigate the Capitol riot.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

President Joe Biden made a surprise stop on Thursday at Honey Hut ice cream shop in Cleveland, Ohio.

Reporters at the scene were eager to know how the president felt about congressional Republicans rejecting the creation of a bipartisan commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol attack.

Biden, famous for his love of ice cream, held up his cone and advised his colleagues across the aisle to “eat some chocolate chocolate chip.”

It was a joke, folks.

After cheers from the small crowd gathered around him, he added, “I can’t imagine anyone voting against establishing a commission on the greatest assault since the Civil War on the Capitol. But at any rate, I came for ice cream.”

Biden took another light-hearted swipe at Republicans during a speech at a Cleveland community college earlier on Thursday. He noted that not a single Republican lawmaker voted for his COVID-19 relief package, the American Rescue Plan, but many of them have since touted the benefits of the legislation to the constituents.

“I’m not going to embarrass any one of them, but I have – here – a list of how back in their districts, they’re bragging about the Rescue Plan,” Biden said, holding up a card listing the names of about a dozen lawmakers.

The crowd broke out in laughter.

He added, “I mean some people have no shame.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

McDonald’s is offering free McFlurries for its new Caramel Brownie flavor on Tuesday. Here’s how to get one.

Mcflurry cup

McDonald’s will give away free McFlurries on Tuesday following its debut of a new flavor.

The fast-food chain will hand out regular size cups of its new Caramel Brownie McFlurry on May 4. The new flavor, which is characterized as “salty and sweet,” was only just released across the fast food chain on Monday. It is made out of vanilla soft serve mixed with brownie pieces and caramel sauce.

Screen Shot 2021 05 03 at 11.53.03 AM
Caramel Brownie McFlurry

McDonald’s said the free ice cream mix is for anyone who has mistaken the McFlurry spoon – a hollow plastic scoop – for a straw. The chain announced it would release the new flavor on National Caramel Day in April.

In order to qualify for the free Caramel Brownie McFlurry, customers must download the McDonald’s app and register for a free account.

From the account, just provide the offer code for the free McFlurry at the register or through an online order. The code can only be used once per customer. No purchase is required to get the free soft-serve mix.

From Monday to Wednesday, McDonald’s customers can also get the Caramel Brownie McFlurry for free via the delivery app Uber Eats with a $15 or more purchase.

Read the original article on Business Insider

How Ben & Jerry’s makes nearly 1 million pints of ice cream a day

  • Ben & Jerry’s is the best-selling single ice cream brand in the world.
  • It’s gained a cult following thanks to classic flavors like Half Baked and Cherry Garcia and a mission to use ice cream to fight for equality.
  • We visited the plant in St. Albans, Vermont, to see how Ben & Jerry’s pumps out nearly 1 million pints a day.
  • It takes hundreds of workers, special machinery, and a 24/7 operation to package up these pints.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Following is a transcription of the video.

Narrator: Scooped up across 38 countries and up to 75 flavors, Ben & Jerry’s is no pint-sized operation. Its two Vermont factories run 24/7, operated by hundreds of flavor makers. Together, they pump out nearly a million pints a day, from classic flavors like Cherry Garcia and Half Baked to flavors on a mission for criminal-justice reform and refugee rights. And all those flavors have to be delicious.

Sarah Fidler: Our minimum run size, once we get a flavor to the factory, is 80,000 pints. So not only do we have to love it, but 80,000 fans have to love it too.

Narrator: We visited the St. Albans plant in northern Vermont to see how these famous pints flip their way to our freezers. Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield started Ben & Jerry’s Homemade Ice Cream in 1978. From a renovated gas station in Burlington, Vermont, they launched a brand based on sustainable ice cream making and advocating for causes they believed in, and it worked. Today, Ben & Jerry’s is the best-selling single brand ice cream label in the US. To pump out its iconic flavors, first it starts with ingredients.

Ben & Jerry’s partners with 250 farms globally to source everything from vanilla bean to milk. Milk comes from the St. Albans Cooperative Creamery, just a mile and a half from the factory. Once the milk’s at the plant, it heads to one of these massive, 6,000-gallon silos.

But before it can be made into ice cream, everyone involved has to suit up, including us. Gowns, hairnets, caps, and boots.

To make the ice cream base, the milk heads to the blend tank. Cream, milk, and lots of sugar are churned together. The factory goes through 6,700 gallons of cream every single day. Every ice cream flavor starts with either a sweet cream base or a chocolate base.

Next, the Mix Master will pour in eggs, stabilizers, and cocoa powder if it’s a chocolate base. Then it’s piped into the pasteurizer. You can’t see it happening, but hot steel plates are heating up the mix to kill any harmful bacteria. The newly pasteurized milk is stored in a tank for four to eight hours, so the ingredients can really get to know each other.

After making the two bases, they’ll head to one of the 20 flavor vats to get a flavor boost.

Fidler: We’re always coming up with new flavors, hundreds of flavors a year, and we usually narrow it down to about three or four. We really love to bring our social mission values into our naming process. For example, Empower Mint to talk about voting rights.

Narrator: Before Ben & Jerry’s famous chunks can be added, the mix has to get to below-freezing temperatures. It’s pumped through this giant freezing barrel, and when it gets to the front, it’s finally ice cream. Along the way, it’s quality tested, meaning lucky factory floor workers get to taste the ice creams.

Then it goes into the first of two freezer visits. When it comes out, it’s 22 degrees and somewhere between the consistency of a milkshake and soft serve.

Now for the best part, the chunks. Founder Ben actually didn’t have a great sense of smell, which meant he couldn’t taste much either. So his big thing was texture. That’s why Ben & Jerry’s has some of the biggest chunks in the ice cream industry. These chunks end up in flavors like Half Baked, Chubby Hubby, or the one we’re making, Chocolate Therapy.

Workers dump in add-ins through the Chunk Feeder, from brownie bites and cookie dough globs to chocolate chunks, fruits, and nuts. They let us give it a try, but it’s not as easy as it looks. Then it’s finally time to pack those pints. Workers stack the empty containers into the automatic filler. The machine drops the pints into position and perfectly pumps in ice cream. It can fill up 270 pints a minute. The pints are pushed towards the lidder and sealed tight.

At this point, six pints every hour are pulled off the line for quality testing. Quality assurance personnel first cut pints open. They’re making sure the ingredients are symmetrical and there aren’t any big air bubbles.

Worker: There is a small gap, but that’s what we call a functional void. If we saw large voids, it would be concerning. It’s actually quite the workout, as you can tell.

Narrator: They also measure the weight and volume of pints to ensure that the right amount of ice cream makes it into each container.

Worker: So, we know the weight of the ice cream, and anything below 460 is not passable.

Narrator: Now back to the factory line. It’s now time for the pints to take a second spin in the freezer. The ice cream has to get even colder, down to minus 10 degrees. The pints travel along the Spiral Hardener, a corkscrew-shaped conveyor belt inside a freezer. With the wind chill, it can get up to minus 60 degrees in there.

After three hours, the pints are finally frozen and ready to be packaged. They’re flipped over and shrink wrapped into groups of eight. Together, they make a gallon. But you’ll never actually see a gallon tub of Ben & Jerry’s ice cream, because the company never wants its ice cream going bad sitting in the back of your fridge. Once the pints are packaged, they’re ready to be shipped across the globe.

Abby Narishkin: Hey, guys, my name’s Abby, and I’m one of the producers on this video. My favorite flavor is definitely Ben & Jerry’s Milk & Cookies, but let me know your favorites in the comments below and if you have any ideas for the next episode of “Big Business.” Don’t forget to hit the subscribe button so you don’t miss out.

EDITOR’S NOTE: This video was originally published in August 2020.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Ben & Jerry’s partnered with Colin Kaepernick to unveil a vegan ice cream that ‘amplifies calls to defund and abolish the police’

Ben & Jerry's Colin Kaepernick Change the Whirled flavor
Ben & Jerry and Colin Kaepernick’s Change the Whirled flavor.

  • Ben & Jerry’s has teamed up with civil rights activist and athlete Colin Kaepernick to unveil a new vegan ice cream flavor that will be available next year.
  • The Change the Whirled flavor “celebrates Kaepernick’s courageous work to confront systematic oppression and to stop police violence against Black and Brown people,” according to the ice cream maker.
  • Ben & Jerry’s has a history of being vocal on racial, political, and social justice issues in the US.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Ben & Jerry’s has teamed up with activist and athlete Colin Kaepernick to unveil a new ice cream flavor, Change the Whirled.

According to Ben & Jerry’s, the flavor “celebrates Kaepernick’s courageous work to confront systematic oppression and to stop police violence against Black and Brown people.”

Like Kaepernick, Change the Whirled is vegan, and has a caramel sunflower butter ice cream base with fudge bits and graham cracker and chocolate cookie swirls. The ice cream will be available early next year, and all of Kaepernick’s proceeds will go to the Know Your Rights Camp, a Kaepernick-founded organization with the goal of “advancing the liberation and well-being of Black and Brown communities,” according to its website.

Read more: Nike just blew past Wall Street’s expectations, and experts say it’s thanks to tech and taking risks like its Colin Kaepernick campaign

“Ben & Jerry’s commitment to challenging the anti-Black roots of policing in the United States demonstrates a material concern for the well-being of Black and Brown communities,”  Kaepernick said in a statement. “My hope is that this partnership will amplify calls to defund and abolish the police and to invest in futures that can make us safer, healthier, and truly free.”

The ice cream will be sold in the US and parts of Europe for between $4.99 to $5.49.

The ice cream giant’s history of championing causes

Justice Remix'd Ben & Jerry's
Cohen and Greenfield announce a new flavor, Justice Remix’d, during a press conference in 2019

This isn’t the first flavor Ben & Jerry’s has released with a cause. In 2019, the ice cream maker – which calls itself an “aspiring social justice company” – unveiled its Justice ReMix’d flavor with the goal of bringing attention to criminal justice reform and racial inequality in the US, according to Ben & Jerry’s website

Read more: How Ben & Jerry’s embrace of social issues set it apart from the competition, boosted its marketing, and helped it build a positive workplace culture

Ben & Jerry’s has also used other avenues besides themed ice cream flavors to express its views on social and racial issues across the country.

In September, the ice cream maker and Vox Media launched the “Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America” podcast that takes a deeper look at racism and white supremacy throughout US history. And following the death of George Floyd, Ben & Jerry’s published a statement that was lauded by Twitter users for its length and details.

Last year, Ben & Jerry’s also publicly supported H.R. 40 which, if passed, could create the Commission to Study and Develop Reparation Proposals for African-Americans.

“Ben & Jerry’s is proud to diversify our flavor portfolio by honoring Kaepernick with a full-time flavor,” Ben & Jerry’s CEO Matthew McCarthy said in a statement. “We deeply respect how Colin uses his voice to protest racism, white supremacy, and police violence through the belief that ‘love is at the root of our resistance.'”

Read the original article on Business Insider