Over 50 House Republicans call on Biden to replace Harris in leading immigration efforts at US-Mexico border

Biden Harris
Vice President Kamala Harris listens as President Joe Biden speaks about distribution of COVID-19 vaccines at the White House on May 17, 2021.

  • Over 50 Republicans have called on Biden to replace Vice President Harris in immigration efforts at the border.
  • “Harris has not yet shown adequate interest in observing this crisis first-hand,” the group said.
  • The administration has emphasized that Harris is not a “czar” in charge of managing the border.
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More than 50 House Republicans have called on President Joe Biden to remove Vice President Kamala Harris from leading the effort to address the root causes of the surge in migrants at the US-Mexico border, accusing her of “inaction.”

In a letter to Biden, 56 Republicans, led by GOP Rep. Glenn Grothman of Wisconsin, have expressed “serious concerns” about Harris’s role in handling what they deem a “crisis” at the southern border.

The group cited recent figures released by the Customs and Border Protection (CBP), which revealed 180,034 migrant encounters at the southern border last month.

“Despite being in the midst of a border crisis this country has not seen in two decades, Vice President Harris has not yet shown adequate interest in observing this crisis first-hand,” the letter said.

They added: “In the 85 days since the Vice President has been tasked with solving this crisis, she has yet to visit the border and meet with Border Patrol agents, Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officials, and local law enforcement officials.”

In March, Biden tapped Harris to work with Central American nations to address the root causes of the surge in migrants seeking to come to the US.

Addressing Biden, the members of Congress found fault in the president’s selection of Harris.

“At the time of her appointment, you stated, ‘I can think of nobody who is better qualified to do this.’ We disagree,” the letter said.

GOP Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, a frequent critic of the administration, on Tuesday blasted Harris for not visiting the border since taking office in January.

“Vice President Harris, who was in charge of the border, seems determined to go anywhere she can but the border,” he said.

Read more: How Biden’s chances of receiving Communion are in jeopardy because of his abortion stance

Harris and her staff have stressed that their diplomatic work is focused on Mexico and the Northern Triangle countries of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador. However, Republicans have sought to shift broader concerns about the US-Mexico border onto Harris, despite the administration emphasizing that she is not a “czar” in charge of managing the border.

During a recent NBC interview, Harris discussed the border issues in a series of exchanges with Lester Holt.

As a former US Senator from California, she represented a state with a 140-mile border with Mexico.

“It is my firm belief that if we care about what’s happening at the border, we better care about the root causes and address them,” she said. “And so that’s what I’m doing.”

Harris said she would personally go to the border “at some point” and stressed other administration officials had already paid visits.

“At some point, you know, we are going to the border,” Harris said. “We’ve been to the border. So this whole, this whole, this whole thing about the border. We’ve been to the border. We’ve been to the border.”

“You haven’t been to the border,” Holt responded, calling out Harris’s lack of a visit since taking office as vice president.

“And I haven’t been to Europe,” Harris said. “I don’t understand the point that you’re making. I’m not discounting the importance of the border. … I care about what’s happening at the border. I’m in Guatemala because my focus is dealing with the root causes of migration.”

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GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski says she’s ‘offended’ by House Republicans minimizing the Capitol riot

Lisa Murkowski
Sen. Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), foreground, speaks during a Senate Appropriations Committee hearing as Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine) listens.

  • Sen. Lisa Murkowski criticized House GOP efforts to downplay the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.
  • “I’m offended by that,” Murkowski told CNN. “This was not a peaceful protest.”
  • Murkowski said she would be open to backing an investigation examining the riot.
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GOP Sen. Lisa Murkowski of Alaska on Friday said that she was “offended” by a number of House Republicans who have sought to minimize the Jan. 6 Capitol riot, according to CNN.

Murkowski, who voted to convict former President Donald Trump in his second impeachment trial for his role in the riot, slammed revisionist attempts to label the insurrectionist mob’s actions as “a normal tourist visit.”

“I’m offended by that,” Murkowski told CNN. “This was not a peaceful protest. When somebody breaks and enters, and then just because you know they don’t completely trash your house once you’re inside does not mean that it has been peaceful. This was not a peaceful protest.”

She added: “We got to get beyond that rhetoric and acknowledge that what happened were acts of aggression and destruction towards an institution, and there were some people intent on (harming) the people that were part of that institution.”

Murkowski, who is also up for reelection next year and has been targeted for defeat by Trump, expressed a willingness to back a bipartisan commission in Congress that would examine the riot.

“I’m one that thinks that there should be an investigation regarding the events on the 6th,” she said.

Read more: How Marjorie Taylor Green became the Voldemort of Congress. Few lawmakers even want to say her name.

Advocates of the commission hope an investigation would deter any further GOP attempts to downplay the riot, which has become a popular sentiment among some House Republicans.

On Friday, Rep. Louie Gohmert of Texas minimized the severity of the insurrection.

“There have been things worse than people without any firearms coming into a building,” he expressed on the House floor, arguing that Pearl Harbor and the Sept. 11 attacks were more consequential events.

“When Pearl Harbor occurred, that was more of an attack on democracy than the protests of January 6,” he said. “When 9/11 occurred, and I know it’s been so long ago and a lot of people that have forgotten apparently about 9/11, 3,000 people killed, the Pentagon was hit, the two World Trade Centers were hit, thousands died.”

Rep. Paul Gosar of Arizona accused the Justice Department of “harassing peaceful patriots across the country.

A fellow conservative, Rep. Ralph Norman of South Carolina, tried to dispute that the protestors were mostly in support of Trump, despite the rally held that day that sought to pressure Republicans to overturn the Electoral College victory of President Joe Biden.

“I don’t know who did a poll to say that they were Trump supporters,” he said.

Another Republican, Rep. Andrew Clyde of Georgia, described the harrowing scene as similar to a “normal tourist visit” to the Capitol.

“Let’s be honest with the American people: It was not an insurrection,” he said. “There was an undisciplined mob. There were some rioters, and some who committed acts of vandalism.”

He added: “To call it an insurrection, in my opinion, is a bald-faced lie.”

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House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy backs ousting Liz Cheney from leadership over her criticism of Trump while claiming Republicans ’embrace free thought and debate’

kevin mccarthy liz cheney side by side
House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy of California, right, listens to Rep. Liz Cheney of Wyoming at a Republican press conference.

  • House GOP Leader Kevin McCarthy announced that his caucus will vote on Wednesday on whether to recall Rep. Liz Cheney from leadership.
  • McCarthy argued that Cheney’s criticism of Trump and the GOP’s election lies had become a distraction.
  • He simultaneously argued that Republicans “embrace free thought and debate.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

House Republican Leader Kevin McCarthy announced in a Monday letter to his caucus that it will vote on Wednesday on whether to recall Rep. Liz Cheney from her leadership position amid widespread opposition to her within the party.

McCarthy suggested that Cheney’s criticism of the party’s election lies, which provoked the Capitol riot, had “distracted” her from the work of promoting the Republican agenda. He said that after hearing from “so many” of his members, it had become “clear that we need to make a change.”

“Each day spent relitigating the past is one day less we have to sieze the future,” McCarthy said. “If we are to succeed in stopping the radical Democrat agenda from destroying our country, these internal conflicts need to be resolved so as not to detract from the efforts of our collective team.”

Cheney, the House GOP conference chair and third-highest ranking member, has accused many of her fellow Republicans of lying about voter fraud and the election being “rigged” by Democrats. She’s argued that Trump and his allies are “poisoning our democratic system.”

McCarthy insisted that the Republican Party is a “big tent” and encourages internal debate, even as he argued that such a debate was detrimental to the party’s efforts to regain the House majority in 2022 and implement its agenda.

“Unlike the left, we embrace free thought and debate,” he said.

Many Republican lawmakers have turned on Cheney since she became one of just 10 House Republicans to vote to impeach Trump for inciting the Capitol attack. Cheney has since urged her party to support a commission to investigate the Jan. 6 riot — something McCarthy and many others oppose.

McCarthy on Sunday publicly endorsed Rep. Elise Stefanik to replace Cheney in leadership after telling Fox hosts in a leaked conversation that he had “lost confidence” in Cheney and “had it with her.” Cheney condemned the “dangerous and anti-democratic Trump cult of personality” in an op-ed published in The Washington Post last Wednesday.

A handful of Republicans have spoken up in Cheney’s defense. Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah tweeted on Monday that ousting Cheney would be politically unwise for the party.

“Expelling Liz Cheney from leadership won’t gain the GOP one additional voter, but it will cost us quite a few,” he said.

McCarthy has changed his tune on the president’s complicity in the Capitol attack since January. On Jan. 7, McCarthy said Trump “bears responsibility” for the riot and argued “he should have immediately denounced the mob when he saw what was unfolding.” McCarthy also rejected the false claim, made by Trump and others on the right, that the Capitol rioters included Black Lives Matter protesters and members of antifa.

But last month, after it had become clear that Trump remained a powerful force in the GOP and popular with the party’s base, McCarthy defended Trump’s response to the riot.

“What I talked to President Trump about, I was the first person to contact him when the riots was going on. He didn’t see it,” McCarthy told Fox News. “What he ended the call was saying — telling me, he’ll put something out to make sure to stop this. And that’s what he did, he put a video out later.”

Hours after the attack began, Trump released a video expressing sympathy for the “very special” rioters and gently urged them to “go home.”

“I know your pain. I know your hurt. But you have to go home now,” Trump said. “We love you. You’re very special.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Arkansas governor said he doesn’t think it’s ‘healthy’ for GOP to consider ousting Liz Cheney over Trump criticism

Asa Hutchinson
Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson speaks at a news conference at the Arkansas state Capitol in Little Rock, Ark., Tuesday, Aug. 4, 2015.

  • Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson said it is “divisive” for the GOP to consider ousting Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney.
  • Cheney has been under scrutiny for her public criticism of former President Donald Trump.
  • House GOP leader Kevin McCarthy said Tuesday some members voiced concerns about Cheney’s “ability to carry out the job as conference chair.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson weighed in on the mounting GOP criticism of Wyoming Rep. Liz Cheney, saying he doesn’t think it is “healthy” for the party to consider ousting her over her public criticism of Trump and the GOP.

Hutchinson came to Cheney’s defense after House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, of California, signaled his and other GOP lawmakers waning support of Cheney as conference chair in an interview with “Fox and Friends” earlier this week.

“I have heard from members concerned about her ability to carry out the job as conference chair, to carry out the message,” McCarthy said during the Tuesday interview. “We all need to be working as one if we’re able to win the majority [in the 2022 midterm elections].”

After the interview, McCarthy was later heard on a hot mic privately saying he has “had it with her” and that he “lost confidence” in her as a Republican leader in the House, Axios reported Tuesday.

“You know, I’ve lost confidence,” McCarthy said. “Well, someone just has to bring a motion, but I assume that will probably take place.”

Cheney initially raised the ire of her party when she voted in favor of Trump’s impeachment earlier this year. That move resulted in the Wyoming GOP censuring her.

In an op-ed published Wednesday by The Washington Post, Cheney slammed some GOP lawmakers’ continued support for Trump after he lost the 2020 presidential election to Joe Biden by more than 7 million votes. Cheney called her party’s ongoing fealty to Trump “immensely harmful.”

“While embracing or ignoring Trump’s statements might seem attractive to some for fundraising and political purposes, that approach will do profound long-term damage to our party and our country,” Cheney wrote. “Trump has never expressed remorse or regret for the attack of Jan. 6 and now suggests that our elections, and our legal and constitutional system, cannot be trusted to do the will of the people.”

In an interview with CNN on Wednesday, Hutchinson said he doesn’t think ousting Cheney as a House Republican leader is “healthy for our party.”

“We’ve got to get back to talking about ideas and how to unify ourselves,” Hutchinson said in the interview with CNN’s Erin Burnett.

“This debate right now will not be perceived as helpful but divisive,” he continued.

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Liz Cheney refuses to say whether Trump should be prosecuted for inciting the Capitol riot

Liz Cheney
Rep. Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, April 14, 2021, in Washington

  • Rep. Liz Cheney refused to say whether former President Donald Trump should be prosecuted for inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.
  • The third highest-ranking House Republican said the decision should be left up to the Department of Justice.
  • She also said the House commission investigating the Jan. 6 riot shouldn’t be expanded to include an investigation of BLM protests.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Rep. Liz Cheney, the third highest-ranking House Republican, refused to say whether former President Donald Trump should be prosecuted for inciting the Jan. 6 Capitol riot.

Cheney, who voted to impeach Trump earlier this year, told reporters at a House GOP retreat in Florida that the decision about whether to prosecute Trump should be left up to the Department of Justice. She also said that the bipartisan House commission investigating the Jan. 6 riot shouldn’t be expanded to include an investigation of Black Lives Matter protests, as her fellow GOP leaders are pushing for.

“I’m very concerned, as all my colleagues are, about the violence we saw from BLM and antifa last summer,” she told reporters. “I think it’s very important that the January 6 commission focus on what happened on January 6.”

The Wyoming congresswoman was one of just 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump for “incitement of insurrection” and is the most anti-Trump in GOP leadership.

“The President of the United States summoned this mob, assembled the mob, and lit the flame of this attack,” she said in a January statement about the riot. “There has never been a greater betrayal by a President of the United States of his office and his oath to the Constitution.”

Cheney, who’s said she won’t support Trump if he becomes the 2024 GOP presidential nominee, has since accused Trump of “embracing insurrection” by continuing to spread lies about the 2020 election.

“The election wasn’t stolen. There was a judicial process in place,” she said earlier this month. “If you attack the judicial process and you attack the rule of law, you aren’t defending the Constitution. You’re at war with the Constitution. And for us as a party going forward, we have to embrace the Constitution and we also have to put forward positive solutions.”

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Harry Reid on former House Speaker John Boehner: ‘I did everything I could to cause him trouble’ but we ‘got a lot done’

John Boehner Harry Reid
Then-House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio, left, speaks with then-Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada on Capitol Hill on December 10, 2014.

  • Former Sen. Harry Reid on Saturday responded to his inclusion in John Boehner’s new memoir.
  • CNN host Jim Acosta made reference to an incident where Boehner cursed Reid out at the White House.
  • Reid recounted that he worked “well” with Boehner and called the former speaker “a great patriot.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

When former Democratic Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nevada was asked on Saturday about a now-infamous confrontation with former GOP House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio at the White House in 2013, he seemed to express a sense of nostalgia.

During a CNN interview, host Jim Acosta made reference to Boehner’s new memoir, “On the House: A Washington Memoir,” where the former speaker recounted that Reid called the House a “dictatorship of the Speaker” during a challenging set of fiscal-cliff negotiations at the White House during then-President Barack Obama’s tenure.

In the memoir, Boehner expressed how infuriated he was with the comment.

“If I were a dictator, do you think I’d let all these members get away with screwing me over all the time?,” he wrote. “Hell no! And Reid, who was a ruthless bastard, knew exactly what I was doing.”

He continued: “So when I saw him at the White House the next day, talking quietly with Mitch McConnell before the meeting, I went over, got in Reid’s face, and said, ‘Do you even listen to all of the s— that comes out of your mouth?’ You can go f— yourself.”

Read more: Introducing Todd Young, the most important senator you’ve never heard of

When asked for a response by Acosta, Reid said that he “got along well” with the former speaker.

“The deal is this – John Boehner and I got a lot done, but we didn’t mince words,” he said. “He was right. I did everything I could to cause him trouble because I knew he was having a lot of trouble. The more trouble he had in his caucus, the better it was for us, and he knew what I was doing, and I wasn’t at all surprised that he came to me and gave me one of his underhanded blessings.”

Reid, who served in the Senate from 1987 to 2017, also gave an interesting tidbit on why he always conducted business with Boehner in the former speaker’s office.

“We had a deal,” he said. “He would not come to my office. I would always go to his office. I didn’t want anybody smoking in my office, so all of our meetings were in his office. He could smoke to his heart’s content.”

He added: “I have a lot of respect for John Boehner. He, as far as I’m concerned, was a great patriot.”

Boehner’s memoir, where he criticizes leading Republican figures including former President Donald Trump, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, and Rep. Jim Jordan of Ohio, is set to be released on April 13.

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Former GOP House Speaker John Boehner in new book excerpt calls Ted Cruz a ‘reckless a–hole who thinks he is smarter than everyone else’

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, answers questions on his opinion on the resignation of Speaker of the House John Boehner at the Values Voters Summit at the Omni Shoreham hotel in Washington D.C., Friday, September 25, 2015.
Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, answers questions on his opinion on the resignation of Speaker of the House John Boehner at the Values Voters Summit at the Omni Shoreham hotel in Washington D.C., Friday, September 25, 2015.

  • Former House Speaker John Boehner didn’t mince words about his ex-GOP colleagues in his new book, “On the House.”
  • Boehner calls Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas “dangerous” and a “reckless a–hole” in an excerpt of his forthcoming book.
  • This isn’t the first time Boehner, who served as House speaker from 2011-2015, has made his dislike for Cruz known.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former House Speaker John Boehner didn’t mince words when reflecting on his GOP congressional colleagues, including Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas, who he called “dangerous” and a “reckless a–hole” in an excerpt from his new book.

“By 2013 the chaos caucus in the House had built up their own power base thanks to fawning right-wing media and outrage-driven fundraising cash,” Boehner wrote in “On the House: A Washington Memoir,” a portion of which was published in Politico on Friday. “And now they had a new head lunatic leading the way, who wasn’t even a House member. There is nothing more dangerous than a reckless a–hole who thinks he is smarter than everyone else. Ladies and gentlemen, meet Senator Ted Cruz.”

This isn’t the first time Boehner, who served as House speaker from 2011-2015, has made his dislike for Cruz known. Axios reported in February that Boehner went off-script in the recording of his book and, when discussing Cruz, added, “Oh, and Ted Cruz, go f— yourself.”

And in 2016, Boehner called Cruz “Lucifer in the flesh.”

“I get along with almost everyone, but I have never worked with a more miserable son of a bitch in my life,” Boehner said during a talk at Stanford University.

Boehner had comparatively nicer things to say about former President Barack Obama than he does about a whole segment of his own party, which he argues has succumbed to “paranoia” and is led by conspiracy theorists. Boehner wrote that while Obama didn’t do enough to appeal to Republicans in Congress, it would’ve been difficult for him to negotiate with a party led by “right-wing propaganda nuts” and “kooks on YouTube spreading dangerous nonsense” about the then-president.

“[Obama] could come off as lecturing and haughty. He still wasn’t making Republican outreach a priority,” Boehner wrote. “But on the other hand-how do you find common cause with people who think you are a secret Kenyan Muslim traitor to America?”

Read the original article on Business Insider

2 recent GOP votes show the party is more invested in censuring members who break with party line than addressing extremism and violence within its own ranks

marjorie taylor greene
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene.

  • Eleven House Republicans voted to effectively punish Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene for endorsing political violence.
  • Six times as many voted to strip Rep. Liz Cheney’s leadership position for supporting Trump’s impeachment.
  • With both lawmakers facing scrutiny, the votes highlight an ongoing division within the party.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene was stripped of her committee assignments Thursday after 11 House Republicans joined Democrats and voted in favor of the resolution, following reports detailing her expressing support for political violence.

A day earlier, six times as many House Republicans voted to remove Rep. Liz Cheney from her leadership position over her support of Donald Trump’s impeachment. (Cheney still kept her post.)

With both Republican representatives facing scrutiny for very different actions, the votes highlighted an ongoing division within the party between moderate Republicans and the ones who align more closely with Trump.

Greene, a staunch Trump loyalist, drew criticism recently as reports emerged of her appearing to support violence against Democrats and other political opponents as well as apparent adherence to conspiracy theories.

In 2018, the Georgia lawmaker expressed support on her Facebook page for assassinating top Democrats, including Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, CNN reported.

In 2019, she liked a Facebook comment saying House Speaker Nancy Pelosi should get a “bullet to the head,” according to CNN.

And in a video that recently resurfaced, Greene can be seen harassing a survivor of the Parkland school shooting, which she has also called a false-flag operation.

In response to the reports – and after GOP House leadership declined to punish the freshman lawmaker – the House of Representatives held the vote to remove Greene from her two committee assignments, with Democrats condemning the reports and her support of right-wing conspiracy theories.

While 11 Republicans joined the Democrats, others who did not vote in favor of her removal criticized the move as an attempt to “cancel” a member of the GOP.

In a 233-199 vote, Greene lost her seats on the Education and Labor Committee and the Budget Committee.

Read more: Trump is plotting a campaign revenge tour targeting GOP defectors after Senate impeachment trial

Cheney, the third-highest ranking Republican in the House, did not vote to remove Greene.

On Wednesday, the Wyoming lawmaker faced a vote of her own over whether she should keep her leadership position in the caucus.

Cheney has been criticized by members of her party for voting in favor of impeaching Trump, following the Capitol insurrection. In total, ten Republicans voted in favor, making it the most bipartisan impeachment in US history. Following her vote, there were calls from some within the GOP for her to step down, prompting the vote on her role in the caucus.

In the Wednesday vote, Cheney held onto her position, with 145 Republicans voting for her to remain and 61 voting for her removal, according to Politico.

Experts have said the GOP is in a “no-win situation” as it struggles to hold together its base of traditional Republicans and Trump supporters, Insider previously reported.

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Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene brags about phone call and ‘support’ from Trump amid rash of controversies

Marjorie Taylor Greene
Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene (R-Georgia) wears a “Trump Won” face mask as she arrives on the floor of the House to take her oath of office on the opening day of the 117th Congress at the US Capitol on Sunday, January 3, 2021.

  • Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene bragged that former President Donald Trump called her with “his support.”
  • Greene has spread debunked conspiracy theories on everything from 9/11 to school shootings.
  • A Democratic-led effort is underway to have Greene booted from the House of Representatives.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene of Georgia, who has been involved in multiple controversies before and after her arrival in Washington, bragged on Saturday about receiving a phone call from former President Donald Trump and indicated that she had “his support.”

Greene, who over the years has spread debunked conspiracy theories on everything from the 2012 shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut and the 2018 Parkland shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida to the Sept. 11 attacks and the 2017 Las Vegas music festival shooting, has attracted bipartisan scorn for her comments and social media profile.

“I had a GREAT call with my all time favorite POTUS, President Trump!” she tweeted. “I’m so grateful for his support and more importantly the people of this country are absolutely 100% loyal to him because he is 100% loyal to the people and America First.”

In a rant-filled haze, she added: “You can never beat him because We The People have his back. The blood thirsty media and the socialists hate America Democrats are attacking me now just like they always attack President Trump. I won’t back down. I’ll never apologize. And I’ll always keep fighting for the people. For me, it’s America First!!! Any elected politician that isn’t putting America First doesn’t deserve their position or the people’s trust.”

 

Despite Greene’s proclamations of support from Trump, she is earning deeply unfavorable reviews from her many of her peers.

A video from 2018 that was widely circulated this week showed Greene harassing David Hogg, then a 17-year-old survivor of the Parkland school shooting, as he was walking on Capitol Hill, which drew scores of criticism.

As Hogg ignored Greene’s pointed questions, she continued to shout questions at him.

“Why are you using kids as a barrier?,” she asked. “Do you not know how to defend your stance? Look, I’m an American citizen, I’m a gun owner. I have a concealed carry permit, I carry a gun for protection for myself, and you are using your lobby and the money behind it and the kids to try to take away my Second Amendment rights.”

In the past, Greene has supported Facebook posts that advocated for violence against Democratic lawmakers, including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi of California.

Read more: Trump tested the Constitution and shredded traditions. Biden and the Democrats have big plans of their own about what to do next.

While GOP House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California has said that he “plans to have a conversation” with Greene about her posts, she was still assigned to the House Education and Labor Committee by GOP leaders, a decision that Pelosi called “absolutely appalling.”

On Jan. 29, Democratic Rep. Cori Bush of Missouri announced that she was moving offices on Capitol Hill to get away from Greene’s office after a recent confrontation where Bush says she was “berated” by Greene and her staff in a hallway.

Multiple Democrats have called for Greene’s expulsion from the House, including Rep. Jimmy Gomez of California, who said he would introduce a resolution to have her removed from the legislative body for her behavior.

“Such advocacy for extremism and sedition not only demands her immediate expulsion from Congress, but it also merits strong and clear condemnation from all of her Republican colleagues,” he said in a statement. “Her very presence in office represents a direct threat against the elected officials and staff who serve our government.”

GOP Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah, who has been a longtime critic of Trump’s influence on the party and his failed quest to overturn President Joe Biden’s electoral win, poked at Greene and the former president on Saturday.

“Lies of a feather flock together: Marjorie Taylor Greene’s nonsense and the “big lie” of a stolen election,” he tweeted. 

Romney, who was the party’s 2012 presidential nominee, lamented in a December 2020 interview that the GOP had “strayed from” its emphasis on character and said that he didn’t see the party “returning to that for a long time.”

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GOP Rep. Nancy Mace said that Trump ‘put all of our lives at risk’ during the Capitol riots, but rejected impeachment, calling the process ‘rushed’

Nancy Mace
Rep. Nancy Mace (R-South Carolina).

  • Freshman GOP Rep. Nancy Mace of South Carolina said on Sunday that President Donald Trump’s actions related to the Jan. 6 Capitol riots “put all of our lives at risk.”
  • “We feared for our lives, many of us that day, and our staff,” she said. “My children were supposed to be up there. If they had been there like they were supposed to be, I would have been devastated, so we do need to find a way to hold the president accountable.”
  • Despite calling out Trump’s conduct, Mace voted against impeachment, calling the process “rushed.”
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Freshman GOP Rep. Nancy Mace of South Carolina, who has been sharply critical of President Donald Trump’s handling of the Jan. 6 Capitol riots, said on Sunday that his actions related to the deadly attack “put all of our lives at risk.”

On NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Mace brought up a bipartisan push to censure Trump that could have been an alternative to the second impeachment of the president, which cleared the House of Representatives 232-197, with ten Republican votes.

Despite calling out Trump’s conduct, she voted against impeachment, describing the process as “rushed” and saying it didn’t give the president due process.

“With censure, that was one of the things that I believe we should have had up for debate,” Mace said. “It’s complex, constitutionally, but there were folks in both chambers and in both parties having the ability to look at that as an option, but we couldn’t even bring it up for debate or look at that as an option because we were really trying hard to figure out how do we hold a president accountable that put all of our lives at risk?”

She described the riots, which resulted in the deaths of five people, as “a traumatic event” for many members.

Read More: Mitch McConnell is telling GOP senators their decision on a Trump impeachment trial conviction is a ‘vote of conscience’

“We feared for our lives, many of us that day, and our staff,” she said. “My children were supposed to be up there. If they had been there like they were supposed to be, I would have been devastated, so we do need to find a way to hold the president accountable.”

Mace was then asked about members who continued to object to the presidential election results after the riots, including the top two GOP leaders in the House, Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California and Minority Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana.

“I will tell you for me, as a new member, it was enormously disappointing,” she said. “I literally had to walk through a crime scene where that young woman [Ashli Babbitt] was shot and killed to get into the chamber to vote that night to certify what was supposed to be a ceremonial vote to certify the Electoral College. Yet my colleagues continued to object, and they knew this was a failing motion.”

On Jan. 7, Mace said on CNN that that Trump’s “entire legacy was wiped out” in the aftermath of the Capitol riots.

“We’ve got to start over,” she stressed at the time. “We don’t have the ground that we need to push forward and do the things that we need to do to be successful and work for and be the voice for hard-working Americans that believed in his message. We cannot condone the violence … We’ve got to rebuild our nation and rebuild our party.”

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