The job market is on fire right now. Here are the best tips for finding a career that you love.

working on beach computer vacation
It’s shaping up to be a hot summer for job searching.

  • This summer is the best time to be looking for a new job.
  • Employers are looking to woo workers with signing bonuses and other perks.
  • Insider’s compiled a helpful guide for anyone searching for a new role this summer.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The job market is on fire right now.

After a steep decline at the beginning of the pandemic, employers are finally beginning to hire again. And they’re hiring a lot. On July 16, job postings on Indeed were up 36.4% above where they were on February 1, 2021, the pre-pandemic baseline. There were 9.2 million open jobs in the US at the end of May, the most recently available data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics indicated.

Moving jobs is also a great way to make more money. A 2017 Nomura analysis found that people who had changed jobs earned roughly 1% more year over year than people who stayed with the same employer.

It’s a job seekers’ market, and some employers are working to woo workers with incentives such as bonuses and new employee benefits.

There’s never been a better time to look for a job, and Insider has compiled a helpful guide for anyone looking for a new opportunity.

Table of Contents: Static

Quitting shouldn’t be your first move if you’re unhappy

woman burn out work from home
If you’re feeling burned out, look for small ways to improve your satisfaction at work.

Maybe you don’t want to leave your job, but you’re not exactly thrilled with how things are going. Don’t fret, experts said there are simple tweaks you can make to your workday that may help you feel more fulfilled.

It’s a common problem. Gallup found that 51% of workers in its global analysis of about 112,000 business units were not engaged at work. No wonder 3.6 million US employees left their jobs in May.

But, career experts told Insider, playing to your strengths can help you feel more satisfied at work.

And remember: Don’t be afraid to share feedback with your boss. Chances are that if you’re unhappy, other people are, too.

Read more:

A few small changes can make you happier at a job you don’t like, experts say

The Great American Burnout is just beginning. Here are 5 ways managers can prevent the wave from hitting their teams.

Don’t quit your job. Do these 2 steps to get more money or a new boss instead.

A C-suite executive shared his performance review to all 1,400 people in the company to promote a culture of feedback. Read the email he sent.

WFH employees are more emotionally exhausted than those who work in person. Is going back to the office the solution?

When it’s time for a change

Starbucks Now Hiring sign
There were 9.2 million open roles at the end of May, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said.

Maybe you’ve tried to make things better at your current role, but they aren’t improving. Or maybe you’ve outgrown your role and want to move on.

Regardless, it’s time to launch your job search.

A good first step is to send some networking messages. Blair Heitmann, a LinkedIn career expert, previously told Insider that your network “is your No. 1 asset as a professional over the course of your career.”

You can also make key tweaks to your job-application materials that may draw the attention of recruiters and hiring managers.

And when you’re ready to give your notice, make sure you don’t burn any bridges with your employer. You never know if you may want to return someday.

Read more:

A workplace expert shares the exact steps you should take to quit your job without burning bridges

Use this template from a career coach to revamp your résumé and land a remote job anywhere in the world

Now may be the best time to switch jobs – and make more money

Your best shot at making $100,000 is to work remotely. Here are 6 steps to landing a WFH role you love.

No college degree? No problem. How to land a stable, high-paying job on certificates and trainings alone.

Finding the best opportunities

Job fair Florida
A man handing his résumé to an employer at the 25th annual Central Florida Employment Council Job Fair at the Central Florida Fairgrounds.

Jobs in human resources and diversity and inclusion are skyrocketing right now.

HR professionals, for example, are being recruited relentlessly for high-paying roles, experts previously told Insider. Jobs in diversity and inclusion grew 123% between May and September of last year, Indeed data showed.

But these aren’t the only industries worth checking out. It’s important to explore all of your options to find a role that is the best fit for you.

Read more:

The 2021 job market is going to be unlike anything we’ve seen before. Here’s how recruiters and job seekers should handle it.

Diversity and inclusion professionals are being recruited relentlessly. Top execs in the field share their advice for making a name in the industry.

Jobs in diversity are hotter than ever. DEI execs from companies like Wayfair and LinkedIn share strategies for getting into the field.

If you want a career in sports, media, or video games, join the $44B esports industry. A veteran host explains where to start.

HR professionals are being recruited relentlessly and have their pick of top jobs

Asking (and answering) the right questions

A woman gives two thumbs up while videoconferencing in her home for a remote job interview
Know the right questions to ask during your interview.

You’ve done the work and sent out tons of applications. Now hiring managers are scheduling interviews with you.

The most common interview question is “Tell me about yourself.” Jacques Buffett, a career expert at the online résumé service Zety, said interviewees should use this question to briefly mention their career history and tell stories of past achievements.

But it’s also important to know the right questions to ask hiring managers. This could help you get a clearer sense of the company culture.

Read more:

5 questions companies are asking in interviews right now and how to answer, according to a career expert

What Elon Musk, Richard Branson, Jack Dorsey, and 52 other top executives ask job candidates during interviews

Job seekers have all the power right now. Here are 7 questions you should definitely ask in your next job interview.

How can I tell a hiring manager that I want to be fully remote?

PwC is hiring for 100,000 jobs over the next 5 years. Here’s how to prove you have the top trait they’re looking for: agility.

Remote, in person, or somewhere in between

hybrid work
Hybrid work gives you the option to work partially from the office and partially remote.

Once you’ve accepted a job, you have an opportunity to craft your ideal work life.

Maybe you want to be completely remote or solely in the office. Or maybe you want something in between.

Many employers are still sorting out their plans for returning to the office, but regardless, you’re in a good position to negotiate as much flexibility as you want.

Some companies, such as marketing startup Scroll and Kickstarter, are testing out four-day workweeks.

Read more:

How to craft your ideal work life and get your boss on board

Take this personality quiz to find out if you work best from home, in an office, or something in between

Marketing startup Scroll trialed a 4-day workweek for a month and is already seeing huge gains in revenue and employee mental health

Kickstarter CEO: Why we’re doing a 4-day workweek

If you want to ask your boss to let you work from home forever, use this script

Read the original article on Business Insider

What to say when someone tells you ‘people don’t want to work right now’

A sign reads "We all quit" at a Burger King in Nebraska
  • As stories about labor shortages continue to pop up, it might seem like no one’s working.
  • The truth, of course, is far more complicated – just like the strange economy right now.
  • Importantly, the pandemic is still ongoing, and workers have a lot more options.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

It’s a common refrain right now: No one wants to work. It’s a twist in the story of a not-quite-post-pandemic economy that left millions of people unemployed, as understaffed businesses struggle to hire and workers quit en-masse.

But, as always, the economy is complex, and so are the myriad of people who keep it running. A simple phrase doesn’t capture all of the complexities of why people may or may not be working. If you want to inject some nuance into your next conversation about the labor shortage, here’s what to know.

The pandemic is still going on

If the Delta variant has taught us anything, it’s that COVID is still spreading – and it’s still impacting the economy.

For instance, childcare – or lack thereof – has emerged as one potential driver keeping parents out of the workforce. With schools and daycares shuttered, some parents left their jobs to provide care. Others may have lost their roles, and delayed searching for new ones while their kids were at home. Either way, they may not have returned to the workforce yet.

Sociologist Jessica Calarco tweeted recently about the challenges facing parents as children remain unvaccinated and variants spread, noting that classrooms and daycares may have to temporarily shutter as cases come up.

“Given that kids aren’t going to be eligible for vaccines any time soon, and with Delta spreading rapidly, we should expect a whole lot more of this to come. I won’t be surprised if we end up with a whole bunch more 2-week gaps (or longer) in childcare this fall,” she wrote.

COVID fears have also kept some older workers out of the workforce. They were disproportionately impacted by job losses early in the pandemic, and some have called it quits and retired altogether.

Fed Gov. Lael Brainard said that labor shortages should fade by fall as schools reopen and fears abate, along with federal unemployment benefits.

Workers are taking advantage of more options

A huge amount of workers are quitting their jobs, which seems counterintuitive. In May, 3.6 million workers quit their jobs – but it may be because they are taking advantage of new opportunities.

Wages in industries that are having difficulty staffing up – like leisure and hospitality – are on the rise, but they’re still relatively low compared to other fields. Dr. William Spriggs, an economics professor at Howard University and chief economist at the AFL-CIO, previously told Insider that “workers who are employed are finding ways to get jobs in the sectors that are expanding and hiring.” Those sectors might offer higher wages, or at least more consistency than their prior roles.

It’s what Insider’s Aki Ito calls The Great Reshuffle: An unprecedented labor market, coupled with a rethinking of what workers want out of both work and life, has led many to exit their positions or seek out new ones. The market out there for workers is competitive, and many are finding higher salaries or better positions as they depart their old roles.

And yes, some workers may not be returning because they’re benefiting from enhanced unemployment benefits. As Insider previously reported, the consistent pay from unemployment – as well as the fact that it’s higher than what some workers made before – has caused some to rethink work.

“I just think that UI has just at least fixed everyone’s brain enough to see how f—ed up the wages are,” Matt Mies, an unemployed 28-year-old, previously told Insider.

But, as always, the picture is still nuanced. Many workers will find themselves cut off completely – including those who have been frantically searching for work.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Just over 6% of workers say they would quit their jobs if told to go back to the office 5 days a week

quitting job lay off
Many workers say they’d quit, but the majority say they’d comply.

  • 6.4% of US workers said they would leave their jobs without a backup if they were asked to return to the office 5 days a week.
  • The Survey of Working Arrangements and Attitudes collects monthly data on remote work.
  • Half would return without complaint, while 35% said they would return to work, but look elsewhere.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Some 6.4% of US workers say they would quit their jobs on the spot, regardless of whether they had a backup, if their employer asked them to go back to the office for five days a week, according to survey data gathered for June 2021.

The Survey of Working Arrangements and Attitudes asked employees how they would respond if their employer announced to all workers that they must return to the office from August 1st 2021.

The majority would be happy to comply, with 57.8% of respondents saying they would return to their desks.

However, while they wouldn’t quit outright, 35.8% said they would return but will look for a job that offers working from home.

Other findings from the survey suggest that Monday and Friday are the most popular days to work from home if employees had to choose two, being chosen by 54.1% and 56.6% of respondents respectively.

Managers should be aware of the consequences of not listening to their colleagues

The survey was founded in May 2020 in order to track attitudes and patterns of remote work during the pandemic.

It is jointly run by academics from the University of Chicago, ITAM, and Stanford University and collects monthly surveys of between 2,000 to 5,000 US respondents.

It doesn’t however ask for identifying details, making it harder to draw more specific conclusions other than general sentiment.

Conversations about hybrid work are not straightforward and depend on the needs of the employee and the business, Nick Bloom, professor of economics at Stanford and one of the academics behind the survey, told Insider.

Nevertheless, he said managers should be aware of the potential consequences of asking colleagues to come back to the office.

“The labor market is red hot, plenty of firms are offering people work-from-home packages. So if I’m an employee, this is not an empty threat,” said Bloom.

Other surveys suggest that workers are reassessing their career plans following the pandemic.

In May, 3.6 million US workers left their jobs according to latest figures from the Bureau of Labour Statistics, down slightly from a two-decade-high record in April.

There are many factors behind what experts are deeming the ‘great resignation’.

In March 2021, 72% of respondents told Prudential they were reassessing their skillset as a result of the pandemic. A report gathered by the UK insurance firm Aviva suggests that some care less about their career following a year of long hours and burnout – 47% said they were less career-focused, according to the BBC.

With the labor market as it is at present, companies are balancing recruitment against retention, said Bloom. “It’s a direct choice: do you pay higher wages, or do you give better work-life balance and better work perks?”

As the US economy experiences soaring vacancies following the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations are turning to more generous and creative means as a way to retain and recruit new staff.

Read the original article on Business Insider