How much YouTube pays influencers for 100,000, 1 million, and 150 million views, according to top creators

Natalie Barbu
YouTube star Natalie Barbu.

  • YouTube’s Partner Program allows influencers to earn money off their channels by placing ads within videos. 
  • Google places these ads and pays a creator based on factors like a video’s watch time, length, and viewer demographic.
  • Here’s how much YouTube pays creators for a single video with 100,000, 1 million, and 150 million views, according to top influencers.
  • Subscribe to Business Insider’s influencer newsletter: Insider Influencers.

This is the latest installment of Business Insider’s YouTube money logs, where creators break down how much they earn.

How much money YouTube pays creators for a single video depends on a number of factors, but the number of views it gets is a big one.

Creators with 1,000 subscribers and 4,000 watch hours are eligible to have their videos monetized with ads by joining YouTube’s Partner Program. These ads are filtered by Google, and how much money a creator earns depends on the video’s watch time, length, video type, and viewer demographics – among other factors.

Some top creators have ad-placement strategies to maximize their earnings.

For instance, Andrei Jikh, a personal-finance influencer, told Insider that he earns more money by including midroll ads, which can run in videos lasting over 8 minutes. They can be skippable or non skippable, and creators can place them manually or have them automatically placed by YouTube.

There are also things creators can avoid to try and boost earnings.

Some videos that contain swearing or copyrighted music are flagged by YouTube and demonetized, earning hardly any money for the creator (or none at all). One of YouTube’s biggest stars, David Dobrik, said in an interview that he earned about $2,000 a month from YouTube directly, despite his weekly videos gaining an average 10 million views. He earns most of his money through brand sponsorships instead, like his partnership with SeatGeek.

Here’s how much money YouTube paid creators for a video with 100,000, 1 million, and 150 million views, according to top YouTube creators.

This article has been updated to reflect new YouTuber earnings. 

100,000 views – between $500 to $2,500 (5 creators)

Natalie Barbu
Natalie Barbu.

How much money a single YouTube video with 100,000 views makes from Google-placed ads depends on the content of the video and the audience who watches. But even some YouTube stars don’t realize this.

Natalie Barbu started her YouTube channel while she was in high school about eight years ago.

She’d post videos about fashion and beauty as an after-school hobby, long before she knew she could be earning any money from the platform, she told Insider

Now she runs a channel with 292,000 subscribers and posts weekly videos about her day-to-day life experiences.

Barbu has more than 20 videos with over 100,000 views uploaded to her YouTube channel. On average, her videos earn between $200 and $500, she told Insider in February 2020. 

YouTube pays Barbu through direct deposit once a month. After she receives the money, she will save a portion for taxes and she has a separate bank account where she keeps her tax money.

We spoke to five YouTube creators — Natalie Barbu (lifestyle), Marko Zlatic (personal finance), Ruby Asabor (business), Erica Boucher (business), and Roberto Blake (tech) — who broke down what they generally earn from a video with around 100,000 views. 

When Asabor was first starting out, she thought everyone made the same rate.

But then she found out she was making more money from YouTube than a friend of hers who had more subscribers. Asabor realized that her finance- and business-related videos, which target an older audience, were more favorable to Google’s advertisers. These advertisers pay more than others because there are fewer videos on YouTube that attract their target audience.

Read the full post: 

How much money a YouTube video with 100,000 views makes, according to 5 creators

1 million views – between $3,400 and $40,000 (6 creators)

Jade Darmawangsa
Jade Darmawangsa.

A video with 1 million YouTube views doesn’t always make the same amount of money and can vary considerably depending on the creator.

Insider spoke with six YouTube influencers with very different channels — SemideCoco, Jade Darmawangsa, Marina Mogilko, Kevin David, Austen Alexander, and Shelby Church — on how much they earned from videos with over 1 million views (and below 1.5 million views).

These creators all said that enabling every ad option, which includes banner, preroll, and midroll ads, had helped with their earnings. 

Read the full post: 

How much money a YouTube video with 1 million views makes, according to 6 creators

150 million views – $97,000 (Paul Kousky)

Paul Kousky
Paul Kousky.

Paul Kousky films videos about Nerf guns for YouTube and has 14 million subscribers. 

He told Insider that he earns a majority of his revenue through ads on his YouTube channel, PDK Films.

Kousky’s highest-earning video is one he posted in February 2018 titled “Nerf War: Tank Battle,” which went viral worldwide six months later, he said. 

By the time the video had hit 150 million views (it continues to rack up views), he earned $97,000 in AdSense revenue, according to screenshots of his creator dashboard viewed by Insider in December 2019. 

When Kousky first uploaded the video, he said it had about 50% US viewers, which is his target demographic. After it went viral, the US audience dropped and was about 5% as of December.

On average, the view duration for this video was around four to five minutes. That put the video at about a 45% average watch time, which is considered high for YouTube. This is an important metric because a high view duration lets YouTube’s automated algorithm know that a video is performing well, and that can help a video get picked up and recommended to viewers.

Read the full post here:

How much money a YouTube video with 150 million views makes, according to a top creator

Read the original article on Business Insider

All the states where marijuana is legal – and 5 more that voted to legalize it in November

medical marijuana cbd hemp weed smoking joint leafly flowers cannabis cox 82
  • Marijuana is legal for adults in 15 states and Washington D.C. Medical marijuana is legal in 34.
  • New Jersey, Arizona, Montana, and South Dakota voted to legalize recreational marijuana in November’s elections.
  • South Dakota also voted in favor of a medical-cannabis program, as did Mississippi.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Marijuana legalization is spreading around the US. 

Since 2012, 15 states and Washington, DC, have legalized marijuana for adults over the age of 21. And 36 states have legalized medical marijuana – meaning that a majority of Americans now have some form of access to marijuana, whether medically or recreationally.

Four more states – New Jersey, Arizona, Montana, and South Dakota – voted to legalize recreational cannabis in November. On top of that, voters in Mississippi backed the creation of a medical cannabis program.

In February, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy signed legislation officially legalizing marijuana in the state. 

Though Canada legalized marijuana federally in 2018, the US has not followed suit, forcing states to chart their own courses. As it stands, marijuana is still considered an illegal Schedule I drug by the US federal government.

Joe Biden’s victory in the presidential election and the Democratic party’s control of Congress, could give marijuana a bigger boost in the US. The House in December voted on a bill to legalize marijuana and expunge the records of those convicted under previous laws, the Marijuana Opportunity Reinvestment and Expungement (MORE) Act, though the legislation was considered a nonstarter when Republicans controlled the Senate.

Cowen analyst Vivien Azer said in a January 6 note that with a Democratic-controlled government, cannabis-related legislation – like the STATES Act or MORE Act – has a better chance of passing through Congress, creating big opportunities for the US industry.

“[W]e expect Congress will give cannabis companies access to commercial banking and insurance,” Azer wrote. “We also see medical cannabis being protected. Capital markets access is largely dependent upon enactment of either the STATES Act or the MORE Act.” 

Biden has said he would support federal decriminalization of the drug. Vice-president-elect Kamala Harris sponsored a previous version of the MORE Act in the Senate. And, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer has said that marijuana reform would be a priority for the Senate this year. 

Despite the political back-and-forth, most Americans want legal marijuana, according to recent polls. Sixty-seven percent of Americans polled by Pew Research said marijuana should be legal, with only 32% in opposition.

All the states where marijuana is legal: 

 

This article was first published in January 2018 and has been updated with new information about where cannabis is legal and the results from Georgia’s runoff elections. Melia Russell contributed to an earlier version of this report. 

Alaska

cannabis
A cannabis-testing laboratory in Santa Ana, California.

Adults 21 and over can light up in Alaska. In 2015, the northernmost US state made it legal for residents to use, possess, and transport up to an ounce of marijuana — roughly a sandwich bag full — for recreational use. The first pot shop opened for business in 2016.

Alaska has pounced on the opportunity to make its recreational-pot shops a destination for tourists. More than 2 million people visit Alaska annually and spend $2 billion.

Arizona

Curaleaf
Nate McDonald, General Manager of Curaleaf NY operations, talks about medical marijuana plants during a media tour of the Curaleaf medical cannabis cultivation and processing facility Thursday, Aug. 22, 2019, in Ravena, N.Y

Arizona in 2020 voted to legalize cannabis for all adults over the age of 21

The measure had support from almost 60% of Arizona voters, according to preliminary results from Decision Desk HQ. 

The ballot measure was backed by a number of cannabis giants, including Curaleaf, Cresco, and Harvest Enterprises. 

The Arizona Department of Health Services is required to lay out adult-use cannabis regulations by April 5, 2021.  

California

cannabis
A MedMen store in West Hollywood, California, on January 2, 2018.

In 1996, California became the first state to legalize medical marijuana. California became even more pot-friendly in 2016 when it made it legal to use and carry up to 1 ounce of marijuana.

The law also permits adults 21 and over to buy up to 8 grams of marijuana concentrates, which are found in edibles, and grow no more than six marijuana plants per household.

Colorado

marijuana
A marijuana leaf.

In Colorado, there are more marijuana dispensaries than Starbucks and McDonald’s combined. The state joined Washington in becoming the first two states to fully legalize the drug in 2012.

Residents and tourists over the age of 21 can buy up to 1 ounce of marijuana or 8 grams of concentrates. Some Colorado counties and cities have passed more restrictive laws.

Illinois

JB Pritzker
Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker.

Illinois lawmakers in June 2019 passed a bill that legalized the possession and commercial sale of marijuana in the state starting on January 1.

Gov. J.B. Pritzker, who made marijuana legalization a core component of his campaign for the governor’s office, signed the bill into law.

For its part, Illinois is the first state to legalize marijuana sales through a state legislature, rather than a ballot initiative.

Maine

marijuana
Harvested cannabis plants at Hexo Corp.’s facilities in Gatineau, Quebec, on September 26, 2018.

A ballot initiative in 2016 gave Maine residents the right to possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana, more than double the limit in most other states.

Recreational-marijuana dispensaries are set to open in Maine in October.

Massachusetts

cannabis
Medicinal cannabis cigarettes on July 12, 2018, at a cultivation facility in Milford, Massachusetts.

Massachusetts was the first state on the East Coast to legalize marijuana after voters approved the measure in 2016. 

Marijuana dispensaries opened their doors to consumers in November 2018. Adults over the age of 21 can purchase up to 1 ounce of marijuana but cannot consume it in public.

Michigan

marijuana
The Far West Holistic Center dispensary on November 7, 2018, in Detroit.

Voters in Michigan passed Proposition 1 in 2018, making it the first state in the Midwest to legalize the possession and sale of marijuana for adults over the age of 21. Adults can possess up to 2.5 ounces of marijuana, and residents can grow up to 12 plants at home.

The law is more permissive than other states with legal marijuana: Most allow residents to possess only up to 1 ounce at a time.

Marijuana dispensaries in Michigan opened on December 1.

Montana

Cannabis
A CPlant employee organizes a box of hemp for export at the company’s farm on the outskirts of Tala, Uruguay, Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020.

Montana in 2020 voted to legalize recreational marijuana for adults 21 and over

Montana residents will officially be allowed to use marijuana as of January 1, 2021. A year later, the state would begin to open up applications for dispensaries. 

New Jersey

cannabis
A CPlant employee trims a hemp flower for export at the company’s farm on the outskirts of Tala, Uruguay, Thursday, Aug. 13, 2020.

New Jersey in 2020 voted to legalize recreational marijuana for adults 21 and older, opening a market that could near $1 billion given New Jersey’s proximity to New York City and Philadelphia. 

In February, Gov. Phil Murphy signed the legalization legislation, after months of back-and-forth arguments about criminal penalties for minors possessing marijuana and the proper way to set up a licensing framework for cannabis sales in the state, among other details. Sales of cannabis for adult use could start in the second half of this year, analysts at Cowen said.

Nevada

marijuana recreational dispensary las vegas nevada
The Essence cannabis dispensary on July 1, 2017, in Las Vegas.

Residents and tourists who are 21 and over can buy 1 ounce of marijuana or one-eighth of an ounce of edibles or concentrates in Nevada. Less than two weeks after sales of recreational weed began on July 1, 2017, many stores ran out of marijuana to sell.

There’s bad news if you want to grow your own bud, though. Nevada residents must live 25 miles outside the nearest dispensary to be eligible for a grower’s license.

Oregon

marijuana cannabis cost Canada United States
Oregon’s Finest medical-marijuana dispensary in Portland, Oregon, on April 8, 2014.

Oregon legalized marijuana in 2015, and sales in the state started October 1 of that year. 

Sales in Oregon pot shops have exploded since legalization: They’re expected to top $1 billion by 2020, Portland Business Journal reported.

South Dakota

Aurora Cannabis
A team member of Aurora Cannabis works in the grow room at Aurora Sky cannabis growing greenhouse in Alberta, Canada, in this 2018 handout image.

South Dakota in 2020 voted to legalize both medical and recreational cannabis, the first time a state has voted in favor of both at the same time.

State lawmakers have until April 2o22 to create rules around cannabis, including regulations around dispensaries.  

Vermont

cannabis
Cannabis plants in a laboratory.

Vermont became the first state to legalize marijuana through the legislature, rather than a ballot initiative, when Republic Gov. Phil Scott signed a bill into law in January 2018.

Adults in the Green Mountain State can carry up to 1 ounce of marijuana and grow no more than two plants for recreational use. The law went into effect in July 2018. But it is limited in scope. It doesn’t establish a legal market for the production and sale of the drug, though the Vermont Legislature is working on adopting rules to create a recreational market.

Washington

medical marijuana
A medical-marijuana plantation on March 21, 2017.

Marijuana was legalized for recreational use in Washington in 2012.

The state allows people to carry up to 1 ounce of marijuana, but they must use the drug for medicinal purposes to be eligible for a grower’s license.

Washington, DC

Capitol Hill sunset

Residents in the nation’s capital voted overwhelmingly to legalize marijuana for adult use in November 2014.

The bill took effect in 2015, allowing people to possess 2 ounces or less of marijuana and “gift” up to an ounce, if neither money nor goods or services are exchanged.

Read the original article on Business Insider