California Gov. Gavin Newsom pulled his kids out of summer camp after a photo showed his son not wearing a mask inside

Gavin Newsom, his children, and wife.
Gavin Newsom with his children and wife in 2018.

  • California’s governor said he pulled his kids out of a summer camp over its mask policies.
  • Gov. Newsom’s office said it missed an email that said the camp wouldn’t enforce mask guidance.
  • He was criticized after his son was photographed not wearing a mask at the camp.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California’s governor pulled his kids out of a summer camp after facing criticism over a photo of his son inside at the camp without a face mask on, at odds with the state’s coronavirus guidance.

Gov. Gavin Newsom’s spokeswoman, Erin Mellon, said his team missed an email from the camp that two of his children – ages 10 and 11 – attended, saying the camp would not be enforcing guidance to wear masks, The Sacramento Bee reported.

A photo of his son not wearing a mask while indoors at the camp circulated online, and was met with outrage from people who oppose the state’s guidance.

California asks that people, even those who are fully vaccinated and children, to wear masks indoors in youth settings like summer camps.

The children attended the camp for one day, Mellon said.

Mellon said in the statement: “The Newsoms were concerned to see unvaccinated children unmasked indoors at a camp their children began attending yesterday.”

“The family reviewed communication from the camp and realized that an email was missed saying the camp would not enforce masking guidance. Their kids will no longer be attending this camp.”

This isn’t the first time that Newsom has faced backlash for perceived hypocrisy in his handling of the pandemic. In November, Newsom and his wife were photographed attending a large dinner at an upscale Napa Valley restaurant a week before the governor warned Californians to “limit interactions to their immediate household.”

Newson is currently facing a recall election in September, which has been described as a response to Newsom’s coronavirus leadership.

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Newsom vows California will have the ‘strongest vaccine verification system in the US’ as mandate is announced

Gavin Newsom
California Gov. Gavin Newsom.

  • California will require state employees and all healthcare workers to provide proof of COVID-19 vaccination or get tested weekly.
  • Gov. Gavin Newsom vowed that California will have the “strongest vaccine verification system in the US.”
  • “Too many people have chosen to live with this virus,” Newsom said Monday as he announced the new mandate.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California will soon require state employees and all healthcare workers to provide proof of COVID-19 inoculation or get tested at least once a week, Gov. Gavin Newsom announced Monday as he vowed that the the Golden State will have the “strongest vaccine verification system in the US.”

“Too many people have chosen to live with this virus,” Newsom said during a press briefing where he announced the new vaccination requirement, which will take effect next month.

The Democratic governor added, “We’re at a point in this epidemic, this pandemic, where individuals’ choice not to get vaccinated is now impacting the rest of us in a profound and devastating and deadly way.”

There are 246,000 state employees in California who will be impacted by the order. Additionally, there are at least 2 million healthcare workers in the public and private sectors in the state who fall under the mandate, according to the Associated Press.

Read more: How anti-vaxxers are engineering a wave of legal battles to fight mandatory workplace Covid jabs

The vaccine or test requirement also applies to those working in “high-risk congregate settings” like adult and senior residential facilities, homeless shelters, and jails, the governor said.

The new policy for state workers will take effect on Aug. 2 and testing will be phased in over the next few weeks, while the policy for healthcare workers and those in congregate facilities will take effect on Aug. 9.

Healthcare facilities will have until Aug. 23 to be in full compliance.

California has recently seen an increase in coronavirus cases as the highly transmissible Delta variant of COVID-19 continues to spread. The state’s coronavirus positivity rate has risen to 5.3%, Newsom said Monday.

“As the state’s largest employer – we’re leading by example. Vaccines are the solution,” Newsom said in a tweet. “We encourage local governments and other businesses to follow suit.”

According to Newsom’s office, “Despite California leading the nation in vaccinations, with more than 44 million doses administered and 75% of the eligible population having received at least one dose, the state is seeing increasing numbers of people who refused to get the vaccine being admitted to the ICU and dying.”

California’s mandate was the latest vaccine requirement announced as the COVID-19 pandemic drags on.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio announced Monday that the entire city workforce – some 340,000 people – will be mandated by mid-September to get vaccinated against the coronavirus or be tested weekly, and the Department of Veterans Affairs also announced that all healthcare workers will need to get vaccinated.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom signs bill that bans police from posting mugshots of people accused of non-violent crimes on social media

California Gov. Gavin Newsom
California Governor Gavin Newsom at a June 2021 press conference.

  • California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed a bill preventing police from sharing mugshots on social media of individuals accused of non-violent crimes.
  • The bill’s sponsor said he hoped the legislation helps to tackle “unconscious bias,” according to the San Francisco Chronicle.
  • Under the law, police can still share photos of individuals they believe are dangerous who those who are accused of violent crimes.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom on Friday signed into law a bill that bans police from sharing on social media the mugshots of individuals charged with non-violent offenses.

Assembly Member Evan Low, a Democrat representing San Jose, sponsored the bill, known as AB 1475, and told the San Francisco Chronicle that he authored the legislation to reduce “unconscious bias” and “the assumption of guilt that” is created when police post booking photos online.

Sometimes, he noted, police will share photos mocking those accused of crimes.

The bill passed with bipartisan support, and there was no organized campaign against the legislation, the Chronicle reported. The law also passed with the support of San Francisco Police Chief Bill Scott, Low said, according to The Chronicle.

“In recent years, many departments have used their social media accounts to shame suspects arrested by officers, posting mug shots, names and alleged crimes,” Low wrote in a letter to Newsom that urged him to sign the bill, according to the Chronicle.

“The publication of these mugshots does little to serve a legitimate public safety interest as suspects are already in custody,” he added.

The new law still allows law enforcement to post the mugshots of criminals accused of violent crimes, fugitives, or individuals that police believe pose an immediate threat to the public.

The law also creates a way for people who have been accused of non-violent crimes to have their photos removed from social media pages of police departments that already shared them on social media, according to the legislation. Those accused of violent crimes can also request their mugshot be removed should they meet criteria set forth in the legislation.

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California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill dedicating a record $12 billion to homelessness

Gavin Newsom
In this Feb. 16, 2021, file photo, California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference on the campus of the California State University of Los Angeles in Los Angeles

  • California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill allocating a $12 billion budget to combat homelessness.
  • This is a part of Newsom’s “California Comeback Plan,” which will also focus on affordable housing.
  • “We can end homelessness in the state of California,” Newsom said.
  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom signed a bill into law Monday dedicating $12 billion towards combating homelessness in the state.

The new legislation is the largest investment in the state’s history in confronting the homelessness crisis, topping last year’s amount of $950 million, Newsom said during a Monday press conference.

The “California Comeback Plan,” which will also focus on affordable housing, will come with “more transparency and more accountability,” Newsom said. He added that the funds will provide crucial support for the state population that are “getting on their feet.”

Previously, solving the homelessness crisis has been left up to cities and counties – not the state. Newsom said he will also be holding cities and counties accountable. Project Roomkey, a homelessness relief initiative, provided shelter for 42,000 homeless Californians during the pandemic.

The US Department of Housing and Urban Development estimated that there were 161,548 people experiencing homelessness in California as of January 2020.

“We can end homelessness in the state of California,” Newsom said. “We don’t think that, we know that.”

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California lawmakers just approved the nation’s first guaranteed income program

dollar bills
  • California lawmakers approved a program that would provide monthly checks to residents.
  • This guaranteed income program will prioritize pregnant people and those aging out of the foster system.
  • The state is the first to implement this type of program, which many Democrats have been pushing for.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

In the first-of-its-kind state initiative, California just approved a program to distribute monthly checks to its residents, marking a step toward a universal basic income in the country.

On Thursday, California’s state legislature unanimously passed a $35 million guaranteed income program funded by taxpayer dollars, in which residents can receive up to $1,000 monthly checks. According to the text of the bill, the program would prioritize residents who age out of the foster system and pregnant individuals, and it does not contain any restrictions on how the monthly payments should be spent.

“I’d like to thank my colleagues for partnering with me on this important work and investing in this concept that will uplift the lives of so many,” California State Senator Dave Cortese, who advocated for the program, said in a statement. “I’m excited that 40 million Californians will now get a chance to see how guaranteed income works in their own communities.”

Cortese added that this program is modeled after a successful universal basic income program passed in Santa Clara County last year, which offered $1,000 monthly checks for a year to young adults who were no longer eligible for foster care.

The California Department of Social Services will administer the funds equitably for both rural and urban applicants, and the bill now heads to California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s desk for approval.

The idea of a universal basic income is becoming increasingly popular. After the pandemic spurred Congress to approve three stimulus checks for Americans, some Democrats began to call for those checks to continue well beyond the end of the pandemic.

On March 31, in the midst of infrastructure negotiations, 21 Democratic senators urged President Joe Biden in a letter to include recurring direct payments in his infrastructure plan, saying that when checks ran out after the CARES Act, poverty rose.

Insider also previously reported that a fourth and fifth stimulus check could cut the number of Americans in poverty in 2021 from 44 million to 16 million while helping close imbalances in poverty, income, and wealth between white Americans and Americans of color.

Biden has not yet commented on if recurring direct payments will become a reality, but California might have paved the way for other states to follow suit and amplified Democrats’ calls to give every resident guaranteed monthly payments.

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Caitlyn Jenner’s campaign says they’re ‘documenting history’ with a camera crew, but the footage could be sold for a documentary or reality show

Television personality Caitlyn Jenner attends WORLDZ Cultural Marketing Summit at Hollywood and Highland on August 1, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.
Television personality Caitlyn Jenner attends WORLDZ Cultural Marketing Summit at Hollywood and Highland on August 1, 2017 in Los Angeles, California.

  • Suspicions over Caitlyn Jenner’s California gubernatorial campaign are growing.
  • A new Politico report sheds details on a camera crew following her around.
  • Jenner could flip the footage to make money off of a documentary or reality show.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Although Caitlyn Jenner’s Republican gubernatorial campaign in California has been light on substance, it may be sitting on a cash cow in the form of documentary footage.

Jenner is running in a recall election against Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom, with enough voters signing a petition to put his term on the ballot early.

Read more: An ex-cop, anti-vaxxers, and Mike Huckabee: The 17 most prominent people driving the recall of California Democratic Gov. Gavin Newsom

A camera crew has been following Jenner all over the campaign trail, giving her the option of selling the video to a streaming service or TV channel, according to Politico Playbook.

“Right now, we’re focused on winning and I haven’t thought about what to do with it, but [the campaign is] something that needs to be documented,” a Jenner spokesperson told Politico.

Jenner’s campaign told Insider there is no deal in place for a documentary or TV show.

“As with any candidate that has done in the past, there are cameras filming Caitlyn at certain big political events like CPAC,” a campaign spokesperson wrote in an email. “There is no deal for any television show or documentary.”

While having a behind the scenes documentary put together is not unique to Jenner in US politics – the Mitt Romney and Hillary Clinton presidential campaigns being the most notable examples – Jenner’s campaign has befuddled California political observers for months.

Right from the start, Jenner’s campaign had mysteriously few public events, even going “silent” for its first full week, as Politico reported back in April.

Her interviews have been mostly confined to Fox News and conservative media, and it took her 77 days to take any questions from the California press.

“If she goes through the motions and it’s a legit campaign, we can’t legally differentiate between people where it’s a long shot and she’s just doing it to make a movie,” Richard Painter, a campaign ethics lawyer, told Playbook.

California’s recall election is set for September 14.

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CA Gov. Gavin Newsom asks California residents to cut water use by 15% as drought ravages the state

California Gov. Gavin Newsom.
California Gov. Gavin Newsom.

  • California Gov. Gavin Newsom asked residents of the Golden State Thursday to cut their water use by 15%.
  • The move comes as drought conditions intensify across the western US.
  • The state is encouraging locals to “do common sense things” like reducing the amount of time spent in the shower, Newsom said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom asked residents of the Golden State Thursday to cut their water use by 15% as drought conditions intensify across the western US.

The Democratic governor signed an executive order to “encourage” voluntary water conservation efforts across the state.

“I want to underscore voluntary water conservation,” Newsom said at a press briefing. “We are hopeful that people will take that mindset brought into the last drought and extend that forward with a 15% voluntary reduction not only on residents, but industrial, commercial operations and agricultural operations.”

Newsom explained that the state is encouraging locals to “do common sense things” like reducing the amount of time spent in the shower and doing laundry and running a dishwasher only when there is a full load.

“I’m not here as a nanny-state. I’m not trying to be oppressive,” he said. “These are voluntary standards.”

Additionally, Newsom added nine counties to an emergency drought proclamation, which now includes 50 of the state’s 58 counties.

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Photos show the ‘bathtub ring’ along a parched Los Angeles reservoir, as California’s drought grows more dire

An aerial view of reservoir tucked in between a mountainous landscape under a bright sky.
Aerial view of the reservoir nestled in the San Gabriel Mountain Range.

  • Gov. Gavin Newsom declared a drought emergency in 41 California counties, representing 30% of the state’s population.
  • Reservoirs across the state are running dry.
  • Photographer Ted Soqui captured the dramatic “bathtub ring” at the San Gabriel Reservoir, just outside Los Angeles.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The three-mile-long San Gabriel Reservoir, nestled in the mountains above Los Angeles, is running dry.

California saw significantly less rain and snow this year, and drought conditions this summer have left much of the state increasingly parched.

Across California, many reservoirs and lakes are experiencing a “bathtub ring” phenomena: Declining water levels expose white rings around the edges of these bodies of water – the result of calcium carbonate and other minerals attached to the rock. The more rings that are visible, the lower the water level.

Photographs of the San Gabriel Reservoir offer a hint at how severe the drought could get in Southern California.

Rings are seen along rocks above a reservoir, showing where the water line once was.
Aerial view of the “bathtub ring” phenomena around the San Gabriel Reservoir.

A close-up of the rings that form along the rocks, showing where the water line once was.
Detail of the newly exposed “bathtub ring” phenomena on the side of the San Gabriel Reservoir as it dries out.

In May, California Governor Gavin Newsom expanded the state’s emergency drought declaration to cover 41 counties, representing 30 percent of the state’s population. The governor’s office attributed the situation to especially hot temperatures brought on by climate change, as well as extremely dry mountaintop soil that absorbs water that would otherwise flow into the state’s water collection systems.

“Extraordinarily warm temperatures in April and early May separate this critically dry year from all others on California record,” the governor’s office said in a statement.

The giant reservoirs in Northern California – Folsom Lake, Lake Oroville, and Shasta – are also seeing low water levels after less snow and rain runoff came down from the Sierra Nevada mountain range.

A bald eagle is seen resting on a leaf-less tree amid a parched landscape.
A Bald Eagle rests near the reservoir.

An aerial view shows the bottom of the reservoir.
The bottom of the reservoir becomes exposed as it dries out.

Most of Los Angeles’ water is pumped over the Tejon pass from northern California. The water from the San Gabriel reservoir, which holds more than 54 million cubic meters of water when full, mostly serves the San Gabriel Valley.

Significant rain and snow fall is not expected until November.

An aerial view of the reservoir shows a swirl of patterns.
Rorschach-like patterns now appear on the newly exposed bottom of the San Gabriel Reservoir.

A wide aerial view of the reservoir dam area.
Wide view of the southern area of the reservoir’s dam area. The reservoir is now almost empty with a sliver if water running through it.

The barren, dry landscape is seen around the reservoir.
The terrain around the San Gabriel Reservoir is now fully exposed.

Ted Soqui is a photojournalist based in L.A. See more of his work here.

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Disneyland and other California theme parks just returned to full capacity – here’s what is changing

disneyland
LOS ANGELES, CA – FEBRUARY 19: Pedestrians walk near the entrance to Disneyland Resort on February 19, 2009 in Anaheim, California. With the worsening economy, declining attendance and reduced operating income, the Walt Disney Company announced that it plans to restructure its domestic theme-park operations, which will result in the layoff an unspecified number of employees in the coming weeks. Disneyland in Anaheim, California and Walt Disney World in Orlando, Florida will reportedly be consolidated into a single unit headed by Worldwide Operations President Al Weiss. Attendance at Disney theme parks in the US dropped 5 percent in the last quarter of 2008 compared to the previous year and in January, Disney offered buyout packages to 600 US executives.

  • California theme parks, sporting events, and concerts returned to 100% capacity on Tuesday.
  • The state health department added some regulations on vaccinations records and masking for theme parks.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California theme parks, including Disneyland and Universal Studios Hollywood, returned to full capacity on Tuesday.

Gov. Gavin Newsom first announced the parks could return to full capacity in May as a part of his Blueprint for a Safer Economy. The previous 15% to 35% capacity limits lifted at the same time that the entire state fully reopened.

The parks will also no longer be required to maintain physical-distancing requirements on the sites.

The California Health Department added special regulations for venues such as theme parks, concerts, and sports arenas that could be classified as “mega-events” – indoor events with more than 5,000 people, and outdoor ones with over 10,000. The venues are required to provide masks for all customers, though attendees will not be required to wear them if they have been fully vaccinated.

Customers planning on attending indoor venues must either be able to verify that they are fully vaccinated or take a COVID-19 test with a negative result 72 hours prior to entering the venue. They are expected to bring their test results or send them prior to arriving at the event.

For outdoor events, the agency recommends that the venues require a vaccination record or COVID-19 test, but will not enforce it. If an individual at an outdoor event cannot verify that they have been vaccinated, it is recommended that the venue asks the individual to wear a mask.

The California Health Department said the new mandates will run through October 1, but will be reassessed on September 1.

Disneyland reopened for the first time since the pandemic started on April 30 at 25% capacity. Since then, fans have flocked to the theme park.

Fully reopening the park will allow Disney to begin recouping from the impact of the pandemic on one of its biggest revenue streams. Last year, the media giant lost nearly $5 billion due to park closures.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Disneyland and other California theme parks will return to full capacity in June – here’s what is changing

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  • On Friday, Governor Gavin Newsom announced California would fully reopen on June 15.
  • Theme parks, sporting events, and concerts will be able to return to 100% capacity.
  • The state health department added some regulations on vaccinations records and masking for theme parks.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California theme parks, including Disneyland and Universal Studios Hollywood, will return to full capacity on June 15.

The announcement was made on Friday as a part of Governor Gavin Newsom’s Blueprint for a Safer Economy. The current 15% to 35% capacity limits will lift at the same time that the entire state fully reopens.

The parks will also no longer be required to maintain physical-distancing requirements on the sites.

The California Health Department added special regulations for venues such as theme parks, concerts, and sports arenas that could be classified as “mega-events” – indoor events with more than 5,000 people, and outdoor ones with over 10,000. The venues are required to provide masks for all customers, though attendees will not be required to wear them if they have been fully vaccinated.

Customers planning on attending indoor venues must either be able to verify that they are fully vaccinated or take a COVID-19 test with a negative result 72 hours prior to entering the venue. They are expected to bring their test results or send them prior to arriving at the event.

For outdoor events, the agency recommends that the venues require a vaccination record or COVID-19 test, but will not enforce it. If an individual at an outdoor event cannot verify that they have been vaccinated, it is recommended that the venue asks the individual to wear a mask.

The California Health Department said the new mandates will run through October 1, but will be reassessed on September 1.

Disneyland reopened for the first time since the pandemic started on April 30 at 25% capacity. Since then, fans have flocked to the theme park.

Fully reopening the park will allow Disney to begin recouping from the impact of the pandemic on one of its biggest revenue streams. Last year, the media giant lost nearly $5 billion due to park closures.

Read the original article on Business Insider