Ireland, the home of Apple and Google in Europe, is seeking a compromise on Biden’s plan for a 15% global minimum corporate tax rate, reports say

A woman wearing sunglasses exits Google's Dublin headquarters
A Google office in Dublin.

  • Ireland – home to Google, Apple, Microsoft – said it’s willing to “compromise” on corporate taxes.
  • G7 leaders agreed to a 15% global minimum corporate tax rate, which is higher than Ireland’s 12.5%.
  • Ireland’s finance minister on Friday told CNBC there’s a role for “legitimate tax competition.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Ireland – European home to tech giants like Apple, Google, and Microsoft – said it was willing to “compromise” on global minimum tax rates.

Paschal Donohoe, Ireland’s finance minister, on Friday told CNBC that the country would “engage” in tax-rate negotiations “very intensely.”

“…and I do hope an agreement can be reached that does recognize the role of legitimate tax competition for smaller and medium-sized economies,” Donohoe said.

The Group of Seven wealthy nations this month agreed to a 15% global minimum corporate tax rate, higher than Ireland’s 12.5%. President Joe Biden’s administration pushed the agreement, saying it would be “a critical step towards ending the decades-long race to the bottom” on corporate tax rates.

Ireland has long attracted multinational corporations seeking a European outpost with favorable rates, sometimes at the frustration of its European neighbors. Apple in 2016 was targeted by the European Commission, which said the company needed to pay back taxes of about $15 billion. Apple appealed.

Big Tech this month mostly said it welcomed a uniform global rate.

“Facebook has long called for reform of the global tax rules and we welcome the important progress made at the G7,” Nick Clegg, vice president for global affairs at Facebook, told Insider.

As the G7 tax agreement was announced, Donohoe said on Twitter that there were 139 countries that would eventually be involved in such a tax agreement. As such, it would have to work for small and large nations, he said. Developing and wealthy nations would all have to agree, he said.

“It is in everyone’s interest to achieve a sustainable, ambitious and equitable agreement on the international tax architecture,” he said at the time.

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Joe Biden was corrected by Boris Johnson after the president interrupted him at the G7 summit

Joe Biden points while sitting next to Boris Johnson at the G7 Summit
Boris Johnson and Joe Biden at the G7 summit

  • UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson seen correcting US President Joe Biden at this weekend’s G7 summit.
  • Biden wrongly suggested Johnson hadn’t introduced South African president Cyril Ramaphosa.
  • The UK Prime Minister appeared to twice wave away the president’s interruptions.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson was seen correcting US President Joe Biden at this weekend’s G7 Summit in Cornwall, England, after the president interrupted him to wrongly suggest that Johnson had failed to introduce South Africa’s president at a roundtable of world leaders.

Johnson appeared to twice wave away Biden’s interruptions on Saturday, while he was hosting a roundtable of world leaders at the G7 summit.

The UK prime minister welcomed India’s prime minister Narendra Modi via video-link and then introduced South Africa’s president Cyril Ramaphosa, who joined the leaders of the G7 grouping, which comprises Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States.

“And the president of South Africa,” Biden added to Johnson.

“And the president of South Africa, as I said earlier on,” Johnson replied.

“Oh, you did,” Biden said.

“I did, I certainly did,” Johnson said.

It was not clear from footage of the incident whether Biden had not heard Johnson introduced President Ramaphosa or whether he was unaware of his name and therefore had not realized that Johnson had already introduced him.

World leaders agreed at the summit – the major first in-person meeting of the G7 since the coronavirus pandemic – to donate one billion COVID-19 vaccine doses to poorer countries over the next 12 months.

They also agreed to take more action on climate change and renewed a pledge to raise $100 billion a year to help poor countries cut carbon emissions.

However, some charities and campaign groups said the commitments were vague in their wording did not go far enough.

“Never in the history of the G7 has there been a bigger gap between their actions and the needs of the world,” said Oxfam’s head of inequality policy Max Lawson in a statement cited by the Guardian.

“We don’t need to wait for history to judge this summit a colossal failure, it is plain for all to see.”

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G7 Summit takeaways: The US is back on top, the Queen cut a cake with a sword, and world leaders promised 1 billion COVID-19 doses

(L-R) Italy's Prime Minister Mario Draghi, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Britain's Prime Minister Boris Johnson, US President Joe Biden, France's President Emmanuel Macron, Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Japan's Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga attend a plenary session during G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall on June 13, 2021.
(L-R) Italy’s Prime Minister Mario Draghi, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson, US President Joe Biden, France’s President Emmanuel Macron, Canada’s Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Japan’s Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga attend a plenary session during G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall on June 13, 2021.

  • World leaders from the US, Italy, France, Japan, Canada, Germany, and the UK met this weekend for the G7 Summit.
  • The summit, made up of the world’s wealthiest large democracies and close allies, is designed to discuss economic and international policies.
  • Here are the biggest takeaways from the three-day event:
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
Against the backdrop of the global pandemic, world leaders met in person for the first time since the coronavirus shut down travel.

(L-R) German Chancellor Angela Merkel, European Commission Ursula von der Leyen, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Queen Elizabeth II, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, President of the European Council Charles Michel and United States President Joe Biden pose for a group photo at a drinks reception for Queen Elizabeth II and G7 leaders at The Eden Project during the G7 Summit on June 11, 2021 in St Austell, Cornwall, England.
(L-R) German Chancellor Angela Merkel, European Commission Ursula von der Leyen, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Queen Elizabeth II, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, President of the European Council Charles Michel, and US President Joe Biden.

The seven world leaders — German Chancellor Angela Merkel, French President Emmanuel Macron, Japanese Prime Minister Yoshihide Suga, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau, British Prime Minister Boris Johnson, Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi, and US President Joe Biden — met on a seaside resort in Cornwall, England. 

It was the first time the heads of these countries met in person since the pandemic shut down travel more than a year ago. The G7 leaders last met in person in France in August 2019, nearly two years ago.

In addition to the seven countries normally present, others like South Africa, South Korea, India, and Australia received invitations to attend virtually the 47th Summit.

In the spirit of gathering and collaboration, the G7 leaders talked through strategies to end the coronavirus pandemic.

Boris Johnson
UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson.

Johnson announced that the leaders would together donate at least 1 billion vaccine doses against the coronavirus to lower-income countries over the next year in a coordinated effort to end the pandemic in 2022. 

“Our international priority is to accelerate the rollout of safe and effective, accessible and affordable vaccines for the poorest countries, noting the role of extensive immunization as a global public good,” the leaders said in a statement published on Sunday. 

They promised to also help countries around the world develop technology that can manufacture and disseminate vaccines quicker.

When asked about the expected timeline to end the pandemic on a global scale, Biden said “it might take slightly longer” than 2022.

G7 leaders agree that the US is back on top.

Emmanuel Macron in Brussels
Emmanuel Macron, President of France speaks in Brussels on October 2, 2020.

Macron on Saturday signaled his confidence in the United States as an ally with Biden at the nation’s helm. When asked by reporters whether he thinks “America is back,” Biden gestured to Macron to answer the question. 

“Yes, definitely,” Macron said. “It’s great to have a US president who’s part of the club and very willing to cooperate. What you demonstrate is that leadership is partnership.”

Biden indicated his agreement. “The United States, I’ve said before, we’re back,” the US president said. “Things are going, I think, well, and we’re, as we say back in the States, we’re on the same page.”

Johnson on Thursday hailed Biden as “a big breath of fresh air.”

The Queen showed off her sword skills.

The Queen used a sword to cut a cake
Queen Elizabeth II attempts to cut a cake with a sword, lent to her by the Lord-Lieutenant of Cornwall, Edward Bolitho, to celebrate of the Big Lunch initiative at the Eden Project, near St Austell in southwest England on June 11, 2021.

The Queen of England borrowed a ceremonial sword to cut a cake on Friday. 

An aide informed her that there was a standard knife available to cut the cake. But the Queen insisted she use the sword.

“I know there is,” she told the aide. “This is more unusual.”

After the first slice using the sword, she then cut the rest of the cake with a regular knife.

World leaders single out Russia and China.

Biden Putin
President Joe Biden and Russian President Vladimir Putin are set to meet in Geneva on June 16.

The world leaders presented a united front against Russia and China, vowing to condemn human-rights abuses and political tactics that stray from their economic and international visions. 

Biden, for example, rebuked China for human-rights abuses. “I think China has to start to act more responsibly in terms of international norms on human rights and transparency,” he said. “Transparency matters across the board.”

In a press briefing, a senior US administration official said the six other leaders maintain “a very strong and shared foundation” in their approach to China. The seven leaders also promised to investigate the origins of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Later, China clapped back, saying “the days when global decisions were dictated by a small group of countries are long gone.”

On Russia, Biden said US relations with Moscow have reached a “low point.” 

“Russia has engaged in activities which we believe are contrary to international norms, but they have also bitten off some real problems they’re going to have trouble chewing on,” Biden said.

Leaders agree on a plan to phase out gasoline cars.

Three G7 leaders sit at table
South Korea’s President Moon Jae-in (L) and US President Joe Biden (R) listen to Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson during a working session at the G7 summit in Carbis Bay, Cornwall on June 12, 2021.

Aside from the coronavirus, G7 leaders focused on advancing climate change measures. 

Among them is a proposal to phase out gasoline and diesel cars. The leaders vowed to end “almost all direct government support” for fossil fuels and halt “all unabated coal as soon as possible.”

In an effort to extend this proposal beyond the G7, world leaders agreed to allocate $2 billion to help developing countries to seek out other options besides coal, a statement from the White House said.

Despite the heavy focus away from fossil fuels, world leaders, including Biden, did not set a concrete date for the end of coal use, which contributes directly to global warming.

Biden met the Queen for the first time as president.

Joe Biden and Jill Biden meet the Queen at Windsor Castle
President Joe Biden and first lady Jill Biden stood beside the Queen outside of Windsor Castle on Sunday.

Biden and Queen Elizabeth II met on Friday, marking his first time engaging with the Queen in person as president. The Queen has met every president since Harry S. Truman, with the exception of Lyndon B. Johnson.

At the end of the Summit on Sunday, Biden and first lady Jill had tea with the Queen at Windsor Castle.

Biden met the Queen for the first time as a US senator in the 1980s.

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China to G7 leaders: Days when world affairs are decided by a ‘small group of countries are long gone’

G7
G7 leaders agreed on Sunday to raise their contributions to meet an overdue spending pledge of $100 billion a year to help poorer countries cut carbon emissions and cope with global warming, but campaigners said firm cash promises were missing.

  • China said that the times of a “small” group of countries deciding world decisions are “long gone,” Reuters reported.
  • The remarks came as G7 leaders met in London over the weekend.
  • A spokesperson for the China embassy in London added that “world affairs should be handled through consultation by all countries.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

China said that the time of a “small” group of countries has authority over global decisions is “long gone,” as a warning to Group of Seven leaders on Sunday.

“The days when global decisions were dictated by a small group of countries are long gone,” a spokesperson for the China embassy in London told Reuters.

The spokesperson continued: “We always believe that countries, big or small, strong or weak, poor or rich, are equals, and that world affairs should be handled through consultation by all countries,” according to the report.

The remarks follow after President Joe Biden and the other leaders of the G7 from Canada, Italy, Japan Germany, the United Kingdom, and France who convened in England over the weekend. They announced a multi-billion dollar infrastructure plan to challenge China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

“Ganging up, pursuing bloc politics, and forming small cliques are unpopular and doomed to fail,” Wang Wenbin, China’s foreign ministry spokesperson previously said, as Insider Kevin Shalvey reported.

The G7 also discussed how to overcome the pandemic on a global scale and revamp their economies including calling “for a timely, transparent, expert-led, and science-based WHO-convened Phase 2 COVID-19 Origins study including, as recommended by the experts’ report, in China.”

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G7 leaders push for a ‘transparent’ investigation into the origins of COVID

G7 family photo
The 2021 G7 family photo in Cornwall, England.

  • The G7 leaders want a “transparent” investigation into the origins of the coronavirus.
  • Biden signed a joint communiqué that outlined plans to defeat the virus and plan for the future.
  • The G7 also committed to giving 1 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses to countries in need.
  • Sign up for the 10 Things in Politics daily newsletter.

The Group of Seven (G7) leaders on Sunday expressed support for a “transparent” investigation into the origins of the coronavirus, while also seeking ways to better prepare for future pandemics.

President Joe Biden joined the leaders of the United Kingdom, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, and Japan in signing a joint summit communiqué that addressed everything from strategies to end the current pandemic to a guideline for combatting climate change and an examination of international law regarding online safety and hate speech.

The international leaders are pushing for “a timely, transparent, expert-led, and science-based WHO-convened Phase 2 COVID-19 Origins study including, as recommended by the experts’ report, in China.”

The G7 also committed to giving 1 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses to countries in need as they continue to weather the pandemic.

Read more: What we learned about Joe Biden from riding Amtrak with a Senate colleague who has known the president for five decades

In recent weeks, the debate over the origins of the coronavirus has become a huge issue among US lawmakers and several health experts who question if the coronavirus possibly originated in a lab in Wuhan, China.

However, China has refuted the claim, and Republicans have been critical of involvement by the World Health Organization regarding any possible investigation.

Last month, Biden asked for the intelligence community to “redouble their efforts” in ascertaining the origins of the coronavirus after it was revealed that there was COVID-19 evidence that had not yet been analyzed, according to The New York Times

At the time, the president also requested a report on the findings to be issued in three months.

Last year’s in-person G7 summit was set to be held at Camp David, the presidential retreat in Maryland, but was canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

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Biden pushes G7 to get tough on China, calling out forced labor, human rights abuses, and ‘non-market’ practices

President Joe Biden and German Chancellor Angela Merkel talk with in England.
President Joe Biden and German Chancellor Angela Merkel during a bilateral meeting on Saturday.

  • President Biden urged G7 leaders to collectively rebuke China over forced labor.
  • “And more than just speaking out, taking action,” a senior US administration official said.
  • Some G7 leaders with trade ties to Beijing expressed concern about calling out human-rights abuses.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

President Joe Biden this weekend worked to rally the Group of Seven to offer a collective rebuke to China over forced labor, human-rights abuses, and other “non-market” practices.

The leaders on Saturday found they had a “very strong and shared foundation” for a joint approach to China, a senior US administration official said in a press briefing.

“And more than just speaking out, taking action, responding to forced-labor in supply chains, again, including from Xinjiang,” the official said, referencing a region where human rights groups say China has committed crimes against humanity.

Biden has made slowing China’s growing economic power and international reach the centerpiece of his foreign policy agenda for his first overseas summit. The G7 nations – US, UK, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the EU – yesterday announced a multi-billion-dollar infrastructure plan to rival the international spending of China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

President Joe Biden leaves Sunday mass in St. Ives, England.
President Joe Biden on Sunday morning in St. Ives, England.

Senior US officials, who spoke to the press on the condition of anonymity, detailed areas where the US and its allies were seeing “convergence” during Saturday’s talks in Carbis Bay, England.

The administration said Biden had urged other G7 members to speak out about China’s “practices that are harmful and distorted to the global economy.”

Biden spoke about China in his breakout one-on-one sessions with Italian Prime Minister Mario Draghi and French President Emmanuel Macron, according to official readouts.

But it was unclear whether Biden would be able to steer the group to include the type of strong, disapproving language the US favors in the official G7 communiqué, which is expected after the summit wraps on Sunday.

Some senior UK officials, for example, have sought to keep human-rights abuses in China off the table, partly because the UK has worked to build up trade with China, Politico reported.

Officials from Italy, Germany, and the EU also each expressed concern on Saturday about putting stress on their economic ties to China, The New York Times reported.

Japan in April expressed similar concern during a White House visit, The Washington Post reported.

A spokesperson for the Chinese embassy in London told Reuters that the “days when global decisions were dictated by a small group of countries are long gone.”

The spokesperson said: “We always believe that countries, big or small, strong or weak, poor or rich, are equals, and that world affairs should be handled through consultation by all countries.”

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G7 members will spend ‘hundreds of billions’ on infrastructure to rival China’s Belt and Road initiative, according to a US official. China says G7 proposals are doomed to fail.

President Joe Biden talks with French President Emmanuel Macron and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen at the G7.
President Joe Biden, French President Emmanuel Macron, and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen.

  • G7 members plan to announce an international spending initiative to rival China’s Belt and Road.
  • They will be “collectively catalyzing hundreds of billions of dollars,” a US official said.
  • Proposals amounted to “bloc politics,” and were “doomed to fail,” said China’s Foreign Ministry.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

President Joe Biden and the G7 member states on Saturday planned to announce a multibillion-dollar initiative to build infrastructure overseas, a direct challenge to China’s Belt and Road Initiative.

“There is, by some estimates, a $40 trillion infrastructure gap in parts of the world that this would be intended to help other countries fill,” said a senior US administration official, who spoke about the plans on the condition of anonymity.

Biden and his G7 counterparts planned to announce the initiative during a working session focused on China on Saturday, the second day of the summit in Carbis Bay, England.

The Biden administration and international allies planned to “soon be collectively catalyzing hundreds of billions of dollars in infrastructure investment for low- and middle-income countries that need it,” the official said.

The plan would place the wealthy G7 nations – US, UK, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, and the EU – in competition with Beijing’s spending on international infrastructure.

Under President Xi Jinping, China spearheaded a new “Silk Road” initiative to build or improve transportation networks throughout Asia and reaching into Europe.

The trillions of dollars spent so far by Beijing have increased the country’s ability to ship goods, while also building international goodwill.

US officials on Friday said the G7 spending wouldn’t be about “making countries choose between us and china,” but would instead be about “offering an affirmative, alternative vision and approach that they would want to choose.”

Wang Wenbin, China’s foreign ministry spokesperson, said of the G7 plans, “Ganging up, pursuing bloc politics, and forming small cliques are unpopular and doomed to fail.”

Biden’s White House was calling the initiative “Build Back Better for the World,” expanding on Biden’s 2020 campaign tagline of “Build Back Better.” An official called it “B3W” as a shorthand.

The White House and its G7 partners have “long been skeptical about China’s Belt and Road Initiative,” a second senior administration official said.

“We’ve seen the Chinese government demonstrate a lack of transparency, poor environmental and labor standards, and a course of approach that’s left many countries worse off,” the official said. “But until now, we haven’t offered a positive alternative that reflects our values, our standards, and our way of doing business.”

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London and Switzerland are seeking ways to dodge the global minimum tax Biden is pushing at the G7

Joe Biden touching Boris Johnson at the g7 summit in the UK
Prime Minister Boris Johnson speaks with US President Joe Biden at Carbis Bay Hotel on June 10, 2021, near St Ives, England.

  • G7 finance ministers agreed a global corporate minimum tax of 15% at the UK summit on Saturday.
  • The plan is aimed at tech giants, but some nations worry their financial districts will be hit.
  • Switzerland is discussing how it will mitigate the tax and The City of London wants an exemption.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The City London and Switzerland are aiming to mitigate the effects of the global minimum tax plan agreed by the G7 group of nations.

On Saturday, G7 finance ministers meeting in Cornwall, UK, agreed a global corporate minimum tax of 15%, which companies would need to pay in each country where they operate.

The plan was first put forward by US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen.

Many companies register themselves in countries with favorable tax rates, like Ireland and Switzerland. The G7 plan is an attempt to impose extra costs on that practice.

Activists have long complained that companies like Google, Amazon, and Facebook avoid paying millions in tax due to their use of tax havens.

But the City of London and Switzerland are already working to ensure they don’t get badly hit by the minimum tax rate, as they fear it will make their financial districts less attractive.

The central Swiss government has discussed ways to offset the G7’s minimum tax rate with the 26 Swiss cantons, according to the Financial Times.

Possible measures include social security deductions and tax credits, the FT said.

Ernst Stocker, the finance chief of the Zurich canton, told the SRF broadcaster on Monday that the country needs to stay attractive to businesses, and may need to introduce new tax deductions.

In the UK, Chancellor Rishi Sunak is worried that banks based in the City of London, whom he says pay adequate tax, will be wrongly dragged into the 15% rate.

London’s finance sector is of disproprtionate importance to the UK economy, and is a hub for business activities from all over the world.

Sunak is attempting to get the City of London an exemption to any minimum tax rate, according to reports.

A source close to the G7 talks told the Guardian that several other EU countries want financial services to be excluded from the minimum rate.

“The Europeans don’t want to pull too many companies into this, they’re mostly interested in US tech,” the source said

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The White House press plane was delayed for more than 6 hours by swarms of cicadas

cicada washington
A cicada nymph seen at the US Capitol on May 20, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • A plane was due to take White House reporters to the UK for the G7 summit at 9 p.m. ET on Tuesday.
  • It was delayed for at least six hours after cicadas swarmed the plane, reporters on board said.
  • The US East Coast is overrun with cicadas after a huge brood hatched last month.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A White House press plane was delayed for more than 6 hours on Tuesday night after thousands of cicadas swarmed the aircraft, CNN reported.

The plane, which was due to take off from Washington’s Dulles International Airport at 9 p.m. ET, was laid on to transport US reporters covering the G7 summit, which runs from June 11 to June 13 in Cornwall, UK.

But their flight was delayed after cicadas invaded exterior sections of the plane, CNN reported.

The US East Coast is currently overrun by swarms of cicadas, after huge brood hatched following a 17-year wait last month.

“Another reason to dislike cicadas … Waiting to board replacement aircraft 6 hours later…,” Andrew Mitchell, NBC News’ chief Washington correspondent, tweeted late Tuesday.

Biden is flying to the UK ahead of the G7 summit on Wednesday.

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United, Delta, and American Airlines call for Biden lift restrictions and approve transatlantic travel between the US and UK

Scott Kirby 1   Photo by Chip Somodevilla:Getty Images
United Airlines CEO Scott Kirby.

  • Airline bosses have called for restrictions on US-UK travel to be relaxed in a joint statement.
  • United Airlines and Delta Air Lines are among the six carriers calling for a travel corridor.
  • Airlines have suffered record losses since the start of the pandemic.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Airline bosses have called the opening of a travel corridor between the US and UK amid both countries’ “world-leading vaccination programmes” in a joint statement released Monday.

The chief executives of American Airlines, Delta Air Lines, United Airlines, and JetBlue joined British carriers Virgin Atlantic, and British Airways in urging President Joe Biden and UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson to lift travel restrictions between the two countries.

The bosses of the US Travel Association and London’s Heathrow Airport also joined the call ahead of the G7 meeting in Cornwall, England this week.

“There is a clear opportunity to safely open up travel between these two low-risk countries,” the statement said.

The group urged the US government to allow fully vaccinated UK travelers, or those who can show a negative COVID-19 test, to enter the country.

The US is on the UK’s “amber list” for travel, meaning that visitors arriving from the US into the country must quarantine for 10 days, and take two COVID-19 tests.

“Experts have encouraged governments, businesses and the public to follow the science,” United CEO Scott Kirby said. “United and other airlines have done that and implemented the necessary safety protocols to re-open key international routes like the air corridor between our two countries. We are ready.”

Airlines posted record losses in 2020 after the pandemic forced them to suspend international travel. American Airlines reported a $8.9 billion annual loss in 2020.

International airlines are expected to lose up to $157 billion across 2020 and 2021, the International Air Transport Association predicted last year.

Many have announced new incentives to encourage people to travel – United offered its MileagePlus passengers a chance to win a year of free flights.

United said last week that it would require all external US-based hires to be vaccinated against COVID-19, following a similar decision by Delta last month.

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