MAKING BIG MONEY: The ultimate guides to breaking into careers with 6-figure salaries

Caroline Stokes
Caroline Stokes is the CEO of talent agency and executive search firm FORWARD, and an expert on growing your career in management consulting.

  • You want to increase your salary but don’t know how to get that promotion or land that job.
  • These guides will point you in the right direction by shifting to freelance or learning new skills.
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Looking for a career move that can boost cash flow? These professions and positions help add the good kind of zeros to your salary. Read these articles to help you combine a career you love with a paycheck you want – and for advice on how to get there.

Full-time gigs

IT professional: 3 IT professionals who didn’t get a college degree and are now making 6 figures reveal how to succeed in their field

Management consultant: How to get onto the partner track at McKinsey and make millions, according to 3 management-consulting headhunters and a former McKinsey HR manager

Engineer: The best way to teach yourself to code and land a six-figure job, from 5 people who’ve done it

Marketing consultant: The ultimate guide to breaking into marketing consulting and making 6 figures, from people who did it

VC: How to break into venture capital and land a job at a top firm, according to recruiters, managing partners, and executive coaches in the VC space

Crisis manager: Crisis managers are taking center stage during the pandemic – and can make a lucrative living. Here’s how to break into the in-demand role, according to 5 veterans in the industry.

Software engineer: 3 software engineers reveal the steps they took to move up in their careers to make 6-figure salaries

Executive in gaming or esports: The non-engineer’s guide to landing a 6-figure job in online gaming or esports, according to senior executives and CEOs in the space

Freelance or independent gigs

General freelancer: The ultimate guide to going freelance – and making more than you did at a full-time gig

Software engineer: Freelance software engineers making over $100,000 a year reveal how they got started, find clients, and set their rates

Ghostwriter: How to become a freelance ghostwriter, according to someone who left her $50,000-a-year banking job and now makes $80,000 a year on her own time

Graphic designer: The best way to build a client base and make 6 figures as a freelance graphic designer, according to 6 people who are currently doing it

Web designer: How to find clients and market your business as an independent web designer, according to 6-figure freelancers who did it

Presentation designer: The exact email one freelance presentation designer uses to increase her rates – and how she plans to make $400,000 this year

Independent consultant: How 5 executives who left their jobs to become independent consultants now make 6 figures on their own time – and how you could do the same

Real estate agent: How to make 6 figures as an independent real estate agent, according to someone who did it

Dietitian: How to earn a 6-figure salary as a dietitian or nutritionist, according to 4 renowned entrepreneurs in the industry

Personal trainer: How to earn a 6-figure salary as a personal trainer, according to 3 people who are doing it

Online tutor: How to become a highly successful online tutor and make a lucrative living as virtual learning becomes the norm

Poshmark seller: The ultimate guide to earning 6 figures on Poshmark, according to star sellers who’ve done it and gained boatloads of customers

Ecommerce seller: The ultimate guides to using popular platforms like Amazon, Depop, and eBay to start your own online business, sell to a massive audience, and make big money

Massage therapist and birth coach: A New-York-based doula and massage therapist reveals the exact formula that’s helped her build an almost 6-figure business solely by word-of-mouth referrals

Upwork freelancer: Self-employed professionals who’ve made over $100,000 on Upwork reveal how they built lucrative businesses in just a few years on the freelancing platform

Freelancer.com freelancer: How to land gigs and build a 6-figure career on Freelancer.com, according to the CEO and freelancers who’ve done it

Fiverr freelancer: 6-figure sellers on the freelancing platform Fiverr share how they landed clients and built successful businesses online

Read the original article on Business Insider

I’m a freelancer and mother who banished burnout by scheduling my own summer Fridays just for me – here’s how I make the time

Alice Dubin
Alesandra Dubin.

  • Alesandra Dubin is a freelancer who ends work at noon every Friday from Memorial Day to Labor Day.
  • She frees the afternoons by setting earlier deadlines for herself and putting the effort in upfront.
  • This time to herself makes her a better professional and mother during the rest of the year.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

I’m a proud mom to six-year-old twins and also a proud professional with a demanding, deadline-driven solo practice.

Most days – even when I’m not emerging tentatively from a pandemic like a thawing caveperson – it all just feels like a lot.

Indeed, like most working moms, I characterize myself as generally overcommitted and exhausted. But I have a strategy aimed at banishing burnout: I make my own summer Fridays.

For most of my career, I’ve wrapped up work around noon every Friday between Memorial Day and Labor Day. Up until a couple of years ago, this practice was conveniently built into my work life as an employee of various New York City-based media organizations, among which this type of structure is a common employer-sanctioned practice and a well-loved tradition among staff.

When I shifted to the full-time freelance lifestyle in 2019, it was entirely up to me to defend this sacred time from work and errand creep. But by now I’ve learned that doing so is a game-changer for my lifestyle and sense of self, so I create my boundaries.

In order to make it happen, I think of the summer as a whole, rather than looking at each week or day individually.

I get analytical about how much work and what type of work I want to take on in order to keep my summer Friday afternoons free.

Sure, work has a way of bottlenecking sometimes, and some deadlines don’t go as planned. But putting in the effort upfront – setting the intention, as I do – helps lay the groundwork that supports the structure I want.

I’m also an obsessive time manager, so I give myself – and stick to – artificial deadlines early enough that I avoid the potential for a Friday bottleneck.

In most cases, I assign myself deadlines only Monday through Thursday for the work requiring the most brainpower and time commitment – even if that means I’m delivering well ahead of a client’s drop-dead needs.

This, of course, is a good thing: It doesn’t just reduce my own stress on Fridays, but it also has the benefit of making me a favorite freelancer among my clients, and that general approach yields me more income over the course of the whole year (even if it occasionally might mean a bit less during a given week here or there in the summer).

If I’m in town, here’s what I might do on a summer Friday: Take myself to a solo matinee, get a massage, or go for a hike alone with my podcasts.

A post shared by Alesandra (Alice) Dubin (@alicedubin)

Here’s what I don’t do: Return stuff to Target, get a dental cleaning, or accidentally schedule a work meeting.

These few hours when my kids are in school and my husband is at work are reserved for joyful, indulgent, or contemplative activities – not to check stuff off a list. These 12 Friday afternoons provide my only time dedicated for this purpose in a typical year, and I believe they comprise a key pillar of my mental-health strategy.

Summer Fridays take the edge off the rest of the week. And they mean my kids get the best of me – not the smoke-breathing version of me who might be limping out of a week of meetings without having yet had a chance to regroup.

And summer Fridays are a mental-health boon throughout not just these weeks, but the whole year, too: It’s a cherished rhythm I look forward to and that makes me more productive, like a vacation already booked.

“By taking time exclusively for yourself and exclusively for the purpose of bringing pleasure, joy, and comfort into your life, [that’s] actually an act of radical self-compassion,” Leah Rockwell, a licensed professional counselor and founder of Rockwell Wellness, which specializes in therapy for burnout, told Insider.

The notion of radical self-compassion comes from a concept founded by Kristin Neff nearly 20 years ago.

“Yet for many overworked, overachieving women, it is an amazingly difficult concept to actually integrate into our daily lives,” Rockwell said. “While we might be the first person to rabidly advocate that a girlfriend should do whatever it takes to care for or prioritize herself, many of us cannot extend that same permission to ourselves.”

Rockwell said that by building that permission into my actual schedule, I’m showing myself (and others around me, too) that my emotional wellness is a priority for me. “Why not capitalize on how summer can fortify us?” she added.

Engaging in a relationship with what brings us joy is something that we witness our children do all day long, but we often deny it of ourselves as adults. “By structuring your summer weeks as you are, you’ve invited back into your life the bliss of summer that we often assume that adults just don’t have a right to, yet we inherently long for,” Rockwell said.

Podcast host and bestselling author Gretchen Rubin calls it “designing your summer.”

“You want there to be something special about summer,” she said. “If you don’t actually plan that out or at least be very intentional about it, it’s very easy for days to just slip by.”

Anyone can design their summer – not just people who make their own work hours or have lots of disposable income.

“It’s not about taking massive amounts of time off work,” Rubin said. Rather, it’s an attitude.

Habits and routines have the effect of speeding up time, whereas “time feels rich and slow when things are different,” Rubin said. (That’s why a three-day vacation can feel like a full chapter in our lives.) So to make our lives feel richer and more textured, we must make an effort to do something apart from our seasonally nonspecific routines.

And I need that distinction perhaps now more than ever given how the pandemic presented a seemingly endless stretch of days marked by the unrelenting sameness of staying at home.

As the world opens up again, I’m setting aside both time and headspace for novelty, for variety, for pleasurable personal challenges that stand to make time feel ever so slightly less ephemeral and much more vivid (all while actually fortifying my earning potential all year long).

Join me?

Read the original article on Business Insider

I’m a freelancer who could lose out on income, flexibility, and being the primary caregiver to my child if the PRO Act passes

Mary Kearl
Mary Kearl.

  • Mary Kearl is a professional freelance writer and marketing consultant.
  • As a freelancer, she enjoys being able to make more money, choose her own hours, and be an active caregiver to her toddler.
  • If the PRO Act in its current form passes in the Senate, Kearl says she could potentially most of her clients and income.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Professionally, I’ve never been happier since becoming a freelancer. Sure, there are the occasional stresses of chasing down payments and the ongoing uncertainty of not knowing exactly how much I’ll earn, but as someone who thrives when I’m learning and being challenged, the pros outweigh the cons.

For me and my husband, who is also a freelancer, the pros include earning more per hour than when we worked full time, setting our own schedules, sharing in being the primary caregivers to our toddler, deciding the companies we work with and projects we take on, and the flexibility to work from and live anywhere – even traveling through South America for six months.

As a freelancer, I earn about three times more per hour than when I had a full-time six-figure job.

I’m not alone. A new survey from the freelancing platform Upwork found that most freelancers (75%) earn the same as or more than what they took home from their former full-time jobs.

Freelancing has been life-changing for my family, but now all of that is potentially on the line for me and millions of other freelancers because of a new bill the House of Representatives just passed called the Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2021, or PRO Act for short.

Certain goals of the bill are concepts I support – like making updates to US labor laws to advance workers’ rights to organize and strengthen unions and aiming to prevent gig-economy companies like Uber and Lyft from designating workers such as drivers as independent contractors rather than full-time employees who would be eligible for benefits.

But there’s a fear that the PRO Act could potentially sideline the self-employed careers of individuals like me who do not want to be classified as employees and would prefer to retain our independence.

As other writers have spoken out about, the main issue for freelancers comes down to the inclusion of the ABC test within the bill, which states:

“An individual performing any service shall be considered an employee (except as provided in the previous sentence) and not an independent contractor, unless-

“(A) the individual is free from control and direction in connection with the performance of the service, both under the contract for the performance of service and in fact;

“(B) the service is performed outside the usual course of the business of the employer; and

“(C) the individual is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession, or business of the same nature as that involved in the service performed.”.

Self-employed contractors may “fail” to qualify as independent for any one of these reasons. For the publications I write for, publishing articles will likely be considered part of the “usual course of business” for the company. The same goes for the social media strategy, copywriting, editing, and content marketing support I’ve provided to marketing agencies.

If the PRO Act passes in the Senate without any changes to its language and the ABC test becomes the standard used to classify employees, the fallout for my career and family could be considerable.

I know because I’ve already once had to make major life changes due to the ABC test.

Last year, a California law AB5 that adopted the ABC test and impacted hundreds of types of professionals into effect and threatened to bring my new career to an end. Ultimately AB5 factored into my decision to move out of the state to a small town in Maine where I wouldn’t be impacted.

Already three of the companies I’ve worked for in a marketing capacity have worked with me through third-party companies that set up contracts with me directly to absorb the risk of working with self-employed individuals like me. Contracting freelancers through third parties is something major companies may be able to do, but that’s not likely for smaller companies.

If enough of my clients can no longer work with me as a freelancer as a result of this new law, I’ll most likely have to get a full-time job, take a pay cut, work longer hours than my current 25 hours a week, lose my flexible schedule and autonomy, and miss out on being a primary caregiver to my child.

And, unless I can find something that’s remote, I’ll likely have to move again.

This time, I’d have to go to a major city where there are more openings for writers and marketers like me. That means a higher cost of living, and, unless one or both of us can find something truly flexible, we’ll either have to start paying for childcare (which costs about $9,000 a year in Los Angeles, for instance) or one of us will have to take a break from being part of the workforce, something more parents and, moms especially, have already had to do during the pandemic.

As I write this article at night as my child sleeps, I’ve just spent the morning at the beach with my family.I choose when I work and when I’m off the clock. Over the past two years, I’ve had the chance to work with over 30 different brands and publications, and during that time no single company I’ve worked with has made up more than about one-fourth of my income, let alone 100% of it.

I’m certainly not a misclassified employee. I’m happily self employed, and that’s how I hope things can stay.

I’m in favor of advancing workers’ rights, and hope the PRO Act can be updated to ensure freelancers who want to remain autonomous can do so.

Read the original article on Business Insider

I made nearly $10,000 last month doing freelance voice-over work. I get 90% of my work through Fiverr and work just five hours a day – here’s how I do it.

Alice Everdeen
Alice Everdeen is a freelancer based in Texas.

  • Alice Everdeen is a 29-year-old voice-over artist based in Austin, Texas.
  • After years working in radio and TV, Everdeen quit her full-time job and now can make thousands a week as a freelancer.
  • This is what her job is like, as told to freelance writer Rose Maura Lorre.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

I launched my full-time voice-over career just last year, but even as a kid, I was always doing voice work in some way. I would constantly mimic the people I heard in commercials and on the radio and I made tons of prank phone calls, but I never really thought about it as something I could do as a career.

I went to Rutgers University to study journalism and visual arts. After working at MSNBC and a local news station for several years, I moved to Texas in 2016. There, I eventually switched over to a production company where I wrote and produced TV and radio ads.

One day, I was going over a client’s script with my colleagues. Just as a joke, I read the script out loud in the most over-the-top radio voice I could think of. They stopped and stared at me; then they said, “Wow, that was really good!”

I started doing voice-overs for the company and realized it was really fun.

I also think it also helped that I’m a very animated person and I enunciate well.

Then around January 2020, right before the pandemic, I was going through a divorce and felt unhappy going to work for nine hours a day. I told myself, “I’m going to quit my job, start freelancing, buy a school bus, and I’m going to travel.”

I made my own voice-over demo reel and made a profile on Fiverr and things surprisingly took off.

One of the first clients I got was Fiverr itself. I know they will hire new members to give them some credibility, so I think they just saw that I was new and they liked my demo. Now I book probably 90% of my work through Fiverr, where other companies will find me for their clients. I’ve done VOs for companies like, Valvoline, Community Coffee, Verizon, Accenture, and Amazon.

I always ask potential clients a few questions before accepting the job.

Alice Everdeen
Everdeen says she practices each script several times before recording.

I ask how long the script is, what’s the audience and tone they’re going for, and whether or not the recording has to meet certain time requirements. My voice-overs typically run anywhere from 15 seconds to three minutes, but I’ve done some audio (usually for e-learning projects) that was as long as 20 minutes.

Generally, I practice a script a couple times and record it as many as four times, depending on how comfortable I am with the style and subject. Medical or technical copy can take me way longer. Then comes editing, which takes forever. I usually spend four times as long on editing as I do on recording, because I have to remove breaths, gaps, mess-ups, etc. I spend about 10% of my time practicing scripts, 30% recording them, and 60% editing the recording.

I’ve spent over $1,000 on equipment to produce the best quality voice-overs.

I work with a Rode NT USB mic, which costs about $170, and then I have a dinky HP laptop that I bought about a year ago. I definitely should have bought a more powerful one, but for now it gets the job done.

I also bought myself an Isovox, which is a soundproofed, square-shaped box you shove your head into. It’s super claustrophobic, but it makes my audio sound pretty great. I use a program called Audacity to edit my work.

Due to COVID-19, there are tons of phone recording jobs these days.

Alice Everdeen Isovox
Everdeen recording inside her Isovox.

About 20% of my orders nowadays talk about safety precautions or mention COVID directly. Pretty much every company needs a new outgoing message saying, “Thank you for calling blah-blah. Here are the precautions we’re taking,” or, “We offer pick-ups and deliveries, etc.”

These are probably the most boring jobs, because they’re just so straightforward. Personally, my favorite assignments are when I get to feel like I’m acting and I can really get into a character.

Taking care of my voice is something I try not to be a diva about. Mainly, I just stay hydrated. I try not to record in the morning, when I sound congested and nasally. I also avoid recording when I’m tired or angry, because that’ll come through in my vocal quality.

I sometimes get weird and even creepy requests.

I’ve occasionally received requests from people (almost all of them men) for fetish-related “audio porn” although since I’ve raised my prices it’s gotten better. People will ask for burping recordings, or that I record the sound of myself being tickled. Somebody else asked me if I could simulate the sound of getting a wedgie while also talking about how the wedgie feels and how much I hate getting wedgies. I respond to those requests with, “I’m not interested, but good luck.”

As a freelancer, I’ve already surpassed my old full-time income. In January, I had my best week ever when I made about $3,300. February was my best month to date – I made just under $10,000 total. And even on my busiest days, I’m still only working from about 12 to 5 p.m. The amount of free time this career allows has been the biggest blessing, as it’s given me and my partner time to work on refurbishing our school bus.

Alice Everdeen
Everdeen and her partner are currently refurbishing an old school bus to make it road trip-ready.

If you want to get into this line of work, my advice is to work on your acting.

Even if you have a nice voice, doing voice-overs is really about being an actor more than anything. You have to be able to sound compelling and convincing.

There are websites specifically for finding voice-over work, like Voices.com, Voices123, and VoiceBunny. I went the Fiverr route because I’d used it in my previous lines of work. You can definitely land bigger jobs on the voice-over websites, whereas a lot of the Fiverr and Upwork roles are more for mom-and-pop places. I’ve had my share of big clients, but most of my work is for smaller companies.

You’re going to get a lot of rejections at the start, especially if you go the more traditional route of auditioning for roles. While I don’t audition for the work I get via Fiverr, I’m also on Upwork, where I audition for roles and lose a lot of them. You can do something you think is perfect and other people hate it. It’s hard sometimes, but I’ve learned to just power through and continually improve.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Financial Advice Every Freelancer Should Know during the Covid Pandemic

Freelancing has always been a popular option for creatives looking for more autonomy and flexibility in their schedules. Now with layoffs, pay cuts, and overall economic uncertainty during the pandemic, millions more have turned to freelancing as a much-needed source of income.  It’s a great way to bring in extra money and may help keep you afloat during economic hardships. However, income and opportunities are often unpredictable, which can present a new set of financial challenges, especially for those just starting out. Read on for four money management tips every freelancer should follow:  Set Intentional Savings Goals  Long-term savings goals

The post Financial Advice Every Freelancer Should Know during the Covid Pandemic appeared first on Moneybies.com.