Here’s what happened at Mike Lindell’s cyber symposium, from him storming offstage to Bolsonaro’s son giving him a MAGA hat signed by Trump

my pillow ceo mike lindell documentary
Mike Lindell is a leading promoter of baseless voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

  • Mike Lindell just held a 72-hour voter-fraud “cyber symposium” in Sioux Falls, South Dakota.
  • Speakers included Ronald Watkins, Steve Bannon, and the son of Brazilian president Jair Bolsonaro.
  • Here’s what happened.
Lindell said the event would prove his voter-fraud theories

mike lindell trump
Lindell is a staunch Trump supporter.

Mike Lindell, a leading promoter of baseless voter-fraud conspiracy theories, has spent months gathering information that he said would prove that China helped Joe Biden to “steal” the 2020 presidential election from Donald Trump.

This culminated in the MyPillow CEO holding a 72-hour “cyber symposium” in Sioux Falls, South Dakota, between Tuesday and Thursday.

Lindell claimed that he had 37 terabytes of information related to voter fraud to reveal at the cyber symposium, which was livestreamed on his website, Frank. He said he’d give $5 million to anyone who could disprove the data, provided they attend the event in person.

The event featured controversial speakers, as well as a documentary played on repeat

Speakers on stage at Mike Lindell's
Steve Bannon spoke at the event.

Speakers at the event included conspiracy theorists Ronald Watkins, Raheem Kassam, and Steve Bannon, as well as the son of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

And in between speeches, attendees watched a series of videos. This included watching the same conspiracy theory-filled documentary four times on Tuesday, Salon reporter Zachary Petrizzo said.

Jair Bolsonaro’s son gave Lindell a MAGA hat signed by Trump

Mike Lindell Eduardo Bolsonaro Steve Bannon at cyber symposium in South Dakota
Eduardo Bolsonaro gave a speech at the event.

Eduardo Bolsonaro, the son of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro, gave Lindell a “Make America Great Again” hat he said was signed by Trump, on Tuesday.

The hat was signed “to Mike, a great patriot,” Lindell said, adding, “Thank you, Mr. President, our real president.”

Bolsonaro then gave a speech about voter fraud in Brazil. Jair Bolsonaro has suggested that Brazil’s voting machines were used to rig the country’s elections, leading to the country’s election authority launching an investigation into Bolsonaro.

Lindell once against blasted Fox News

tucker carlson mike lindell
Lindell was formerly one of the biggest advertisers on Tucker Carlson’s show.

Throughout the event Lindell slammed multiple news outlets – including another attack on Fox News where he implied that he wouldn’t trust the network to report the weather.

“I said the other day they should be a weather channel,” the MyPillow CEO said Tuesday, per The Washington Times. “And the next day I changed my mind because they wouldn’t report an oncoming storm.”

Lindell has clashed with Fox News several times over the past few months after the outlet stepped up its content moderation and refused to cover some of his debunked theories about the 2020 presidential election.

This culminated in Lindell pulling MyPillow’s advertisements from Fox News last month after it refused to air ads for his cyber symposium. Lindell was formerly one of the biggest advertisers on Tucker Carlson’s show.

A spokesperson for Fox News told CNN that the network hadn’t sent a reporter to cover the symposium.

Lindell invited a reporter to interview him on stage, before called him a “cancer”

mike lindell mypillow ceo
Lindell ranted about a Salon reporter from the main stage.

But Fox News wasn’t the only outlet in the firing line.

Lindell has repeatedly sparred with Salon reporter Zachary Petrizzo during interviews, phone calls, and livestreams.

After ranting about Petrizzo’s work on stage Tuesday, including calling his articles “hit jobs,” Lindell texted him later that night inviting him for an interview.

“Zach go write your garbage, and then we will interview on stage,” the text message read.

But on Wednesday, Lindell took back the offer.

“Lose my number. You are a cancer to our country,” he texted Petrizzo, before calling him “insane.”

Insider viewed screenshots of the messages.

Lindell fled the stage after a judge ruled Dominion could proceed with its lawsuit against him

Lindell rushed offstage when news broke that the $1.3 billion defamation suit voting-machine company Dominion filed against him would go ahead.

Lindell attempted to have the defamation lawsuit dismissed, but a US district judge ruled on Wednesday the suit could proceed in full.

“After news emerged at about 6 p.m. on Wednesday that his attempt to have the lawsuit dismissed was unsuccessful, Lindell was seen on video getting off his seat and rushing off the stage abruptly, disappearing behind a dark curtain,” Insider’s Cheryl Teh reported.

The livestream was instead replaced by a video reel showing articles about voter fraud, alongside an image of Lindell hugging a pillow.

A reporter was reportedly removed from the event – but snuck back in

Mike Lindell
Lindell’s security frog-marched the reporter out of the event.

According to Salon’s Petrizzo, a reporter from far-right outlet The Gateway Pundit was “frog-marched” out of the event Wednesday afternoon.

Petrizzo told Insider that the reporter has been “super rude” and “very aggressive” towards another journalist. Petrizzo said the Pundit reporter also shoved a camera in his face and surreptitiously recorded his laptop.

The Pundit did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Lindell said he got attacked and claimed Antifa was trying to infiltrate the event

Lindell said on Thursday morning that he had been attacked on Wednesday night when he got back to his hotel room.

A Sioux Falls Police Department spokesperson told The Associated Press that his officers had taken a report about an assault at a hotel near the symposium at 11.30 p.m. on Wednesday. They did not say whether Lindell was involved in the incident.

Retired army colonel Phil Waldron said that they had received “credible threat warnings” around two weeks beforehand, and that they had “somebody working in the crowd … detecting threats.”

He added that there were “really radical folks outside trying to penetrate” the event and that attendees were exchanging press badges in the parking lot.

“The big end game is to discredit all the legislators who have had the courage to be here,” Waldron said. “They’re obviously trying to subdue the message that Mike’s trying to get out.”

“So this is a typical insurrection-type activity,” he added.

Lindell also said that his staffers had told him that “Antifa things” were trying to infiltrate the event.

Lindell’s website Frank sent out an email to subscribers Thursday afternoon with the subject: “Mike Lindell and His Cyber Symposium Attacked — Please Share Everywhere.”

The email included video footage of Lindell talking about the attack at the event and Waldron speaking about the alleged security threats.

The event also included prayers and the national anthem

Before launching into a series of speeches, the second day of the symposium started with morning prayers and the national anthem, The Dispatch’s Khaya Himmelman said.

The size of the audience dwindled over the course of the event, according to reports

Salon’s Petrizzo reported on the first day of the event there were “a ton of Republican state legislators and their staffs.”

But not many attendees stayed until the end of the symposium.

Petrizzo said the next day that the crowd had mostly left. “Only about half of the crowd here on day two is back for the third day,” he added Thursday.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Jair Bolsonaro’s son gave Mike Lindell a MAGA hat ‘signed by Trump’ at event talking about voter fraud

mike lindell trump
Mike Lindell is a leading promoter of voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

  • Jair Bolsonaro’s son gave Mike Lindell a MAGA hat he said was signed by Donald Trump.
  • Eduardo Bolsonaro claimed Trump had signed it the day before he went to the MyPillow CEO’s event.
  • The hat was signed “to Mike, a great patron,” Bolsonaro said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The son of Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro gave MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell a Make Great America hat signed by former President Donald Trump.

Eduardo Bolsonaro, who is also a politician, attended part of the 72-hour “cyber symposium” held in Sioux Falls, South Dakota by Lindell, who has been a leading promoter of voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

After stepping onto the stage the early hours of Tuesday, Bolsonaro gave Lindell a red MAGA hat which he said Trump had given him when they met on Monday.

The hat was signed “to Mike, a great patron,” Bolsonaro claimed. Lindell said: “Thank you Mr President, our real president.”

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

Lindell, who said in April that he still spoke to Trump about once a month, is a leading promoter of baseless voter-fraud conspiracy theories that posit that China helped Joe Biden “steal” the presidential election from Trump.

Lindell has claimed that he has 37 terabytes of information related to voter fraud, which he planned to reveal at the cyber symposium, which is being live-streamed on his website, Frank.

Lindell said that he’d give $5 million to anyone who can disprove the data, provided they attend the event in person.

Similar to Trump in the US, Jair Bolsonaro has suggested that Brazil’s electronic voting machines were used to rig the country’s elections.

Brazil’s electoral authority has announced that it’s investigating Bolsonaro, who has been president since 2019, over the debunked claims.

During his speech on Tuesday, Eduardo Bolsonaro criticized the media for depicting Brazil as “racist”, “against women,” and “dictators.”

Mike Lindell Eduardo Bolsonaro Steve Bannon at cyber symposium in South Dakota
Eduardo Bolsonaro gave a speech about alleged voter fraud in Brazil.

“The left in Brazil copy the left in [the] US,” Bolsonaro said. He called his father “the most hated president ever in Brazil.”

After Bolsonaro’s speech, former Trump advisor Steve Bannon said that Brazil’s 2022 election was the “second most important election in the world.”

“Bolsonaro will win unless it’s stolen by – guess what – the machines,” Bannon added.

He called Bolsonaro’s opponent, Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, “a criminal” and “the most dangerous leftist in the world.”

Lula, a founding member of the Workers’ Party who was Brazil’s president between 2003 and 2010, was convicted in July 2017 on charges of money laundering and corruption.

He was was sentenced to 12 years in prison in April 2018 but was freed in November 2019 when the Supreme Court ruled his imprisonment was unlawful.

Lula has denied wrongdoing and claimed the prosecution was politically motivated.

Last week, an opinion poll put him 13 points ahead of Bolsonaro.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Watch a defensive Mike Lindell get fact-checked live by CNN over his baseless claims that China hacked the election

Mike Lindell
Mike Lindell has repeatedly challenged the integrity of the 2020 election.

  • MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell told CNN’s Drew Griffin he had proof that China hacked the 2020 election.
  • Cybersecurity experts told CNN that Lindell’s alleged evidence of voter fraud didn’t show anything.
  • Griffin said Lindell was destroying confidence in the election. Lindell accused him of lying, and offered him a hug.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell was fact-checked by a CNN reporter over his baseless voter-fraud claims – and he wasn’t happy about it.

Lindell said the reporter, CNN’s Drew Griffin, was wrong, accused him of lying, and even offered him a hug.

Lindell has repeatedly challenged the integrity of the 2020 election. In an interview with Griffin Thursday, Lindell said he had proof that “100%” showed China hacked the election and changed votes from former President Donald Trump to President Joe Biden.

Lindell said he would reveal his proof at a so-called “cyber symposium” due to take place in South Dakota next week.

He had sent CNN a snippet of the data a few days before his interview. Griffin said CNN had shown the data – which consisted of six screenshots – to nine cybersecurity experts, who all said it was proof of nothing.

Lindell said the experts were wrong.

Griffin said CNN had also spoken to election officials in the 15 counties whose votes Lindell claims were hacked. The election officials all said they used paper ballots counted by systems not connected to the internet, per Griffin, and that they had no evidence the votes were hacked.

“I don’t think you really understand how votes are cast, collected, and tabulated in the country,” Griffin said to Lindell.

“You know what, I do,” Lindell said. “What you don’t understand is after they’re tabulated they can get hacked after the fact, which they were, because Donald Trump was going to win anyway.”

Griffin said that the paper ballots were audited against the machine count. “No they weren’t!” Lindell said. “Who told you that?”

When Griffin said it was the county officials, Lindell replied: “Well they’re going to have some answering to do.”

Griffin asked whether the county officials were lying.

“I don’t know,” Lindell said. “They might be misconstrued … they don’t realize what happened.”

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

Later in the interview, Griffin told Lindell that he could “possibly be the victim of a scam” over his support for voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

“Well then why don’t you come to the symposium and make $5 million?” Lindell replied, referring to the cash prize he said he would give to anyone who debunks his alleged voter-fraud data at the event. “Are you worried about me? We should have a hug. Are you worried about old Mike? Oh, God bless you.”

Griffin replied that he was “worried that what you are doing is mistakenly or deliberately destroying the confidence in the legitimate, elected president of the United States and fostering what could be real damage to this country.”

Lindell claimed he’d “never said anything bad about Biden or the Democrats. Ever! Never.” He said Griffin was “wrong … You’re lying.”

Lindell, who said in April that he still spoke to Trump about once a month, has poured time and money into spreading his voter-fraud theories.

He launched a website, Frank, to spread misinformation about the election, made a two-hour voter-fraud film, and held a rally at South Dakota’s Corn Palace in May with guest speakers including Ben Carson, Trump’s secretary of housing and urban development, and the conservative podcaster Eric Metaxas.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Mike Lindell is offering $5 million to anyone who can disprove his alleged voter-fraud evidence – if they show up to his cyber symposium conference

Mike Lindell
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell waits outside the West Wing of the White House on January 15, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • Mike Lindell continues to spread baseless claims that Donald Trump won the 2020 presidential election.
  • The MyPillow CEO is offering a $5 million bounty to anyone who can prove he’s wrong.
  • The catch: you have to attend his upcoming cyber symposium conference in South Dakota.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, a staunch ally of former President Donald Trump and leading promoter of voter fraud conspiracy theories, said he’d give $5 million to anyone who can disprove data that he claims shows election interference.

But there’s a catch. To be eligible, you have to attend his upcoming cyber symposium conference, which is taking place in South Dakota between August 10 and 12.

And the event isn’t open to the public, according to an advert for the event posted on Lindell’s website Frank. Invitees include current politicians, cyber experts, and the media, though it will also be streamed for 72 hours on Frank.

Lindell said he wants the symposium to be the most-watched live event in history, and is aiming for 1 billion people to watch it via his website, Salon’s Zachary Petrizzo reported. He has reserved 800 rooms for the event, but few officials have said they will attend.

There is nothing to suggest Lindell’s event will draw anywhere close to those numbers. For context, the most-watched Super Bowl ever drew in around 114 million viewers, and the first 2020 presidential debate had a total of 73 million viewers.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

At the event, “Mike will reveal the cyber data and the packet captures from the November 2020 election,” the advert says. “A $5,000,000 prize will be offered to any attendee who can prove that this cyber data is not valid data from the November 2020 election.”

Lindell told Steve Bannon on Monday that he has 37 terabytes of information related to voter fraud, Salon reported.

Kevin Skoglund, president and chief technologist of Citizens for Better Elections, told The Dispatch that Lindell’s data theory is “technically incoherent and wrong in several ways.” According to Skoglund, Lindell claims that his team of anonymous experts collected internet traffic from foreign computers that infiltrated US voting systems.

“An extraordinary claim needs extraordinary evidence,” Skoglund said to The Dispatch. “And they provide little evidence at all.”

Lindell, who said in April that he still spoke to Trump around once a month, has repeatedly supported the former president’s debunked claims challenging the integrity of the 2020 election.

This has led to Lindell being blocked from Twitter and sued by vote-machine company Dominion for $1.3 billion for claiming that it “switched” votes from Trump to Biden. MyPillow’s products have also been pulled by retailers and Lindell said he’d received death threats, too.

Discussing the media, Lindell said: “I’ve invited them all to the symposium. Why don’t you prove it there so then you can win $5 million?”

This isn’t the first time Lindell has held an event to spout his voter-fraud theories.

He also held a so-called “Frank Rally” at the Corn Palace in South Dakota in May to celebrate the launch of the site, which features videos and articles, many by right-wing conspiracy theorists, that largely focus on voter fraud.

The venue for the Frank Rally could fit around 3,000 attendees – but pictures circulating on Twitter showed that it was only half full.

The rally featured talks from Ben Carson, Trump’s secretary of housing and urban development, and conservative podcaster Eric Metaxas, as well as Lindell himself, who spread voter-fraud theories including an inflated estimate of Trump’s vote total in the 2020 presidential election.

Attendees received a free copy of both Lindell’s autobiography and his self-made voter-fraud film “Absolute Proof.”

Lindell also spoke at the ReAwaken America tour last week, where he claimed that Trump received 80 million votes in the 2020 election and Biden 68 million, though he failed to provide any evidence to back up his claims.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Some Mike Lindell fans reportedly stood in line for 7 hours to watch his rally at the Corn Palace – but when the event started, the venue was half-empty

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.

  • Mike Lindell held a rally in South Dakota Monday to speak about his voter-fraud website Frank.
  • The Dickinson Press reported that guests stood in line for hours – but the venue was only half-full.
  • Ben Carson and Eric Metaxas spoke at the event, while Joe Piscopo performed a music set.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Supporters of MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell stood in line for hours to attend his rally in South Dakota on Monday – but the Corn Palace venue was only half-full for the event.

Lindell held the rally to launch “Frank,” the website he billed as a social-media site, but is so far a one-way platform for him to spread baseless allegations of voter fraud.

Photos shared on Twitter show lines snaking around the Corn Palace in Mitchell. The Dickinson Press reported that some people stood in line for up to seven hours for the free event, which let people in on a first-come, first-served basis.

Some guests said they came from neighboring states, including Minnesota and Nebraska, while others came from as far away as Texas, the publication reported.

Corn Palace Director Doug Greenway told Insider’s Kevin Shalvey that he had fielded calls from dozens of people interested in attending the event.

The venue fits about 3,000 people, and photos on Twitter suggest that it was around half full for the event.

Lindell, a close ally of former President Donald Trump, has repeatedly pushed disproven voter-fraud conspiracy theories about the presidential election, leading to voting-machine company Dominion suing him for $1.3 billion.

Some attendees at Monday’s event brought along Trump merchandise, including hats and flags. Salon.com’s Zachary Petrizzo reported that a group of far-right Proud Boy members attended, citing a source at the event.

The event featured talks from Ben Carson, Trump’s secretary of housing and urban development, who joined on video call, and conservative podcaster Eric Metaxas. Comedian Joe Piscopo of “Saturday Night Live” fame performed a music set, which included the national anthem.

This was followed by a 90-minute speech from Lindell, who spread voter-fraud theories, including claims that Trump got 80 million votes in the 2020 presidential election, per Newsweek. The Federal Election Commission says that Trump got just over 72 million votes.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

Attendees received a free copy of both Lindell’s autobiography and his self-made film “Absolute Proof,” which alleges fraud in the 2020 election.

Mitchell has a population of around 15,000, but Lindell said he chose the location partially because of the South Dakota GOP governor’s resistance to COVID-19 lockdown measures.

His Corn Palace rally was sandwiched between a Dakota Wesleyan University graduation ceremony and an event by the American Corn Hole Association.

Frank failed to fully launch

Lindell announced plans to launch his own social-media site in March after Twitter banned him and billed the site as a “YouTube-Twitter combination.”

But it was hit by multiple delays, technical problems, and what Lindell claimed was “the biggest attack ever” before Frank ultimately launched as a one-way channel in April.

The site features videos and articles, many written by Lindell himself, that largely focus on voter-fraud conspiracy theories. Some also spread misinformation about the coronavirus, with one article calling vaccines “a deadly depopulation bioweapon.”

Lindell regularly livestreams from the site, hosting other right-wing personalities.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Mike Lindell is holding a rally in South Dakota to promote his voter-fraud website Frank

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell and the Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.

  • Mike Lindell is holding an in-person “Frank Rally” in Mitchell, South Dakota on Monday.
  • Lindell created Frank as a “free speech” social-media site after Twitter banned him.
  • But it launched instead as a blog spreading misinformation about voter fraud and coronavirus.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell is holding an in-person rally in South Dakota on Monday to promote “Frank,” the website he billed as a social-media site but is so far a one-way platform where Lindell circulates baseless allegations of voter fraud.

The event, titled “Frank Rally,” will take place at the Corn Palace in the town of Mitchell.

Lindell first announced the event on former Donald Trump advisor Steve Bannon’s “War Room” podcast.

He said that the event would be free and on a first-come, first-served basis, Inforum reported.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

The event will start with a set by comedian Joe Piscopo who made his name on “Saturday Night Live,” followed by a speech by Lindell, which he told Bannon would last for up to 90 minutes.

Attendees will receive a free copy of his autobiography, “What Are the Odds? From Crack Addict to CEO,” alongside a copy of his self-made film “Absolute Proof” which alleges voter fraud in the 2020 election.

“It’s going to be fun for everyone, the whole town,” Lindell told Bannon.

Event organizers told The Argus Leader that they expected around 2,200 people to attend.

Lindell, a close ally of former President Donald Trump, has repeatedly pushed disproven voter-fraud conspiracy theories about the presidential election. He announced plans to launch his own social media site in March after Twitter banned him.

Lindell had billed the site as a “YouTube-Twitter combination” and said he had spent “millions of dollars” building the platform.

But it was hit by multiple delays, technical problems, and what Lindell claimed was “the biggest attack ever” before Frank ultimately launched as a one-way channel in April.

The site features videos and articles, many written by Lindell himself, that largely focus on voter-fraud conspiracy theories. Some also spread misinformation about the coronavirus, with one article calling vaccines “a deadly depopulation bioweapon.”

Lindell’s choice of venue has come as a surprise

The Corn Palace seems like a strange location for what Lindell told Bannon would be Frank’s “grand, grand opening to the world.”

Mitchell has a population of less than 20,000. The Corn Palace describes itself as the town’s “premier tourist attraction” and the world’s only corn palace, built in the late 1800s to celebrate the crop.

It’s open daily to visitors for free so they can admire its “uniquely designed corn murals,” but it can also be hired out for events for $1,750 a day.

The Corn Palace in Mitchell, South Dakota.
The Corn Palace is located in Mitchell, a South Dakota town with a population of under 20,000.

Lindell’s rally is sandwiched between a Dakota Wesleyan University graduation ceremony and an event by the American Corn Hole Association.

Lindell told Bannon that he chose South Dakota partly because of its Republican governor Kristi Noem, who refused to introduce statewide mask mandates and lockdowns during the pandemic.

South Dakota Republican Rep. Dusty Johnson told Forum News Service that he didn’t “agree with many of [Lindell’s] debunked claims” about the 2020 election, but that “cancel culture is just as dangerous.”

“We shouldn’t stop him from coming to South Dakota just because his views are different than mine or yours,” he added.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Mike Lindell slammed Fox News for not reporting his lawsuit against Dominion during another rant about the media

my pillow ceo mike lindell documentary
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell.

  • Mike Lindell urged Fox News to invite him on air to discuss MyPillow’s $1.6 billion lawsuit against Dominion.
  • MyPillow advertises on Fox News – but relations between the broadcaster and Lindell have soured.
  • “Why don’t you report? Fox, report, have me on,” Lindell said during a livestream on his new social-media site, Frank.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell isn’t happy that Fox News hasn’t written about his firm’s lawsuit against voting-machine company Dominion.

During a livestream for the launch of his new social-media site Frank, Lindell urged the network to invite him on air so he could speak about his lawsuit. MyPillow sued Dominion for $1.6 billion on Monday, accusing it of trying to stifle free speech. The suit also repeated debunked conspiracy theories that Dominion facilitated voter fraud.

“Isn’t it big news that MyPillow sued a company called Dominion that is paid for by tax dollars?” Lindell said, addressing Fox.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

MyPillow’s suit follows a $1.3 billion lawsuit Dominion filed against both Lindell and MyPillow in February, after he spread baseless claims that it had developed technology to switch votes from Donald Trump to Joe Biden.

MyPillow’s lawsuit has been covered by other news outlets including The Wall Street Journal, Bloomberg, and CNBC, but not on Fox News or Fox Business’ websites.

“Why don’t you report? Fox, report, have me on,” Lindell said during the livestream. “We can talk about Frank, talk about this lawsuit,” he added, after naming Fox hosts Laura Ingraham, Sean Hannity, and Tucker Carlson.

Fox didn’t respond to Insider’s request for comment.

In the past, MyPillow has advertised heavily on Fox News, but relations have soured over 2021. Lindell previously told Steve Bannon that he had hired private investigators to find out why Fox News isn’t letting him go on the network.

Fox News has also been sued by Dominion, as well as fellow voting-machine company Smartmatic. They accuse the network of airing baseless segments about the companies’ roles in facilitating election fraud.

Fox News said in a statement earlier this year that it was “proud” of its election coverage, and that it would “vigorously” defend itself against the lawsuits in court.

Frank Mike Lindell

Lindell said during his livestream Tuesday that “Fox has already been sued by Dominion and Smartmatic, so if you’ve already been sued, why would you not want to pour out the evidence that you were talking about before anyway?”

He added that MyPillow was “suing Dominion because they’re suppressing our right to free speech and it affects you Fox, it affects all the outlets, why not have me on?”

Lindell also asked Newsmax and its CEO, Chris Ruddy, to invite him on again.

He even urged CNN’s Anderson Cooper to speak to him. Cooper sparred with Lindell during an interview in August after the CEO pushed an unproven “cure” for the coronavirus.

“I’ll even come on your rotten show,” Lindell said, directed at Cooper, during Tuesday’s livestream.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Jimmy Kimmel made digs at MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, calling his social-media site Frank ‘a world of paranoia and mustache-wax’

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, Jimmy Kimmel
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell, Jimmy Kimmel.

  • Jimmy Kimmel made fun of Mike Lindell’s new social-media site and e-commerce store Tuesday night.
  • Kimmel said the new site, Frank, “sounds like it’s gonna be the place to be.”
  • He also ridiculed MyStore products, including “freedom flags” and books called “Donald the Caveman.”

MyPillow’s CEO, Mike Lindell, is launching his own social-media site and e-commerce store – and Jimmy Kimmel couldn’t resist poking fun at the new ventures on “Jimmy Kimmel Live” on Tuesday night.

“You’re a former crack addict who somehow made millions of dollars selling pillows,” Kimmel said. “Sell pillows. Why isn’t that enough?”

Lindell, a staunch supporter of former President Donald Trump, is making a social-media platform called Frank after being banned from Twitter for spreading voter-fraud conspiracy theories.

“I tell you what, [Frank] sounds like it’s gonna be the place to be,” Kimmel said Tuesday.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

Frank uses the tagline “the voice of free speech,” and Lindell said in a video recently uploaded to the static webpage that he had spent millions of dollars on the site’s security because he expected the site to be the victim of cyberattacks.

Kimmel played the video clip, saying: “That’s right, come get lost in a world of paranoia and mustache-wax.”

HuffPost first reported on the Lindell portion of the show.

He also swiped at Lindell’s Amazon-rival MyStore, which sells an eclectic range of goods including homeware, medical products, Lindell’s autobiography, and a DVD called “Florida Beach Secrets.”

The store has been live for months, but Lindell told Steve Bannon that he planned to make the site bigger.

On Tuesday’s show, Kimmel picked out some of the products, including the pet stain remover “WoofPurrfect,” a series of children’s books called “Donald the Caveman,” and what MyStore dubs “freedom flags,” which Kimmel said are “48% more patriotic than regular flags.”

“It sounds like we made them up, we didn’t,” Kimmel said.

The site also sells a life-size cardboard cutout of Lindell. “Who would buy this?” Kimmel asked. “The only person crazy enough to pay $40 for a life-size Mike Lindell is Mike Lindell.”

He added: “Why do I get the feeling Mike Lindell is gonna be living in a motel soon?”

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Mike Lindell has launched VIP access to his social-media site Frank, which he says will bar swearing, porn, and death threats

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell
MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell.

  • Mike Lindell’s platform Frank is set to go live on Monday but VIPs can get access from Thursday.
  • Lindell said he’d spent millions of dollars on the site’s security, including its own servers.
  • He described the site as a cross between YouTube and Twitter – but some content will be off-limits.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

You can now sign up for VIP access to Frank, the social-media site being launched by MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell but if you choose to join, you’ll still have to be careful about what you post.

Although the site supports free speech, people won’t be able to post swear words, porn, or death threats, Lindell said.

Lindell, a staunch supporter of former President Donald Trump, first announced plans to launch his own social-media site in early March, after being banned from Twitter.

Read more: The MyPillow guy says God helped him beat a crack addiction to build a multimillion-dollar empire. Now his religious devotion to Trump threatens to bring it all crashing down.

In a video posted this week to Frank’s static webpage, which first went live in late March, Lindell said he had worked on the site for four years and it would be a “platform like no other.”

Frank uses the tagline “the voice of free speech,” and Lindell has previously said he would use the site to share evidence of his voter-fraud theory, which has been thoroughly debunked.

In the new video, which Newsweek first reported on, Lindell said: “You’re not going to have to worry about what you’re saying.”

He did, however, note that there will be some content moderation on the site. “You don’t get to use the four swear words: the c-word, the n-word, the f-word, or God’s name in vain,” he said. “Free speech is not pornography, free speech isn’t ‘I’m gonna kill you.'”

Details of this would be available in the site’s mission statement when it goes live, he said.

Lindell added that he had spent millions of dollars on the site’s security over the last four weeks because he expected the site to be the victim of cyberattacks.

“We’re going to be attacked, but I have my own servers and everything,” he said. “We’re not going to be worried about Amazon taking it down, or YouTube, or Google, or Apple.”

Social-media site Parler was booted offline by its previous web host Amazon Web Services. It was also shunned by other tech giants, including Apple and Google, after Trump supporters used it to call for more violence during the January Capitol riots because of its lax stance on moderating content.

Lindell said Frank would be “kind of like a YouTube-Twitter combination.”

“You’re going to have your own like YouTube channel, only that’s your Twitter handle,” he said.

A previous description of the site, which has since been removed, said that users would be able to “post videos, livestream television, distribute news and information, and find community and fellowship with likeminded Americans.”

Lindell told “The Eric Metaxas Radio Show” in March that the site is “reverse-engineered,” and that when influencers join, “they will now have a platform where all the people down here follow them instantly.”

“They don’t have to earn their followers,” he added.

Frank’s webpage includes a box where visitors can submit their cellphone number to receive a text code for early VIP access to sign up. Lindell said in the video that people who do would be able to get access to the site at midnight on Thursday.

He said the site is set to launch more widely at 9 a.m. on Monday for a two-day “Frankathon,” during which he’ll broadcast live on the site.

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