MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell says Fox News is ignoring his ‘cyber symposium’ – so he’s planning to buy more ads on the network to promote it

mike lindell trump
Former president Donald Trump with MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell at the White House.

  • MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell said Fox News hadn’t covered his upcoming “cyber symposium” event.
  • He told Salon he planned to buy ads on the network to promote the upcoming event.
  • Lindell said his symposium would reveal details about voter fraud during the 2020 election.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

MyPillow CEO Mike Lindell is unhappy with Fox News over what he saw as its disregard for his upcoming rally, so he plans to buy more ad time on the network, Salon reports.

Lindell said the news network hadn’t yet covered his “cyber symposium” event, scheduled to start August 10 in South Dakota.

“Fox [News] does not talk about anything with the election,” he told Salon. Fox News did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

Lindell said he planned to respond by buying more ads on Fox News. Those ads would promote his website, FrankSpeech.com, and include information about the event in an attempt to “get the word out,” he said.

“So I’m going to make ads that will talk about – at least advertising for FrankSpeech.com – that we’re going to be televising this [cyber symposium] for 72 hours straight,” he said.

Lindell has said his symposium would reveal new information about voter fraud in the 2020 election. An ally of former President Donald Trump, he has been a leading voice in spreading conspiracies theories about the election being “stolen.”

In December 2020, Lindell said “the biggest fraud is the Dominion machines,” a reference to machines used to cast votes. He said Dominion’s technology switched votes for Trump to votes for Joe Biden. Dominion sued Lindell for $1.3 billion, and Lindell countered with a lawsuit for $1.6 billion.

Lindell told Salon: “Fox News has refused to cover election fraud, especially the machines.” He added: “Shame on Fox News!”

Following the 2020 elections, Lindell’s relationship with Fox News soured. He said the network was “unwatchable” after it announced Biden’s victory. He championed other conservative networks, like Newsmax.

Lindell went after the network on Steve Bannon’s podcast “War Room: Pandemic” on Real America’s Voice. He told Bannon that MSNBC has way “better coverage” than Fox News.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The Biden White House confronted Fox News about its hosts’ bid to erode trust in the COVID-19 vaccine

Jen Psaki
White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki speaks during a daily briefing at the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House May 4, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • The White House has held discussions with Fox News about its COVID-19 vaccine coverage.
  • Fox News hosts have for months encouraged viewers to question the safety and effectiveness of vaccines.
  • Studies have found a partisan divide in willingness to get the shot.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Biden administration has confronted Fox News over the bid by some of its top-rated hosts to erode trust in the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines.

White House Press secretary Jen Psaki at a press briefing on Tuesday confirmed that officials had held talks with the right-wing Fox News network and other media outlets about their coverage of the vaccine rollout strategy.

“We’ve been in touch with every network and many, many media outlets about coverage of COVID-19 to make sure people have accurate information, to voice concerns when we have them,” Psaki said.

And addressing Fox News specifically, Psaki emphasized “the importance of reaching Fox News’ audience about the COVID-19 vaccines and their benefits, and like we are with all of you here today we, of course, are in regular contact.”

Psaki’s statement came after CNN reported that the discussions between White House officials and Fox News over its vaccination coverage had taken place regularly and at a “high level.”

A Fox News spokesperson denied CNN’s characterisation of the White House meetings.

“CNN’s reporting is inaccurate. There have been no high level conversations between Fox News Media and the White House regarding our coverage. We had one routine briefing with the White House in early May on vaccination rates and our DC bureau personnel are regularly in touch with them on a variety of issues, as is the case with every other network,” said the spokesperson.

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for information on the meetings.

Over the past week the Biden administration has stepped up its pushback against vaccine skeptics and anti-vaccine conspiracy theorists as vaccination rates lag and the highly contagious Delta variant spreads rapidly.

Last week President Joe Biden accused Facebook of “killing people” by hosting anti-vaccine propaganda on its platform, in comments he subsequently moderated. Anthony Fauci, the White House’s chief medical officer, on Saturday said media networks which have pushed vaccine skeptical views have played a key role in discouraging many to get a shot.

Several surveys have found a clear partisan divide in willingness to get vaccinated, with the states where vaccination rates are lowest among the most conservative in the country.

Some of Fox News’ top-rated hosts, including Tucker Carlson and Laura Ingraham, have for months been encouraging Americans to question the safety of vaccines, misrepresenting the views of public health officials and skewing data in their arguments.

Critics told Insider back in February the campaign was likely a bid to damage the Biden administration, and boost ratings by stirring paranoia about plots by liberal and scientific “elites.”

In an abrupt shift in message emphasis on Monday, hosts including Sean Hannity and Steve Doocey urged viewers to get the vaccine. Senior Republicans including Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell also issued public statements Monday urging Americans to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

A Fox News spokesperson denied claims that the positive comments made about vaccines by hosts Monday were a new position, directing Insider to a list of times hosts in recent months had expressed support for the drive to get Americans vaccinated.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Fauci says polio and smallpox would still be spreading in the US if anti-vaxx misinformation had been as popular in the past

fauci niaid
Dr. Anthony Fauci in Washington DC on February 25, 2021.

  • Dr Anthony Fauci in a CNN interview addressed anti-vaccination misinformation.
  • If there was the same pushback against smallpox vaccines in the past the disease would still be around, he said.
  • Vaccination rates in the US have stalled as Fox News hosts and GOP lawmakers push anti-vaccination propaganda.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The White House’s top medical advisor, Dr Anthony Fauci, has said that the US’ campaigns to innoculate people against diseases in the past would not have been successful if anti-vaccination misinformation had been as popular as it is now.

Fauci, who is one of the top experts in infectious diseases in the US, made the comments as vaccination rates in the US stall, and conspiracy theorists backed by top-rated hosts on the right-wing Fox News network and Republican lawmakers seek to erode faith in the shot.

In an interview with CNN Saturday, host Jim Acosta asked Fauci whether history could have played out differently if public health authorities in the past had had to battle the waves of misinformation currently spreading in the US.

Acosta asked if he thought “we could have defeated the measles or eradicated polio if you had Fox News, night after night, warning people about these vaccine issues that are just bunk.”

Fauci said: “We probably would still have smallpox, and we probably would still have polio in this country if we had the kind of false information that’s being spread now,” Fauci said.

On Friday President Joe Biden singled out Facebook for criticism, saying the social media platform was “killing people” by allowing COVID-19 misinformation to spread on its platform.

The White House has missed its target of vaccinating 70% of the US population by July 4, and the huge surge in people initially seeking the injection has leveled. Infection rates driven by the more infectious Delta variant are rising, with White House coronavirus coordinator Jeff Zients saying last week that 4 states with relatively low vaccination rates were driving 40% of new cases.

Fox News hosts and some GOP lawmakers have stepped up a campaign to erode faith in the vaccines in recent months, which experts told Insider in February was likely partly a bid to damage Biden’s vaccination strategy and score political points.

Fauci has become a hate figure for some right-wingers. A PAC linked to Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis has even started selling “Don’t Fauci My Florida” merchandise.

In the interview with CNN, Fauci expressed his bafflement at the hostility directed at him.

“Taking an individual who stands for public health, for truth… and to use my name in a derogatory way to prevent people from doing things that’s for the benefit of their own health, go figure that one out.”

“That doesn’t make any sense at all,” he said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Tucker Carlson compares COVID-19 vaccine question to being asked if he has HIV or what his favorite sexual position is

tucker carlson
Tucker Carlson speaks onstage during Politicon 2018 at Los Angeles Convention Center on October 21, 2018 in Los Angeles, California.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson has repeatedly refused to reveal whether he’s received a COVID-19 vaccine and has argued questions about his vaccination status are as personal and “vulgar” as questions about his sex life.

When a Time Magazine reporter recently asked Carlson whether he’d been vaccinated, he replied, “Because I’m a polite person, I’m not going to ask you any supervulgar personal questions like that.”

He went on, “That’s like saying, ‘Do you have HIV?’ … How about ‘None of your business’?”

When a New York Times reporter asked Carlson in May whether he’d been vaccinated, he texted back, “When was the last time you had sex with your wife and in what position? We can trade intimate details.”

Carlson has repeatedly promoted misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccines and undermined public health efforts to control the virus from his massive primetime platform.

Fox News has repeatedly declined to comment in response to Insider’s questions about whether Carlson has been vaccinated.

Dozens of Republican members of Congress have also refused to tell media outlets whether they’ve been vaccinated. As of May, fewer than half of House Republicans had publicly revealed that they’ve been vaccinated. Meanwhile, every Democrat in the House and Senate has said that they’ve received a COVID-19 vaccine.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Tucker Carlson called Trump ‘the single most repulsive person on the planet’ and a ‘wacko’ in 1999

Fox News host Tucker Carlson
Fox News host Tucker Carlson

  • Tucker Carlson called Donald Trump the “most repulsive person on the planet” in 1999.
  • Carlson acknowledged that Trump was more “interesting” than many others in politics.
  • “Horrible as he is (or perhaps because he is so horrible), Trump is interesting,” he wrote.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Fox News host Tucker Carlson called former President Donald Trump, then a real-estate mogul toying with a presidential bid, the “most repulsive person on the planet” and “so horrible” in a 1999 post on the website Slate.

Carlson, then an early-career conservative writer and commentator, made the judgment in an exchange with fellow Slate blogger, Evan Smith, who first labelled Trump a “repulsive” character.

“I’d love to add something even meaner to your description of Donald Trump – he’s the sort of person I want to keep kicking once he’s down-but I don’t think I can,” Carlson wrote in his exchange with Smith. “You’ve said it all: He is the single most repulsive person on the planet.”

But Carlson acknowledged that Trump, who was considering a 2000 run as a Reform Party candidate, was more “interesting” than many others in politics.

“That said, I still plan to write about him some time. I don’t think I’ll be able to help it. Horrible as he is (or perhaps because he is so horrible), Trump is interesting, or at least more so than most candidates,” he wrote, adding that the Trump and the Reform Party lacked any political “ideology” and were “just a bunch of wackos with a Web site and federal matching funds.”

The Washington Post resurfaced Carlson’s comments in an investigative piece published Wednesday exploring his history of pushing white grievance politics and opposing efforts to promote diversity, inclusion, and anti-racism.

Carlson, who later became a key Trump ally, couldn’t have predicted in the 90s that his career as a right-wing TV personality would thrive under a Trump presidency. His Fox News primetime show, “Tucker Carlson Tonight,” debuted shortly after Trump’s election in 2016 and has become the most-watched cable news show in the country.

A spokesperson for Fox News declined to comment, but pointed Insider to a 2016 Politico column Carlson wrote in which he calls Trump “imperfect” and stops short of endorsing him for the GOP presidential nomination, while simultaneoulsy lavishing praise on his populist politics.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Fox News contributor praises America for ‘relatively short’ history of slavery

George Murdoch argued on Fox News that American slavery existed for a 'relatively short' amount of time.
George Murdoch argued on Fox News that American slavery existed for a ‘relatively short amount of time.’

  • George “Tyrus” Murdoch downplayed America’s history of slavery while discussing critical race theory.
  • Murdoch argued that America was able to “to get slavery out of the way” in a “relatively short amount of time.”
  • It’s unclear what Murdoch’s argument about the length of slavery in America has to do with anti-racist education.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Fox News personality George Murdoch downplayed America’s history of slavery while arguing during a Fox News appearance on Wednesday that critical race theory shouldn’t be taught in elementary and high schools.

“As far as teaching our multicultural classrooms about race in this country, I think we need to start where we’re at and acknowledge our history. But when you look at slavery in this country opposed to the world, 400 years is still too long, but at the same time other countries dealt with it for thousands of years, where America was able to get it — in a relatively short amount of time in terms of our history — to get slavery out of the way.” ” he said on the daytime news show “America’s Newsroom.”

It took the US almost 100 years after signing the Declaration of Independence — and a civil war — to abolish slavery. Slaves were first brought to Virginia in 1619 and made up a significant portion of the US population for about 250 years.

Critical race theory emerged out of the civil rights movement in the 1960s and 70s and holds that many American laws and systems are structurally racist and that most people of color suffer from racism on a daily basis.

It’s unclear what Murdoch’s argument about the length of slavery in America has to do with the anti-racist theory.

Republicans have aggressively campaigned against the Biden administration efforts to encourage schools to teach students about the history of slavery and its impacts, including systemic racism.

Biden hasn’t proposed any changes to school curricula, but conservative state legislatures across the country have moved to ban critical race theory, which they call a “Marxist doctrine,” from being taught in public schools. They’ve also opposed The New York Times’ Pulitzer Prize-winning 1619 Project being taught to students.

Former President Donald Trump and Republican lawmakers have leaned into the campaign, attempting to fuel anger among the party’s base. Fox has heavily covered the topic, often celebrating the backlash against anti-racist teachings. A Fox spokesperson didn’t immediately provide comment to Insider.

Murdoch, who was formerly a professional wrestler known as “Tyrus,” was accused of sexual harassment in 2019 by his former Fox co-host Britt McHenry. McHenry, then a Fox Nation host, sued Fox News for retaliation after she accused Murdoch of sexual misconduct. After she brought her allegations to Fox executives, Murdoch was promoted to host his own show on the network’s streaming service.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Liz Cheney said Fox News ‘especially’ has an ‘obligation to make sure people know the election wasn’t stolen’

Liz Cheney shadows
WASHINGTON, DC – APRIL 20: Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) speaks during a press conference following a House Republican caucus meeting on Capitol Hill on April 20, 2021 in Washington, DC. The House Republican members spoke about the Biden administration’s immigration policies and the coronavirus pandemic.

  • Rep. Liz Cheney said Fox News “especially” has an “obligation” to ensure Americans know the 2020 election wasn’t “stolen.”
  • Cheney’s remarks came after she was ousted from her leadership position by House Republicans a day earlier.
  • Fox News host Bret Baier responded by saying Fox News has reported “numerous times” that the election wasn’t stolen.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Rep. Liz Cheney clashed with a Fox News host on Thursday, saying the news outlet “especially” has a “particular obligation to make sure people know the election wasn’t stolen.”

Cheney’s scathing comments came after House Republicans voted Wednesday to oust her from her leadership position amid her public criticisms of former President Donald Trump.

“We all have an obligation, and I would say Fox News especially, especially Fox News, has a particular obligation to make sure people know the election wasn’t stolen,” Cheney said during an interview with Fox News host Bret Baier.

Cheney has been embroiled in a political firestorm after criticizing Trump and other GOP lawmakers who still embrace him post-presidency, particularly with regard to claims the 2020 election was rigged, and about the Capitol insurrection.

The Wyoming congresswoman has consistently pushed back against her colleagues’ false claims the 2020 election was rigged. In January, she was one of just 10 Republicans who voted to impeach Trump in the aftermath of the Capitol riots.

In a tense exchange on Thursday, Cheney argued with Baier over Fox News’ reporting of the 2020 election, saying “we have to be in a position where we are being clear. We stand for the rule of law,” and Fox News “needs to make sure” that they are doing the same.

“We need to make sure the American people recognize and understand that the election wasn’t stolen, that we shouldn’t perpetuate ‘the Big Lie,’ and that there’s real danger,” she said.

Cheney added: “I’ve worked in countries around the world where we don’t have peaceful transitions of power, and all of us who are elected officials have got to make sure that we obey and abide by the oath that we swore to the Constitution, and that the peaceful of power is key to that.”

Baier responded to Cheney by saying Fox News has reported “numerous times” that the election wasn’t stolen.

On Wednesday, GOP lawmakers in the House voted to remove Cheney as House Republican Conference chair. McCarthy and his Republican allies have bristled at Cheney’s public criticism of Trump in recent weeks, and the House GOP leader authorized the vote to oust Cheney earlier this week.

“We all need to be working as one if we’re able to win the majority” in the 2022 midterm elections, McCarthy said during a Fox News interview last week.

Read the original article on Business Insider

New York Post reporter resigns saying she was ‘ordered’ to write ‘incorrect’ story on Kamala Harris’ book at a migrant shelter

ny post covers
Fading Page 1 editions of the New York Post are pasted on the wall of the press room in the State Supreme Court building, also known as 100 Centre St., Friday, Jan. 25, 2019, in New York.

  • A New York Post reporter who authored a story falsely claiming that migrant children were being given copies of Kamala Harris’ children’s book resigned Tuesday.
  • The reporter, Laura Italiano, said that she’d been “ordered” to write the “incorrect” story and had reached her “breaking point.”
  • The Post temporarily deleted Italiano’s two stories on the topic and republished altered versions hours later with editor’s notes.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A New York Post reporter who authored a story falsely claiming that migrant children were being given copies of Vice President Kamala Harris’ children’s book announced on Tuesday that she’d been “ordered” to write the “incorrect” story and resigned from the paper.

Earlier on Tuesday, the Post temporarily deleted Italiano’s two stories on the topic and republished altered versions hours later with editor’s notes.

“An announcement: Today I handed in my resignation to my editors at the New York Post,” Laura Italiano tweeted on Tuesday evening. “The Kamala Harris story – an incorrect story I was ordered to write and which I failed to push back hard enough against – was my breaking point.”

Italiano’s cover story last Friday titled, “Kam On In: Solo kids at border welcomed with copy of veep’s book,” falsely reported that migrant children were provided with “welcome kits” that included Harris’ 2019 book. The story was void of evidence supporting that claim, which appeared entirely based on a Reuters photo showing a single copy of the book propped against a backpack on a table at the Long Beach, California, migrant shelter.

The story was debunked by other news outlets after it was heavily promoted in the right-wing media and brought up in a White House press briefing.

A spokesperson for the city of Long Beach told The Washington Post that the copy of Harris’ book was donated to the shelter by a community member as part of a city-wide book and toy drive to support young migrants. The Post fact-checker gave Italiano’s reporting four “Pinocchios.”

Neither Italiano, nor a spokesperson for the Post immediately responded to Insider’s requests for comment.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Right-wing media has pushed 3 completely false narratives in less than a week

fox news hannity tucker ingraham
Fox News primetime hosts Tucker Carlson, Laura Ingraham and Sean Hannity on a banner outside the Fox News headquarters in Midtown Manhattan.

  • Fox News heavily promoted a false claim that the Biden administration would force Americans to cut their red meat intake by 90%.
  • The network falsely reported that a migrant shelter was distributing Kamala Harris’ book in “welcome packs.”
  • Fox also ran stories inaccurately claiming the Virginia department of education is moving to eliminate advanced math classes in high schools.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Right-wing media, most prominently Fox News, has promoted three major false stories in just the last few days.

Last Friday, The New York Post published a cover story claiming that copies of Vice President Kamala Harris’ 2019 children’s book, “Superheroes Are Everywhere,” was being gifted to migrant children at a Department of Health and Human Services shelter in Long Beach, California. The Post provided no evidence for the claim aside from a single Reuters photograph of Harris’ book propped against a backpack on a table.

The story was picked up by a host of right-wing media, including Fox News, which co-authored a follow-up story with The Post reporter, Laura Italiano, who wrote the original piece. A slew of prominent Republican lawmakers, including GOP Sen. Tom Cotton and Republican National Committee Chair Ronna McDaniel, promoted the Post’s story.

But the Post’s story was quickly debunked. The Washington Post fact-checker, which gave the Post story “four Pinocchios” on Tuesday, reported that The Post based its entire story on a photo of one copy of the book donated to the shelter by a community member. The Post deleted its two stories on the matter and later republished them with corrections and editor’s notes added.

Spokespeople for Fox News did not respond to Insider’s comment about the network’s reporting, but the network quietly added an editor’s note to its story about the White House’s response to the Post’s reporting and deleted Italiano’s byline.

Also last Friday, Fox News ran multiple segments falsely claiming that President Joe Biden’s administration would require Americans to radically reduce their red meat consumption under Biden’s climate policy. Fox’s on-air discussions relied on a Daily Mail story that reported the Biden administration “could” require Americans to cut their red meat consumption by 90%, citing academic studies showing that reductions in animal products help cut greenhouse gas emissions.

In reality, Biden has no plan to require Americans eat less red meat.

Fox chyrons read, “Bye-Bye Burgers Under Biden’s Climate plan” and “90% of Red Meat Out With Biden Climate Plan.” One graphic falsely stated that “Biden’s climate requirements” include a maximum of four pounds of red meat consumption a year and “one burger per month.” A slew of conservative lawmakers promoted the false claims and lashed out at the Biden administration. Donald Trump Jr. claimed he’d likely eaten four pounds of red meat the previous day.

“Joe Biden’s climate plan includes cutting 90% of red meat from our diets by 2030. They want to limit us to about four pounds a year. Why doesn’t Joe stay out of my kitchen?” Colorado Rep. Lauren Boebert tweeted on Saturday.

Fox host John Roberts acknowledged in a brief on-air correction on Monday that the claims were wrong. Roberts said the network’s graphic and script “incorrectly implied” that reducing red meat consumption “was part of Biden’s plan for dealing with climate change.”

Fox and other right-wing media also ran with a story that Virginia’s public schools were moving to eliminate accelerated high school math courses to improve racial equity, “effectively keeping higher-achieving students from advancing as they usually would in the school system.”

The stories, which were amplified by Fox’s opinion side, were false and overblown. Virginia’s superintendent of public instruction, James Lane, told The Washington Post that the state’s department of education is beginning a regular evaluation of its math curriculum and is not eliminating any advanced classes.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Daily Mail and Fox News pushed misleading claims about Biden limiting meat consumption. Conservatives like Lauren Boebert and Marjorie Taylor Greene lashed out at the president anyway.

lauren boebert
Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-CO) attends the Conservative Political Action Conference held in the Hyatt Regency on February 27, 2021 in Orlando, Florida.

  • False claims spread this week about Biden limiting Americans’ meat consumption.
  • Biden has not released any plans related to meat consumption.
  • Prominent conservatives amplified the misleading claims online with widely shared tweets.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

False claims about President Joe Biden’s plans for addressing the climate crisis spread online this week, but the lack of truth over the claims didn’t stop Republican lawmakers from responding to or repeating them.

The Daily Mail published a story Thursday with a headline that began: “How Biden’s climate plan could limit you to eat just one burger a MONTH.” It included unsubstantiated claims that in order to meet Biden’s plan Americans would need to “cut 90% of red meat out of diet” and “only eat 4lbs a year.”

Republican Texas Gov. Greg Abbott shared a screenshot from Fox News that echoed the claims, labeled as “Biden climate requirements,” along with the limit of “one burger per month.”

Read more: Republicans keep denying evidence they don’t like – as a former Republican and polar bear scientist, I know exactly how dangerous this can be

Fox News show host Larry Kudlow said: “Speaking of stupid, there’s a study coming out of the University of Michigan which says that to meet the Biden Green New Deal targets, America has to, get this, America has to stop eating meat, stop eating poultry and fish, seafood, eggs, dairy, and animal-based fats.”

In fact, the University of Michigan study cited by the Daily Mail and Fox was published in January 2020 and is not related to Biden or his climate plan. According to the authors, the study analyzes “hypothetical reduction in the consumption of animal-based foods in the US diet” and relies on “a number of simplifying assumptions.” It is not a policy proposal or suggestion.

When reached by CNN’s Daniel Dale, one of the authors said: “I, admittedly, have no idea what Biden’s plan has to say about our diets.”

Biden announced on Thursday that the US will aim to cut carbon emission 50% by 2030, but he has released few details on how his administration plans to meet that goal. During the announcement, Biden made no mention of Americans’ meat consumption.

The Daily Mail and Fox News did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

The claims about Biden’s plan were amplified by conservatives on Twitter, including members of Congress.

GOP Rep. Lauren Boebert tweeted the false claims, saying “Joe Biden’s climate plan includes cutting 90% of red meat from our diets by 2030. They want to limit us to about four pounds a year. Why doesn’t Joe stay out of my kitchen?”

Fellow freshman GOP Rep. Marjorie Taylor Greene tweeted an apparent reference to the false claims, writing “The Hamburglar,” alongside a photo of Biden eating a burger. She added in quotes: “No burgers for thee, but just for me.”

Donald Trump Jr. tweeted the Fox News screenshot, saying: “I’m pretty sure I ate 4 pounds of red meat yesterday. That’s going to be a hard NO from me.”

Representatives for Boebert and Greene did not respond to Insider’s request for comment. Representatives for Abbott and Trump Jr. could not be reached.

All of the tweets mentioned above that spread the false or misleading claims were liked and shared thousands of times on Twitter.

Read the original article on Business Insider