Rastelli’s sells top-quality meat and seafood to restaurants around the world — you can now order online delivery

Prices are accurate at the time of publication.

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rastellis meat and fish delivery 2
  • Famous family business Rastelli’s is online, so you can order beef, poultry, and seafood in bulk.
  • All of Rastelli’s products are responsibly raised, antibiotic-free, and added-hormone-free. 
  • We ordered from Rastelli’s and loved the large selection of meat and seafood and the convenience. 

We ordered from Rastelli’s and loved how convenient the service was. You can get free shipping on orders of $200 or more, a $10 shipping charge on orders between $100-$199, and $25 shipping on orders under $100.


When you don’t want to or can’t go grocery shopping for the week, it’s tempting to re-open your fridge door in hopes that food will magically appear. But with an internet connection and a laptop, you have better options. 

For general groceries, you can go to any number of online grocery delivery services such as FreshDirect and AmazonFresh. But if you’re craving something a little more gourmet, there are even more specific delivery services. 

The magic of meat delivery services like Porter Road and Snake River Farms is this: They provide curated shopping experiences, they sell high-quality and responsibly raised meat, and they’re really convenient because they’ll ship fresh products directly to your door. 

Rastelli’s is a family business that started in 1976 as a local New Jersey butcher shop. It supplied the neighboring deli and the community with quality meat, eventually expanding into poultry and seafood and distributing its food products worldwide. If you live in New Jersey, you can shop in person at its gourmet markets, Rastelli Market Fresh. But if you don’t, you can still cook and enjoy meat, poultry, and seafood from this storied brand.

rastellis meat and fish delivery 3

How to order from Rastelli’s 

On its website, Rastelli’s offers various proteins made up of 12 to 24 servings of steak, chicken, shrimp, salmon, and more. If you choose to subscribe, you’ll save a little money (5%), and there are various shipment-frequency options so your freezer won’t get overcrowded. 

All of Rastelli’s animals are responsibly raised, antibiotic-free, and added-hormone-free. The seafood is wild-caught. 

Review of Rastelli’s

rastellis meat and fish delivery

Your order is packed in an insulated box with dry ice. From there, you can store them in your freezer and fridge until they’re ready to cook. We tried chicken, salmon, and steaks from Rastelli’s and were happy with the experience on all fronts, from convenience to taste.

The steaks were juicy, flavorful, and easy to cook, while the salmon came out perfectly flaky and moist. We thought the taste of the chicken breast was comparable to similar versions we’ve tried from stores, but we did appreciate that we could have antibiotic-free and organic options delivered right to us.

The bulk design means that as long as you have adequate fridge space, you’ll always have a protein waiting for you when you get home from work or school. 

The bottom line

If you have a busy schedule, you know that any subtle automation of a routine can help make life much less stressful. Ultimately, the Rastelli’s experience was as much about the quality of the food as it was about the pure and simple convenience of the service.

We ordered from Rastelli’s and loved how convenient the service was. You can get free shipping on orders of $200 or more, a $10 shipping charge on orders between $100-$199, and $25 shipping on orders under $100.


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Starbucks closes 2 stores and launches a full inspection of all 5,400 outlets in China after a report that staff used out-of-date produce

A staff member serves a customer at a Starbucks Coffee house in Beijing
A staff member serves a customer at a Starbucks Coffee house in Beijing

  • Starbucks is inspecting all 5,400 China stores after staff in two outlets reportedly used expired food.
  • Beijing News’ undercover report said staff used expired matcha liquid and sold old pastries, per Reuters.
  • Starbucks apologized in a Weibo post, saying it has closed the two stores being investigated.

Starbucks said on Monday that it has launched a full inspection into all 5,400 stores in China after a state-backed newspaper said that staff in two of its outlets had used expired ingredients.

Beijing News said on Monday it had carried out an undercover investigation at two Starbucks stores in Wuxi City in eastern China and found that staff were using out-of-date ingredients, Reuters reported.

A server at one of the Starbucks stores used expired matcha liquid to make lattes, according to the report.

At the other store, old pastries, which were supposed to be thrown away, were put on display for sale, the report said.

Starbucks apologized for the incidents in a Weibo post, and said that it has closed the two stores for investigation, according to the newswire. 

The company reportedly confirmed in the post that employees in the two stores in Wuxi violated operating regulations.

“We sincerely apologise to all of Starbucks’ customers,” the company said in a statement on its Weibo account, per Reuters. Starbucks added in its apology that the company had not paid enough attention to food safety standards.

Reuters reported that Wuxi’s Market Supervision Administration said in a statement on Monday that following its investigations into the two stores, it had also inspected all of Starbucks’ 82 stores in the city.

Across these stores, the agency discovered 15 problems, including unfinished disinfection records and staff not wearing their work hats, per Reuters.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Gordon Ramsay moves restaurant HQ to Texas from California as his huge brand expansion plans start to take shape

Gordon Ramsay
Gordon Ramsay.

  • Gordon Ramsay has moved his restaurant headquarters to Texas, Dallas Morning News reported
  • The expansion is part of Ramsay’s plan to open dozens more restaurants across North America. 
  • A dedicated team of chefs and businessmen will be based in Las Colinas, Dallas, the outlet added. 

Celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay has relocated his restaurant headquarters from California to Texas, Dallas Morning News reported.

Ramsay has hired a team of businessmen and chefs to expand his restaurant brand across North America, the outlet reported. It added that the team, which will be based in Las Colinas, plans to launch 18 restaurants in cities including Boston, Miami, and Chicago. 

The CEO of Gordon Ramsay North America, Norman Abdallah, will oversee the opening of 75 company-owned restaurants across the country in the next five years, according to Dallas Morning News. 

The availability of chefs and restaurant support staff, as well as the favourable tax policies, are what attracted them to Dallas, Abdallah told the outlet. “The cost of living adjustment [from California to Texas] is pretty substantial,” he added.

Gordon Ramsay North America did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment. 

Insider’s Kate Duffy reported in February that Ramsay took a massive hit to his business during the pandemic, losing $80 million worth of turnover.

The impact of the pandemic has been “incredibly costly,” he told The Sun at the time. “I get criticised for being wealthy, but the responsibility on my shoulders — the livelihoods at stake — is huge.”

 

Read the original article on Business Insider

Starbucks’ app has allowed customers to order illogical drinks like iceless Frappuccinos and waterless Americanos, baristas say

starbucks drink cup barista
One Americano, hold the water.

  • Starbucks baristas say they were puzzled by orders for iceless Frappuccinos and waterless Americanos.
  • They said customers could order them on the Starbucks mobile app, until it was updated recently.
  • Customers could sometimes get mad if their drinks didn’t turn out as expected, some baristas said.

Starbucks baristas have expressed puzzlement at receiving orders for iceless Frappuccinos and waterless Americanos via the coffee-chain’s app.

Current and former baristas told Insider that unusual mobile orders — the beverage equivalent to ordering a cheeseburger with no burger — could cause headaches and lead to customers getting angry.

The baristas said weird mobile orders posed problems because they couldn’t ask customers questions about what they actually wanted before they arrived at the store to collect their drinks. In some cases they had to offer customers refunds or alternative drinks, said the baristas, who spoke on the condition of anonymity to protect their employment.

A Starbucks barista in Minneapolis said some mobile orders couldn’t be made until the customer got to the store “because we have no idea what they’re asking for.”

The latest version of Starbucks’ US iPhone app, which is updated frequently, didn’t as of Friday include some of the customization options that baristas described.

A Starbucks spokesperson said: “Customizing beverages at Starbucks and our baristas’ expertise in helping customers find and craft the right beverage has and always will be at the heart of the Starbucks experience.”

They added: “There are many ways for customers to modify their favorite beverage and most customizations are reasonable requests from customers; 75% of customized beverages at Starbucks have fewer than three unique modifications.”

One Frappuccino, hold the ice

Starbucks staff said customers had ordered iceless Frappuccinos on the Starbucks app.

“That always makes me chuckle,” a shift supervisor in Tennessee said, noting that ice is an “integral” part of the drink. “The Starbucks app shouldn’t let you do that.”

Baristas said that the “no ice” option was once available on the company’s US app. This wasn’t an option as of Friday. Customers could still order iceless Frappuccinos on the UK app, however, Insider found.

Starbucks app screenshot
The Starbucks UK app lets customers order iceless Frappuccinos and waterless Americanos.

A former barista in British Columbia, Canada, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because she may return to work at Starbucks, said her store used to get at least three orders a day for iceless Frappuccinos.

Opinions were divided among baristas as to why customers were opting for Frappuccinos without ice.

“They just didn’t know what they were ordering,” Kelly Preston, a former barista in Georgia, said.

Starbucks app glitches waterless Americano iceless Frappuccino
The UK app lets customers select how much ice they want in their Frappuccino. “No ice” is an option.

Gary Ladewig, a former shift supervisor in Illinois, said he thought some customers had selected the no-ice option by accident. Madeline Babin, a former barista in Louisiana, said she thought they were accidentally ordered by children.

Ladewig and the former British Columbia barista said some customers told them they bought iceless Frappuccinos to drink at home, where they added ice themselves.

One Americano, hold the water

Six former Starbucks employees in the US said they’d received mobile orders for Americanos with no water. A former barista in Canada and a former shift supervisor in the UK also said they’d been asked to make waterless Americanos.

The baristas said the “no water” option was once available on the company’s US app but isn’t any longer. Customers can still order waterless Americanos on the UK app, Insider found, as well as iced teas with no ice and no water.

Starbucks app glitches waterless Americano iceless Frappuccino
The UK app lets customers choose how much water they want in their Americano. “No water” is an option.

Preston said she thought customers who ordered waterless Americanos wanted lattes but didn’t want to pay full price, and would add milk themselves from the self-serve station.

Starbucks app glitches waterless Americano iceless Frappuccino
The Starbucks UK app lets customers order waterless Americanos.

“Customers often don’t actually understand what a drink is made out of and so they might select ‘Americano with no water’ and then get angry when you hand them a cup of just espresso,” Nicholas Anderson, a former barista in Atlanta, said. “So it’s always better to err on the side of not making the drink.”

Starbucks app glitches waterless Americano iceless Frappuccino
The Starbucks UK app also lets customers order iced tea without ice or water.

Excessive modifications and cup sizes that don’t match the drinks

Some baristas said customers had placed mobile orders for hot drinks with cold foam.

“That’s just funny,” the Tennessee shift supervisor said.

Starbucks uses cold foam for cold brew coffee. When cold foam is used on hot drinks it melts quickly, and customers “get in a little fit with me about it,” the Tennessee shift supervisor said.

The Starbucks US app still allows customers to order drinks with cup sizes that don’t reflect the size of their drink.

Babin said a lot of customers ordered drinks in bigger cups, which she thought was so they could add extra milk or whipped cream, but some ordered drinks in smaller cups, which she didn’t understand. In these cases, she would serve the drink in a cup that matched the size of the drink, but would also give the customer a cup in the size they requested, she said. 

Some baristas said that customers had asked for so many modifications, they struggled to fit the drinks into one cup. One barista called drinks like these “kitchen soup Frappuccinos.”

The Tennessee shift supervisor said one customer ordered a Frappuccino with around 10 shots of espresso, which just melted the ice.

A shift supervisor in Maryland said some customers added modifications “just because they’re there.”

“People can make drink combinations that not only aren’t intuitive but also just don’t make sense,” they added.

Baristas said that some in-store customers had weird requests, too, like asking for cake pops, brownies, and even egg bites to be blended into drinks.

Do you work at Starbucks? Got a story to share? Email this reporter at gdean@insider.com

Read the original article on Business Insider

I was served by talking robots at a sci-fi restaurant. It was fun but the hospitality sector could easily survive without them.

"Amy" and "Sparky" the robots inside Robotazia
“Amy” and “Sparky” the robots inside Robotazia.

  • Robots are becoming more popular in hospitality and I wanted to see what the hype was about.
  • I went to a sci-fi restaurant where I was served nachos by chatty, smiling robots.
  • The robots roll back to battery stations when they need to recharge and cry if you get too close.
I visited “Robotazia,” a sci-fi restaurant full of different types of robots, to see what it was like being served by human-like, talking machines.

"Sparky" the robot inside Robotazia
“Sparky” the robot inside Robotazia

Robotazia, based in Milton Keynes, north-west of London, employs 20 staff and four robots, owners Joy Gittens and Mark Swannell told Insider.

Outside of robot restaurant in Milton Keynes
Outside of robot restaurant in Milton Keynes

The restaurant bought the four server robots, which all look similar to “Ella” pictured below, from Japan.

"Ella" the robot inside Robotazia
“Ella” the robot inside Robotazia

Apart from the four server robots, all of the other robots in the restaurant were made out of recycled metals and other materials.

Reporter with robot outside Robotazia restaurant
Reporter with robot outside Robotazia restaurant

I sat in one of the booths where a human server took my order.

Robotazia
Inside Robotazia restaurant

The robots have a runway which they roll up and down, delivering food to guests. One side of the booth is blocked off so people don’t disrupt the robots’ flow.

"Ella" the robot inside Robotazia
“Ella” the robot inside Robotazia

The first robot that came to say hello was called “Sparky,” who was built by Swannell. Although Sparky was friendly and, dare I say it, witty, I preferred chatting to a human.

"Sparky" the robot inside Robotazia
“Sparky” the robot inside Robotazia

After Sparky waved goodbye, “Amy” rolled over to my table to deliver the nachos I ordered.

"Josh" the robot inside Robotazia
“Amy” the robot inside Robotazia

After I took my bowl of nachos off the tray, Amy told me to touch her hand to let her know when I was finished with her service. She replied “bon appetit” — I was impressed.

"Amy" the robot inside Robotazia
“Amy” the robot inside Robotazia

Gittens said the robots can turn around and roll off if they detect a lot of metal jewellery on a guest. A tear also appears on their face if a person gets too close to them, she said.

"Amy" the robot inside Robotazia
“Amy” the robot inside Robotazia

“Josh” smoothly passed down the aisle with food for another table.

"Josh" the robot inside Robotazia
The four robots are costly and require maintenance every week, Swannell said, adding that usually, every Tuesday he has to fix or tweak something on them. They’re more expensive than hiring human servers, he said.

"Josh" the robot inside Robotazia
“Josh” the robot inside Robotazia

On one busy Saturday, Gittens said that one of the robots said it needed to “recharge” and returned to the dock to refill its batteries.

"Ella" the robot inside Robotazia
“Ella” the robot inside Robotazia

Both owners emphasized how the robots are not designed to replace humans and are purely a fun feature of the restaurant. With the hospitality industry increasingly turning to robotics, especially amid the labor shortage, it dawned on me how valuable the human experience is during table service.

Robotazia
Robotazia

Overall, being served by chatty, smiling robots was a fun experience. But I wouldn’t swap them for human servers!

"Sparky" the robot insider Robotazia
“Sparky” the robot insider Robotazia

Read the original article on Business Insider

I went to Taco Bell for the first time. The food was cheap but mediocre, and I don’t feel like going back.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to a Taco Bell in Newcastle, northern England, to try out the chain’s famous foods.

  • I went to Taco Bell for the first time and tried out a range of tacos, burritos, and desserts.
  • I loved the churros and the Volcano Burrito but was disappointed by the Crunchwrap Supreme.
  • The food was cheap but compared with other Tex-Mex restaurants, the flavors were bland.
It’s only in the last couple of years that I discovered I love burritos and tacos. The pandemic made it hard for me to satisfy my cravings, although I tried burritos from a few local restaurants. I decided to finally go to Taco Bell for the first time to see how it stacks up against other Tex-Mex food I’d sampled.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The Taco Bell I went to is in Newcastle, north England. The chain came to the UK in 2010 after failed launches in the 1980s and 1990s and now has nearly 90 restaurants across the region. The Newcastle restaurant opened in 2018.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Sources: BigHospitality, Taco BellThe Chronicle

The restaurant is popular with students. With two large universities nearby, it wasn’t a surprise to see an ad for a 15% student discount.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The restaurant seemed quiet, but I wasn’t surprised given it was a Monday lunchtime.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

There’s a row of digital ordering kiosks in the center. More and more restaurants have been rolling them out during the pandemic to encourage contactless ordering and help ease staff shortages.

Taco Bell Newcastle order kiosk
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Source: Insider

I was encouraged to download the Taco Bell loyalty app.

Taco Bell Newcastle kiosk order
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Of course, you can also order from a cashier, but I decided to use a kiosk.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Most of the tacos and burritos have a choice of three fillings – beef, grilled chicken, or black beans.

Taco Bell Newcastle kiosk order
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

It’s very easy to customize dishes using the kiosk – which also makes it very easy to add to your order total. It wasn’t quite the same as going to the other burrito bars in Newcastle, where you can watch your order being made and choose from a range of rice flavors, salsas, and salad fillings.

Taco Bell Newcastle kiosk order
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

While I waited for my order I looked at the decor. The store had some wall art and decorations that made it seem somewhat like a bar, like this neon lettering…

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

…and these pictures (can you guess what they spell out?).

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Some of the decor paid tribute to Taco Bell’s California origins.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The fact it sold beer made it seem more like a bar. So I was surprised to hear Christmas songs being blasted out when I visited in late November. The music made it feel more like a family restaurant than the edgy eatery I’d thought Taco Bell was.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

These was a small waiting area for delivery drivers with a chair, table, and bucket.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I’m not sure what the bucket was for. During my time at the restaurant, I noticed lots of Uber Eats and Deliveroo drivers collecting orders.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

My order arrived in just under 10 minutes. This is slower than I’ve found with Burger King and McDonald’s but I’d ordered lots of different items, so I wasn’t surprised. I shared everything with a friend and saved some to eat the next day.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Most of the items were wrapped up, which would make it easier to eat on the go, but the Cinnamon Twists were packed in a box.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Some dishes, like the Quesadilla and the Crunchwrap Supreme, had their own special packaging.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

A lot of the wrappers had pictures on them with check boxes. I wasn’t sure what they were for because none were marked.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I started off by trying the Cheesy Roll-up, one of the cheapest things on Taco Bell’s menu at just £1 ($1.32).

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

It’s a soft tortilla wrap containing Taco Bell’s three-cheese blend. But the cheese hadn’t melted, and I was disappointed.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

It wasn’t just in the roll-up that the cheese hadn’t melted. Most of the items I ordered had grated cheese in them that hadn’t melted, which messed with the texture of the dishes.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I was intrigued by the Crunchwrap Supreme, which I’d ordered with grilled chicken. It had been heavily recommended by one of my friends and is known as one of Taco Bell’s flagship items.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

There wasn’t much chicken compared to the other ingredients. A lot of it seemed to be lettuce and sour cream. Pictures on Taco Bell’s website show it bursting with protein filling and melted cheese, separated from the salad by a wall of nachos, but it didn’t look as impressive in real life.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I was surprised that they had nachos for the Crunchwraps…

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

…given that signs stuck to the kiosks said the restaurant was out of nachos. Perhaps they only had a few left and wanted to prioritize the Crunchwraps.

Taco Bell Newcastle kiosk order
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The Chalupa I had was overflowing with fillings, though there was much more lettuce, cheese, and tomato than black beans.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The Chalupa tasted good. I liked the flavor of the black beans, and wished there had been more. It was quite small, and was basically a taco with a chewier shell, but at only £1.99 ($2.64) it’s hard to complain.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I also tried Taco Bell’s Quesadilla, which cost £3.99 ($5.28). It came cut into four slices and was a good size for the price.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I ordered mine with beef, and it was one of the few items where the cheese was gooey and melted. It didn’t look good on the inside, but tasted great.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Unlike some of the other dishes I ordered, it wasn’t bulked out with salad. It was supposed to contain creamy jalapeño sauce but I couldn’t taste this at all.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I also tried two burritos. They weren’t as big as burritos I’d got elsewhere, but were considerably cheaper.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The Seven-Layer Burrito is still on the menu in the UK, even though it disappeared from US restaurants during the pandemic. The layers were hard to distinguish by eye, but it tasted good. At some burrito bars I’ve been to I’ve had to pay extra for guacamole, so I’m glad it came included with this one.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Source: Insider

The main thing the burrito was lacking was a bit of a kick, such as using salsa rather than diced tomatoes. At Taco Bell in the US some burritos are available in two versions, with one described as “spicy,” but this wasn’t the case in the Newcastle restaurant.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The Volcano Burrito had plenty of kick, though. It’s still available in the UK despite being axed from the US menu back in 2013, to the disappointment of fans of the chain’s spiciest dish.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Source: Reddit

The Volcano Burrito cost £3.99 ($5.28), slightly more than the Seven-Layer Burrito (£3.29; $4.36). I ordered mine with chicken. It was delicious and had a lovely squidgy texture. Of everything I ordered, it definitely had the most flavor, and quite a strong aftertaste. I can’t handle spice very well, but I smeared some guacamole on mine and was just about able to handle it.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I tried Taco Bell’s fries, too. The chain isn’t known for its fries and I was expecting them to be bad.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

But I was pleasantly surprised. The fries were really good. Taco Bell makes it clear that its Mexican Fries aren’t meant to be like French fries, and to me they tasted like cheese and onion potato chips.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The fries were only £1 ($1.32) for a portion similar in size to what you’d expect at McDonald’s – and they came with a small pot of Nacho Cheese Sauce, too.

Taco Bell fries
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I love cheese but the Nacho Cheese Sauce didn’t hit the spot for me.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

It tasted artificial and though it was melted it was wet, thick, and gooey rather than stringy when I dipped my fries in. The guacamole was good but nothing exceptional.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

We tried some desserts, too. Taco Bell sells churros in the UK, which aren’t currently available in the US. These are available in either two- or six-packs. I ordered a six-pack to share with friends, and was surprised that they still came individually packaged in pairs, and in a nacho bag.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The churros were delicious. They were beautifully soft and sprinkled with the perfect amount of sugar and cinnamon. And at £1 ($1.32) for a two-pack, they were really well-priced. I wouldn’t be surprised if people popped into Taco Bell while out and about just to pick up some churros.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Each two-pack came with a small pot of dulce de leche, though these were less than half full. It tasted really good but I was surprised they didn’t just give us one pot filled a bit higher.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

We ordered a large pack of Cinnamon Twists, which came in at £3.99 ($5.28). The portion was huge.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The Cinnamon Twists had a similar flavor to the churros – both were sugary and cinnamony – but an airy, crunchy texture that reminded me of a brand of potato chips I used to eat as a child.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I also took home a Crunchy Taco Supreme, which cost £1.99 ($2.64). Most other tacos I’ve bought were sold in threes. On its own, Taco Bell’s taco was quite small and definitely not filling, but I liked how you could order the tacos separately and mix and match between fillings.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Inside, the taco was very similar to the Chalupa, and was the same price, too. Compared to a regular Taco Bell Crunchy Taco, the Supreme version cost £0.50 ($0.66) more but the only difference was that it came with sour cream and tomatoes.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Taco Bell was ultimately a mixed bag – some of the food like the Quesadilla, Volcano Burrito, and the desserts were delicious, while others didn’t have much flavor. I’d expected more zest and spice from most of the dishes.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

I’d been very excited to try the Crunchwrap Supreme but it disappointed. Clearly some diners do love it, though, and the dish has become one of the brand’s flagship foods.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

As for the cost, Taco Bell wasn’t bad, with quite a few items available for £1 ($1.32) or £1.99 ($2.64).

Taco Bell Newcastle kiosk order
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

The restaurant offered 20% off your next visit if you gave feedback online.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Bottom line: I’d rather pay a little more elsewhere for food that has more flavor.

Taco Bell Newcastle
I went to Taco Bell for the first time.

Read the original article on Business Insider

I went to a swanky weed-infused dinner with big-name chefs and a fire dancer. Here’s what it was like.

Scenes from N-S-F-W.
Scenes from NSFW in New York.

  • New York City offers tons of cannabis-infused experiences, from large events to intimate gatherings.
  • The New Society for Wellness, a pro-cannabis space more known for its love of sex, hosted one recently.
  • I went, and I enjoyed everything from infused snacks and drinks to a performance by a fire dancer.

New York City offers a wealth of infused cannabis consumption experiences. Thankfully, covering the space and the city the past five or so years has allowed me to sample quite a few of those options. I’ve been to large, small, public, and intimate gatherings of all sizes along the way, developing a personal preference similar to how a person defines their choices regarding restaurants, nightlife, or a myriad of other recreational activities. My experience this past fall is one that most may not come across on the list of infused experiences, but it certainly was one worth taking in.

NYC has never waited for regulations to explain how infused events work. Instead, many have hosts, brands and venues laid out the possibilities on their own. I’ve been fortunate enough to take in a plethora of them over the years, noticing that each event has its own unique offerings. 

There are quaint, cozy family style meals in restaurants during off-hours. There’s also swanky multi-floored, seven-course sit-down dinners in the heart of Downtown Manhattan, rivaling any five-star event you’d find in the city. And sometimes you get to catch an unintentional show, like at the outdoor street-side dining event that occurred as New York City Pride weekend celebrations were just taking off, adding a burst of color and pride to the already joyous infused evening. 

Often, it isn’t always about cannabis at infused events. In some cases, the plant can be a more subtle component to the evening. Recently, I was able to attend an event where cannabis played the supporting role in a night filled with sex and performance art. 

The versatility of infused events makes sense. Cannabis, a market projected to contribute $92 billion to the U.S. economy in 2021, is known for its variety, be it consumption methods, plant profiles, cultivation methods or just about any other component to the emerging market. If state-by-state markets allow such versatility, they could see further gains from various types of legalized consumption spaces. 

Substantial legal pot markets, including Illinois, Nevada, and New York, have recently signed off on legal consumption spaces — attracting everyone from diehard cannabis consumers to restaurant giants. In August, BLT Restaurant Group CEO Jimmy Haber told Fox Business the company plans to open a lounge within two years.     

Dankquet foods at the N-S-F-W club.
A Danquet at NSFW.

New York City has hosted infused dining events for years on the underground. Today’s offering is run by a slew of operators, with some looking to turn mainstream and others planning to remain underground for now. In either case, they represent the various approaches to infused events that guests can enjoy today, and possibly in the future if regulations allow. 

Styles of infused events vary 

Cannabis-focused restaurants are growing in prominence across the country. Before the pandemic temporarily shut it down, the Original Cannabis Cafe opened in Los Angeles in 2019 and gained quite a bit of buzz as LA’s first legal infused dining space. 

Dankquet foods at the N-S-F-W club.
A Danquet at NSFW.

Infused restaurants also exist in New York — most notably, Stoned Pizza. Other brands have operated as supper clubs and tasting menu-style events for years, offering guests options rather than a uniform environment or experience. The diversity is present despite the low amount of infused dining events operating so far. 

As infused events gain popularity, not every event is cannabis-focused

Infused events can be cannabis-centric, or instead, use pot as a background component to the affair. Other infused events are occurring in less obvious destinations — like at sex-positive swinger play clubs. 

In October, I arrived at downtown Manhattan and the clubhouse for New Society for Wellness (NSFW), a pro-cannabis space more known for its love of sex. Operating since 2014, the community playhouse has kept its current location since 2019 despite ongoing stigmas against cannabis and sex.

NSFW founder Daniel Saynt told Insider underground clubs and events spiked in the wave of cannabis reform. 

“Producers are less timid about promoting cannabis sales, so you’re starting to find these events on sites like Eventbrite,” Saynt said, adding that events have grown in size in the city and his demand is up since COVID-19 restrictions lessened. 

NSFW now hosts five events per week, with cannabis welcomed at every event. The company’s early October affair, complete with reduced attendance and vaccine-card checks at the door, offered a glimpse into how cannabis plays a subtle component in an evening. Infused snacks and drinks were served while guests supplied their own additional cannabis consumables. By the time the evening’s performer, a fire dancer, performed around midnight, many attendees had consumed their fair share of THC — myself included. 

This event was a change from other infused experiences at NSFW, like Dankquet. Featuring prominent chefs like Oscar Toro (Buddakan, Jue Lan Club), these events were some of my favorite pre-COVID infused meals. Often featuring a single, long communal table, guests were encouraged to cozy up to willing attendees so they could get to know each other and enjoy several rounds of infused courses. 

Dankquet foods at the N-S-F-W club.
A Danquet at NSFW.

Comparing two of NSFW’s approaches, I preferred the more food-focused elements of Dankquet but still appreciated the more recent affair. With cannabis taking a backseat this time around, people got to mingle throughout the entire evening. The live performance, a component also found at most Dankquets, brought focus onto a singular element for several attendees, signaling the shift from casual conversation and consumption to consensual dalliances with new and old friends. Or in my case, it indicated that it was time to buy some pre-rolls and head home to my dog. 

With a growing diversity of infused events to partake in, would-be attendees are encouraged to read event details before purchasing tickets to any infused event. Most events in New York City won’t run any cheaper than $50, with the price usually higher than that. Make sure you get what you’re looking for.

Typically, events of any type feature one or several vendors offering a range of consumables. Bring money if you plan on picking up. Vendors are starting to accept digital payments using Cash App, Venmo and other options. 

Regulations could limit infused-event ingenuity

Without clear regulations, the future of legal infused events remains uncertain. A few markets are setting the trend with their laws. However, most remain unclear. New York City and other popular cannabis-consuming destinations may offer the best look into the future. Or, most may stay on the underground. 

Still, optimism appears high across the board. Attendees often come away with a substantial buzz, and operators like NSFW and co-host Spleef feel convinced that they are headed in the right direction. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

This cookware startup lets you buy the same pots and pans used in Michelin-starred restaurants at a discount — here are our favorite pieces

Prices are accurate at the time of publication.

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

Made In pots and pans on a stovetop.
  • Made In offers well-made, durable, and versatile cookware at affordable prices. 
  • Thanks to their careful construction and durable materials, these products will last a lifetime. 
  • We’ve tested many Made In items. Favorites include a nonstick pan ($89) and a knife set ($199)

A slew of kitchenware startups has quickly cropped up in recent years, but Made In (launched in 2017) remains a standout company for its unique, accessible, and simple approach to making cookware. 

The founders of Made In, whose family have worked in kitchen supply for a century, wanted to create cookware that didn’t cost a lot but was good enough for the rigors of a professional kitchen. They strived for a balance of price, quality, and approachability with their products. 

Most of Made In’s products, which are mainly kitchen basics like frying pans, pots, and knives, are made in the United States, though a few pieces are made in France and Italy. Working with manufacturers with centuries of experience, Made In emphasizes careful craftsmanship with high-quality materials (such as five-ply construction and 18/10 stainless steel) and smart, clever design.

As a result, its cookware is durable, a lifetime investment rather than a temporary fix to get you through the next couple of years. Made In’s fans love that they can get cookware akin to All-Clad’s, at a fraction of the price. 

A selection of Made In pots and pans stacked on shelves.

Made In has also attracted investors and board members like restaurateur and “Top Chef” judge Tom Colicchio, as well as the founders of the Alinea Group, Grant Achatz and Nick Kokonas. It helps stock the kitchens of the world-famous Alinea and Le Bernardin, and it also regularly collaborates with other top chefs and restaurants to create limited-edition cookware bundles and recipe kits.

With both its consumer-facing and restaurant-facing businesses thriving, Made In has proven its strength. Everyone, from everyday home cooks to expert chefs of the best restaurants, wants high-quality cookware at a decent price. 

We’ve tried many of Made In’s cookware pieces and cooking tools in the past year, so if you need help narrowing down the best of its collection, keep reading. 

Shop all cookware at Made In

Here are the best Made In products to buy in 2021

A cookware essential for any egg dish

A Made In 10-inch nonstick frying pan full of stuffing, placed on a table.

My first introduction to Made In was more than a year ago with this nonstick pan, and it’s still one of my favorite pieces of cookware. The nonstick surface, which is free from the toxic ingredient PFOA, is a dream to cook with because eggs glide smoothly on it without leaving any crusty residue. It’s also so easy to clean, saving me countless hours in front of the sink. It heats up quickly and the heat distribution stays consistent, but the sturdy and ergonomic handle always stays cool. 

The pan comes in three sizes, 8-inch ($89), 10-inch ($99), and 12-inch ($109). I have the 10-inch, which is the perfect size for a couple of eggs or fish for one, so if you’re cooking for more people, I’d recommend sizing up to the 12-inch. —Connie Chen, senior reporter

A pan commonly used in European cooking

A Made In 10-inch blue carbon steel frying pan against a white background.

Carbon steel is cool because it combines the best properties of stainless steel and cast iron. With the light weight, heat control, and cooking speed of stainless steel and the heat retention, seasoning, and nonstick surface of cast iron, it’s the underrated cooking material more home cooks need to take advantage of. The sloped edges let you stir and saute in ways that the straight edge of a cast iron pan can’t, but it still has great heat retention if you want that coveted sear on your meat. 

You need to season it like a cast iron, so there is still a maintenance aspect to it, but you’ll be rewarded with a nonstick surface and more flavorful food as the seasoning develops. —Connie Chen, senior reporter 

A large and sturdy stock pot

Made In's 6-quart stockpot on a stove.

After moving into a new apartment, I was excited to add the Made In Stock Pot to my kitchen. The 6-quart Stock Pot is a nice size, perfect for everything from soups to mac and cheese to hard-boiled eggs. It’s tall and narrow, so I never have to worry about it boiling over.

The stainless steel is substantial, but still relatively lightweight. The side handles make it easy to move the pot from stovetop to countertop with ease. —Remi Rosmarin, reporter 

Made In’s Stock Pots are everything you look for in a stockpot, save for the size. I wish they’d make one twice as large for my backyard oyster roasts and clambakes. Sure, that’d be twice as much steel, and it’d be that much more expensive, but the steel the brand uses is just right for such a task.

I don’t want to spend $400 to $500 on a finely finished stainless steel stockpot only to load it with shells and hit it with merciless heat, repeatedly. So, instead, I’ve made my stock in bigger, cheaper pots, and transferred it into the Made In 8-quart stock pot once it had reduced enough. From there, it was low and slow, and the pot maintained even heat. I left it bubbling for about six hours and didn’t get any hot spots. ‘Nuff said. —Owen Burke, senior reporter

A set of knives for delicate tasks

A set of five Made In knives with red handles.

Made In’s paring knife makes it easy to chop up an onion or slice a hard cheese. If the utility knife were a little longer, it would be perfect for slicing wider loaves of bread like sesame semolina, but the serrated edge has been great for slicing more narrow loaves of bread like baguettes, and for slicing softer foods like tomatoes and grilled peaches. —Danny Bakst, senior story producer 

A pan with a rounded bottom that’s perfect for making sauces

Made In's 3-quart saucier, on a stove.

Made In’s stainless clad might be a little rawer than, say, All-Clad’s, but it’s hefty, seemingly durable, and made in the USA. Because it’s a little less refined than some other 18/10 Stainless Steel, it maybe takes a little more work to season. But after seasoning my Saucier once or twice, I had no problem with anything sticking, even rice, which I’m usually awful at cooking.

Again, the weight and the handle are assuringly substantial, and I don’t sense anything’s going to fall apart anytime soon. I also like the shape of the saucepans; the beveled edge allows you to roll the pan a bit more on the stove than something with a harder, squarer chine. This is now my go-to saucepan for that very reason. —Owen Burke, senior reporter 

The staple of all staples: a stainless steel pan

Three Made In stainless steel frying pans of varying sizes, stacked.

I’ve had Made In’s stainless steel frying pan for months, and I’ve grown to appreciate how cool the handle stays while I cook and how nice it looks in the kitchen. It also cooks very evenly.

But it also takes much longer to clean than my nonstick pans. I’ll be the first to admit that this may be exacerbated by my lack of experience cooking, but it means I skip using this when I’m in a rush — which is often. However, my experience seems to run counter to most reviews on the site, though a few three-star reviews also mention cleanability as a con. —Mara Leighton, reporter 

A wok to make a delicious stir fry

A Made In blue carbon steel wok, on a stove.

The first piece I tried from Made In was the Blue Carbon Steel Wok. I’ve seared scallops and stir-fried clams so far, and with a little seasoning, this has been a good heavy-duty wok for use and abuse in my kitchen. It’s got the weight and rigidity of something that will last a good long while. I liked how easily I was able to season it, and I liked the sturdy handle and substantial weight too. I’ll continue to put this to work. —Owen Burke, senior reporter

A well-designed block that doubles as an attractive serving tray

Made In butcher's block cutting board, with a charcuterie spread.

The Made In American Maple Butcher Block is a substantial block of wood that is equal parts elegant and functional. Made from recycled maple wood sourced in Wisconsin, the butcher block has a beautiful exterior that is smooth to the touch.

Additionally, the grooves and wells along the edge of the block collect liquids and bread crumbs, helping cut down on countertop messes. With other cutting boards, I’ve had a hard time getting rid of murky residue after slicing avocados, tomatoes, or raw chicken, but after a simple scrub with hot water and soap, there is minimal residue engrained into the wood. 

Beyond being a sturdy place to chop, slice, and dice, the flat side of the board was designed as a serving tray or cheese board. While it is quite heavy to lug around as a serving piece, it does have two built-in handles that make it easier to transport around the house. —Danny Bakst, senior story producer 

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A former Burger King worker got ‘WE ALL QUIT’ tattooed on her arm after she and her coworkers ditched the chain

A sign reads "We all quit" at a Burger King in Nebraska
  • A former Burger King worker got “WE ALL QUIT” tattooed on her arm.
  • Kylee Johnson and eight coworkers quit their jobs in July, and their story soon went viral.
  • Johnson said almost everyone she knew who’d left had since a found better job.

A former employee at a Burger King, where staff resigned en masse in July, has commemorated the event by having the viral message “WE ALL QUIT” tattooed on her arm.

Kylee Johnson, who had worked at the Lincoln, Nebraska Burger King outlet for around seven months, was one of nine members of staff who left the restaurant, citing problems including understaffing, long hours, low pay, and broken air conditioning.

One member of staff changed the restaurant’s front sign to “We all quit — sorry for the inconvenience,” and a photo of it quickly went viral.

Johnson got the tattoo as a reminder of her worth, Nebraska media outlet Flatwater Free Press reported. “I was raised to give respect. But I was also taught that when you give respect, you should be given respect back,” she told the outlet.

Many restaurant workers across the US are quitting their jobs in search of better wages, benefits, and working conditions, often leaving restaurants scrambling for staff. Hospitality workers have cited long and unsocial working hours, rude customers, and fears of catching COVID-19 as reasons for leaving their jobs.

Johnson told Flatwater Free Press in a recent interview that other staff who’d quit their jobs at the Lincoln Burger King had got new roles including as clerks or cooks at sit-down restaurants, hotels, and convenience stores. Most of the nine who left have not gone back into fast food jobs, according to the outlet.

Johnson said that she’d worked at the Burger King restaurant to help out her roommate Rachel Flores, its then general manager, while also working at a Ruby Tuesday restaurant as a server and bartender. She said that after leaving Burger King she stayed working at Ruby Tuesday, and that some of her Burger King coworkers moved to Ruby Tuesday, too.

“Almost everyone that I know that left has found better jobs making at least the same or more,” Johnson told Flatwater Free Press. 

“There’s so many openings,” Johnson added. “It does leave the door open.”

Johnson: Working at Burger King was ‘horrible’

Johnson told Flatwater Free Press that working at the Lincoln Burger King during the pandemic was “horrible” and “exhausting.”

Johnson said that management was slow to fix the kitchen’s air conditioning and that the store was understaffed.

“Four or five people left and upper management had not tried to bring in anybody new,” she said.

Burger King didn’t respond to Flatwater Free Press’ or Insider’s requests for comment.

Flores told Insider in July that she’d regularly had to cover unexpected absences, leaving her working many back-to-back, open-to-close shifts from 5:30 a.m. to 1 a.m., with just an hour off during the day to care for her child. She said that her team frequently worked six- and seven-day weeks for weeks on end.

Flores also said that the local area managers resisted her requests to raise wages above $12.50 per hour, even for an employee who had worked for 18 years at the restaurant. She also said that she was once hospitalized for dehydration.

“The work experience described at this location is not in line with our brand values,” a Burger King spokesperson told Insider at the time. “Our franchisee is looking into this situation to ensure this doesn’t happen in the future.”

Johnson told Flatwater Free Press that she’d now been banned from the Burger King restaurant in Lincoln, and that she’d got the tattoo in mid-July.

Read the original article on Business Insider

I went to Burger King for the first time in 19 years — I can see why it’s losing out to McDonald’s

Burger King Newcastle
I went to a Burger King in Newcastle city center, and it was very quiet for a Saturday night.

  • I went to Burger King for the first time since 2002.
  • The chain’s been rolling out plant-based and gourmet burgers to lure in more customers.
  • The restaurant I went to was pretty quiet but the McDonald’s just around the corner was heaving.
I last went to Burger King on the way back from a family holiday in 2002, when the chain was giving out “Jimmy Neutron” toys.

Customers line up at a Burger King drive-through window June 12, 2001 at a restaurant in Federal Heights, Colorado
A photo of a Burger King in Federal Heights, Colorado, in 2001.

My parents didn’t take me to fast-food chains often as a child, and as I got older, my friends preferred to go to McDonald’s when they fancied something quick to eat or after a night out. This was because it was cheaper and there are more McDonald’s restaurants in the UK.

A McDonald's restaurant sign is seen at a McDonald's restaurant in Del Mar, California April 16, 2013. REUTERS/Mike Blake
A McDonald’s restaurant sign is seen at a McDonald’s restaurant in Del Mar, California

But I went to Burger King in November to try out its plant-based Whopper, breaking my 19-year spell by visiting the chain for only the second time. Burger King unveiled a new logo earlier this year, but the restaurant I went to in Newcastle, northern England, hadn’t updated its yet.

Burger King Newcastle
I went to a Burger King in Newcastle city center.

Source: Insider

What I did notice, though, was the stripes around the bottom of the store windows, designed to look like its flagship Whopper burger.

Burger King Newcastle
I went to a Burger King in Newcastle city centre.

I went at around 7 p.m. on a Saturday night. The McDonald’s right round the corner was rammed full. But Burger King — arguably tucked slightly further away from Newcastle’s main shopping and drinking areas — was very quiet.

Burger King Newcastle
I went to a Burger King in Newcastle city center, and it was very quiet for a Saturday night.

A few people were sat down eating, but most seemed to be standing around waiting to collect their orders.

Burger King Newcastle
I did, however, see a few delivery drivers come in to collect orders.

Burger King Newcastle
Burger King was heavily promoting its vegan burgers in store, as well as its halloumi fries. Fast-food chains have been competing for a bigger share of the plant-based market, and McDonald’s recently launched its McPlant in the UK.

Burger King's Plant-Based Whopper
I tried Burger King’s Plant-Based Whopper.

Source: Insider, Insider

There was also a sign advertising its two new “gourmet” burgers, which the company rolled out in October. Its focus on plant-based and gourmet food suggested that it was trying to move away from its image as just another cheap fast-food joint.

Burger King Newcastle

Source: Insider

Though the burgers were more expensive than at McDonald’s, one advantage Burger King did have was a Coca-Cola Freestyle machine with unlimited soft drinks. But I got my food to-go, so it seemed like I was paying for something I couldn’t use.

Burger King Newcastle
You could order at a cashier but the restaurant had a lot of digital kiosks, too.

Burger King Newcastle
Burger King’s digital kiosks.

Source: Insider

The prices were considerably higher than for comparable meals at McDonald’s. Like at other fast-food chains, I noticed that Burger King was encouraging customers to order its burgers as part of a meal with fries and a drink …

Burger King's Plant-Based Whopper
Burger King’s digital kiosks.

… or add extra toppings. I was surprised that adding bacon was a suggested customization for the plant-based Whopper.

Burger King's Plant-Based Whopper
Burger King’s digital kiosks.

Source: Insider

As you’d expect from a fast-food chain, the service was really quick …

Burger King Newcastle
… but I looked around the restaurant while I waited. Despite the retro orange and brown color palette, the interior seemed quite modern.

Burger King Newcastle
Burger King started revamping some of its stores in 2021, and the Newcastle restaurant looked nothing like the mock-ups for its new design.

Burger King
Burger King is revamping its restaurants.

Source: Insider

The redesigned restaurants will have a designated section for “walk up” orders …

Walk up Burger King
Burger King is revamping its restaurants.

Source: Insider

… as well as designated food lockers for customers who order on Burger King’s app. More advance orders could have helped reduce congestion at the Newcastle store I went to, where people were standing around waiting for their orders to be ready.

Burger King

Sources: Insider, Insider

I liked how my burger came wrapped in paper, making it easier to eat on-the-go, unlike other fast-food companies that serve their take-out burgers in boxes.

McDonald's McPlant Burger King plant-based vegan Whopper
I tried Burger King’s Plant-Based Whopper.

I’d never had a Whopper before. When it arrived, my plant-based Whopper was much larger than expected.

Burger King's Plant-Based Whopper
I tried Burger King’s Plant-Based Whopper.

The burger came with lettuce, onion, ketchup, tomato, vegan mayo, and pickles. Its patty tasted a little more meaty and barbecuey than McDonald’s vegan McPlant burger. The fries, however, disappointed me. While they were chunkier than the ones at McDonald’s, the portion was smaller and they weren’t as salty.

Burger King's Plant-Based Whopper
I tried Burger King’s Plant-Based Whopper.

Source: Insider

Interestingly, Burger King classes its meat-free Whopper as plant-based but not vegan. This is because, while the patty is plant-based, it’s cooked on the same broiler as its meat namesake.

Vegan plant-based Whopper
I tried Burger King’s Plant-Based Whopper.

Source: Insider

McDonald’s has around 1,300 restaurants in the UK, while Burger King has just over 500. Globally, McDonald’s has close to 40,000 restaurants and Burger King has nearly 19,000.

McDonald's Westminster
There are 20 McDonald’s restaurants within a two-mile radius of Westminster.

Sources: McDonald’s, BBC, McDonald’s, Restaurant Brands International

And none of the Burger King restaurants in Newcastle city center appeared to be open 24 hours. A staff member told me that the one I went to closes at 10 p.m. each day.

Burger King worker
A Burger King worker in Putrajaya, Malaysia.

McDonald’s, in comparison, has a lot of 24-hour restaurants in Newcastle. And in a city famed for its nightlife, this seems to make sense.

McDonald's opening times
McDonald’s locations in Newcastle.

At McDonald’s, comparable total global sales were up 12.7% in the third quarter compared with 7.9% at Burger King, including a drop in the chain’s comparable US sales.

Burger King London
A Burger King in London.

Sources: McDonald’s, Restaurant Brands International

I was impressed by my plant-based Whopper, but how deserted the Newcastle restaurant was on a Saturday night shows how people are shunning the chain in favor of cheaper deals at McDonald’s.

Burger King Newcastle
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