Abortion-rights groups file federal lawsuit to block Texas law that would allow anyone to sue abortion providers after 6 weeks

Greg Abbott texas bar close order
Texas Gov. Greg Abbott.

  • Pro-abortion groups filed a federal lawsuit to block a six-week abortion ban in Texas.
  • The law, set to take effect in September, would allow people to sue anyone helping someone get an abortion after six weeks.
  • The groups argue that the law violates “constitutional right to privacy and liberty.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Several abortion-rights groups and providers filed a federal lawsuit on Tuesday to block a Texas law that would allow people to sue abortion clinics, doctors, and anyone else helping someone get an abortion in the state after six weeks.

The law, signed by Texas Gov. Greg Abbott in May and set to take effect in September, invites private citizens, even those outside of Texas, to help enforce the state’s six-week abortion ban, awarding them with at least $10,000 per each successful court challenge.

The law will “incentivize anyone who disapproves of a patient’s abortion – a relative, an abusive partner, or even a stranger – to sue the provider and obtain a court order stopping the abortion,” the group of plaintiffs, including the Center for Reproductive Rights, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the American Civil Liberties Union, along with several abortion providers, said in a press release.

The groups argue that the law violates “constitutional right to privacy and liberty as established by Roe v. Wade,” the landmark Supreme Court decision that granted the right to abortion almost 50 years ago.

The Texas law, known as SB 8, is one of a slew of restrictive “heartbeat” abortion bans recently enacted by Republican governors. The law seeks to prohibit abortions once a fetal heartbeat is detected, which typically occurs at the six-week mark, a time when some people don’t know they are pregnant.

But the Texas law is unique from the others in that it authorizes individuals, and not state government officials, to enforce the ban.

“This new law would open the floodgates to frivolous lawsuits designed to bankrupt health centers, harass providers, and isolate patients from anyone who would treat them with compassion as they seek out health care,” Alexis McGill Johnson, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, said in a statement. “The cruelty is the point – and we will not let it stand.”

The challenge comes as the Supreme Court is due to consider a major abortion case that could upend landmark decisions such as Roe v. Wade. The case, Dobbs v. Jackson Women’s Health Organization, concerns a Mississippi law that would ban nearly all abortions after 15 weeks of pregnancy.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes is pregnant, and is requesting her federal trial to be delayed again

elizabeth holmes
Elizabeth Holmes, founder of Theranos.

  • Theranos founder and former CEO Elizabeth Holmes is pregnant, her lawyer says.
  • Holmes expects to give birth in July, and is asking to push her trial back to the end of August.
  • The federal prosecution also requested a delay due to her pregnancy.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Founder and former Theranos CEO Elizabeth Holmes is pregnant, according to new court documents.

Holmes expects to give birth in July, and is requesting a delay to her federal trial, according to newly filed court documents. Both Holmes’ lawyers and the prosecution requested the trial’s delay. If approved, she’ll face trial for multiple federal charges of fraud starting on August 31.

Holmes, who was the focus of an HBO documentary about Theranos, is alleged to have defrauded the company’s investors out of millions of dollars with the promise of a new type of blood test. That test was purported to perform a multitude of blood tests, able to detect everything from high cholesterol to cancer, with a simple pin prick.

The company raised over $700 million from investors on the promise of such a test. By August 2015, the FDA began investigating Theranos and found “major inaccuracies” in its tests.

Holmes, alongside former Theranos president Sunny Balwani, was charged with nine counts of wire fraud and two counts of conspiracy to commit wire fraud by the US Department of Justice in 2018. She subsequently stepped down from her role as CEO.

If convicted, Holmes is facing upwards of 20 years in federal prison.

Got a tip? Contact Insider senior correspondent Ben Gilbert via email (bgilbert@insider.com), or Twitter DM (@realbengilbert). We can keep sources anonymous. Use a non-work device to reach out. PR pitches by email only, please.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Trump-appointed federal judge indefinitely blocks the Biden administration’s 100-day deportation freeze

2020 10 14T135617Z_1_LYNXMPEG9D16J_RTROPTP_4_USA IMMIGRATION WALL.JPG
A US Customs and Border Protection vehicle patrols a new section of the border wall in El Paso, Texas, as seen from Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, on August 27, 2020.

  • A federal judge blocked the Biden administration from enforcing a 100-day deportation freeze.
  • The ruling does not mandate that deportations have to return to their previous rate.
  • Democrats are hoping to pass a large-scale immigration overhaul in Congress this year.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

A federal judge in Texas indefinitely blocked President Joe Biden’s administration from enforcing a 100-day deportation freeze, according to the Associated Press.

US District Judge Drew Tipton granted a preliminary injunction on Tuesday, halting the moratorium that the Biden administration announced last month.

The ruling serves as a win for Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, a Republican, who filed a lawsuit against the government over the moratorium. The administration’s policy was unveiled by the US Department of Homeland Security in a memorandum shortly after Biden’s inauguration.

Last month, Tipton, an appointee of former President Donald Trump, issued a 14-day temporary restraining order to stop any enforcement of the moratorium, arguing at the time that the Homeland Security memo didn’t “consider potential policies more limited in scope and time” or “provide any concrete, reasonable justification for a 100-day pause.”

Tipton also ruled last month that the moratorium ran afoul of federal law on administrative procedure and that the administration didn’t sufficiently justify the pause.

Tuesday’s injunction will extend the temporary restraining order. However, this ruling does not mandate that deportations have to go back to to their previous rate. Even in the absence of a moratorium, federal immigration agencies will have wide leeway in enforcing deportations and processing cases.

Biden, who campaigned on a 100-day deportation freeze during his campaign as a part of his review of immigration policies and enforcement, has sought to turn the page from Trump’s aggressive crackdown on immigration.

The president has proposed a comprehensive immigration bill that would offer a pathway to citizenship for roughly 11 million people who are living in the United States illegally.

After years of false starts, Democrats are hoping to finally pass a large-scale overhaul, but top Republicans have already begun rallying against any policies they deem as granting “amnesty.”

The judicial fight over the deportation ban is an early indicator of GOP resistance to Biden’s immigration priorities, a reversal of the frequent Democratic-led judicial battles against Trump’s proposals.

As of Wednesday morning, it was not yet clear if the Biden administration plans to appeal Tipton’s latest ruling.

Read the original article on Business Insider