Satellite images show the Ever Given in limbo the day before Egypt impounded it, demanding up to $900 million in compensation

suez canal ever given april 12 skitch maxar
Marked-up satellite image of the Ever Given in Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake as of April 12 2021.

  • Satellite images show the Ever Given on Monday, still in the Great Bitter Lake off the Suez Canal.
  • It has been declared seaworthy, but has been impounded by Egyptian authorities.
  • Egypt is demanding up to $900 million in compensation for the chaos caused when the ship was stuck.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Newly-released satellite images show the Ever Given in the Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake, where it is being held while a legal battle rages.

Egyptian authorities impounded the vessel Tuesday while it pursues a case against its owner – the Japanese company Shoei Kisen Kaisha Ltd.

They are reported to be seeking $900 in compensation for the chaos caused in the six days the vessel was blocking the way, costing the canal operators a vast amount on lost transit fees.

ever given suez canal maxar Mon april 12
A satellite view of the Ever Given in the Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake as of Monday, April 12 2021.

Lt. Gen. Osama Rabie, head of the Suez Canal Authority (SCA), told state-run television: “The vessel is now officially impounded. They do not want to pay anything,” The Guardian reported.

The Ever Given was moved to the canal’s large artificial lake on March 29, having spent the previous six days blocking the crucial maritime thoroughfare. It took the massive efforts of dredgers, excavators, tugboats and winches to shift the vast container ship from where it had been lodged since March 23.

Rabie said that its investigation into who was at fault for the grounding will be concluded Thursday, the Guardian reported. He denied any culpability on the SCA’s part, and said that “of course” the ship’s owner was at fault, the paper reported.

ever given suez canal maxar Mon april 12
A satellite view of the Ever Given in the Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake as of Monday, April 12 2021.

The ship’s technical managers, Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement (BSM), said in a statement that it found the SCA’s decision to impound the Ever Given “extremely disappointing,” citing the cooperation it had offered the authority in investigating the cause of the grounding.

In early April, Shoei Kisen Kaisha filed a “general average” claim, which would share any costs between the ship’s insurers and the owners of its cargo.

General average is a principle of maritime law that means risk for damages is shared between the ship’s customers.

Maritime insurance claims attached to the grounding will ripple far beyond the one lodged by Shoei Kisen Kaisha, as the shipping journal Lloyd’s List reported. Hundreds of ships were delayed or re-routed by the grounding, throwing destination ports into disarray and causing a backlog in the flow of goods around the globe.

ever given suez canal maxar Mon april 12
A satellite view of the Ever Given in the Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake as of Monday, April 12 2021.

Separately, on Wednesday BSM said that an inspection of the Ever Given’s seaworthiness had concluded, finding that it was still capable of sailing.

The inspection concluded that the ship was technically able to keep moving through the canal to its northern end, Port Said.

From there, it would be inspected again to make sure it could continue to its intended destination of Rotterdam, BSM said.

However, Egypt’s decision to impound the ship means that it is unlikely to go anywhere soon despite being technically able.

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Companies that have containers on the Ever Given could have to help pay the up to $1 billion Egyptian authorities are demanding before the ship leaves the Suez Canal

ever given suez canal
The Ever Given container ship in the Suez Canal on March 29, 2021.

  • The Suez Canal Authority said the Ever Given can’t leave until $1 billion in damages is paid.
  • The $1 billion would likely include paying for the tugboats and dredging ships that freed the ship.
  • The owner of the Ever Given declared “General Average,” so insurance could pay some of the damages.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Though three weeks have passed since the Ever Given first became stuck in the Suez Canal, the massive container ship is still anchored after Egyptian authorities announced $1 billion must be paid before it can leave.

“The vessel will remain here until investigations are complete and compensation is paid,” the head of the Suez Canal Authority, Lt. Gen. Osama Rabie, told a local news station.

But Rabie hasn’t publicly explained where the $1 billion estimate came from nor did he provide a breakdown of expenses from the incident.

An estimate of the damages that the $1 billion could include paying for:

  • Transit fees – Refinitiv, a London-based financial firm, estimated that Egypt lost $95 million in transit fees while the Ever Given blocked the Suez
  • Two dredger ships
  • 11 tug boats of varying size
  • Wages of 800 Egyptian workers that operated around the clock to free the ship
  • Damage to the canal
  • Other miscellaneous equipment used to free the ship, such as excavators

Abdulgani Serang, the general secretary-cum-treasurer of the National Union of Seafarers in India, likened Rabie’s $1 billion demand to a ransom and said the crew shouldn’t be held against their will while the ship is anchored and motionless.

“If the SCA has suffered losses, they can sort it out with those involved with the ship, but that cannot haul up seafarers in any manner,” Serang told the Times of India.

Serang told Insider that though they are not allowed to leave the ship, the crew are not imprisoned or on a form of house arrest.

“They are all onboard the ship and continuing with their work as required onboard,” Serang said. “Absolutely no cause to worry about their supplies, including their wages all being taken care of as per the union agreement like before the incident.”

The Ever Given’s newest challenge: insurance

Ever Given, Suez Canal
Container ship Ever Given stuck in the Suez Canal, Egypt on March 27, 2021.

Neither Egypt nor the Suez Canal Authority explained who could be responsible for the full $1 billion demand, but recent filings in London’s High Court suggest that the expenses could be split between the Evergreen, its insurers, and cargo owners on the boat.

The owners of the Ever Given filed a General Average claim in early April against Evergreen Marine Corp, the company leasing the ships. The suit included 15 other defendants who would likely be asked to chip in on the bill.

General average is a principle of maritime law that requires any of the ship’s customers to share the risk and costs involved if the ship faces a tragedy or failure.

“Evergreen Marine received a notice from the lawyer representing EVER GIVEN’s owner on the 1st April which specified that the owner had filed an Admiralty limitation claim at the High Court of Justice in the UK in accordance with the Merchant Shipping Act 1995, in view of the liabilities and compensation that may occur due to the grounding incident,” a spokesperson for Evergreen told Insider.

Declaring General Average would prevent Shoei-Kisen, the owner of the ship, and its insurance from paying the bulk of damages from the shipwreck but could lead to even longer waiting times for people to receive the goods still on the ship.

The British International Freight Association announced in a statement that if a company has containers aboard the ship, they will be asked for “an indemnity or deposit,” but noted that “any standard marine insurance policy” includes General Average losses. If a company did not insure the ship, however, then a cash deposit will be necessary to receive the containers.

If a company has cargo aboard the Ever Given without insurance and cannot pay the deposit, there is a possibility that the freight could be discarded, according to a release from the International Federation of Freight Forwarders Associations.

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2 experts explain why the company whose ship blocked the Suez Canal has seen its stock surge 28% since the incident started

Suez canal ever given
  • Evergreen Marine Corporation has rallied 28% since its Ever Given ship got stuck in the Suez Canal.
  • We spoke with two analysts who said its not unusual for freight tanker stocks to see bouts of volatility.
  • Freight tanker stocks are heavily tied to shipping rates, which have skyrocketed this year.
  • However, the canal blockage exacerbated supply and demand conditions and pushed rates higher.
  • Sign up here for our daily newsletter, 10 Things Before the Opening Bell.

The stock price of the Taiwanese transportation company whose ship blocked the Suez Canal has soared ever since the incident that upended global trade began.

Shares of Evergreen Marine Corporation have gained 28% since March 23, the day the Ever Given ship got stuck in the Suez Canal and triggered an epic traffic jam of more than 400 ships.

Evergreen’s stock has been climbing since last summer, but saw a significant spike after the canal blockage. On the day the Ever Given got stuck, Evergreen tumbled 8% and closed at 42.75 New Taiwan dollars (NT$). Since then, it’s rallied to NT$55-the highest price in over a year-bringing Evergreen’s yearly gain to 440%.

It’s not out of the ordinary for ocean freight tanker stocks to experience volatility, as they’re heavily tied to shipping rates which tend to swing around, said Adam Scheiner, an analyst at UBS Global Wealth Management.

But shipping rates have been steadily rising as the world emerges from the pandemic, and the canal blockage only exacerbated port congestion and demand for shipping.

“The blockage in the Suez Canal just poured gasoline on this demand and price fire,” Scheiner told Insider.

Peter McNally, Third Bridge’s global sector lead for industrials, materials, and energy, told Insider that container shipping rates are up four times since the start of last year.

“This was the state of play before the Ever Given snarled global shipping traffic,” he explained.

A shortage of containers and difficulties dealing with the logistics of getting vessels in use back to Asia drove shipping rates higher throughout the year, McNally said. Additionally, the pandemic slowed air traffic and more companies turned to marine shipping to transport freight, he said.

High shipping rates will bode well for freight transportation companies, but Evergreen may be coming under pressure soon for its role in the global trade chaos.

The company could be facing a fine as large as $1 billion, though Evergreen’s president said the shipping giant is “free of responsibility from cargo delays” because “it will be covered by insurance,” according to Bloomberg.

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Maersk, the world’s largest shipping company, says the Suez Canal blockage’s economic fallout will continue into second half of May

Ever given
The Ever Given container ship after it was refloated.

  • The Suez Canal blockage will continue rippling through the economy for weeks, Maersk said.
  • Effects will still be seen in the “second half of May,” an executive told The Financial Times.
  • In its latest update, Maersk said about 50 ships had been delayed for about a week.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Fallout from the Ever Given’s time lodged in the Suez Canal will “ripple” through the economy for the next few weeks or months, according to Maersk, the world’s biggest shipping company.

“We will see ripple effects continuing into the second half of May,” Lars Mikael Jensen, head of Maersk’s Global Ocean Network, told The Financial Times.

The Ever Given, which is among the world’s largest container ships, was lodged in the canal for six days, effectively closing one of the world’s most important trade routes.

The Ever Given was operated by the Taiwan-based shipping company Evergreen Group. The ship was freed on March 29.

Maersk predicted knock-on effects from the blockage. In an updated press advisory posted on Thursday, the company said it was pleased to see that the queue waiting at the canal was rapidly diminishing.

“For each day that passes we are getting a clearer picture of what this incident means for our customers,” the company said.

Maersk said about 50 ships had been delayed for about a week because of the blockage. Some of those ships waited on either end of the canal, while others were redirected around the Cape of Good Hope.

The effects of those delays will be felt in ports around the world, the company said. Its advisory warned that delays may vary by location. Busy ports and terminals may not have berths for ships arriving outside their originally scheduled windows.

The company previously said shipping backlogs may take months to unravel.

“Even when the canal gets reopened, the ripple effects on global capacity and equipment are significant and the blockage has already triggered a series of further disruptions and backlogs in global shipping that could take weeks, possibly months, to unravel,” Maersk said in a statement back when the Ever Given was still lodged in the canal.

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Ever Given ship forbidden to leave the Suez Canal until its owners pay up to $1 billion in compensation for the chaos it caused

Ever given
The “Ever Given” container ship operated by the Evergreen Marine Corporation, sails through the Suez Canal.

  • The Ever Given can’t leave the Suez Canal until compensations are paid, officials said Thursday.
  • It is still unclear how much has to be paid, although it could be up to $1 billion.
  • The owner of the Ever Given said it hadn’t officially heard from Egyptian authorities yet.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

While the giant Even Given container ship might have been freed from the banks of the Suez Canal, it still finds itself stuck, embroiled in a row of who should pay for dislodging it from the waterway.

Egyptian authorities said that they wouldn’t release the massive ship, which was stuck in the Suez Canal for almost a week until its owners agree to pay up to $1 billion in compensation.

“The vessel will remain here until investigations are complete and compensation is paid,” Lt. Gen. Osama Rabie, who leads the Suez Canal Authority, told a local news station on Thursday, according to the Wall Street Journal.

“We hope for a speedy agreement,” he said, adding that the “minute they agree to compensation, the vessel will be allowed to move.”

Read more: 4 ways small business owners can benefit from supply chain delays happening right now

Rabie said that Egyptian authorities would demand $1 billion to cover the costs of freeing the vessel.

The figure will cover the expense of the equipment and machinery used to clear the way, damage to the canal itself by the dredging, and compensate around 800 people who worked to release the 200,000-ton ship, Rabei said.

It will also refund the costs from the blocking of the canal, which ended up causing an epic traffic jam of more than 400 ships on either side of the channel.

Rabie did not say how exactly he arrived at that figure.

According to London-based financial firm Revenitiv, the Egyptian state lost transit fees worth $95 million because of the blockage.

suez canal plane picture
An aerial view of the Suez Canal in Egypt, taken from a commercial flight on March 27, 2021.

It is also still unclear who will pay for Egypt’s demand for compensation. Shoei Kisen Kaisha Ltd., the Japanese owner of the Ever Given, told the Wall Street Journal that it hadn’t officially heard from the Egyptian authorities.

Eric Hsieh, the president of Evergreen Marine Corp, the charterer of Ever Given, said that the company is “free of responsibility from cargo delays” because “it will be covered by insurance,” Bloomberg reported.

The 1,300-foot Ever Given made headlines on March 23 when an unexpected wind storm caused it to steer off course and get lodged in the sandbanks of the Suez Canal, disrupting global trade. It was freed six days later.

Egypt has since opened a formal investigation into how the vessel got stuck in the first place.

The ship, its cargo, and the 25-person Indian crew of sailors will remain at anchor in Egypt’s Great Bitter Lake until the investigation is over. Earlier this month, authorities told Insider that the crew of the ship is safe and will continue getting paid.

Rabie said that he would prefer to settle the matter of compensation outside of court, although he didn’t rule out a lawsuit.

“We could agree on a certain compensation, or it goes to court,” he said, according to CNBC. “If they decide to go to court, then the ship should be held.”

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Egypt’s first female ship captain fears for her career after she was blamed falsely for the Suez Canal blockage when she was aboard a vessel 200 miles away

ever given suez canal
Ever Given, a Panama-flagged cargo ship, that was wedged across the Suez Canal and blocking traffic in the vital waterway is seen Saturday, March 27, 2021.

  • Marwa Elselehdar is Egypt’s first female ship’s captain.
  • Online rumors and fake news headlines blamed her for the Ever Given grounding, she told the BBC.
  • Elselehdar was actually 200 miles away from the incident when it occurred.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Egypt’s first female ship’s captain was blamed for the Suez Canal blockage despite having been hundreds of miles away from the incident, she told BBC News.

Marwa Elselehdar said that she saw online rumors accusing her of being responsible for the Ever Given container ship becoming beached, the media outlet reported.

At the time of the jam, Elselehdar was working as a first mate on the Aida IV. This vessel was in Alexandria – more than 200 miles away from the site of the collision.

An investigation is underway to explain the Ever Given’s grounding, but it is clear that the 29-year-old was not to blame.

Read more: The 4 biggest losers of the Suez Canal fiasco – and 4 surprising winners

Rumors circulating online about Elselehdar’s supposed culpability were made worse by the sharing of screenshots of fake news headlines, BBC News reported.

Several social media accounts also impersonated her and spread false claims putting the blame on her, the media outlet said.

“I felt that I might be targeted maybe because I’m a successful female in this field or because I’m Egyptian, but I’m not sure,” Elselehdar told the BBC.

The young woman described how she was “shocked” when she first saw the baseless accusations on her phone.

The rumors concerned her. “I tried so hard to negate what was in the article because it was affecting my reputation and all the efforts I exerted to be where I am now,” she said in the BBC interview.

A post shared by Marwa Elselehdar💫مروة السلحدار (@marwa.elselehdar)

Elselehdar is one of the few women in the heavily male-dominated shipping industry.

In 2016, she became the youngest and first female Egyptian captain to cross the Suez Canal. A year later, she was honored by Egypt’s president during Egypt’s Women’s Day celebrations, the BBC said.

She hopes that her career, despite this unfortunate setback, inspires other women to break into the industry.

“My message to females who want to be in the maritime field is fight for what you love and not let any negativity affect you,” she told the BBC.

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The epic traffic jam of 400 ships caused by the Ever Given blockage of the Suez Canal is cleared, Egyptian authorities say

suez canal ever given
Photographers take pictures of ships sailing through the Suez Canal as traffic resumes after the “Ever Given” container ship operated by the Evergreen Marine Corporation, was freed after blocking the waterway route for almost a week.

  • A shipping backlog of more than 400 ships was caused by the Ever Given blocking the Suez Canal.
  • The 61 ships that remain stranded are expected to pass through the waterway on Saturday.
  • Problems caused by the blockage could take months to resolve, the world’s biggest shipping company warned.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The shipping backlog that built up after the Ever Given container ship became lodged in the Suez Canal should come to an end on Saturday, authorities told Reuters.

The 61 remaining ships of the 422 that were left stranded after the major blockage are expected to pass through the waterway imminently, the Suez Canal Authority’s chairman, Osama Rabie, said.

Around 85 ships in total are set to pass through the canal on Saturday, he added.

Read more: The 4 biggest losers of the Suez Canal fiasco – and 4 surprising winners

Last Monday, the Egyptian president’s advisor for the canal authority told Bloomberg that it could take “around a week” to get all of the ships out of the canal’s corridor.

If the remaining ships successfully pass through the waterway on Saturday, the backlog’s end will have beaten expectations by a couple of days.

The reopening of the canal, however, will likely not mark the end of the disruption.

The world’s biggest shipping company, Maersk, warned on Monday that the shipping problems caused by the Ever Given could take months to resolve, Insider’s Sinéad Baker reported.

“Even when the canal gets reopened, the ripple effects on global capacity and equipment are significant and the blockage has already triggered a series of further disruptions and backlogs in global shipping that could take weeks, possibly months, to unravel,” Maersk said.

The 1,300-foot Ever Given container ship was stuck for about 152 hours, with the blockage’s total costs reaching an estimated $60 billion.

Rabie told local television stations that an investigation into what caused the costly jam is ongoing and will reach its conclusion next week, Reuters reported.

“The investigation is going well‮ ‬and will take two more days. Then we will announce the results,” Rabie said.

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The Ever Given’s crew is safe, still onboard, and is getting paid while the ship’s being investigated

Ever given
The “Ever Given” container ship operated by the Evergreen Marine Corporation, sails through the Suez Canal, after it was fully freed and floated.

  • Egyptian authorities are investigating the Ever Given after it blocked the Suez Canal for six days.
  • The National Union of Seafarers of India’s general secretary is hopeful the crew will be absolved.
  • The union’s general secretary said the crew will continue to be paid as the inquiry continues.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The 25-person Indian crew of the Ever Given is stressed and tense, but is doing well as the massive container ship faces investigations after blocking the Suez Canal.

Abdulgani Serang, the general secretary of the National Union of Seafarers of India, gave Insider an update on their wellbeing on Friday.

The Egyptian government launched an inquiry into the event to uncover what went wrong after the ship became wedged in the canal and upended global trade. Investigators questioned the Ever Given’s crew on Wednesday, Suez Canal Authority Chairman Osama Rabie told local outlets, according to Reuters.

“There is a clear danger that the crew will be made scapegoats,” a senior authority in the shipping industry told the Times of India. The publication also said the Ever Given’s crew could be placed under house arrest until the investigation is completed.

ever given suez canal
The Ever Given sits beached across the Suez Canal, blocking all traffic. The ship was re-floated on March 29.

Serang told Insider that the crew of the Ever Given is safe and awaiting the results of the investigation, and added that reports about the status of the crew have been blown out of proportion.

“We want the inquiry done so corrective measures can be taken in the future,” Serang told Insider, “but we don’t want to take a guess about house arrest. Let’s not jump the gun and just wait for the results of the inquiry.”

Despite the investigation, Serang told Insider he’s optimistic that the crewmembers won’t face consequences.

“We are hopeful that the inquiry will come out that the seafarers end up clean,” Serang said. “As of now, the reports are that it was purely a weather-related incident.”

The Ever Given was traveling faster than the speed limit of the Suez Canal before getting stuck, Bloomberg reported. Initial investigations suggested the ship became beached due to high winds and ruled out any mechanical or engine failures.

ever given great bitter lake
A radar image taken by the Sentinel-1 satellite shows the Great Bitter Lake on March 31. The Ever Given is the bright ship on the lake’s eastern side.

The union secretary also said the Ever Given’s crew will continue to get paid even as the ship waits inspection in the Great Bitter Lake to determine if it can continue to its port of call.

“Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement is a company of repute,” Serang said, “and the company and union have an agreement in place. All the things will be taken care of and there is no cause to worry whatsoever.”

The owners of the Ever Given recently filed a lawsuit in the High Court of London, The Lawyer reported. According to a spokesperson for Evergreen Marine Corporation, the ship’s operators, the filing is in relation to the Merchant Shipping Act 1995 and relates to liability and compensation claims related to the beached ship.

The preemptive lawsuit was filed to limit the potential damages faced by the owners of the Ever Given and was not filed in retaliation against the ship’s crew, The Maritime Executive reported.

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Turkish media outlets – including the BBC – fell for an April Fools’ news story that said the UN was planning a second Suez Canal for Egypt

ever given suez canal guardian april fool turkey egypt
A screenshot of The Guardian’s April fool article, as of 7pm March 31.

  • Turkish media appears to have fallen for an April fools prank by British newspaper The Guardian.
  • The Guardian published a spoof story claiming a second Suez Canal was in the works.
  • Several outlets, including BBC Turkey, reported – and then deleted – the story.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

An ‘April Fools” news article claiming the United Nations is looking into building a second Suez Canal appears to have been taken wholly seriously by major Turkish media outlets.

On April 1, The Guardian published “‘Suez 2’? Ever Given grounding prompts plan for canal along Egypt-Israel border,” an article that rapidly gained attention given the current international interest in the canal.

The article said that the UN was studying the feasibility of a second channel along the Egypt-Israel border.

suez canal april fools guardian graphic ever given turkey
A graphic that appeared in The Guardian’s spoof, marking “Suez 2” in red along the Egypt-Israel border.

Several Turkish outlets appear to have taken it at face value, including BBC News Türkçe , which reported the story.

BBC turkey april fools suez canal Guardian ever given
A screenshot of the now-deleted BBC Turkey article.

“The eyes and ears of the world were there! UN stepped in, rolled up sleeves for 2nd Suez Canal,” read the headline used online by major national paper Hürriyet.

T24, an online Turkish news outlet, also published the story. The pages have now been deleted, but can be found via Google’s cache.

Unfortunately, it was a spoof. The article – written by “Flora Lopi” – cited “sources” such as “Iver Shovel,” “international tunnelling company OFP Lariol,” and “Mo Sez, a regional expert in water division management.”

The Guardian went all in and created a fake Twitter account for “Flora Lopi,” who played along with the joke on social media:

The apparent mistake was first reported by online news portal Gazete Duvar.

Middle East Eye Turkey correspondent Ragıp Soylu, who tweeted images of several print front pages that Insider has not been able to independently confirm:

The fake story created a huge buzz when first published, and “Suez 2” briefly trended on Twitter in the UK. It’s not a surprise – the Ever Given has dominated the news cycle ever since it was grounded for six days in the crucial waterway.

The 220,000-ton container ship completely blocked one of the world’s most important trading routes, choking the supply chain – and sparking endless memes. The ship was eventually freed on Monday, and the accumulated backlog of vessels is slowly passing through the channel.

The Guardian updated its story, marking it “April Fools’,” as of noon on April 1, as is traditional with spoof stories.

The BBC, T24 and Hürriyet did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

– Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story said incorrectly that Ragıp Soylu, not Gazete Duvar, was the first to spot the Turkish media’s error. This has been corrected.

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Satellite images show the Ever Given sitting in an artificial lake off the Suez Canal, where its hull will be inspected for seaworthiness

ever given great bitter lake
A radar image taken by the Sentinel-1 satellite shows the Great Bitter Lake on March 31. The Ever Given is the bright ship on the lake’s eastern side.

  • The Ever Given once stuck in the Suez Canal is in an artificial lake with its 18,000 containers.
  • The giant container ship is awaiting a hull inspection that will decide if it can continue sailing.
  • In the meantime, a backlog of 422 ships has resumed traffic in the Suez Canal.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Three days after the Ever Given container ship was dislodged from the Suez Canal, it remains anchored in an artificial lake, its future route uncertain.

The ship, operated by the Evergreen Marine Corporation, had been en route to Rotterdam, Netherlands, when it ran aground in the canal on March 23. It remained wedged horizontally for six days, blocking a major global shipping route and becoming an international spectacle.

A spokesperson for Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement, the company that manages the Ever Given, told Insider the ship is due for a “hull inspection” and will remain in the Great Bitter Lake until it’s completed.

Evergreen said in a statement that the upcoming inspection “will determine whether the ship can resume its scheduled service” to Rotterdam.

In the meantime, traffic along the Suez Canal has resumed, though the Suez Canal Authority chairman told reporters on Monday the backlog of 422 ships would take several days to clear.

Another satellite image from Maxar Technologies shows a line of ships steadily making their way down the canal on March 31:

suez canal shipping traffic
Shipping traffic in the Suez Canal has resumed, after the Ever Given was dislodged on March 29.

The Ever Given initially got stuck in the canal due to high winds from a sandstorm. It was ultimately freed thanks to a combination of dredging operations that removed the sand and mud from underneath the ship’s hull, and tugboats that pulled and pushed the ship into position.

The vessel is one of the world’s largest container ships – it’s roughly the same length as the Empire State Building and can carry up to 20,000 containers. The debacle cost the global economy an estimated $400 million per hour.

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