UK ministers were told not to use the phrase ‘it’s coming home’ ahead of the Euros final because it annoys other countries

England captain Harry Kane celebrates scoring the winning goal against Denmark in the Euro 2020 semifinal.
England captain Harry Kane celebrates scoring the winning goal against Denmark in the Euro 2020 semifinal.

  • UK government ministers were told not to use the phrase “it’s coming home” ahead of the Euros final, Politics Home reported.
  • A leaked memo from the department for digital, culture, media, and sport said the phrase annoys other countries.
  • England is playing Italy in the final of the tournament on Sunday evening.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

UK government ministers have been told to avoid using the phrase “it’s coming home” when they are discussing the England football team because it irritates other countries, Politics Home reported.

A leaked memo sent by the department for digital, culture, media, and sport said the phrase – taken from ‘Three Lions,’ a popular song about the England football team – could damage England’s chances of winning a bid to host the World Cup in 2030.

The email said: “As stressed before, please do encourage your Ministers not to use ‘It’s Coming Home’ with the news media and social media.

“I know we’re swimming against the tide, but we know this does not go down well overseas – and strategically we need to do all we can to make ourselves welcoming to the football authorities when the UK and Ireland is scoping out a bid for the 2030 World Cup.”

The phrase “it’s coming home” comes from “Three Lions,” a song released by the Lightning Seeds and comedians David Baddiel and Frank Skinner to mark the Euro 1996 final.

It referenced the fact that a major international football tournament was being played in England for the first time since the 1966 World Cup, which is characterized as the home of the sport.

But the phrase “it’s coming home” can be seen to annoy other countries who claim the sport originated there.

UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson on July 7 appeared last week to contradict his own government’s advice on the use of the phrase, tweeting “Let’s bring it home” after England defeated Denmark in the semi-final of the tournament.

The email came as England prepared to play Italy in the final of the Euro 2020 tournament, which was delayed by a year due to the coronavirus pandemic.

It is the first time England has played in the final of the tournament, and only the second time in history that the team has played in the final of a major international tournament.

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