Don’t miss out on these TV deals from Walmart’s Deals for Days sale – you’ll still find major discounts from LG, Samsung, and more

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

LG C1 OLED 4K TV in a living room.
LG’s C1 OLED is one of several 4K TVs on sale right now during Walmart’s Deals for Days event.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

As the big retailers go to war on prices during Amazon’s Prime Day 2021 sale event, we’re seeing some tempting discounts from competing events like Walmart’s Deals for Days. The big sale has another day to go, but some of the best TV deals will likely sell out. You can find discounts on TVs from LG, Samsung, TCL, and more.

We’ve highlighted some of the best Walmart TV deals right now, with displays that range in size from just 32 inches all the way up to 65 inches. If you’re in the market for a new TV make sure you check out the best Prime Day 2021 TV deals at Amazon, too.

Best Prime Day 2021 Walmart TV deals

It’s not often that you get money off the best 4K TVs or the best OLED TVs, but there are some good panels on offer here, and discounts on some of the best cheap TVs for anyone with a limited budget.

65″ Class 4K UHD Smart OLED C1 Series TV with AI ThinQ (medium, Preferred: Walmart)55-inch OLED C1 Series 4K Smart TV (medium, Preferred: Walmart)43-inch The Sero QLED Smart TV (medium, Preferred: Walmart)65″ Class 5-Series 4K UHD QLED Roku Smart TV (medium)32″ Class 3-Series 720P HD LED Roku Smart TV (medium)40-inch FHD Roku Smart TV (medium)

How to shop for a TV

Picking the right television for your needs can be difficult. When it comes to budget-friendly displays, you can find HDTVs for as low as $100 in smaller screen sizes. On the high end, premium 65-inch 4K TVs can cost $1,500 or more. Flagship 8K TVs can even sell for over $10,000.

Buyers who prioritize picture quality will want to go for a 4K TV with at least a 65-inch screen. The best 4K TVs feature an OLED panel or an advanced LED screen with a feature called local dimming. These technologies enable the best contrast, deepest black levels, and brightest images for gorgeous high dynamic range (HDR) picture.

Though companies use different terms to describe their flagship models, in general, shoppers who focus on picture quality should look for TVs branded as OLED, QLED, Neo QLED, Quantum, NanoCell, and QNED.

People who just want a simple TV for casual viewing, however, will be better off with a smaller display using an affordable LED screen without advanced image features. Though picture quality won’t be as good as more expensive TVs, there is plenty of solid budget LED TVs, including affordable sets that include 4K resolution and reliable smart TV streaming.

If you’re looking for even more TV recommendations, be sure to read our TV buying guides:

Read the original article on Business Insider

Walmart’s Deals for Days sale features big discounts on TVs from Sony, Vizio, and more

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

Sony 75-inch TV sitting on a mantle in a living room
Walmart’s Deals for Days sale includes a discount on Sony’s 75-inch X750H TV.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

This is a perfect time for bargain hunters to find a deal on a big-ticket TV with Amazon Prime Day 2021 sparking a range of competing events from other big retailers, including Walmart’s Deals for Days. There’s no need for a subscription to snag one of Walmart’s deals, and you could save yourself a serious chunk of change on a new set from brands like Sony, TCL, Vizio, and Hisense.

Below, we’ve rounded up some of the top TV deals you can get right now at Walmart, with displays ranging in size from 32 inches to 85 inches. For more TV discounts, check out the best Prime Day 2021 TV deals at Amazon.

Best Prime Day 2021 Walmart TV deals

Discounts on the best 4K TVs tend to be scarce as retailers use events to clear their stock of cheaper panels and older technology, but you can find some of the best cheap TVs for even less than usual. There are also some deals on large panels from big names like Sony, but sadly the best OLED TVs are cheaper elsewhere.

65″ Class 5-Series 4K UHD QLED Roku Smart TV (medium)32″ Class 3-Series 720P HD LED Roku Smart TV (medium)75″ Class KD75X750H 4K UHD LED Smart TV (medium)85-inch P-Series Quantum X 4K TV (medium, Preferred: Walmart)40-inch FHD Roku Smart TV (medium)

How to shop for a TV

Picking the right television for your needs can be difficult. When it comes to budget-friendly displays, you can find HDTVs for as low as $100 in smaller screen sizes. On the high end, premium 65-inch 4K TVs can cost $1,500 or more. Flagship 8K TVs can even sell for over $10,000.

Buyers who prioritize picture quality will want to go for a 4K TV with at least a 65-inch screen. The best 4K TVs feature an OLED panel or an advanced LED screen with a feature called local dimming. These technologies enable the best contrast, deepest black levels, and brightest images for gorgeous high dynamic range (HDR) picture.

Though companies use different terms to describe their flagship models, in general, shoppers who focus on picture quality should look for TVs branded as OLED, QLED, Neo QLED, Quantum, NanoCell, and QNED.

People who just want a simple TV for casual viewing, however, will be better off with a smaller display using an affordable LED screen without advanced image features. Though picture quality won’t be as good as more expensive TVs, there is plenty of solid budget LED TVs, including affordable sets that include 4K resolution and reliable smart TV streaming.

If you’re looking for even more TV recommendations, be sure to read our TV buying guides:

Read the original article on Business Insider

E3 2021 couldn’t live up to the hype, but people tuned in anyway

halo infinite
The next chapter in the “Halo” video-game franchise, “Halo: Infinite.”

  • E3 2021 is finally over and fans are still processing the week.
  • Major titles for Microsoft, Nintendo, Bethesda, and more debuted at the conference.
  • But gamers expect more than can be delivered from the video game convention.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

When I was in middle school, I looked forward to E3 more than any other holiday or birthday combined. The weeklong video-game industry convention featuring reveals and press conferences from gaming’s top studios offered a constant source of whimsy and potential in my adolescent mind.

Ahead of the annual conference, I’d prepare lists of the games expected to debut and scream gleefully at my standard definition television when executives or G4TV hosts confirmed my predictions with actual release dates.

In 2018 and 2019, I got to attend the convention for the first time, attending those same press conferences that used to be the highlight of my summers as a kid.

So when it was announced that the convention would return after a year-long pandemic hiatus, I was thrilled.

This year, while attending the virtual conference, I believed that one good, solid game announcement could return the light from my childhood to the dark apartment inhabited by my now nearly-30-year-old self.

While I was watching the return of “Master Chief,” “Wario,” and so many other games, the hype did feel real, but it didn’t necessarily live up to my expectations.

E3 2021 came with a lot of anticipation

Fan expectations for E3 2021 had to be tempered due to it being remote. Some new games were announced before the convention, like “Hollow Knight: Silk Song” and the latest “Call of Duty,” meaning those titles wouldn’t make an appearance. Still, gamers were left with a near-infinite amount of possibilities. Naturally, many were let down.

“Everyone is looking towards one big date in the gaming calendar, but we already know E3 can’t possibly provide everything we’re hoping to see,” gaming writer Melindy Hetfeld said in PC Gamer.

Still, there is no hype like gamer hype, and the week started off strong with the Summer Games Fest on June 10. There, fans got a better look at the “Left 4 Dead” successor “Back 4 Blood,” as well as “Elden Ring,” the highly anticipated fantasy role-playing game (RPG) written by George R. R. Martin.

Over the next week, at their own official E3 conferences, game studios showed off their best content coming in the next few years.

Xbox and Bethesda aired cinematics for the space explorer game “Star Citizen” and the legacies shooter game “Halo Infinite.”

Ubisoft introduced us to shooter “Rainbow Six: Extraction” and the second installment of the plumber’s RPG “Mario + Rabids: Sparks of Hope.”

Gearbox had cheeky reveals for the shooter games “Tiny Tina’s Wonderlands” and “The Outer Worlds 2.”

Square Enix gave us a confusing string of new games, like “Strangers of Paradise Final Fantasy Origin” and an in-depth gameplay trailer for a “Guardians of the Galaxy” game.

Not all studios lived up to the convention’s hype

While those studios brought just enough hype, others fell short.

“I expected it to look and feel kinda messy, and that’s what we got,” VentureBeat video games reporter Jeff Grub told Insider. “Gaming fans always expect the moon, but if you talk to them long enough, they’ll admit that they really just want an exciting presentation from big companies.”

Studios Capcom and Bandai barely had enough content to fill their conference slots, and even Nintendo fell victim to the hype when rumors about a reveal of a pro version of its Switch failed to materialize. Though the company showed off the minigame collection “Warioware: Get It Together,” the latest character from “Tekken” coming to “Super Smash Bros. Ultimate,” and the first gameplay footage of “The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild 2,” it just wasn’t enough to keep their stock from falling five percent.

Despite the existence of social media, which gives companies the capability of talking directly to their fans, E3 still has mystical clout in the gaming world.

“It’s a single event that gets a massive audience to willingly tune in to watch a series of commercials,” Grubb said. “People take time off work to watch. Hundreds of content creators that normally do one video a week are creating multiple videos per day. Mainstream media outlets watch and listen. And everyone buys into that because of the E3 branding.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

Best Buy says the hot housing market is boosting the need for TVs and at-home installations

A sign marks a Best Buy store in Salem, New Hampshire, U.S., November 25, 2019.   REUTERS/Brian Snyder
Best Buy reports an increase in TV’s sales and at-home installations, contributing this spike to the hot housing market and home improvements

  • Best Buy says that TV sales and home installations soared for the first quarter earnings.
  • Best Buy CEO Corie Sue Barry contributes this spike to housing sales and home improvements.
  • Revenue for Best Buy is up 27% compared to the first quarter of fiscal year 2020.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Best Buy says that there has been an increase in TV sales and at-home installations for the first quarter of 2021.

“This demand is being driven by continued focus on the home, which encompasses many aspects of our lives, including working, learning, cooking, entertaining, redecorating and remodeling,” CEO Corie Sue Barry said during the company’s earnings call on Thursday. Barry also added that the increase in sales could be due to “government stimulus programs and the strong housing environment.”

The housing market is in fact booming right now, and some reports have even compared the current climate to the housing bubble that occurred in the early 2000’s before the crash in 2008, as Insider previously reported. Some sellers have even experienced their homes selling at record speed.

Overall in the first quarter, Best Buy sales rose 37%, and earnings per share growth rose 230%. Revenue for Best Buy is up 27% compared to the first quarter of fiscal year 2020.

The biggest factors contributing to increased sales were home theater items, computers, and other appliances. But going forward Best Buy doesn’t have much confidence that the boom will continue. Barry said in a statement on Tuesday that the government stimulus payments provided consumers with a level of confidence and without future payments there could be a “lack of confidence” from consumers, according to CNN.

The chain reported earnings of $2.23 per share in the first quarter, a large beat on analyst estimates of $1.39. The firm also topped revenue expectations and raised its outlook for same-store sales growth, helping its shares rise about 1.8% in trading Thursday.

Revenue was expected at $10.44 billion, but the company exceeded that estimate as well, raking in $11.64 billion, according to CNBC.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Here’s why there’s a global computer chip shortage that is slamming automakers during the pandemic

vauxhall car factory
Vauxhall car factory in April 2020.

  • There’s a computer chip shortage accelerated by pandemic-driven disruptions in the supply chain.
  • Automakers rely on chips for tech in their cars, and the likes of Apple need them to power gadgets.
  • With only so many chips to go around, industries are suffering as they struggle to meet demand.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

A group of lawmakers is asking the Biden administration to intervene in what has become a global computer chip shortage.

“We believe that the incoming administration can continue to play a helpful role in alleviating the worst impacts of the shortage on American workers,” the senators wrote in a letter.

So what’s going on? 

Automakers and consumer electronics companies are vying for computer chips

These chips have become a crucial part of the supply chain.

Car companies like Ford use them to power the modern-day technology in their vehicles – the engine, Bluetooth capabilities, seat systems, collision and blind-spot detection, transmissions, WiFi, and video displays systems all run on the chips.

And the silicon components are what power the high-tech gadgets from companies like Apple that we use every day. The upgraded technology in gaming consoles and 5G smartphones in particular require a lot more power, and therefore rely more on chips than previous generations.

Since March, when the pandemic set in, consumer demand has surged for vehicles and for devices like smartphones and gaming consoles that people can use for entertainment while stuck at home.

Automakers like General Motors, Toyota, Ford, and Subaru, to name a few, were forced to close factories around the onset of the pandemic. When the factories reopened, customer demand for cars had skyrocketed as people, stimulus checks in hand, jumped at the opportunity for low-interest rates and a way to get around that didn’t involve mass transportation.

Automakers responded by ramping up production to maximum levels, further driving up demand – and competition – for computer chips.

Read more: Wall Street is worried that Intel’s disappointing earnings are a sign that its terrible year will only get worse: ‘2021 seems like a messy year’

Meanwhile, chip industry players like Intel were already struggling to keep up with demand, even since before the pandemic. And chipmakers overseas were also experiencing supply chain disruptions as the pandemic forced them to close down factories.

Even with chipmakers that are doing fairly well during the pandemic, like Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company – which produces more than half of the world’s computer chips and is also Apple’s primary supplier – there still isn’t enough supply to go around.

The shortage doesn’t look like it will let up any time soon

Computer chip makers are running at maximum capacity and it’s not feasible for companies to build factories to compensate for the increase in demand, Bloomberg has reported.

Phone makers like Apple are more prepared to pay higher prices for the chips than automakers are, according to an analyst who spoke to Bloomberg. That doesn’t mean phone makers haven’t been negatively impacted by the chip shortage though – Apple reportedly faced supply issues for chips to power its 5G-equipped iPhone 12 models that debuted in October.

But the auto industry specifically has felt the pinch, and some have even had to halt production due to the shortage. Ford and Fiat are temporarily pausing production because they don’t have enough chips.

With not enough chips in supply, the automaking industry could lose $61 billion in 2021, according to consulting firm Alix Partners as Bloomberg reported.

Read the original article on Business Insider