One person reportedly died while helping free the Ever Given ship, the Suez Canal Authority says

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The Ever Given container ship in the Suez Canal on March 29, 2021.

  • The Suez Canal Authority said that one person died during the Ever Given salvage operation in March.
  • In a Facebook post, the SCA said that “one death” is among the authority’s “most prominent losses.”
  • The circumstances around the person’s reported death are not clear.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Suez Canal Authority (SCA) recently revealed that one person reportedly died during the six-day operation that eventually freed the massive Ever Given container ship from a sandbank back in April.

In several statements on the SCA’s official Facebook page, posted from May 26 to May 27, canal authorities listed the damages sustained because of the incident.

Among them, it notes “one death, the sinking of one of our rescue boats and 48 ships having to find alternative routes.”

Read more: The 4 biggest losers of the Suez Canal fiasco – and 4 surprising winners

In another statement posted on Facebook, the authority states: “The highlighted losses incurred by the S.C authority due to the incident of the grounding crisis of Ever Given that can be seen is the damage to a number of participating marine units and the sinking of one of SCA marine units during the salvage operations, resulting in the death of one of the participants.”

It is unclear who died and how exactly this reported death occurred. There is also no record of a tugboat or marine unit sinking during the operation.

Insider has reached out to the SCA for more information but did not hear back in time for publication.

The Japanese-owned Ever Given container ship made headlines in March after it ran aground in the single-lane stretch during a sandstorm, blocking the Suez Canal for six days and significantly disrupting global trade.

Lawyers acting on behalf of the Japanese company Shoei Kisen Kaisha, which owns the ship, have said the SCA was at fault for Ever Given’s grounding because they allowed it to enter the canal amid poor weather conditions.

The accusation comes as Egyptian officials have demanded the company pay $600 million compensation for the disruption caused by the blockage. They had initially demanded $916 million.

However, the insurer of the vessel said this amount is still too high.

The massive container ship is currently still impounded in the Great Bitter Lake, a body of water roughly 30 miles from where it first got stuck.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The graves in a 13,000-year-old Egyptian cemetery didn’t come from a single battle, as previously thought, but a long-lasting war likely driven by climate change, new study says

Jebel Sahaba remains
Remains of two individuals found at the Jebel Sahaba site, with pencils showing the position of artifacts.

  • Jebel Sahaba is one of the oldest known sites of mass conflict, dating back over 13,000 years.
  • New research shows the deaths were caused by a series of violent clashes, rather than a single battle.
  • This long-lasting war was likely a consequence of an abrupt change in climate around that time.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A prehistoric cemetery, one of the earliest known examples of mass conflict amongst humans, was caused by an unrelenting series of clashes, rather than a single battle, according to new research.

Climate change likely drove these events, Dr. Isabelle Crevecoeur, the lead author of the study and a researcher at the University of Bordeaux, told Insider.

The findings were published on Thursday in the peer-reviewed journal Scientific Reports.

The Jebel Sahaba site, a cemetery in the Nile Valley discovered in the 1960s, is one of the earliest sites displaying an event of mass violence on humans, New Scientist reported.

The remains, which were dated to be more than 13,000 years old, show signs of injuries from weapons, spears, and arrows.

It is often held up as an example of early emergence of violence and organized warfare triggered by territorial disputes, the scientists said in the study.

New analysis of the remains found more than 100 lesions that had been previously undocumented, some of which showed signs of healing. The remains of sixteen people had both healed and unhealed lesions, the scientists found.

This suggests that these deaths came after a series of raids, skirmishes, and ambushes spread months or years apart, rather than a singular battle.

“That is also a war. It’s just not the concept of war that we have now,” Crevecoeur said.

A war caused by climate change?

One of the most likely hypothesis is that tensions arose as a consequence of extreme weather changes.

The area went from a very arid climate to very moist climate between the end the glacial period, around 20,000 years ago, to the beginning of the African humid period, about 15,000 years ago, Crevecoeur said.

“The transition between both extreme was not gradual. Severe flooding of the Nile are recorded during this period that seems to stabilized only after 11,000 years ago,” she said.

This caused humans to concentrate in what must have been a refuge area at that time, causing competition for resources, a press release accompanying the study said.

Cultural tensions might have also played a part, as previous studies had also shown that humans at that time probably had a sense of group identity, she said.

“If you add cultural identity to climate pressure and maybe stresses to access to basic resources, you really have the roots to generate conflict between the community,” Crevecoeur said.

The scientists also found that male and female remains were evenly affected by the lesions, which Crevecoeur said was a surprise.

“In most ethnoarchaeological examples of similar type of conflict, the number of male individuals exhibiting trauma is always significantly higher than women,” she said.

The only difference is that most of the women had more fractures to the forearm, while men had more fractures on their hands.

“This is the kind of injury that you have in close combat, and these differences may reflect instinctive reaction in these situation when men will maybe more prone to engage the attacker when women might try to protect themselves,” Crevecoeur said.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The Suez Canal will be widened by 131 feet to avoid a repeat of the Ever Given chaos, authorities say

Ever Given, Suez Canal
Container ship Ever Given stuck in the Suez Canal, Egypt on March 27, 2021.

  • The Suez Canal Authority (SCA) said this week it plans on widening and deepening the Suez Canal.
  • Officials are making the changes in the hopes of avoiding a repeat of the Ever Given blunder.
  • The plan is to increase the width of the waterway by 131 feet and to deepen the area by 10 feet.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Egyptian authorities said this week they plan on widening and deepening parts of the Suez Canal to avoid a repeat of the Ever Given blunder in March, according to Bloomberg.

In a televised address on Tuesday, the head of the Suez Canal Authority (SCA), Osama Rabie, said an 18.6 mile stretch of the waterway would be widened by about 131 feet (40 meters) and deepened by 32 feet (10 meters) to improve the movement of ships in the area.

The expansion will take around two years, Rabie said.

Egyptian President Abdel-Fattah El-Sisi, who also spoke at the event, stressed he doesn’t want to mobilize “huge” public funding for the project, according to Bloomberg.

Read more: 4 ways small business owners can benefit from supply chain delays happening right now

The Suez Canal, an artificial sea-level waterway, is one of the world’s most heavily used shipping lanes, facilitating about 12% of all global trade.

The Japanese-owned Ever Given container ship made headlines in March after it ran aground in the single-lane stretch during a sandstorm.

It blocked the crucial waterway for six days, forcing some vessels to reroute, while hundreds had to wait for the Ever Given to be freed.

A few days after the Ever Given was dislodged, the SCA impounded the ship and its cargo and lodged a compensation claim of $916 million.

The canal authority since reduced the claims to $600 million. However, the insurer of the vessel said this amount is still too high.

The massive container ship had spent 48 days idle as of Saturday. It is impounded in the Great Bitter Lake, a body of water roughly 30 miles from where it first got stuck.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Scans revealed an Egyptian mummy was actually a pregnant woman, not a male priest

Thebes egypt mummy Luxor
Engravings in a temple in Thebes in Egypt.

  • Scientists have uncovered the first known example of pregnant woman being mummified.
  • The mummy was first thought to be a male priest because of an inscription on the sarcophagus.
  • “We were really shocked,” said one of the scientists who led to project in Warsaw, Poland.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Scientists were “shocked” to find that a mummy they previously thought to be a male priest instead a pregnant woman.

Scans of the remains revealed the mummy to be the first known case of embalmed pregnancy, according to researchers at the Warsaw Mummy Project in Poland.

The project posted images of the scans to Facebook:

Marzena Ozarek-Szilke, an anthropologist and archaeologist of the University of Warsaw, told the Associated Press that she was “surprised” when she saw scans suggested that the body had breasts and no penis.

“When we saw the little foot and then the little hand [of the fetus], we were really shocked,” she said.

The mummified woman, whose name is unknown, would have been in her 20s to 30s when she died, and would have been in her second trimester of pregnancy, the researchers estimate.

She would have come from an elite community, the scientists said in the study, judging from how she was carefully mummified, wrapped in fabrics, and had amulets

The four bundles in the unnamed woman’s abdominal cavity, were previously thought to be embalmed organs, the BBC reported.

The findings were published in the peer-reviewed Journal of Archeological Science on Wednesday.

The woman’s mummified remains are thought to have first been exhumed from a royal tomb where the ancient city of Thebes once stood, before being transferred to the National Warsaw Museum in Poland in 1826.

An inscriptions on the sarcophagus had previously led scientists to believe the mummy was a male priest named Hor-Djehuty, who lived between the 1st century BC and the 1st AD, The Warsaw Mummy Project said in a Facebook post.

It is not clear why the fetus was not removed from the woman’s body before embalming, the BBC reported.

The findings could provide clues about role of pregnancy and maternity in ancient Egypt, the study said.

Thebes, a city by the Nile on a site that became modern-day Luxor, is often referred to as an “open-air museum” for its wealth of ruins and archeological discoveries.

In 2019, 30 ancient sarcophaguses were unearthed where Thebes once stood, with perfectly preserved mummies inside, Insider’s Morgan McFall-Johnsen reported.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Photos show ancient Egyptian artifacts and skeletons found in a ‘lost golden city’ built by King Tut’s grandfather

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An ancient Egyptian artifact at the site of the newly discovered “lost golden city” in present-day Luxor.

  • Egyptian archaeologists have unearthed a 3,400-year-old “lost golden city” in Luxor over the last seven months.
  • In 1935, a French excavation team searched for the city – which may be the largest ever built in Ancient Egypt – but never found it.
  • The city, named “tehn Aten,” or the dazzling Aten, was built by Amenhotep III, King Tut’s grandfather. He is considered the wealthiest Pharaoh who ever lived.
  • Photos from the site show colored pottery, scarab-beetle amulets, jewelry, wine caskets, mud bricks, and an ancient bakery. Only one-third of Aten has been uncovered so far.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
On the banks of the Nile River, 300 miles south of Cairo, sits the city of Luxor. It’s adjacent to Egypt’s Valley of the Kings, where archaeologists discovered King Tutankhamen’s tomb a century ago.

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Former Egyptian minister of antiquities and archaeologist Zahi Hawass stands amongst the ruins of a newly discovered ancient city in Luxor, April 10, 2021.

Somewhere nearby, King Tut should have a mortuary temple, where priests and relatives left gifts and tribute for the pharaoh to enjoy in the afterlife. But it was never found. 

In September, archaeologist Zahi Hawass, the former Egyptian minister of antiquities, set out to find it.

 

Hawass’ team began searching an area of Luxor where Tut’s successors, Ay and Horemheb, built their mortuary temples. But instead of Tut’s temple, they uncovered an enormous, well-preserved metropolis.

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Walls of an ancient city found in Luxor, Egypt, April 8, 2021.

Within weeks of the start of their dig, Hawass’ team uncovered mud bricks stamped with Pharaoh Amenhotep III’s name. That helped them estimate the city was built 3,400 years ago, since Amenhotep III ruled between 1391 BC and 1353 BC.

“I called the city ‘the golden city’ because it was built during the golden age of Egypt,” Hawass told Insider.

Amenhotep III was King Tut’s grandfather, and “the wealthiest Pharaoh who ever lived,” according to Betsy Bryan, an Egyptologist from Johns Hopkins University.

king tut
The funerary mask of Tutankhamen, or King Tut, in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Amenhotep III ruled during a time of peace, which helped him amass unprecedented wealth, Bryan told Insider.

“He was never at war. All he did was sit back and count money for 40 years, so he built constantly,” she said.

Archaeologists knew the Pharaoh had funneled some of his riches into building a city in this area of Egypt: “This is a place we knew existed,” Bryan said. But its precise location had eluded diggers for almost a century.

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Egyptian excavation workers stand in front of the ruins of the newly discovered “lost golden city” in Luxor.

“Many foreign missions searched for this city and never found it,” Hawass said in a press release, adding it may be the largest ancient city ever found in Egypt.

In 1934 and 1935, a French excavation team searched Luxor for the “lost golden city” but came up empty, Hawass said.

Colossi_of_Memnon
The Colossi of Memnon in Luxor, May 18, 2015.

That effort failed because the French archaeologists had been looking in the wrong place, Hawass added. Figuring the city would be clustered around buildings dedicated to the Pharaoh who built it, the group searched next to the Collosi of Memnon: twin statues that depicted Amenhotep III. The Pharaoh’s mortuary temple was nearby as well — but they had no luck finding the city.

“It never occurred to them to look slightly south,” Bryan said.

The lost city, it turns out, was located to the south and west of Amenhotep III’s mortuary temple.

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Workers carry a fish covered in gold found in Luxor, April 10, 2021.

So far, Hawass’ team has uncovered remnants of the city in an area that’s at least half a square mile.  

But the city is likely far larger, Bryan said, stretching all the way to the Pharaoh’s palace at Malkata, which is almost 2 miles south of the Colossi of Memnon.

In addition to the city’s size, Hawass said, “the huge amount of artifacts” his team uncovered there makes this an unprecedented archaeological find.

luxor hawass getty
Egyptian excavation workers prepare to display ancient Egyptian artifacts like pottery vessels found in Luxor.

“It will give us a rare glimpse into the life of the ancient Egyptians at the time where the empire was at its wealthiest,” he said in a press release.

The city’s streets are flanked with buildings, some of which have walls 9 feet tall.

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A new archaeological discovery is seen in Luxor, Egypt, April 8, 2021.

Scattered throughout those structures, Hawass’ team found rooms filled with pottery, glass, metalwork, and weaving tools. Ancient Egyptians once used these objects in their day-to-day lives, but the tools had lain untouched for millennia. 

Hawass’ excavation team also found a large cemetery north of the city.

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An Egyptian excavation worker removes a cover from a skeleton found at the “lost golden city” in present-day Luxor.

They haven’t figured out how big the cemetery is yet, but the team discovered a cluster of underground tombs with stairs leading to each tomb entrance.

In one part of the cemetery, the diggers found a grave holding a skeleton with a rope wrapped around its knees.

luxor hawass
A skeleton uncovered at the “lost golden city” in present-day Luxor.

Hawass is still investigating why the body was buried in this manner.

The city seems to be divided into industrial and residential areas. In the south, archaeologists found an ancient bakery with a cooking and meal-preparation area, ovens, and pottery used for storing food.

luxor hawass getty
Egyptian excavation workers carry pottery vessels into storage.

Another neighborhood had multiple workshops: one for producing mud bricks used to build temples, and another for producing amulets.

Another part of the city was all houses. 

“For those of us interested in the people and how they did stuff, this place is a treasure trove,” Bryan said.

Nearby the cemetery, Hawass’ team found a piece of pottery containing 22 pounds of dried meat, likely from a butcher at a slaughterhouse.

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Egyptian excavation workers prepare to display ancient Egyptian artifacts ahead of a press conference on April 10, 2021.

The vessel had an inscription indicating that the meat was for a festival celebrating the continued rule of Amenhotep III.

The city dwellers were skilled craftsmen, Bryan said – they made fancy ceramic vessels, glassware, and temple decorations in the name of Amenhotep III.

luxor hawass
A scarab-beetle amulet and other amulets discovered in the “lost golden city” at Luxor.

“It really is like peeking into the king’s private storage unit,” she said. “That kind of specialization was rarely seen anywhere.” 

Hawass’ team also uncovered scarab-beetle amulets, rings, and wine caskets in the city.

luxor hawass getty
Rings of blue stone found in the “lost golden city” in Luxor.

According to Bryan, the city was Amenhotep III’s love letter to the god Aten.

“When ancient Egyptian kings built, they would dedicate their construction to a deity and associate themselves with that deity,” she said.

Aten was depicted as a sun disc. Archaeologists typically associated the deity with Amenhotep III’s son, Akhenaten, who worshipped Aten instead of the chief Egyptian god of the sun and air, Amon.

This discovery shows that Amenhotep III believed in Aten too, Hawass said — which explains why the Pharoah named the city “tehn Aten,” meaning the dazzling Aten.

After taking over from his father, Akhenaten – King Tut’s father – briefly lived in Aten. Then he moved 250 miles north to a city called Amarna, along with his people. That’s where King Tut was born.

luxor hawass
An ancient pottery vessel discovered in Luxor, Egypt.

Akhenaten’s exodus to Amarna could be why so many tools and artifacts were left behind in Aten. 

“When you pick up and move, you’re not going to take the ceramics,” Bryan said.

According to Hawass, Akhenaten fled to Amarna and built that city to escape the priests of Amon, who were displeased that their Pharaoh was worshipping a different god than their own.

Small_aten_temple amarna
Temple of the Aten in Amarna, Egypt.

Akhenaten was branded a heretic. Following his death, King Tut’s family moved to Thebes, another city in the Luxor area that served as the ancient Egyptian capital.

It’s unclear whether Aten was ever reoccupied.

Hawass said there’s plenty more to find of the “lost golden city,” since only one-third of it has been uncovered so far.

luxor hawass getty
Former Egyptian minister of antiquities Zahi Hawass speaks during a press conference on the newly discovered “lost golden city” in Luxor, April 10, 2021.

“We still think that the city has an extension to the west and to the north, and that is our goal by next September,” Hawass said. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

The operators of the Ever Given may be forced to unload its 18,000 cargo containers onto other ships, report says

ever given suez canal
The Ever Given, a Panama-flagged cargo ship, is seen in the Suez Canal in Egypt, on March 27, 2021.

  • The operators of the Ever Given might move its containers onto other ships, according to a report.
  • The ship is unable to deliver its goods until $1 billion in damages is paid to Egyptian authorities.
  • But transporting the containers could become a physical, legal, and logistical nightmare.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The operators of the Ever Given ship are exploring the possibility of transferring its 18,000 cargo-filled containers to other vessels as it remains stuck in legal limbo, according to a report by the Wall Street Journal.

The 224,000-ton cargo ship, which ran aground in the Suez Canal on March 23 and was freed 6 days later, still hasn’t been able to leave the Suez Canal after Egyptian authorities announced it must first pay $1 billion in damages.

But the ship’s operator, Taiwanese company Evergreen Marine Corp., is facing increasing pressure to deliver its thousands of containers – filled with everything from toilet paper to coffee and furniture – to its frustrated customers.

Read more: The 4 biggest losers of the Suez Canal fiasco – and 4 surprising winners

“Customers are asking when their boxes will be delivered after the ship seizure, and the prospect of moving the containers to other ships and delivering them to the clients in Europe is now on the table,” an unnamed source, directly involved in the matter, told the Wall Street Journal.

But any efforts to remove the 18,000, 20-foot container units from the Ever Given could become a massive physical and logistical challenge, possibly requiring officials to move the vessel, which is currently anchored in the canal’s artificial Great Bitter Lake, to the nearby city of Port Said.

“It won’t be easy to do, but there are a number of options,” the same source told Wall Street Journal. “Empty ships can be deployed to pick up boxes and some can be loaded to other container ships crossing on the same route to Europe.”

The move could also create additional legal headaches, relating mainly to claims and fees surrounding the vessel and its cargo customers.

According to the Wall Street Journal, Evergreen Marine Corp. said in a statement that it is looking into the Egyptian court order “and studying the possibility of the vessel and the cargo on board being treated separately.”

Shoei Kisen Kaisha, the ship’s owner, earlier this month filed a general-average claim against the vessel’s operators, which calls for companies with cargo on the vessel to share the risk and costs involved in the ship’s recovery.

Two maritime lawyers, Bruce Paulsen and Brian Maloney of Seward & Kissel told the Maritime Executive this week: “The seizure of the Ever Given and compensation demand for salvage and other expenses by Egypt’s canal authority escalates the complexity and cost for the numerous cargo owners with property in transit aboard the vessel.”

“Barring a settlement, those cargo owners now face additional expense and delay while the vessel’s arrest is maintained,” they added.

The ship was sailing from Asia to Europe when it got stuck in the channel, causing severe delivery delays and an epic traffic jam of roughly 400 other ships, which have since started passing through the canal again.

Evergreen hasn’t identified the customers whose shipments are on the Ever Given, although some companies, including IKEA and Germany-based supermarket ALDI, have already said they’ve been impacted.

Read the original article on Business Insider

One Egyptian company is keeping the 5,000-year-old art of papyrus-making alive – here’s what it’s like inside

  • We visited an Egyptian business that’s one of the last places in the world to make papyrus paper.
  • Ancient Egyptians invented papyrus paper around 5,000 years ago, but the art is almost completely lost today.
  • One village is keeping the ancient tradition alive, though the pandemic is hurting business.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
Read the original article on Business Insider

Satellite images show the Ever Given in limbo the day before Egypt impounded it, demanding up to $900 million in compensation

suez canal ever given april 12 skitch maxar
Marked-up satellite image of the Ever Given in Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake as of April 12 2021.

  • Satellite images show the Ever Given on Monday, still in the Great Bitter Lake off the Suez Canal.
  • It has been declared seaworthy, but has been impounded by Egyptian authorities.
  • Egypt is demanding up to $900 million in compensation for the chaos caused when the ship was stuck.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Newly-released satellite images show the Ever Given in the Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake, where it is being held while a legal battle rages.

Egyptian authorities impounded the vessel Tuesday while it pursues a case against its owner – the Japanese company Shoei Kisen Kaisha Ltd.

They are reported to be seeking $900 in compensation for the chaos caused in the six days the vessel was blocking the way, costing the canal operators a vast amount on lost transit fees.

ever given suez canal maxar Mon april 12
A satellite view of the Ever Given in the Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake as of Monday, April 12 2021.

Lt. Gen. Osama Rabie, head of the Suez Canal Authority (SCA), told state-run television: “The vessel is now officially impounded. They do not want to pay anything,” The Guardian reported.

The Ever Given was moved to the canal’s large artificial lake on March 29, having spent the previous six days blocking the crucial maritime thoroughfare. It took the massive efforts of dredgers, excavators, tugboats and winches to shift the vast container ship from where it had been lodged since March 23.

Rabie said that its investigation into who was at fault for the grounding will be concluded Thursday, the Guardian reported. He denied any culpability on the SCA’s part, and said that “of course” the ship’s owner was at fault, the paper reported.

ever given suez canal maxar Mon april 12
A satellite view of the Ever Given in the Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake as of Monday, April 12 2021.

The ship’s technical managers, Bernhard Schulte Shipmanagement (BSM), said in a statement that it found the SCA’s decision to impound the Ever Given “extremely disappointing,” citing the cooperation it had offered the authority in investigating the cause of the grounding.

In early April, Shoei Kisen Kaisha filed a “general average” claim, which would share any costs between the ship’s insurers and the owners of its cargo.

General average is a principle of maritime law that means risk for damages is shared between the ship’s customers.

Maritime insurance claims attached to the grounding will ripple far beyond the one lodged by Shoei Kisen Kaisha, as the shipping journal Lloyd’s List reported. Hundreds of ships were delayed or re-routed by the grounding, throwing destination ports into disarray and causing a backlog in the flow of goods around the globe.

ever given suez canal maxar Mon april 12
A satellite view of the Ever Given in the Suez Canal’s Great Bitter Lake as of Monday, April 12 2021.

Separately, on Wednesday BSM said that an inspection of the Ever Given’s seaworthiness had concluded, finding that it was still capable of sailing.

The inspection concluded that the ship was technically able to keep moving through the canal to its northern end, Port Said.

From there, it would be inspected again to make sure it could continue to its intended destination of Rotterdam, BSM said.

However, Egypt’s decision to impound the ship means that it is unlikely to go anywhere soon despite being technically able.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Ever Given ship forbidden to leave the Suez Canal until its owners pay up to $1 billion in compensation for the chaos it caused

Ever given
The “Ever Given” container ship operated by the Evergreen Marine Corporation, sails through the Suez Canal.

  • The Ever Given can’t leave the Suez Canal until compensations are paid, officials said Thursday.
  • It is still unclear how much has to be paid, although it could be up to $1 billion.
  • The owner of the Ever Given said it hadn’t officially heard from Egyptian authorities yet.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

While the giant Even Given container ship might have been freed from the banks of the Suez Canal, it still finds itself stuck, embroiled in a row of who should pay for dislodging it from the waterway.

Egyptian authorities said that they wouldn’t release the massive ship, which was stuck in the Suez Canal for almost a week until its owners agree to pay up to $1 billion in compensation.

“The vessel will remain here until investigations are complete and compensation is paid,” Lt. Gen. Osama Rabie, who leads the Suez Canal Authority, told a local news station on Thursday, according to the Wall Street Journal.

“We hope for a speedy agreement,” he said, adding that the “minute they agree to compensation, the vessel will be allowed to move.”

Read more: 4 ways small business owners can benefit from supply chain delays happening right now

Rabie said that Egyptian authorities would demand $1 billion to cover the costs of freeing the vessel.

The figure will cover the expense of the equipment and machinery used to clear the way, damage to the canal itself by the dredging, and compensate around 800 people who worked to release the 200,000-ton ship, Rabei said.

It will also refund the costs from the blocking of the canal, which ended up causing an epic traffic jam of more than 400 ships on either side of the channel.

Rabie did not say how exactly he arrived at that figure.

According to London-based financial firm Revenitiv, the Egyptian state lost transit fees worth $95 million because of the blockage.

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An aerial view of the Suez Canal in Egypt, taken from a commercial flight on March 27, 2021.

It is also still unclear who will pay for Egypt’s demand for compensation. Shoei Kisen Kaisha Ltd., the Japanese owner of the Ever Given, told the Wall Street Journal that it hadn’t officially heard from the Egyptian authorities.

Eric Hsieh, the president of Evergreen Marine Corp, the charterer of Ever Given, said that the company is “free of responsibility from cargo delays” because “it will be covered by insurance,” Bloomberg reported.

The 1,300-foot Ever Given made headlines on March 23 when an unexpected wind storm caused it to steer off course and get lodged in the sandbanks of the Suez Canal, disrupting global trade. It was freed six days later.

Egypt has since opened a formal investigation into how the vessel got stuck in the first place.

The ship, its cargo, and the 25-person Indian crew of sailors will remain at anchor in Egypt’s Great Bitter Lake until the investigation is over. Earlier this month, authorities told Insider that the crew of the ship is safe and will continue getting paid.

Rabie said that he would prefer to settle the matter of compensation outside of court, although he didn’t rule out a lawsuit.

“We could agree on a certain compensation, or it goes to court,” he said, according to CNBC. “If they decide to go to court, then the ship should be held.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

A legendary 3,000-year-old ‘lost golden city’ of the Pharaohs has just been discovered in Egypt

lost Egyptian city 1
The city was found after seven months of excavating.

  • The archaeology team began excavating in September 2020, and have now found entire neighborhoods.
  • So far, they have found residential districts, complete rooms and walls, and even a bakery.
  • Dated to the reign of Amenhotep III, the team expects to uncover further parts of the ancient city.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Archaeologists have discovered what is believed to be the largest ancient city ever found in Egypt, hailing the discovery as one of the most important finds since Tutankhamun’s tomb.

Dubbed “the lost golden city” by Egyptologist Dr. Zahi Hawass, the site was unearthed near Luxor, home of the Valley of the Kings, which lies 300 miles south of Cairo, the capital of Egypt. The city was known as the Rise of Aten, the archaeology team said.

As reported by the Guardian, the team said in a statement: “The Egyptian mission under Dr Zahi Hawass found the city that was lost under the sands. The city is 3,000 years old, dates to the reign of Amenhotep III, and continued to be used by Tutankhamun and Ay.”

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The city has ten feet high walls that are still intact.

The archaeologists also said that Betsy Bryan, Professor of Egyptian art and archaeology at Johns Hopkins University, hailed the find as the “second most important archeological discovery since the tomb of Tutankhamun.”

The team said that the city has been “untouched for thousands of years, left by the ancient residents as if it were yesterday.”

The team began excavations last year in September, beginning between the temples of Ramses III and Amenhotep III. Hawass said that many “foreign missions” have searched for this ancient city before, but had been unsuccessful.

After seven months of excavations and searching, the team unearthed the city and have so far found several neighborhoods, with 10 feet high walls that are still intact. They even found a bakery that has ovens and storage pottery.

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The team found a bakery in the ancient lost city.

“Within weeks, to the team’s great surprise, formations of mud bricks began to appear in all directions,” the team’s statement read of the unearthing.

“What they unearthed was the site of a large city in a good condition of preservation, with almost complete walls, and with rooms filled with tools of daily life.”

Other valuable ancient items have been discovered in the city, too, including jewelry, pottery, scarab beetle amulets, and mud bricks with the seals of Amenhotep III.

ancient city skeleton
A skeleton was found in the ancient city.

Known as Amenhotep the Magnificent, he was the ninth Pharoah of the 18th dynasty, and his reign was known as a time of splendor, style, and riches wherein Egypt reached new levels of artistry and international power.

This could just be the surface of further finds, according to the team, who also discovered a collection of tombs via “stairs carved into the rock.”

“The mission expects to uncover untouched tombs filled with treasures,” the team’s statement read.

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The city dates back to the reign of Amenhotep III.

Meanwhile, Bryan hopes that the city will “give us a rare glimpse into the life of the Ancient Egyptians at the time where the empire was at his wealthiest.”

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