No one has ever gone up to Trump and just told him he lost the election, author Michael Wolff says in The 600-Word Interview

donald trump
Former President Donald Trump.

  • Michael Wolff is the author of three books on Trump. His latest is the best-seller “Landslide.”
  • He says Trump is delusional and won’t listen to what he doesn’t want to hear.
  • So no one has gone up to him and plainly told him he lost fair and square to Joe Biden.
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It seems as if your theory of Trump is that he’s a not-bright insane person with a gift for reading a crowd.

Yes. He’s like many actors I have known in my time: not too bright in their own particular reality, with extraordinary gifts for getting on the wavelength of their audience.

Does he know that he lost the election fair and square?

He does not know. Now, whether he has managed to successfully convince himself or whether from the get-go he was so focused on hearing what he wanted to hear, he is absolutely certain. Absolutely certain that he won the election and that if he did not win it, it could only be that it was stolen from him. And that everybody else also sees it that way. So this is delusional, which is the word I use fairly often in the book.

You also say he’s mentally deranged.

Yes. I would say that seems the obvious conclusion.

I kept waiting for someone in the book to just go out to him and say “You lost.”

When you haven’t been in his presence, it’s very hard then to actually describe for someone the fact that he is incapable of listening. He just doesn’t hear anything that he doesn’t want to hear. He’s unable to acknowledge any deviation, any slightest departure, any merest qualification of something different than what he thinks or wants to think.

So no one has just gone up to him and said, “Sir, you lost this election”?

Exactly so. You cannot say anything to Trump that he doesn’t want to hear. Everybody knows that. So to do that would mark you as incompetent or a fool or a silly person. It just doesn’t happen.

Now, there’s a set of billionaire types – sort of what passes for friends – who have at least described to me instances in which they have tried to, if not exactly level with him, bring him around to a new understanding. But also the feeling that you come away from those descriptions is that even these people can’t get over the barrier of saying: “You’re an idiot. You’re a fool. You don’t know what you’re talking about.”

Partly because it would require that kind of extreme language. And, given that he was the president of the United States, and given that everybody knows he doesn’t listen anyway.

And given, of course, that people who are talking to him want to remain in his favor.

It’s almost another power of his, if every time he encounters someone they can’t bring themselves to be direct about the circumstances.

Completely. But just think of it as talking to a crazy person, a person whose capacity to parse reality in some logical way is so diminished that you have to humor them, essentially. Everybody knows that reality can’t get through here, so the best you can do is work at the edges.

In your first book about Trump, you called Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump “Jarvanka.” Everyone knows it’s “Javanka.” Did you hear about that criticism?

Yeah. And I don’t know what to say about it. I know that Steve Bannon invented the term, and that’s the term he used with me. You know, did it somehow change underneath? I don’t know. I think I was probably one of the first people to put it into print. So who knows? I don’t know. I have no knowledge there. I said to Steve, “Is it Javanka or is it Jarvanka?” And he said, “Javanka, Jarvanka, let’s call the whole thing off.” So I don’t know.

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The US Treasury is now paying off the government’s bills because Congress missed an important deadline

Mitch McConnell Janet Yellen Congress Treasury
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell and Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen.

  • Treasury is starting to pay off the government’s bills because Congress missed an important deadline.
  • Lawmakers failed to raise or suspend the debt ceiling, largely due to GOP resistance.
  • Treasury is using “extraordinary measures” to pay its bills, but Congress must act before the fall.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Treasury Department took initial steps to start paying off the federal government’s bills on Monday because Congress missed a July 30 deadline to either raise or suspend the debt ceiling.

In a letter to Congressional leaders, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said she’s starting what are known as “extraordinary measures” to keep the federal government afloat. She urged lawmakers to take swift action to either raise or suspend the debt ceiling, which hit its statutory limit on August 1.

“I respectfully urge Congress to protect the full faith and credit of the United States by acting as soon as possible,” Yellen said in the letter. The nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office said in an analysis that Treasury would exhaust its special powers sometime in September or October. Absent action from Congress, the US would then default on its loans.

A default from the federal government could precipitate a chain reaction of cash shortages that could hit bondholders including the people, businesses, and foreign governments who hold US debt. It could also lead to a spike in interest rates.

Yellen said the duration of “extraordinary measures” was uncertain because of the economic impact from the pandemic on tax receipts. Last month, she noted that raising the debt ceiling does not prompt more federal spending, it only permits the government to pay back what it owes.

“Failure to meet those obligations would cause irreparable harm to the U.S. economy and the livelihoods of all Americans,” Yellen wrote in a letter to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi.

Congress last suspended the debt ceiling for two years under President Donald Trump in July 2019. But now, many Republicans are balking at raising the debt limit without ensuring spending cuts from Democrats, as they similarly did when they controlled Congress under President Barack Obama. Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell suggested last month Democrats would have to raise the debt ceiling on their own.

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Giuliani says he’s willing to go to jail but those who put him there will have to suffer ‘consequences in heaven’

Giuliani Jan 6
Rudy Giuliani, personal lawyer to U.S. President Donald Trump, speaks during a “Save America Rally” near the White House in Washington, D.C., U.S., on Wednesday, Jan. 6, 2021.

  • Rudy Giuliani said he’s willing to go to jail but those who put him there would suffer “consequences in heaven.”
  • Giuliani is entangled in legal woes over his work as Donald Trump’s personal attorney.
  • Giuliani has denied he committed any crimes while working for Trump.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Rudy Giuliani, who faces legal jeopardy for his work as Donald Trump’s personal attorney, said he has committed no crime but is “more than willing” to go to jail.

The former New York City mayor was interviewed last week by a local NBC News station about the forthcoming 20th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks.

In the interview, Giuliani veered off-topic to discuss more recent issues, including the federal investigation into allegations that he failed to register as an agent for pro-Russian Ukrainians while pushing damaging claims about President Joe Biden back in 2019.

Giuliani’s bid to smear Biden and his son, Hunter, over their work in Ukraine resulted in Trump’s first impeachment.

“I committed no crime,” said Giuliani. “And if you think I did commit a crime, you’re probably really stupid because you don’t know who I am.”

“As the guy who put the mafia in jail, terrorists in jail, put [former mayor] Ed Koch’s commissioners in jail and the worst people on Wall Street, I’m not going to file [as an agent]?” Giuliani asked, referring to several of the most famous cases he pursued as a prosecutor before his political career.

He also said he was “more than willing to go to jail if they want to put me in jail. And if they do, they’re going to suffer the consequences in heaven. I’m not. I didn’t do anything wrong.”

When asked why he would be willing to go to jail if he is not guilty, Giuliani replied, “Because they lie, they cheat.”

He alleges that Democrats accused of serious wrongdoing, including New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, had been given lenient treatment.

As Trump’s personal attorney, Giuliani also spearheaded the former president’s bid to overturn the result of last year’s election.

Giuliani faces a multibillion-dollar lawsuit from election machines companies he falsely claimed had been part of a vast plot to deprive Trump of victory and has had his legal license revoked in New York and Washington DC for pushing Trump’s voter fraud claims.

A series of damaging claims have emerged about Giuliani from recent books about Trump’s last few months in power, with authors Carol Leonnig and Philip Rucker writing that Giuliani was drunk on election night and urged Trump to “just say we won” with the results still uncertain in a series of swing states on election night.

In the interview, Giuliani was asked about the incendiary speech to Trump supporters he delivered just before the Capitol riot.

Though he said some rioters had broken the law, he rejected claims that he had helped incite the violence and rejected comparisons between the attack and 9/11.

“I believe Jan. 6 was a crime. I believe they committed the crime of trespass. I believe they did some destruction,” he said of the rioters.

Giuliani also addressed claims that his legacy had been tainted over his work for Trump.

“I believe I will be vindicated,” he said.

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Pennsylvania GOP lawmaker slams effort to audit the 2020 election results ‘absent credible evidence of fraud’

Pennsylvania voting
Long lines of voters wait to cast early voting ballots at the A. B. Day School polling location in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on October 17, 2020.

  • Pennsylvania state Sen. Dan Laughlin criticized a GOP-led 2020 election audit in an op-ed.
  • “Donald Trump lost Pennsylvania because Donald Trump received fewer votes,” he wrote.
  • Biden defeated Trump in Pennsylvania by 1%, or roughly 80,000 votes out of 6.9 million ballots cast.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A GOP lawmaker in Pennsylvania is criticizing his party’s efforts to push a “forensic” audit of the 2020 statewide election results that saw President Joe Biden defeat former President Donald Trump.

In a Pittsburgh Tribune-Review op-ed that ran on Thursday, state Sen. Dan Laughlin of Erie County spoke out against an investigation of the election results, emphasizing that such a probe would be conducted “absent credible evidence of fraud” and would “only further the paranoid atmospherics, poisoning both parties.”

“The current attempt to discredit the 2020 election results runs headlong into an unmistakable truth,” Laughlin wrote. “While Donald Trump narrowly lost Pennsylvania, the same ballots secured Republican control of the state Senate and House, sent several incumbent Democrats packing, and did so amid record turnout and an expanded voting franchise.”

He added: “Donald Trump lost Pennsylvania because Donald Trump received fewer votes.”

Laughlin rebuked the efforts of conservative state Sen. Doug Mastriano, who has been the leading force behind a potential audit in the Keystone State that has Trump’s blessing.

Read more: Where is Trump’s White House staff now? We created a searchable database of more than 327 top staffers to show where they all landed

Mastriano met with Trump earlier this summer at Trump Tower in Manhattan and traveled to Arizona to meet with GOP lawmakers and tour the audit site. The senator has sought to inspect voting equipment through a “forensic” audit, modeling the investigation after the GOP-led probe in Maricopa County, Arizona’s most populous jurisdiction.

In the op-ed, Laughlin rebuked the Arizona audit, saying that the process “undermined public trust.”

“An outside vendor with a preconceived position was asked to ‘audit’ the ballots and equipment,” he wrote. “The only credible result has been an undermined public trust in democracy and a cost of millions of dollars to taxpayers who must now replace voting machines that were decertified because a third party had tinkered with them.”

Trump, who pushed debunked election conspiracy theories well before the 2020 election, said in June that GOP leaders who weren’t lined up behind him were “stupid, corrupt, or naïve” and “will be primaried and lose by big numbers.”

Mastriano initiated an investigation last month, requesting access to the ballot machines in Philadelphia, Tioga, and York counties. While Philadelphia is one of the most Democratic jurisdictions in the entire county, consistently delivering massive margins for the party’s statewide candidates, Tioga and York are dominated by Republicans.

To date, none of the counties have complied, despite Mastriano’s threat of a subpoena if the officials didn’t turn over machines by July 31.

Pennsylvania already completed a narrow “risk-limiting audit” of the 2020 election, with counties auditing a selection of votes; there was no evidence of the sort of widespread fraud alleged by Trump.

Biden bested Trump in the Keystone State by a little over 1% of the vote, or roughly 80,000 votes out of 6.9 million ballots cast.

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Trump lashed out after documents were released showing him pressuring Justice Department officials to overturn the election

Trump Jan 6
U.S. President Donald Trump is seen on a screen as his supporters cheer during a rally on the National Mall on January 6, 2021 in Washington, DC.

  • Donald Trump lashed out after the release of documents showing him pressuring DoJ officials.
  • The documents show Trump urging them to say last year’s election was “corrupt.”
  • Trump repeated the election fraud claims that are at the center of his bid to overturn the election.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump in an at times contradictory statement responded to the release of documents that showed him pressuring officials at the Justice Department to subvert last year’s election.

In the statement, Trump denied that the documents showed that he sought to overturn last year’s election while repeating the baseless voter fraud claims that have been central to his bid to delegitimize Joe Biden’s win.

The documents were released by the House Oversight Committee Friday, and contain hand-written notes of a call between former Acting Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen and Donald Trump on December 27 taken by Rosen’s deputy, Richard Donoghue, who was also present on the call.

“Just say that the election was corrupt + leave the rest to me,” Trump told the officials in the call, according to the notes. The officials responded that no evidence had been uncovered by the DoJ to substantiate the president’s claim.

Jeffrey Rosen
Deputy Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen holds a news conference at the Justice Department on October 21, 2020 in Washington, DC.

In his statement, Trump said the documents do not show he attempted to overturn the election yet repeated his election fraud claims and offered no new evidence to show they are credible.

“The corrupt and highly partisan House Democrats who run the House Oversight Committee yesterday released documents-including court filings dealing with the rigged election of 2020-that they dishonestly described as attempting to overturn the election,” Trump said.

“In fact, it is just the opposite. The documents were meant to uphold the integrity and honesty of elections and the sanctity of our vote,” he added. “The American People want, and demand, that the President of the United States, its chief law enforcement officer in the country, stand with them to fight for Election Integrity and to investigate attempts to undermine our nation.”

Read more: Where is Trump’s White House staff now? We created a searchable database of more than 329 top staffers to show where they all landed

Trump has pushed his election fraud “Big Lie” since losing the contest last year. Amid rumors that he is gearing up for another bid for political office, the claim has become the center of his propaganda campaign.

Last week a special House committee began probing the January 6 Capitol riot, in which Trump supporters motivated by Trump’s election fraud conspiracy theories attacked the Capitol in a bid to halt Biden’s certification as president.

One of the focuses on the inquiry will be the extent to which Trump’s claims instigated the violence and his actions leading up to the violence, and new evidence has emerged in recent days of the pressure Trump placed Rosen under to back his election fraud claims.

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Trump is ‘moving forward’ with a 2024 presidential run in a ‘real way’ and is meeting with ‘cabinet members’ at his New Jersey golf club, former chief of staff says

Former President Donald Trump and former chief of staff Mark Meadows
Mark Meadows, pictured right, said “cabinet members” met to discuss Former President Donald Trump’s political future.

  • Former President Donald Trump met with “cabinet members” at his New Jersey golf club, Mark Meadows said.
  • The meeting revolved around “what does come next,” the former chief of staff told Newsmax.
  • Trump is “moving forward” with a potential 2024 run in a “real way,” Meadows said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump is “moving forward” with a 2024 presidential run in a “real way,” according to his former chief of staff, Mark Meadows.

Trump met with “cabinet members” at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, New Jersey to discuss his political future, Meadows hinted during an interview with Newsmax’s Steve Cortes on Friday evening.

“As we were looking into that, we’re looking at what does come next,” he continued.

Meadows, a loyal ally to the former president, further teased a potential Trump run.

“I’m not authorized to speak on behalf of the president, but I can tell you this, Steve,” Meadows said. “We wouldn’t be meeting tonight if we weren’t making plans to move forward in a real way, with President Trump at the head of that ticket.”

Read more: Where is Trump’s White House staff now? We created a searchable database of more than 329 top staffers to show where they all landed

The former president has confirmed that another presidential run is a real possibility. In April, he said that he is “100 percent thinking about running again.”

In June, Trump said that he would be making an announcement about a run “in the not too distant future.”

Earlier in that month, he told supporters to look forward to “2024 or before,” Insider’s Mia Jankowicz reported.

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Trump is owed a $1 million tax refund for his Chicago skyscraper but local officials are trying to block it

Donald Trump
Former US President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in Manhattan on July 19, 2021.

  • An Illinois tax agency ruled last month Trump’s Chicago skyscraper was over-assessed in 2011.
  • The ruling means Trump is owed a $1 million refund, but local officials filed a lawsuit to stop it.
  • The refund would come out of property taxes owed to the city and other agencies, including Chicago Public Schools.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump is owed a tax refund of $1 million for his Chicago skyscraper, but local officials are trying to stop it from being issued.

An Illinois tax agency ruled last month that Trump paid too much on his 2011 tax bill after the value of Trump International Hotel and Tower’s rooms and retail space was over-assessed by the Cook County Board of Review, the Chicago Sun-Times reported.

The ruling by the Illinois Property Tax Appeal Board means Trump is owed $1.03 million, which would come from property taxes due to the city and other government agencies. Chicago Public Schools would lose out on about $540,000, according to the Sun-Times.

The Cook County State’s Attorney’s has since filed a lawsuit to block the refund. When reached by Insider, the State’s Attorney’s office said it was unable to comment on pending litigation.

Read more: Where is Trump’s White House staff now? We created a searchable database of more than 329 top staffers to show where they all landed

The dispute is the latest development in the story of Trump’s taxes in Chicago. Alderman Ed Burke, the longest-serving member of Chicago’s City Council in history, served as Trump’s lawyer for more than a decade. His firm originally filed the tax appeal arguing the value of Trump’s building had been overestimated.

Burke, a Democrat, helped Trump secure $14 million in tax breaks on his Chicago skyscraper before parting ways with Trump’s company in 2018, The Chicago Tribune reported.

Later that year, the FBI raided Burke’s City Hall office and he was later charged with racketeering, bribery, and extortion, among other charges.

Prosecutors say Burke used the power of his office to drive business to his law firm, including blocking permits for people who did not hire them. He has pled not guilty to all charges, WTTW reported.

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Trump helped the Republican Party raise $56 million online in the first half of 2021

Donald Trump
Former US President Donald Trump leaves Trump Tower in Manhattan on July 19, 2021.

  • Trump raised $56 million online in the first half of 2021, more than any other Republican.
  • The sum reflects the former president’s continued dominance of GOP politics.
  • A large chunk of the money came from recurring payments, which the party has reportedly halted.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former President Donald Trump helped the Republican Party raise $56 million online during the first half of 2021, a clear reflection of his continued dominance within the party.

Trump helped the GOP raise the substantial sum between January 1 and June 30, which was disclosed in campaign filings on Friday, according to The New York Times.

The former president raised more money than any other Republican through WinRed, the GOP’s fundraising platform that launched in 2019 to counter ActBlue, the highly successful Democratic platform, according to federal records.

Since ActBlue’s founding in 2004, nearly $8.9 billion has been raised on the platform for Democratic and Democratic-aligned candidates.

Read more: Where is Trump’s White House staff now? We created a searchable database of more than 327 top staffers to show where they all landed

Trump’s fundraising haul includes $34.3 million via a shared account with the Republican National Committee (RNC), which is also known as the “Trump Make America Great Again Committee,” according to The Times. Much of the money raised by the committee was generated through a recurring donation program, where supporters made repeated payments, per The Times.

A Times investigation from April revealed how the program caused a series of fraud complaints and refund requests, due to many respondents unintentionally signing up for recurring payments. As of July, GOP officials have halted the withdrawals, according to an individual familiar with the situation who spoke to The Times.

The former president also raised more than $21 million which was funneled into two political action committees (PACs) that he oversees.

Trump’s fundraising slowed as the months passed by; after the January 6 Capitol riot and during his second impeachment trial in February, he raised $13.8 million, but that number had declined to $2.6 million by June.

The second-most dominant fundraiser was Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina, a potential 2024 presidential contender who gave the GOP response to President Joe Biden’s first joint address to Congress in late April. He raised $7.8 million online.

Fundraising has been more urgent than usual for the GOP as the party ramps up efforts to regain control of Congress in the 2022 midterm elections and prepare for the 2024 presidential election.

Trump has not yet confirmed a final decision on whether he will pursue another White House bid in 2024.

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‘You’re all f—ed’ up’: Trump exploded after his officials warned against using military troops to end George Floyd protests, book says

Trump Esper Milley
US Defense Secretary Mark Esper, left, President Donald Trump, center, and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Army Gen. Mark Milley, right, wait for a meeting with senior military leaders in the Cabinet Room of the White House on October 7, 2019.

  • Milley and Esper spoke against Trump using troops to blunt the Floyd protests, per a new book.
  • Trump was intrigued with the idea of invoking the Insurrection Act, according to the book.
  • During the early days of the protests, Trump was concerned that the US appeared out of control.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

After George Floyd was killed while in the custody of Minneapolis police in May 2020, millions of Americans poured into the streets to protest his death and call attention to racial injustice.

In the immediate aftermath of Floyd’s death, Trump summoned Gen. Mark Milley, Defense secretary Mark Esper, White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, and other advisors to find a way to end the protests.

The president was incensed by a New York Times report that he had been taken to a bunker as protests near the White House turned violent, thinking the news “made him appear scared and weak,” according to a newly-released book by the Washington Post reporters Carol D. Leonnig and Philip Rucker.

To blunt the continued protests, Trump insisted that active-duty troops be used, which Milley, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, and Esper sought to eliminate as an option.

Read more: Where is Trump’s White House staff now? We created a searchable database of more than 327 top staffers to show where they all landed

When Trump mentioned the 1960s race riots to justify the use of troops to restore order, Milley threw cold water on the suggestion, part of a longer discussion that resulted in the president cursing out his top military advisors, which Leonnig and Rucker detailed in “I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year.”

“Mr. President, it doesn’t compare anywhere to the summer of sixty-eight,” Milley said, according to the book. “It’s not even close.”

After senior advisor Stephen Miller chimed in to declare the protests as “an insurrection,” Milley pointed to a portrait of former President Abraham Lincoln, who led the country through the American Civil War.

“Mr. President, that guy had an insurrection,” Milley said, according to the book. “You don’t have an insurrection. When guys show up in gray and start bombing Fort Sumter, you’ll have an insurrection.”

Trump entertained the idea of invoking the Insurrection Act, which would let him deploy troops across the country to quell any civil disorder or insurrection, but Milley and Esper continued to fight against the idea.

On June 1, Trump had grown angrier over the press coverage of the protests, urging governors and law enforcement to “dominate” the nationwide unrest.

“How do you think this looks to hostile countries?” Trump said, according to the book. “They see we can’t even control our own capital city and the space around the White House!”

After once again calling for troops, Esper said that the National Guard remained the best option to stop any unrest, but the president proceeded to slam on the Resolute Desk and told the Defense secretary that he wasn’t done enough to solve the problem, according to the book.

Trump sought to make Milley the leader of an operation to restore order, but after the general reiterated that he wasn’t in an operational role, the president lost it.

Read more: Where is Trump’s White House staff now? We created a searchable database of more than 327 top staffers to show where they all landed

“You’re all f—ed up,” Trump said, according to the book. “Every one of you is f—ed up.”

Trump then looked at Vice President Mike Pence, who had been a quiet observer, and directed his ire toward his No. 2.

“Including you!” the president said, according to the book.

Later that day, Trump, along with Milley, Esper, and several other advisors, walked from the White House complex to nearby St. John’s Episcopal Church.

The now-infamous photo op, which showed the president holding a bible in front of the church after protestors were violently cleared from Lafayette Park, immediately attracted criticism. However, the inspector general for the Interior Department determined in June 2021 that the US Park Police and Secret Service did not clear the park for Trump’s photoshoot, but to install anti-scale fencing.

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Trump started speaking in the third person during a heated discussion with Bill Barr regarding the election results, book says

Trump Barr
President Donald Trump stands with Attorney General William Barr during the 38th Annual National Peace Officers’ Memorial Service at the U.S. Capitol, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, in Washington.

  • Trump spoke in the third person during a heated discussion with Bill Barr over voter fraud, per a new book.
  • Trump was incensed that Barr dismissed claims of mass voter irregularities during an AP interview.
  • Barr eventually resigned from his post just weeks after the AP interview.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Last December, then-Attorney General Bill Barr sat down with Associated Press reporter Michael Balsamo, where he essentially rejected then-President Donald Trump’s claims of widespread voter fraud in the 2020 election.

Barr said that the Department of Justice had looked into credible claims of fraud, but notably revealed that “to date, we have not seen fraud on a scale that could have affected a different outcome in the election.”

After the interview, Barr then headed to the White House for a previously scheduled meeting with chief of staff Mark Meadows, where he was told by Meadows that Trump would be “livid” at the election-related statements from the interview, according to a new book by Washington Post reporters Carol D. Leonnig and Philip Rucker.

Barr was told by White House counsel Pat Cipollone that Trump wanted to see him in his private dining room, where the president was watching the right-leaning One America News Network (OANN).

The scene was tense, as “everything about the president telegraphed that he was in a barely contained rage,” and even resulted in him switching to the third person, which Leonnig and Rucker detailed in “I Alone Can Fix It: Donald J. Trump’s Catastrophic Final Year.”

Trump immediately questioned Barr about the Associated Press interview, where he threw cold water on the president’s ongoing voter-fraud claims.

Read more: Where is Trump’s White House staff now? We created a searchable database of more than 327 top staffers to show where they all landed

“Bill did, you say this?” Trump asked in a “sharp and quick” manner, according to the book.

After Barr confirmed that he had indeed made the statement, Trump questioned him again.

“How could you say this?” Trump said, according to the book. “Why didn’t you just not answer the question?”

The president raised his voice and peculiarly began to speak in the third person.

“There’s no reason for you to have said this!” he said, according to the book. “You must hate Trump!”

With OANN in the background, Trump “started yelling” and “was so angry his words came out like spit,” according to the book.

Trump then pointed to the television screen, as OANN was discussing election conspiracies that Pennsylvania backdated late-arriving ballots, as well as allegations that Fulton County, Georgia, illegally added ballots to their tally. Barr told Trump that the Justice Department reviewed the claims and found no evidence that such events occurred.

“We’ve looked into these things and they’re nonsense,” Barr said, according to the book.

After the back-and-forth, Barr reiterated to Trump that there was simply no evidence to support the most prominent allegations.

“Mr. President, I’m not up here to say there was no fraud,” the attorney general said at the time, according to the book. “There may very well have been fraud. I suspect there was fraud, maybe more than usual. But there’s no evidence of substantial fraud that would change the election, and your problem is you have five weeks. The reason you’re sitting where you are today is because you had five weeks for your lawyers to mount a strategy … whereby you can turn around the election.”

While Trump continued to act in an “explosive and crazed” manner, Barr sought to remain “calm and deliberate,” according to the book.

Nearly two weeks later, Trump announced that Barr would be departing the administration shortly before Christmas, lauding the attorney general for doing “an outstanding job.”

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