There have been 4 attacks on British lawmakers at meetings with their constituents since 2000. Two have been fatal.

david amess, jo cox, stephen timms, nigel jones
Four British lawmakers have been attacked during constituent meetings since 2000: David Amess, Jo Cox, Stephen Timms, and Nigel Jones.

  • The fatal stabbing of Conservative MP Sir David Amess is the fourth such attack in the UK since 2000.
  • All of the attacks took place at the lawmakers’ public meetings with constituents.
  • The victims include Amess, Labour MP Jo Cox, Labour MP Stephen Timms, and Liberal Democrat MP Nigel Jones.

A British member of Parliament, Sir David Amess, was stabbed to death on Friday as he met with constituents at a church in Essex – the fourth such attack in the country since 2000.

Amess’ death comes five years after the 2016 murder of Jo Cox. Cox, a 41-year-old member of the left-wing Labour Party, was arriving to meet with constituents when she was shot and stabbed to death by a far-right extremist.

In 2010, another Labour Party lawmaker, Stephen Timms, was stabbed during what’s known as a “constituency surgery” – a regular meeting where constituents can gather with their elected member of Parliament to discuss political issues. Timms’ attacker was a 21-year-old Al Qaeda sympathizer who was later convicted of attempted murder.

Yet another attack occurred during a constituency surgery in 2000 with the Liberal Democrat MP Nigel Jones. The attacker had burst into Jones’ office with a sword, severely injuring Jones and killing his aide, Andy Pennington. The attacker was convicted of attempted murder in 2003.

In Britain, armed police officers provide security to lawmakers while they’re in Parliament, but not during constituency surgeries.

Amess, a 69-year-old member of Britain’s Conservative Party, appeared to be aware of the danger of attending public events. He wrote in his 2020 memoir that a fatal attack “could happen to any of us,” and that he had even previously been warned to be careful during meetings with constituents.

“We are advised to never see people alone, we must be extra careful when opening post and we must ensure that our offices are properly safe and secure,” he wrote.

Amess also lamented that such precautions could interfere with politicians’ practice of meeting directly with their constituents.

“These increasing attacks have rather spoilt the great British tradition of the people openly meeting their elected politicians,” he wrote.

In the wake of Amess’ death, Essex police arrested a 25-year-old man.

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In a video, former President Donald Trump wished Capitol rioter Ashli Babbitt a happy birthday and called for the DOJ to reopen their investigation into her death

In this Sept. 25, 2021, file photo, former President Donald Trump prepares to take the stage during his Save America rally in Perry, Ga.
In this Sept. 25, 2021, file photo, former President Donald Trump prepares to take the stage during his Save America rally in Perry, Ga.

  • Babbitt was fatally shot on January 6 as she and other rioters attempted to enter the Capitol.
  • A DOJ investigation cleared the Capitol Police officer who killed Babbitt of any wrongdoing.
  • In a video, Trump called for a “fair and nonpartisan” investigation into Babbitt’s death.

Former President Donald Trump recorded a video where he wished deceased Capitol rioter Ashli Babbit happy birthday and called for the Department of Justice to reopen its investigation into her death.

The video was reportedly played at the Texas Loves Ashli Babbitt rally on Sunday, which was held by family and supporters in Freeport, Texas, according to a broadcast from News2Share’s Ford Fischer, who confirmed to Insider that he attended and filmed the rally in person.

Babbitt, an Air Force veteran and endorser of QAnon conspiracy theories, was shot by a US Capitol Police officer when she and other rioters tried to enter a door that led to the House of Representatives on January 6, which Trump said in the video was a “horrible day.”

“Together, we grieve her terrible loss. There was no reason Ashli should’ve lost her life that day. We must all demand justice for Ashli and her family, so on this solemn occasion as we celebrate her life, we renew our call for a fair and nonpartisan investigation into the death of Ashli Babbitt,” Trump said in the video.

The DOJ conducted an investigation into Babbitt’s death and concluded in April that the unnamed Capitol Police officer who fatally shot her acted in self-defense and defense of other officers and members of Congress.

The officer was formally exonerated in August, according to a Capitol Police department memo obtained by NBC News.

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A Colorado woman couldn’t get a kidney transplant because she refused a COVID-19 vaccine – a policy at many hospitals

organ transplant donation kidney
Dr. Matthew Cooper carries a kidney before a transplant at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital in Washington, DC on June 28, 2016.

  • A Colorado woman was denied an organ transplant after refusing to get a COVID-19 vaccine, the AP reported.
  • Like many hospitals, Colorado’s UCHealth prioritizes patients who are more likely to survive after surgery.
  • Vaccinated people fall into that category, since they’re well protected against COVID-19.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Leilani Lutali was due for an organ transplant to treat her stage 5 kidney disease. But her hospital, UCHealth in Colorado, requires transplant patients to get a COVID-19 vaccine. Lutali refused the shot, the Associated Press reported, leaving her to search for a different hospital that might approve the surgery.

UCHealth is denying transplants to unvaccinated people “in almost all situations,” the health system told The Washington Post, since these individuals are more likely than vaccinated people to die of COVID-19.

Dan Weaver, a spokesperson for UCHealth, told The Post that the policy aligns with a common practice of prioritizing people who are more likely to survive a transplant, and less likely to require another one down the line. The Cleveland Clinic, one of the largest hospitals in the US, also requires transplant recipients to get a COVID-19 shot.

Lutali, who works as a tech recruiter, is Catholic, and said her decision not to get the vaccine was based on concerns about the connection between vaccines and aborted fetal cells, the AP reported. COVID-19 vaccines don’t contain any fetal tissue – rather, they’re developed using cells that descend from fetal tissue collected several decades ago.

Her wait could be long: More than 100,000 Americans are on a waitlist for an organ transplant, and deciding who to prioritize is complicated business. Patients must be deemed a good match for an organ based on their height, weight, blood type, and geographic location. Many transplant centers require patients to get other vaccines and abstain from drinking or smoking.

In transplant decisions, a key question: Who’s most likely to live?

Deciding who’s eligible for surgery based on vaccination status raises complicated ethical questions.

“Each individual [transplant] center is wrestling with what to do about COVID vaccination status,” Arthur Caplan, a bioethicist at New York University, told Insider.

“You try to maximize lives saved, years of life saved, and even, to some extent, quality of life saved with your scarce supply,” he added. “I don’t see why we wouldn’t be doing that with COVID and vaccination status.”

louisiana covid hospital
Clinicians work on intubating a COVID-19 patient in the ICU at Lake Charles Memorial Hospital in Louisiana on August 10, 2021.

Healthcare systems across the US vie for organs from a national waitlist managed by the nonprofit United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). UNOS has guidelines for how to make the best use of a limited organ supply and prevent discrimination based on demographic factors like sex, religion, or financial status. But health systems can determine independently whether to add or remove someone from the waitlist.

“The general principle driving the list used to be, ‘Who’s sickest? Who’s going to die if they don’t get it?'” Caplan said. “That slowly has been shifting toward, ‘Who’s most likely to live, and how do we get the most benefit from the scarce supply?'”

There are a few reasons for that, he added: Organ transplants started to have a better success rate around the early 2000s, so transplant centers began to worry more about “wasting” organs on people who were likely to die anyway. Transplant centers are also evaluated based on their success rates, which can inform whether they remain eligible for organs from UNOS.

“That puts even more pressure to have organs that work for one year, two years, and five years,” Caplan said. “So they are in a way incentivized not to take higher-risk people – and that would include non-vaccinated people for both flu and COVID.”

a man with a heart transplant seen getting a COVID-19 shot
A doctor administers a COVID-19 vaccine to a heart transplant recipient at a hospital in Strasbourg, France, on February 20, 2021.

Many medical experts agree that it’s important to consider a person’s vaccination status ahead of a transplant, along with other risk factors.

Transplant patients have a much higher risk of dying from COVID-19 than the average person, since their immune systems do a poorer job of vanquishing the virus. Studies have shown that kidney transplant recipients with COVID-19 have a mortality rate between 13% and 39%. (The COVID-19 mortality rate across the entire US is around 1.6%.)

There’s also a small risk that transplant patients will receive an organ from someone who’s had COVID-19, and could therefore inherit a previously undetected infection.

Overall, unvaccinated Americans are 11 times more likely to die from COVID-19 than fully vaccinated Americans, according to a September study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

This story has been updated with new information. It was originally published October 7.

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A bomb detonated at a packed mosque in northern Afghanistan and killed or wounded at least 100 people

People view the damage inside of a mosque following a bombing in Kunduz, province northern Afghanistan, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021.
People view the damage inside of a mosque following a bombing in Kunduz, province northern Afghanistan, Friday, Oct. 8, 2021.

  • A bomb detonated at a crowded mosque in northern Afghanistan on Friday.
  • Scores of Shiite Muslim worshippers were left dead or wounded, according to multiple reports.
  • The Islamic State’s Khorasan branch claimed responsibility, and the death toll isn’t confirmed yet.

A bomb detonated at a crowded mosque in northern Afghanistan on Friday and left scores dead and wounded, according to multiple reports.

The blast targeted Shiite Muslim worshippers in the city of Kunduz, and the Islamic State’s Khorasan branch claimed responsibility, according to a tweet from CBS journalist Ahmad Mukhtar.

Afghanistan’s Islamic State faction, also known as ISIS-K, has a history of attacking members of the Shiite minority, the Associated Press reported.

The exact death toll was not immediately known. AP reported that at least 100 people were killed our wounded in the attack.

Sky News reported that at least 46 people were killed and over 140 were wounded, citing the state-run Bakhtar news agency.

“This afternoon, an explosion took place in a mosque of our Shiite compatriots in the Khan Abad district of Bandar, the capital of Kunduz province, as a result of which a number of our compatriots were martyred and wounded,” Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid tweeted.

Mujahid said an investigation was underway.

“I assure our Shiite brothers that the Taliban are prepared to ensure their safety,” Dost Mohammad Obaida, deputy police chief for Kunduz province, told the AP.

According to the AP, if confirmed, the death toll would be the highest since an August terrorist attack by the same Islamic State branch outside the Kabul airport killed 169 Afghans and 13 US service members.

This story is developing. Please check back for updates.

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The daughter of an unvaccinated man who died of COVID-19 says Tucker Carlson and misinformation ‘played a role’ in his vaccine hesitancy

Katie and Evan Lane speaking to CNN's "New Day."
Katie and Evan Lane speaking to CNN’s “New Day.”

  • The daughter of an unvaccinated man who died of COVID-19 spoke to CNN about her father.
  • Katie Lane said her father “watched some Tucker Carlson videos on YouTube” concerning vaccines.
  • She said her 45-year-old father wasn’t opposed to all vaccines, but was influenced by misinformation.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The daughter of an unvaccinated man who died of COVID-19 told CNN’s “New Day” on Monday she believes Fox News host Tucker Carlson and misinformation “played a role” in her father’s vaccine hesitancy.

Katie and Evan Lane spoke to “New Day” about their father, 45-year-old Patrick Lane, who recently died from the virus.

“He wasn’t by any means far-right. He was right in the middle, and he consumed media from both sides, and just some of the misinformation on one of those sides made him hesitant,” Katie Lane said. “He was going to wait for FDA approval, but by the time that Pfizer had been approved, it was already too late.”

Anchor John Berman later said Katie Lane had said “one media source in particular” impacted her father’s vaccine hesitancy, and asked her to clarify.

“He watched some Tucker Carlson videos on YouTube, and some of those videos involved some misinformation about vaccines, and I believe that that played a role,” she said.

Tucker Carlson is an opinion host whose program airs on the Fox News channel. The network also runs news programming about the coronavirus and the vaccines in addition to its opinion shows hosted by Carlson and other personalities.

Fox News did not immediately respond to Insider’s request for comment.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

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The 34 deadliest jobs in America

logger cutting tree
Logging workers had the second-highest rate of fatal injuries among occupations in America.

  • Some jobs are more dangerous than others.
  • Using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, we found the jobs that had the highest rates of fatal injuries in 2019.
  • Here are the 34 deadliest jobs in America, along with their 2019 fatality rates per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
34. Pipelayers, plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters

pipefitter

What they do: Lay out, install, or maintain pipes, plumbing, and sewer systems.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 6.1

33. Industrial machinery installation, repair, and maintenance workers

fixing production line industrial machine

What they do: Repair, maintain, or install machinery.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 6.4

32. Athletes, coaches, umpires, and related workers

seahawks tackle

What they do: Compete in athletic events, instruct or coach groups or individuals in the fundamentals of sports, or officiate at competitive athletic or sporting events.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 6.5

29 (tie). Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers

air conditioner installation

What they do: Install or repair heating, central air conditioning, or refrigeration systems.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 6.8

29 (tie). Automotive service technicians and mechanics

car mechanic auto

What they do: Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul automotive vehicles.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 6.8

29 (tie). Security guards and gaming surveillance officers

security guard

What they do: Guard, patrol, or monitor premises to prevent theft, violence, or infractions of rules.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 6.8

28. Industrial truck and tractor operators

forklift old used cars
An employee uses a forklift to transport an old AvtoVAZ Lada car at Vtormet scrappage plant outside Moscow, January 30, 2013.

What they do: Operate industrial trucks or tractors equipped to move materials around a warehouse, storage yard, factory, construction site, or similar location.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 7.0

27. Electricians

electrician

What they do: Install, maintain, and repair electrical wiring, equipment, and fixtures.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 7.2

26. Painters, construction and maintenance

amazon tower painter

What they do: Paint walls, equipment, buildings, bridges, and other structural surfaces.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 7.5

25. Bus and truck mechanics and diesel engine specialists

trucks waiting for repair

What they do: Diagnose, adjust, repair, or overhaul buses and trucks, or maintain and repair any type of diesel engines.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 7.7

24. Telecommunications line installers and repairers

Men working on power lines

What they do: Install and repair telecommunications cable.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 7.8

23. Carpenters

carpenter woodshop building

What they do: Construct, erect, install, or repair structures and fixtures made of wood.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 7.9

22. Shuttle drivers, chauffeurs, and taxi drivers

taxi driver tip

What they do: Drive automobiles, vans, or limousines to transport passengers.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 8.0

21. Welding, soldering, and brazing workers

Welding instructor Darlene Thompson, 45, poses for a portrait at Los Angeles Trade-Technical College in Los Angeles, California, United States, June 27, 2016. REUTERS/Lucy Nicholson
The Wider Image: Women workers on the Clinton campaign

What they do: Use hand-welding, flame-cutting, hand soldering, or brazing equipment to weld or join metal components or to fill holes, indentations, or seams of fabricated metal products.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 8.1

20. Police and sheriff’s patrol officers

police

What they do: Maintain order and protect life and property by enforcing local, tribal, State, or Federal laws and ordinances.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 11.1

19. First-line supervisors of landscaping, lawn service, and grounds keeping workers

Landscaping lawn mower summer yard flowers

What they do: Directly supervise and coordinate activities of workers engaged in landscaping or grounds keeping activities.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 12.6

18. Operating engineers and other construction equipment operators

construction seattle
: Workers construct a building that will house the future headquarters of Weyerhaeuser on November 9, 2015 in Seattle, Washington.

What they do: Operate one or several types of power construction equipment.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 12.8

17. Electrical power-line installers and repairers

electrical power line worker repair

What they do: Install or repair cables or wires used in electrical power or distribution systems. 

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 13.3

16. General maintenance and repair workers

maintenance repair

What they do: Perform work involving the skills of two or more maintenance or craft occupations to keep machines, mechanical equipment, or the structure of an establishment in repair. 

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 13.4

15. Other extraction workers

Oil workers using chain to position drill on drilling platform

What they do: This occupation title includes workers who extract resources but that don’t have their own occupation title.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 14.3

14. First-line supervisors of mechanics, installers, and repairers

factory mechanic industrial

What they do: Directly supervise and coordinate the activities of mechanics, installers, and repairers.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 14.6

13. Construction laborers

construction housing
Construction workers build homes on a lot in Vaughan, a suburb with an active real estate market, in Toronto, Canada, May 24, 2017.

What they do: Perform tasks involving physical labor at construction sites.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 15.0

12. First-line supervisors of construction trades and extraction workers

construction workers

What they do: Directly supervise and coordinate activities of construction or extraction workers.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 18.7

10 (tie). Miscellaneous agricultural workers

american farming
Workers weed a cantaloupe field on April 23, 2015 in Firebaugh, California. As California enters its fourth year of severe drought, farmers in the Central Valley are struggling to keep their crops watered and many have opted to leave acres of the fields fallow.

What they do: Work on farms or other agricultural businesses.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 19.8

10 (tie). Grounds maintenance workers

Lawn mowers
Greenskeepers mow the 13th green during a practice round for the U.S. Open golf championship on the Black Course at Bethpage State Park in Farmingdale, New York, June 15, 2009.

What they do: Maintain grounds of property using hand or power tools or equipment.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 19.8

9. Farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural managers

soybean farmer
Farmer John Duffy and Roger Murphy load soybeans from a grain bin onto a truck

What they do: Plan, direct, or coordinate the management or operation of farms or other agricultural establishments.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 23.2

8. Structural iron and steel workers

structural steel worker

What they do: Raise, place, and unite iron or steel girders, columns, and other structural members to form completed structures or structural frameworks.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 26.3

7. Driver/sales workers and truck drivers

truck driver

What they do: Drive truck or other vehicle over established routes or within an established territory and sell or deliver goods.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 26.8

6. Refuse and recyclable material collectors

garbage collector tip

What they do: Collect and dump refuse or recyclable materials from containers into truck.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 35.2

5. Construction trade helpers

construction worker miami
onstruction workers build the $1.05 billion Brickell CityCentre condo/retail mix use complex on July 7, 2014 in Miami, Florida. Condo projects are booming in the South Florida area as foreign investors pour money into the new residences being built.

What they do: Assist construction laborers on construction sites.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 40.0

4. Roofers

Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley in Las Vegas, Nevada April 5, 2013. REUTERS/Steve Marcus
Roofers work on new homes at a residential construction site in the west side of the Las Vegas Valley in Las Vegas

What they do: Cover roofs of structures with shingles, slate, asphalt, aluminum, wood, or related materials.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 54.0

3. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers

pilot

What they do: Pilot and navigate the flight of fixed-wing, multi-engine aircraft, usually on scheduled air carrier routes, for the transport of passengers and cargo.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 61.8

2. Logging workers

logger cutting tree

What they do: Use mechanized equipment or hand tools to cut down trees.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 68.9

1. Fishing and hunting workers

fishing

What they do: Use nets, fishing rods, traps, or other equipment to catch and gather fish or other aquatic animals.

Fatal injury rate (per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers): 145.0

How we ranked the above occupations

The Bureau of Labor Statistics documented how many people died on the job in 2019 for the equivalent of every 100,000 people who held that job.

To find the most dangerous jobs in America, we identified the jobs from the Bureau’s list with the highest fatal injury rate. Each of these jobs has a fatal injury rate above the national average for all workers of 3.5 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers.

Overall, the greatest number of fatal work injuries resulted from transportation incidents, with 2,122 cases in 2019. Falls, slips, and trips; violence or other injuries by persons or animals; and contact with objects and equipment were other leading causes of workplace deaths.

The above are the 34 deadliest jobs in America, ranked by their 2019 fatality rates per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers. We also included a description of what workers in these jobs do from the Department of Labor’s O*NET careers database or the Bureau’s Occupational Outlook Handbook.

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At least 7 conservative radio hosts and anti-mask advocates have died from COVID-19 after bashing the vaccines

Demonstrators gather with signs and flags to protest against mandated vaccines outside of the Michigan State Capitol on August 6, 2021 in Lansing, Michigan. There were 44 counties in Michigan at high or substantial levels of community coronavirus transmission, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Preventions case and test positivity criteria as of August 5, 2021.
Demonstrators gather with signs and flags to protest against mandated vaccines outside of the Michigan State Capitol on August 6, 2021 in Lansing, Michigan.

  • At least seven radio hosts and high-profile anti-mask and anti-vaccine advocates have died from COVID-19 in recent weeks.
  • The men are radio hosts Dick Farrel, Phil Valentine, Bob Enyart, and Marc Bernier, as well as former CIA officer Robert David Steele, anti-masker Caleb Wallace, and conservative leader Pressley Stutts.
  • Misinformation around the virus and vaccines remains widespread as cases continue to rise.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

At least seven conservative radio hosts and high-profile anti-mask and anti-vaccine advocates have died from COVID-19 in recent weeks.

Before catching COVID-19, the men – radio hosts Bob Enyart, Dick Farrel, Phil Valentine, and Marc Bernier, as well as former CIA officer and conspiracy theorist Robert David Steele, anti-masker Caleb Wallace, and South Carolina GOP conservative leader Pressley Stutts – had shared conspiracy theories about vaccines, told supporters misinformation about the virus, and even held rallies in opposition to mask mandates.

As COVID-19 cases continue to surge, nearly all of the COVID-19 deaths in the United States are among unvaccinated people, and misinformation around the virus and vaccines remains widespread.

Bob Enyart had refused to get vaccinated before dying of COVID-19.

Enyart, a conservative pastor who hosted a show called “Real Science Radio,” died on Monday, his cohost, Fred Williams, said in a Facebook post.

It’s unclear exactly when Enyart tested positive for COVID-19, but his Facebook page said he was hospitalized with the virus on September 10.

The radio host from Colorado had vocally refused to get vaccinated and actively spread false claims about the COVID-19 virus, saying overcrowding in hospital ICUs was “imagined” and that the severity of the pandemic was “fake news,” according to The Daily Beast.

Amid COVID-19 shutdowns last year, he successfully sued the state of Colorado over its capacity limits and mask mandates in churches.

Prior to the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, Enyart mocked AIDS victims and called for women who have had abortions to face the death penalty, according to The Guardian.

Florida radio host Dick Farrel had advocated against the COVID-19 vaccine on Facebook before his death.

Farrel Austin Levitt, known publicly as conservative talk show host Dick Farrel, died of “severe damage” caused by COVID-19 in early August, his fiancee and life partner Kittie Farley told the Washington Post. He was 65.

Before getting sick, he had called COVID-19 vaccines “bogus” and called Dr. Anthony Fauci a “power-tripping lying freakbefore his death.

“Why take a vax promoted by people who lied 2u all along about masks, where the virus came from and the death toll?” he wrote in a Facebook post in July.

But his friends said he actually encouraged them to get vaccinated after he got sick.

“He is the reason I took the shot,” Amy Leigh Hair, Farrel’s close friend, told WPTV, an NBC News affiliate. “He texted me and told me to ‘Get it!’ He told me this virus is no joke and he said, ‘I wish I had gotten it!’ “

Radio host Phil Valentine changed his views on the COVID-19 vaccine before his death.

Valentine, a 61-year-old conservative radio host and vaccine skeptic in Tennessee, died of COVID-19 in mid-August.

Valentine, who said his chances of dying from the virus were “way less than one percent” in December 2020, announced he tested positive for COVID-19 on July 11, and less than two weeks later, he became hospitalized with the virus.

His radio station, 99.7 WTN, announced his hospitalization.

“Phil would like for his listeners to know that while he has never been an ‘anti-vaxxer’ he regrets not being more vehemently ‘pro-vaccine,’ and looks forward to being able to more vigorously advocate that position as soon as he is back on the air, which we all hope will be soon,” the station said.

And after Valentine got sick, he changed his view on vaccines, his brother, Mark Valentine, told WBUR.

“Take politics out of it. It’s time for us to get together and fight this thing collectively,” he said. “Just put all the conspiracies and microchips and all that business aside and go get vaccinated and don’t put your family through what his wife and the rest of us are going through.”

Valentine, who was hospitalized with pneumonia caused by COVID-19, died a month after falling ill.

Marc Bernier, a radio host in Florida, said on air that he opposed vaccines before dying of COVID-19.

WNDB radio host Bernier had voiced anti-vaccine opinions on air before his death in late August.

“I’m not taking it,” he said when asked about the COVID-19 during a segment of his show in December 2020, according to USA Today. “Are you kidding me? Mr. Anti-Vax? Jeepers.”

Mel Stack, an attorney and friend of Bernier, told USA Today that Bernier’s anti-vaccine opinions weren’t politically based but instead based on how he believed other vaccines had impacted people close to him.

Former CIA officer Robert David Steele died from COVID-19 after spreading COVID-denial conspiracy theories.

Steele, a former CIA officer who pushed baseless QAnon theories and spread COVID-19 misinformation online, also died from COVID-19, his friend Mark Tassi announced on August 29 on Instagram.

But he had spread anti-vaccine and COVID-19-denial conspiracy theories on his blog throughout the pandemic, Vice reported.

“I will not take the vaccination, though I did test positive for whatever they’re calling ‘COVID’ today, but the bottom line is that my lungs are not functioning,” he wrote in a blog post on August 17.

Accompanying the blog post was a photo of Steele apparently hooked up to a ventilator.

“The good news is that I will survive with a few days off. I should be back up and at least functional soon,” he wrote.

Days later, he died from the virus.

Caleb Wallace, an anti-masker who previously protested against COVID-19 safety measures, died after spending a month in the hospital.

Wallace, a 30-year-old father of three, died of COVID-19 in late August.

In 2020, Wallace helped organize rallies to protest against COVID-19 safety measures, including lockdowns and masks, which he called “COVID tyranny.”

His wife, Jessica Wallace, told the San Angelo Standard-Times that Wallace started showing symptoms in July and opted to treat himself with ivermectin – a horse de-wormer that CDC has warned should not be used to treat COVID-19 – as well as high doses of vitamin C, zinc, aspirin, and an inhaler before seeking professional medical care when his condition deteriorated.

He was taken to an intensive care unit at Shannon Medical Centre, where he spent weeks on a ventilator.

His wife said on a GoFundMe page that he died on August 28.

“He was an imperfect man but he loved his family and his little girls more than anything,” his wife wrote on the GoFundMe page.

Pressley Stutts, a South Carolina conservative group leader, died after making fun of masks.

Stutts, chair of the Greenville Tea Party, died from COVID-19 in August after making false statements about the virus and downplaying the importance of mask-wearing.

Among other comments, Stutts called face masks an “illusion” in a Facebook post, cheered on unvaccinated doctors and nurses, and even downplayed the virus while hospitalized with COVID in early August.

“COVID is nothing to fool with and in as much as possible, it is up to you to take the best precautions for you and your family to avoid getting it,” he said from an ICU bed.

Two weeks later, he changed his views and called the virus “hell on earth.”

“When you have to take every single ounce just to get your next breath, you know you are in the battle for your life!” he wrote in that Facebook post. “I IMPLORE YOU….PLEASE PRAY THAT GOD MOVES MIGHTILY IN MY BODY. ISOLATED. DON’T KNOW HOW MUCH LONGER I CAN ENDURE WITHOUT YOUR PRAYERS. SERIOUSLY!”

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Getting fully vaccinated massively reduces your chance of dying from COVID-19, a new real-world study suggests

A NHS vaccinator prepares to administer the Moderna Covid-19 vaccine to a member of public at a vaccination centre in London.
A NHS vaccinator prepares to administer the Moderna Covid-19 vaccine to a member of public at a vaccination centre in London.

  • COVID-19 accounted for 0.8% of deaths among fully vaccinated people in England, data shows.
  • In unvaccinated people, COVID-19 accounted for 37% of deaths in the same period.
  • The data is more evidence that vaccines significantly reduce the chance of dying from COVID-19.
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Getting a COVID-19 vaccine significantly reduces the chance of dying from the coronavirus, real-world data from England suggests.

Figures from the UK’s Office of National Statistics (ONS) released Monday found that 0.8% of deaths in fully-vaccinated people were linked to COVID-19 between January and July. These figures covered people who died 21 or more days after the second dose.

For comparison, roughly 37% of deaths in unvaccinated people “involved COVID-19” during the same time period, the data showed.

In total, 57,263 fully vaccinated people in England died at least 21 days after their second vaccine dose, and just 458 deaths “involved” COVID-19. Over the same period, there were 38,964 COVID-19-related deaths in unvaccinated people.

Professor Kevin McConway, professor of applied statistics at the Open University, said in a statement to the Science Media Center on Monday that the data showed vaccines were effective at preventing death from COVID-19, but that they weren’t “perfect.”

“Some people do still die of COVID-19 even though they are fully vaccinated,” he said. “No vaccine is 100% effective,” he said, adding that it was important to get both doses.

The ONS data came from census and family doctor health records, considered to be representative of 79% of people aged 10 or older living in England. It didn’t specifically look at variants.

The highly infectious Delta, which can partially avoid the immune response, became dominant in the UK in June.

McConway said the data was evidence that vaccinated people had less chance of dying from COVID-19 than unvaccinated people, but that it couldn’t be used to determine vaccine effectiveness. The population in the vaccinated and unvaccinated groups could differ in important ways – high-risk groups were prioritized for vaccines, for example, he said.

US data released on Friday showed vaccinated Americans were 11 times less likely than unvaccinated Americans to die from COVID-19.

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5 missing Navy sailors have been declared dead after their helicopter crashed into the sea

MH-60S helicopter
The Navy announced Saturday that five sailors are presumed dead after their MH-60S helicopter – similar to the one pictured above – crashed off the coast of San Diego.

  • Five Navy sailors have been declared dead after their helicopter crashed on August 31.
  • The Navy announced that search and rescue efforts have pivoted to recovery operations.
  • The sailors were “conducting routine flight operations” when the crash occurred off San Diego’s coast.
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The US Navy announced Saturday that five sailors who went missing after their helicopter crashed on August 31 have been declared dead.

As of September 4, the US 3rd Fleet’s mission has pivoted from search and rescue efforts to recovery operations, the Navy said in a statement.

The MH-60S helicopter the sailors were in had been “conducting routine flight operations” when it crashed into the sea some 60 nautical miles off San Diego’s coast, the Navy said.

Initial search and rescue efforts went on for more than 72 hours and included 34 search and rescue flights, five search helicopter flights, and “constant surface vessel search.”

One crew member was rescued and was in stable condition as of September 1, The New York Times reported.

The Navy will release the sailors’ names 24 hours after their next of kin have been notified.

The helicopter had been assigned to Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 8 and was based on the USS Abraham Lincoln aircraft carrier, the Navy said.

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The US could record another 100,000 COVID-19 deaths by December if more isn’t done to reduce the spread of the virus

coronavirus covid patient death hospital chaplain healthcare worker
Chaplain Kristin Michealsen holds the hand of a deceased COVID-19 patient while talking on the phone with the patient’s family member at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles on January 9, 2021.

The US is on track to record another 100,000 COVID-19 deaths by December 1, a forecast from researchers at the University of Washington said.

The US has so far recorded more than 637,500 deaths. Researchers said more than 738,700 deaths could be reported by December 1.

For the first time since March 2021, the US is reporting an average of over 1,000 COVID-19 deaths a day. Cases have also been rising across the country as the more transmissible Delta variant spreads.

Experts told the Associated Press the prediction can fluctuate based on how people behaving, with some saying it could be cut in half if people wear masks in public spaces.

“Behavior is really going to determine if, when, and how sustainably the current wave subsides,” Lauren Ancel Meyers, director of the University of Texas COVID-19 Modeling Consortium, told the AP. “We cannot stop Delta in its tracks, but we can change our behavior overnight.”

“We can save 50,000 lives simply by wearing masks. That’s how important behaviors are,” Ali Mokdad, a professor of health metrics sciences at the University of Washington in Seattle, involved in the making of the projections, told the AP.

Meyers said mask-wearing, social distancing, and getting vaccinated can cut down the death toll.

Experts told Insider’s Hilary Brueck that 90% of the US would need to be vaccinated to achieve herd immunity as the Delta variant spreads. So far, only a little more than half of the population is fully vaccinated, according to data from the Centers for Disease Control.

Last week, White House COVID-19 coordinator Jeff Zients said the number of people getting their first shot has been on the rise.

Zients said there was a 70% increase of people getting their first shot compared to mid-July, with an average of 450,000 getting their first vaccine dose.

“In the face of the Delta variant, more and more Americans are stepping up each day to get vaccinated,” Zients said.

Experts previously warned that allowing the virus – particularly the Delta variant – to surge could mean it could evolve into another variant that could evade current vaccines.

“These vaccines operate really well in protecting us from severe disease and death, but the big concern is that the next variant that might emerge – just a few mutations, potentially, away – could potentially evade our vaccines,” Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Rochelle Walensky said during a press briefing last month.

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