NEWSOM STAYS: California Gov. survives the recall election that posed the biggest threat yet to his leadership

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a No on the Recall campaign event with U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris at IBEW-NECA Joint Apprenticeship Training Center on September 08, 2021 in San Leandro, California
California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a No on the Recall campaign event with U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris at IBEW-NECA Joint Apprenticeship Training Center on September 08, 2021 in San Leandro, California

Insider and Decision Desk HQ are projecting that Gov. Gavin Newsom will survive the California gubernatorial recall. Decision Desk called the race at 8:21 p.m. PT and 11:21 p.m ET. Per this projected call, Newsom will remain governor of California.

California governor recall candidate Larry Elder takes a selfie with a supporter outside of the Warner Center Marriott Woodland Hills in Woodland Hills CA., Tuesday, August 24, 2021.
California governor recall candidate Larry Elder was Newsom’s most prominent challenger.

How the recall works and what was at stake:

California is one of 19 states where voters unhappy with the direction of their state can kick their leaders to the curb.

Californians last recalled a governor in 2003, when voters booted former Gov. Gray Davis out of office in favor of actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Issues including an energy crisis and rolling blackouts, a controversial car tax, and a sluggish economy following the dot-com bust, dominated that election.

This time around, Republican activists moved to recall Newsom mainly over their disapproval of his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and frustration with the administration’s COVID-19 restrictions. Other issues defining the recall include the increasing unaffordability of housing fueling homelessness in the state and extreme weather events like wildfires.

Californians were faced with two questions on the ballot: whether or not to recall Newsom (a simple yes or no), and if so, who to replace him with. The first question failed to receive a simple “yes” majority for Newsom to get the boot. On the second question, the winner to replace him could have won with just a plurality and not a majority of the vote.

There were 46 candidates in the running to replace Newsom if he’s recalled, down from the 135 who ran to replace Davis in 2003.

The leading GOP contender to replace Newsom was talk show host Larry Elder, who has a checkered personal past and long history of making controversial comments on the air. He led other replacement candidates by double-digits in FiveThirtyEight’s polling averages.

Other Republicans running in the recall included former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, and 2018 GOP gubernatorial nominee John Cox. Neither the California Republican Party nor national Republicans, however, had attempted to consolidate support around a single candidate.

Reality TV star and former Olympian Caitlyn Jenner, YouTuber Kevin Paffrath, and a host of other minor candidates also ran in the recall.

Unlike in 2003, when Davis’ lieutenant governor ran on the second ballot as an “insurance policy,” Democrats chose not to put up a replacement candidate of their own as a fallback, instead urging their supporters to vote “no” on question one and leave question two blank.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Californians vote on whether to boot Gov. Gavin Newsom from office in high-stakes recall election

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a No on the Recall campaign event with U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris at IBEW-NECA Joint Apprenticeship Training Center on September 08, 2021 in San Leandro, California
California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a No on the Recall campaign event with U.S. Vice President Kamala Harris at IBEW-NECA Joint Apprenticeship Training Center on September 08, 2021 in San Leandro, California

When will we know the result?

The California recall election has been held primarily by mail, with election offices in California sending all registered voters a recall ballot that they can mail back or return to a ballot drop box or voting site.

Polls for in-person voters in California close at 8 p.m. PST and 11 p.m. EST, but because mail ballots take a little longer to process and tabulate, Decision Desk HQ and other outlets may not be able to project an outcome for a few days.

California governor recall candidate Larry Elder takes a selfie with a supporter outside of the Warner Center Marriott Woodland Hills in Woodland Hills CA., Tuesday, August 24, 2021.
California governor recall candidate Larry Elder takes a selfie with a supporter outside of the Warner Center Marriott Woodland Hills in Woodland Hills CA., Tuesday, August 24, 2021.

How the recall works and what’s at stake:

California is one of 19 states where voters unhappy with the direction of their state can kick their leaders to the curb.

Californians last recalled a governor in 2003, when voters booted former Gov. Gray Davis out of office in favor of actor Arnold Schwarzenegger. Issues including an energy crisis and rolling blackouts, a controversial car tax, and a sluggish economy following the dot-com bust, dominated that election.

This time around, Republican activists moved to recall Newsom mainly over their disapproval of his handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and frustration with the administration’s COVID-19 restrictions. Other issues defining the recall include the increasing unaffordability of housing fueling homelessness in the state and extreme weather events like wildfires.

Californians are faced with two questions on the ballot: whether or not to recall Newsom (a simple yes or no), and if so, who to replace him with. The first question must receive a simple “yes” majority for Newsom to get the boot, but on the second question, the winner to replace him could win with just a plurality and not a majority of the vote.

There are 46 candidates in the running to replace Newsom if he’s recalled, down from the 135 who ran to replace Davis in 2003.

The leading GOP contender to replace Newsom is talk show host Larry Elder, who has a checkered personal past and long history of making controversial comments on the air. He leads other replacement candidates by double-digits in FiveThirtyEight’s polling averages.

Other Republicans running in the recall include former San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer, and 2018 GOP gubernatorial nominee John Cox. Neither the California Republican Party nor national Republicans, however, have attempted to consolidate support around a single candidate.

Reality TV star and former Olympian Caitlyn Jenner, YouTuber Kevin Paffrath, and a host of other minor candidates are also running in the recall.

Unlike in 2003, when Davis’ lieutenant governor ran on the second ballot as an “insurance policy,” Democrats have chosen not to put up a replacement candidate of their own as a fallback, instead urging their supporters to vote “no” on question one and leave question two blank.

The latest polls indicate Newsom is in a strong position to survive the recall, with FiveThirtyEight’s polling average showing 56% support for “no” on the recall and 41% support for “yes” as of Monday.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Nina Tuner and Shontel Brown face off in a high-profile Ohio special House election

Nina Turner, left, and Shontel Brown, right, campaign in Ohio's 11th Congressional District
Former state Senator Nina Turner, left, and Cuyahoga County Councilwoman Shontel Brown, right, are the frontrunners in the Democratic primary for the special election in Ohio’s 11th District

  • Voters are choosing the special Democratic primary election in Ohio’s 11th District.
  • Nina Turner and Shontel Brown are the frontrunners for the seat, formerly held by HUD Sec. Marcia Fudge.
  • Polls in Ohio closed at 7:30 pm ET. Follow along for live election results.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Polls in Ohio’s 11th Congressional District closed at 7:30 pm ET.

Former state Sen. Nina Turner and Cuyahoga County Council member Shontel Brown are the frontrunners in a multicandidate Democratic primary for the special election in Ohio’s 11th Congressional District.

In March, the seat was vacated by then-Democratic Rep. Marcia Fudge, who stepped down to become the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development under President Joe Biden.

The racially diverse, reliably Democratic 11th district stretches from Cleveland’s east side to Akron, with a mix of working-to-upper-middle-class suburbs including Euclid and Shaker Heights. The district backed Biden by a margin of 60 percentage points, 79.8 to 19.2%, over former President Donald Trump in the 2020 election.

The winner of the Democratic primary will be the overwhelming favorite to win the Nov. 2 general election.

Turner, who served on the Cleveland City Council from 2006 to 2008 and was a member of the Ohio Senate from 2008 to 2014, became a nationally-known figure as president of the political organization Our Revolution, which was spun off from the 2016 presidential campaign of Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont and has led the largest outside grassroots mobilization effort for her campaign.

Last year, Turner was a national co-chair for the 2020 Sanders presidential campaign, and she has been a leading voice for progressive issues, including a $15 minimum wage and student loan debt cancelation. She has attracted the support of progressive stars such as Reps. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York and Cori Bush of Missouri, who view her as a like-minded ally who will demand real accountability in Congress.

Brown, who also chairs the Cuyahoga County Democratic Party, has promoted herself as an ally of Biden who would not shift the agenda of the narrow Democratic majority too far to the left. Her more moderate stances have attracted the support of party stalwarts like former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and House Majority Whip Jim Clyburn of South Carolina, the highest-ranking Black lawmaker in Congress.

The race has become increasingly heated in recent weeks, with Brown seeking to use Turner’s national profile against her, portraying the former state lawmaker as a Democrat who wouldn’t be a reliable partner with the White House. Turner has rejected such assertions and recently released a pointed television advertisement that questioned Brown’s ethics.

While some groups have deemed the race as a proxy between moderate and progressive Democrats, the race is much more nuanced on the local level.

Turner and Brown have deep roots in the community, and both have indicated that issues such as poverty and criminal justice reform would be major priorities if elected to office.

Turner spoke to Insider in March and explained the need to combat economic inequities, a huge issue in the Rust Belt district.

“Having one job should definitely be enough and we’ve got to work to make sure that’s the case,” she said. “COVID-19 has only exacerbated social, economic, racial, and environmental fissures, and we need to center poor people and working-class people in a way that gives them a shot to live their measure of the American dream. This is going to require us to see the system through a different lens.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: A crowded field of candidates vies for the GOP nomination in the special election for Ohio’s 15th District

Ohio congressional candidate Mike Carey
Mike Carey speaks at a rally hosted by former President Donald Trump after receiving his endorsement on June 26, 2021 in Wellington, Ohio

  • A crowded field of GOP candidates are competing for the special primary election for Ohio’s 15th District.
  • Former President Trump has endorsed and campaigned for coal lobbyist Mike Carey.
  • Polls in Ohio closed at 7:30 pm ET. Follow along for live results.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Polls in Ohio closed at 7:30 pm. Follow along for live results.

A crowded field of candidates are competing in the special primary election to replace former Republican Rep. Steve Stivers in Ohio’s 15th District, which encompasses the suburbs and exurbs south of Columbus.

The contenders for the GOP nomination include state Rep. Jeff LaRe, who has been endorsed by Strivers, state Rep. Bob Peterson, state Sen. Stephanie Kunze, minister and former Columbus NAACP President Ruth Edmonds, Hilliard Councilman Omar Tarzai, and coal lobbyist Mike Carey, who is endorsed by former President Donald Trump.

Trump held his first rally since leaving office to campaign for Carey on June 26.

The special election will pose another test of Trump’s continued influence over down-ballot GOP races in his post-presidency, Insider’s Warren Rojas and Tom LoBianco report.

Read more: Donald Trump’s ‘golden ticket’ is on trial in Ohio, where a special election is again testing his political prowess

Trump’s track record of backing winning candidates suffered a blow last week, when his endorsed candidate Susan Wright lost a special runoff election in Texas 6th Congressional District to state Rep. Jake Ellzey. While it can be difficult to draw sweeping conclusions from individual, low-turnout special elections, tonight’s results will be another data point to Trump’s continued influence over Republican primary voters.

The number of candidates in the field and all the different constituencies at play in the primary make it difficult to discern a clear frontrunner.

“5,000 votes could win this thing, no poll could properly catch the turnout, there’s just no way to guess,” one Ohio GOP consultant told Insider. “Your guess is as good as mine.”

The winner of the special GOP primary will be heavily favored to win the November 2 special general election in the 15th District, which backed Trump over President Joe Biden by 14 percentage points, 56% to 42%, in 2020.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Eric Adams projected winner of New York City Mayor Democratic primary

From left: Shaun Donovan, Andrew Yang, Ray McGuire, Kathryn Garcia, Eric Adams, and Maya Wiley with New York City's skyline tint blue in the background.
  • Eric Adams is now projected to win the Democratic nomination for New York City Mayor.
  • New York City voters are selecting Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor.
  • New York is using ranked-choice voting for the first time, so the winner may not be known for weeks.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The latest tallies of New York City’s ranked-choice Democratic mayoral primary election show Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams narrowly leading former New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia by just 8,426 votes, 50.5% to 49.5%, with most absentee votes now counted. Given the outstanding vote and Adams’ lead, he is projected to be the winner of the primary.

The latest results include over 122,000 absentee ballots and some provisional ballots cast in-person. Out of the total 125,794 absentee ballots cast in the mayoral primary, 3,669 had problems with the signature on the outer envelope that voters will need to fix in order for their ballots to count, the city’s Board of Elections announced Tuesday.

Voters went to the polls through June 22 to pick Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor in the race to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is term-limited.

The winner of the crowded Democratic primary field will be the favorite in November’s general election, with Democrats heavily outnumbering registered Republicans across the five boroughs.

The Board of Elections released unofficial, un-ranked election results based on in-person votes only on Election Night, then ran the first ranked-choice tabulations a week later on June 29, also based on only in-person votes.

But it didn’t go off without some drama along the way: officials had to remove, recalculate, and re-release the first set of ranked-choice vote tabulations for the city’s mayoral race after a major mishap ensued when an employee in Queens accidentally included 135,000 test votes in the ranked-choice runoff results released on June 29, an embarrassment for the embattled city Board of Elections.

Several candidates, however, found themselves eliminated from contention just based on the unranked, election night results.

Shortly before 11 p.m. on the night of June 22, former presidential candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech in front of supporters.

“I am not going to be the next Mayor of New York City,” Yang said, sitting in fourth place.

Here are the unofficial, ranked tenth-round election results that show how the candidates stand before absentee and provisional ballots were added to the tally:

A voter receives her ballot in New York City's June 22 mayoral election
A voter receives her ballot at Frank McCourt High School, in New York, Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Why it took weeks to learn results.

While tabulating ranked-choice votes is done via software and is not particularly arduous on its own, it’s taking weeks to know the final results of the mayor’s race because of New York’s procedures for counting absentee ballots.

New York continued to allow voters to vote absentee due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and state law allows a lot of time for ballots to be accepted and mistakes with voters’ ballots to be rectified.

Absentee ballots were accepted through June 29 as long as they were postmarked by Election Day, and voters have until July 9 to fix or “cure” issues, like missing signatures on the outer envelopes of their ballots, under a new state law.

Military and overseas absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day were also accepted through July 5.

Then, ranked-choice voting comes into play. In the mayoral, borough president, and city council races, voters have the option to rank up to five candidates in order of their preference after New York City voters approved a ballot initiative to enact ranked-choice voting in 2019.

Ranked-choice voting ensures that the candidate who eventually wins does so with a majority of the vote.

Since no candidate won over 50% of the vote outright in the Democratic mayoral primary, the votes earned by the candidate who comes in last place are redistributed up to the next-best performing candidate. The process then continues up the chain until one candidate finally earns a majority of the vote.

The Board of Elections is expected to finish up final ranked-choice rounds with complete absentee and provisional results during the week of July 12.

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams at a campaign event
Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams greets supporters during a campaign event, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York

How the campaign shaped up during the pandemic.

The primary’s early months were dominated by Zoom forums.

Nonprofit organizations, unions, and other local groups held discussions that were less debates than opportunities for the candidates to repeat their campaign promises and sharpen their messaging.

Another factor making this campaign rather unusual was the general lack of public polling, with several pollsters saying they were uncomfortable simulating ranked-choice voting with any accuracy.

By May, in-person campaign events began to heat up, and eventually the candidates were able to meet in-person for a handful of televised debates.

Yang started the race as the frontrunner, but as more polling became available in the final weeks, he began to slip into second, third, and even fourth place in some surveys.

However, Yang remained competitive throughout, and an Ipsos poll released on the eve of the primary showed him in second place behind Adams.

Adams cleaned up with labor endorsements around the city, while Yang received a first of its kind joint-endorsement from Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish community leaders. The borough president’s momentum was complicated by a scandal involving his primary residence, when a Politico investigation found Adams may have been living in either New Jersey or his office instead of a Bedford-Stuyvesant brownstone that he officially listed.

Garcia began to surge following her New York Times Editorial Board endorsement, and Wiley was able to capitalize on late support from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Outside of the top four, several progressive candidates failed to gain traction, most notably City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer was accused by two women of sexually assaulting them in the early 2000s. He denied both allegations, but saw a mass defection of endorsements.

The latest twist in the race came in the final weekend, when Yang and Garcia campaigned together to “promote ranked-choice voting,” but not as a co-endorsement. Adams accused them of trying to prevent a person of color from becoming mayor, to which Yang replied that he’s been Asian his whole life.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: New York City to re-tally ranked choice rounds after major tabulation errors included dummy votes

From left: Shaun Donovan, Andrew Yang, Ray McGuire, Kathryn Garcia, Eric Adams, and Maya Wiley with New York City's skyline tint blue in the background.
  • New York City voters are selecting Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor.
  • New York is using ranked-choice voting for the first time, so the winner may not be known for weeks.
  • Eric Adams’ initial lead was cut down by Kathryn Garcia and Maya Wiley.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

New York City officials have retracted the most recent vote count and the first set of ranked-choice vote tabulations for the city’s mayoral race after accidentally including 135,000 dummy test votes in the ranked-choice runoff tallies it conducted and released on Tuesday.

The Board of Elections removed the previous results from the first set of ranked-choice runoff rounds from its website and announced in a statement late Tuesday night that it will re-upload the election night results (which include in-person votes and no absentee ballots so far), re-generate the cast vote record, and re-tally ranked-choice rounds.

Unofficial and incomplete election night results only had Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams holding a commanding lead, followed by former New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, and civil rights attorney Maya Wiley.

The Board of Elections ran the first round of ranked-choice voting based on the results of in-person votes only. These results will remain incomplete and unofficial, however, since the over 124,000 absentee ballots cast in the Democratic primary won’t yet counted and factored into the tally until later on.

Voters went to the polls through June 22 to pick Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor in the race to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is term-limited.

The winner of the crowded Democratic primary field will be the favorite in November’s general election, with Democrats heavily outnumbering registered Republicans across the five boroughs.

Ranked-choice voting is being used for the first time in the city’s history for these races, complicating predictions and the logistics of counting the votes.

Shortly before 11 p.m. on the night of June 22, former presidential candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech in front of supporters.

“I am not going to be the next Mayor of New York City,” Yang said, sitting in fourth place.

Here are the unofficial, ranked tenth-round election results that show how the candidates stand before absentee and provisional ballots are added to the tally:

A voter receives her ballot in New York City's June 22 mayoral election
A voter receives her ballot at Frank McCourt High School, in New York, Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Why we may not know the winner for two more weeks.

While tabulating ranked-choice votes is done via software and is not particularly arduous on its own, it’s taking weeks to know the final results of the mayor’s race because of New York’s procedures for counting absentee ballots.

New York is continuing to allow voters to vote absentee due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and state law allows a lot of time for ballots to be accepted and mistakes with voters’ ballots to be rectified.

Absentee ballots are accepted through June 29 as long as they’re postmarked by Election Day, and voters have another week on top of that to fix or “cure” issues, like missing signatures on the outer envelopes of their ballots, under a new state law. Military and overseas absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day are also accepted through July 5.

Then, ranked-choice voting comes into play. In the mayoral, borough president, and city council races, voters have the option to rank up to five candidates in order of their preference after New York City voters approved a ballot initiative to enact ranked-choice voting in 2019.

Ranked-choice voting ensures that the candidate who eventually wins does so with a majority of the vote.

Since no candidate won over 50% of the vote outright in the Democratic mayoral primary, the votes earned by the candidate who comes in last place are redistributed up to the next-best performing candidate. The process then continues up the chain until one candidate finally earns a majority of the vote.

Here’s a likely timeline for the results, according to THE CITY and The New York Times:

  • June 22: Unofficial, first-round election night results before ranked-choice rounds are released. These results will only include in-person votes, not absentee or provisional ballots.
  • June 29: Board of Elections runs the first round of ranked-choice voting, also without full absentee and provisional results. These results will remain unofficial.
  • July 6: Ranked-choice tallies are updated with absentee and provisional ballots as they’re counted and accepted.
  • July 12: The Board of Elections is expected to finish up final ranked-choice rounds with complete absentee and provisional results.

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams at a campaign event
Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams greets supporters during a campaign event, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York

How the campaign shaped up during the pandemic.

The primary’s early months were dominated by Zoom forums.

Nonprofit organizations, unions, and other local groups held discussions that were less debates than opportunities for the candidates to repeat their campaign promises and sharpen their messaging.

Another factor making this campaign rather unusual was the general lack of public polling, with several pollsters saying they were uncomfortable simulating ranked-choice voting with any accuracy.

By May, in-person campaign events began to heat up, and eventually the candidates were able to meet in-person for a handful of televised debates.

Yang started the race as the frontrunner, but as more polling became available in the final weeks, he began to slip into second, third, and even fourth place in some surveys.

However, Yang remained competitive throughout, and an Ipsos poll released on the eve of the primary showed him in second place behind Adams.

Adams cleaned up with labor endorsements around the city, while Yang received a first of its kind joint-endorsement from Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish community leaders. The borough president’s momentum was complicated by a scandal involving his primary residence, when a Politico investigation found Adams may have been living in either New Jersey or his office instead of a Bedford-Stuyvesant brownstone that he officially listed.

Garcia began to surge following her New York Times Editorial Board endorsement, and Wiley was able to capitalize on late support from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Outside of the top four, several progressive candidates failed to gain traction, most notably City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer was accused by two women of sexually assaulting them in the early 2000s. He denied both allegations, but saw a mass defection of endorsements.

The latest twist in the race came in the final weekend, when Yang and Garcia campaigned together to “promote ranked-choice voting,” but not as a co-endorsement. Adams accused them of trying to prevent a person of color from becoming mayor, to which Yang replied that he’s been Asian his whole life.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Eric Adams holds a commanding lead as officials begin ranked-choice runoffs in New York City

From left: Shaun Donovan, Andrew Yang, Ray McGuire, Kathryn Garcia, Eric Adams, and Maya Wiley with New York City's skyline tint blue in the background.
  • New York City voters are selecting Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor.
  • New York is using ranked-choice voting for the first time, so the winner may not be known for weeks.
  • Eric Adams holds a strong lead as absentee and ranked-choice votes remain outstanding.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

New York City officials are beginning the process of ranking the still-unofficial results in New York City’s first-ever ranked-choice mayoral election.

On June 29, the Board of Elections will run the first round of ranked-choice voting based on the results of in-person votes only. These results will remain incomplete and unofficial, however, since the over 124,000 absentee ballots cast in the Democratic primary won’t yet counted and factored into the tally until next week.

Voters went to the polls through June 22 to pick Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor in the race to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is term-limited.

The winner of the crowded Democratic primary field will be the favorite in November’s general election, with Democrats heavily outnumbering registered Republicans across the five boroughs.

Ranked-choice voting is being used for the first time in the city’s history for these races, complicating predictions and the logistics of counting the votes.

Unofficial and incomplete election night results only had Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams holding a commanding lead, followed by former New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, and civil rights attorney Maya Wiley.

Shortly before 11 p.m., former presidential candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech in front of supporters.

“I am not going to be the next Mayor of New York City,” Yang said, sitting in fourth place.

Here are the unofficial, un-ranked first-round election results that show how the candidates stood before any ranked-choice rounds are run and before absentee and provisional ballots are added to the tally:

A voter receives her ballot in New York City's June 22 mayoral election
A voter receives her ballot at Frank McCourt High School, in New York, Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Why we may not know the winner for two more weeks.

While tabulating ranked-choice votes is done via software and is not particularly arduous on its own, it’s taking weeks to know the final results of the mayor’s race because of New York’s procedures for counting absentee ballots.

New York is continuing to allow voters to vote absentee due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and state law allows a lot of time for ballots to be accepted and mistakes with voters’ ballots to be rectified.

Absentee ballots are accepted through June 29 as long as they’re postmarked by Election Day, and voters have another week on top of that to fix or “cure” issues, like missing signatures on the outer envelopes of their ballots, under a new state law. Military and overseas absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day are also accepted through July 5.

Then, ranked-choice voting comes into play. In the mayoral, borough president, and city council races, voters have the option to rank up to five candidates in order of their preference after New York City voters approved a ballot initiative to enact ranked-choice voting in 2019.

Ranked-choice voting ensures that the candidate who eventually wins does so with a majority of the vote.

Since no candidate won over 50% of the vote outright in the Democratic mayoral primary, the votes earned by the candidate who comes in last place are redistributed up to the next-best performing candidate. The process then continues up the chain until one candidate finally earns a majority of the vote.

Here’s a likely timeline for the results, according to THE CITY and The New York Times:

  • June 22: Unofficial, first-round election night results before ranked-choice rounds are released. These results will only include in-person votes, not absentee or provisional ballots.
  • June 29: Board of Elections runs the first round of ranked-choice voting, also without full absentee and provisional results. These results will remain unofficial.
  • July 6: Ranked-choice tallies are updated with absentee and provisional ballots as they’re counted and accepted.
  • July 12: The Board of Elections is expected to finish up final ranked-choice rounds with complete absentee and provisional results.

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams at a campaign event
Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams greets supporters during a campaign event, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York

How the campaign shaped up during the pandemic.

The primary’s early months were dominated by Zoom forums.

Nonprofit organizations, unions, and other local groups held discussions that were less debates than opportunities for the candidates to repeat their campaign promises and sharpen their messaging.

Another factor making this campaign rather unusual was the general lack of public polling, with several pollsters saying they were uncomfortable simulating ranked-choice voting with any accuracy.

By May, in-person campaign events began to heat up, and eventually the candidates were able to meet in-person for a handful of televised debates.

Yang started the race as the frontrunner, but as more polling became available in the final weeks, he began to slip into second, third, and even fourth place in some surveys.

However, Yang remained competitive throughout, and an Ipsos poll released on the eve of the primary showed him in second place behind Adams.

Adams cleaned up with labor endorsements around the city, while Yang received a first of its kind joint-endorsement from Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish community leaders. The borough president’s momentum was complicated by a scandal involving his primary residence, when a Politico investigation found Adams may have been living in either New Jersey or his office instead of a Bedford-Stuyvesant brownstone that he officially listed.

Garcia began to surge following her New York Times Editorial Board endorsement, and Wiley was able to capitalize on late support from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Outside of the top four, several progressive candidates failed to gain traction, most notably City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer was accused by two women of sexually assaulting them in the early 2000s. He denied both allegations, but saw a mass defection of endorsements.

The latest twist in the race came in the final weekend, when Yang and Garcia campaigned together to “promote ranked-choice voting,” but not as a co-endorsement. Adams accused them of trying to prevent a person of color from becoming mayor, to which Yang replied that he’s been Asian his whole life.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Virginia voters select Terry McAuliffe as the Democratic nominee for governor

Terry MacAuliffe
Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D-VA) speaks to supporters while campaigning June 4, 2021 in Charlottesville, Virginia. McAuliffe, who previously served as governor from 2014-2018, is seeking a second term as Virginia holds its Democratic primary next Tuesday.

  • Virginia is holding Democratic primaries for key statewide offices on Tuesday.
  • Former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe easily clinched the nomination for his old office.
  • Polls in Virginia closed at 7 p.m. ET.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Virginia voters are casting their ballots for June 8th’s Democratic primaries for governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general. Polls closed at 7 p.m. ET.

Governors can only serve one term at a time under the Virginia constitution, meaning current Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam can’t run for a second consecutive term.

Former Gov. Terry McAuliffe easily clinch the Democratic nomination for the governorship, which he previously held before Northam from 2014 to 2018.

The latest poll of the primary, conducted by Roanoke College, found McAuliffe leading the field by a wide margin. The poll, conducted from May 24 to June 1, surveyed 637 likely Democratic primary voters with a margin of error of ±3.9 points.

In the survey, 49% of likely Democratic voters said they had already voted or planned to vote for McAuliffe, 16% for House Delegate Jennifer Carroll Foy, 11% for Del. Jennifer McClellan, and 27% undecided. Two other candidates, Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax and Del. Lee Carter, polled in the single digits.

McAuliffe will face businessman Glenn Youngkin, who was chosen as the GOP nominee by a select number of party members in a May 8 ranked-choice party convention, with delegates casting their votes at locations around the state.

Virginia Republicans, who opted for the convention format over a traditional primary, selected Youngkin over two GOP members of the House of Delegates, Kirk Cox and Amanda Chase, and entrepreneur Pete Snyder.

McAuliffe is favored by election analysts to defeat Youngkin in the November general election in Virginia, which has trended from a swing state to solidly Democratic territory over the past two decades. The Virginia governor’s race is currently rated as “likely Democratic” by Inside Elections and the Cook Political Report, and as “leans Democratic” by the Crystal Ball at the University of Virginia Center for Politics.

Historically, however, Virginia gubernatorial elections have tended to be more difficult for the party that won the presidential election the prior year, so Democrats aren’t guaranteed a win.

The outcome of the open Democratic primary for lieutenant governor is far less certain. The Roanoke poll found that 45% of voters polled were undecided, with 16% supporting Democratic Del. Hala Ayala, 11% supporting Del. Sam Rasoul, also a Democrat, and the rest of the candidates polling in the single digits.

In the race for attorney general, Democratic incumbent Mark Herring faces a primary challenge from Del. Jerrauld “Jay” Jones, a fellow Democrat. The Roanoke College poll found that 50% of voters had voted for or planned to vote for Herring with 20% for Jones and 28% of voters undecided.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Louisianians voted to fill 2 US House vacancies in Saturday special elections

Karen Carter Peterson
In this Jan. 20, 2021, file photo, state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, speaks in Baton Rouge, La., about her campaign for the 2nd Congressional District seat after signing up for the race.

  • Louisianans voted in two special US House elections on Saturday.
  • The elections will fill vacancies in the 2nd and 5th Congressional Districts.
  • Julia Letlow won the race for the 5th District, while two candidates advanced to a runoff in the 2nd.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Louisiana held special elections for two vacant US House seats on Saturday, March 20. Polls closed at 8 p.m. Central Time.

The 2nd District, which is based in southern Louisiana and includes part of the Baton Rouge area and all of New Orleans, was vacated by former Rep. Cedric Richmond, who left Congress to serve in the White House as Director fo the Office of Public Engagement and a senior advisor to President Joe Biden.

State Senators Karen Carter Peterson and Troy Carter advanced to a runoff for the safely-Democratic seat, which gave Biden over 75% of the vote in 2020, Insider and Decision Desk HQ.

Richmond has endorsed Carter as his replacement, while Peterson has received the backing of EMILY’s List and Stacey Abrams, according to Ballotpedia.

In the 5th District, Rep.-elect Luke Letlow, who was elected to succeed retiring Rep. Ralph Abraham, died of COVID-19 on December 29, 2020, before he was able to assume office.

Letlow’s widow, Julia Letlow, who works as an administrator at the University of Louisiana-Monroe, will win the race to replace him outright with enough votes to avoid a runoff, Insider and Decision Desk HQ projected Saturday night.

The 5th District, which contains a large portion of eastern Louisiana, is safely Republican, backing former President Donald Trump by a margin of over 30 percentage points in 2020, according to Daily Kos.

Louisiana uses a “jungle” election system where all the candidates from all parties run in the same primary, instead of separate primaries for each party.

Since neither candidate earned over 50% of the vote in the 2nd District, Carter and Peterson will advance to a general runoff on April 24, with the winner seated in Congress shortly after.

There are currently five total vacancies in the House, creating a precarious situation for Democratic leaders presiding over a narrow eight-seat majority of 219-211 with some seats set to be vacant for months.

The special election to replace the late Republican Rep. Ron Wright of Texas’s 6th District, who died of COVID-19 on February 7, will take place on May 1.

And two representatives from safely Democratic seats, former Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico and former Rep. Marcia Fudge of Ohio, were tapped to serve in Biden’s cabinet as Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, respectively.

The special election to replace Haaland will take place on June 1, with the nominees selected by party committees. The primary to replace Fudge in Ohio’s 11th District will be on August 3 and the general election on November 2.

Read the original article on Business Insider

LIVE RESULTS: Voters go to the polls in 2 special US House elections in Louisiana

Karen Carter Peterson
In this Jan. 20, 2021, file photo, state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, speaks in Baton Rouge, La., about her campaign for the 2nd Congressional District seat after signing up for the race.

  • Louisianans are voting in two special US House elections on Saturday.
  • The elections will fill vacancies in the 2nd and 5th Congressional Districts.
  • Follow along for live results from Insider and Decision Desk HQ.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Louisiana is holding special elections for two vacant US House seats on Saturday, March 20. Polls closed at 8 p.m. Central Time.

The 2nd District, which is based in southern Louisiana and includes part of the Baton Rouge area and all of New Orleans, was vacated by former Rep. Cedric Richmond, who left Congress to serve in the White House as a senior advisor to President Joe Biden.

The leading contenders for the safely-Democratic seat, which gave Biden over 75% of the vote in 2020, are State Senator Karen Carter Peterson, Sen. Troy Carter, and Gary Chambers.

Richmond has endorsed Carter as his replacement, while Peterson has received the backing of EMILY’s List and Stacey Abrams, according to Ballotpedia.

In the 5th District, Rep.-elect Luke Letlow, who was elected to succeed retiring Rep. Ralph Abraham, died of COVID-19 on December 29, 2020, before he was able to assume office.

Letlow’s widow, Julia Letlow, who works as an administrator at the University of Louisiana-Monroe, will win the race to replace him outright with enough votes to avoid a runoff, Insider and Decision Desk HQ projected Saturday night.

The 5th District, which contains a large portion of eastern Louisiana, is safely Republican, backing former President Donald Trump by a margin of over 30 percentage points in 2020, according to Daily Kos.

Louisiana uses a “jungle” election system where all the candidates from all parties run in the same primary, instead of separate primaries for each party.

If neither candidate earns over 50% of the vote, the top two will advance to a general runoff on April 24, with the winners seated in Congress shortly after.

There are currently five total vacancies in the House, creating a precarious situation for Democratic leaders presiding over a narrow eight-seat majority of 219-211 with some seats set to be vacant for months.

The special election to replace the late Republican Rep. Ron Wright of Texas’s 6th District, who died of COVID-19 on February 7, will take place on May 1.

And two representatives from safely Democratic seats, former Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico and former Rep. Marcia Fudge of Ohio, were tapped to serve in Biden’s cabinet as Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, respectively.

The special election to replace Haaland will take place on June 1, with the nominees selected by party committees. The primary to replace Fudge in Ohio’s 11th District will be on August 3 and the general election on November 2.

Read the original article on Business Insider