RESULTS: Eric Adams projected winner of New York City Mayor Democratic primary

From left: Shaun Donovan, Andrew Yang, Ray McGuire, Kathryn Garcia, Eric Adams, and Maya Wiley with New York City's skyline tint blue in the background.
  • Eric Adams is now projected to win the Democratic nomination for New York City Mayor.
  • New York City voters are selecting Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor.
  • New York is using ranked-choice voting for the first time, so the winner may not be known for weeks.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The latest tallies of New York City’s ranked-choice Democratic mayoral primary election show Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams narrowly leading former New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia by just 8,426 votes, 50.5% to 49.5%, with most absentee votes now counted. Given the outstanding vote and Adams’ lead, he is projected to be the winner of the primary.

The latest results include over 122,000 absentee ballots and some provisional ballots cast in-person. Out of the total 125,794 absentee ballots cast in the mayoral primary, 3,669 had problems with the signature on the outer envelope that voters will need to fix in order for their ballots to count, the city’s Board of Elections announced Tuesday.

Voters went to the polls through June 22 to pick Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor in the race to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is term-limited.

The winner of the crowded Democratic primary field will be the favorite in November’s general election, with Democrats heavily outnumbering registered Republicans across the five boroughs.

The Board of Elections released unofficial, un-ranked election results based on in-person votes only on Election Night, then ran the first ranked-choice tabulations a week later on June 29, also based on only in-person votes.

But it didn’t go off without some drama along the way: officials had to remove, recalculate, and re-release the first set of ranked-choice vote tabulations for the city’s mayoral race after a major mishap ensued when an employee in Queens accidentally included 135,000 test votes in the ranked-choice runoff results released on June 29, an embarrassment for the embattled city Board of Elections.

Several candidates, however, found themselves eliminated from contention just based on the unranked, election night results.

Shortly before 11 p.m. on the night of June 22, former presidential candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech in front of supporters.

“I am not going to be the next Mayor of New York City,” Yang said, sitting in fourth place.

Here are the unofficial, ranked tenth-round election results that show how the candidates stand before absentee and provisional ballots were added to the tally:

A voter receives her ballot in New York City's June 22 mayoral election
A voter receives her ballot at Frank McCourt High School, in New York, Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Why it took weeks to learn results.

While tabulating ranked-choice votes is done via software and is not particularly arduous on its own, it’s taking weeks to know the final results of the mayor’s race because of New York’s procedures for counting absentee ballots.

New York continued to allow voters to vote absentee due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and state law allows a lot of time for ballots to be accepted and mistakes with voters’ ballots to be rectified.

Absentee ballots were accepted through June 29 as long as they were postmarked by Election Day, and voters have until July 9 to fix or “cure” issues, like missing signatures on the outer envelopes of their ballots, under a new state law.

Military and overseas absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day were also accepted through July 5.

Then, ranked-choice voting comes into play. In the mayoral, borough president, and city council races, voters have the option to rank up to five candidates in order of their preference after New York City voters approved a ballot initiative to enact ranked-choice voting in 2019.

Ranked-choice voting ensures that the candidate who eventually wins does so with a majority of the vote.

Since no candidate won over 50% of the vote outright in the Democratic mayoral primary, the votes earned by the candidate who comes in last place are redistributed up to the next-best performing candidate. The process then continues up the chain until one candidate finally earns a majority of the vote.

The Board of Elections is expected to finish up final ranked-choice rounds with complete absentee and provisional results during the week of July 12.

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams at a campaign event
Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams greets supporters during a campaign event, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York

How the campaign shaped up during the pandemic.

The primary’s early months were dominated by Zoom forums.

Nonprofit organizations, unions, and other local groups held discussions that were less debates than opportunities for the candidates to repeat their campaign promises and sharpen their messaging.

Another factor making this campaign rather unusual was the general lack of public polling, with several pollsters saying they were uncomfortable simulating ranked-choice voting with any accuracy.

By May, in-person campaign events began to heat up, and eventually the candidates were able to meet in-person for a handful of televised debates.

Yang started the race as the frontrunner, but as more polling became available in the final weeks, he began to slip into second, third, and even fourth place in some surveys.

However, Yang remained competitive throughout, and an Ipsos poll released on the eve of the primary showed him in second place behind Adams.

Adams cleaned up with labor endorsements around the city, while Yang received a first of its kind joint-endorsement from Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish community leaders. The borough president’s momentum was complicated by a scandal involving his primary residence, when a Politico investigation found Adams may have been living in either New Jersey or his office instead of a Bedford-Stuyvesant brownstone that he officially listed.

Garcia began to surge following her New York Times Editorial Board endorsement, and Wiley was able to capitalize on late support from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Outside of the top four, several progressive candidates failed to gain traction, most notably City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer was accused by two women of sexually assaulting them in the early 2000s. He denied both allegations, but saw a mass defection of endorsements.

The latest twist in the race came in the final weekend, when Yang and Garcia campaigned together to “promote ranked-choice voting,” but not as a co-endorsement. Adams accused them of trying to prevent a person of color from becoming mayor, to which Yang replied that he’s been Asian his whole life.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: New York City to re-tally ranked choice rounds after major tabulation errors included dummy votes

From left: Shaun Donovan, Andrew Yang, Ray McGuire, Kathryn Garcia, Eric Adams, and Maya Wiley with New York City's skyline tint blue in the background.
  • New York City voters are selecting Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor.
  • New York is using ranked-choice voting for the first time, so the winner may not be known for weeks.
  • Eric Adams’ initial lead was cut down by Kathryn Garcia and Maya Wiley.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

New York City officials have retracted the most recent vote count and the first set of ranked-choice vote tabulations for the city’s mayoral race after accidentally including 135,000 dummy test votes in the ranked-choice runoff tallies it conducted and released on Tuesday.

The Board of Elections removed the previous results from the first set of ranked-choice runoff rounds from its website and announced in a statement late Tuesday night that it will re-upload the election night results (which include in-person votes and no absentee ballots so far), re-generate the cast vote record, and re-tally ranked-choice rounds.

Unofficial and incomplete election night results only had Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams holding a commanding lead, followed by former New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, and civil rights attorney Maya Wiley.

The Board of Elections ran the first round of ranked-choice voting based on the results of in-person votes only. These results will remain incomplete and unofficial, however, since the over 124,000 absentee ballots cast in the Democratic primary won’t yet counted and factored into the tally until later on.

Voters went to the polls through June 22 to pick Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor in the race to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is term-limited.

The winner of the crowded Democratic primary field will be the favorite in November’s general election, with Democrats heavily outnumbering registered Republicans across the five boroughs.

Ranked-choice voting is being used for the first time in the city’s history for these races, complicating predictions and the logistics of counting the votes.

Shortly before 11 p.m. on the night of June 22, former presidential candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech in front of supporters.

“I am not going to be the next Mayor of New York City,” Yang said, sitting in fourth place.

Here are the unofficial, ranked tenth-round election results that show how the candidates stand before absentee and provisional ballots are added to the tally:

A voter receives her ballot in New York City's June 22 mayoral election
A voter receives her ballot at Frank McCourt High School, in New York, Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Why we may not know the winner for two more weeks.

While tabulating ranked-choice votes is done via software and is not particularly arduous on its own, it’s taking weeks to know the final results of the mayor’s race because of New York’s procedures for counting absentee ballots.

New York is continuing to allow voters to vote absentee due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and state law allows a lot of time for ballots to be accepted and mistakes with voters’ ballots to be rectified.

Absentee ballots are accepted through June 29 as long as they’re postmarked by Election Day, and voters have another week on top of that to fix or “cure” issues, like missing signatures on the outer envelopes of their ballots, under a new state law. Military and overseas absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day are also accepted through July 5.

Then, ranked-choice voting comes into play. In the mayoral, borough president, and city council races, voters have the option to rank up to five candidates in order of their preference after New York City voters approved a ballot initiative to enact ranked-choice voting in 2019.

Ranked-choice voting ensures that the candidate who eventually wins does so with a majority of the vote.

Since no candidate won over 50% of the vote outright in the Democratic mayoral primary, the votes earned by the candidate who comes in last place are redistributed up to the next-best performing candidate. The process then continues up the chain until one candidate finally earns a majority of the vote.

Here’s a likely timeline for the results, according to THE CITY and The New York Times:

  • June 22: Unofficial, first-round election night results before ranked-choice rounds are released. These results will only include in-person votes, not absentee or provisional ballots.
  • June 29: Board of Elections runs the first round of ranked-choice voting, also without full absentee and provisional results. These results will remain unofficial.
  • July 6: Ranked-choice tallies are updated with absentee and provisional ballots as they’re counted and accepted.
  • July 12: The Board of Elections is expected to finish up final ranked-choice rounds with complete absentee and provisional results.

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams at a campaign event
Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams greets supporters during a campaign event, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York

How the campaign shaped up during the pandemic.

The primary’s early months were dominated by Zoom forums.

Nonprofit organizations, unions, and other local groups held discussions that were less debates than opportunities for the candidates to repeat their campaign promises and sharpen their messaging.

Another factor making this campaign rather unusual was the general lack of public polling, with several pollsters saying they were uncomfortable simulating ranked-choice voting with any accuracy.

By May, in-person campaign events began to heat up, and eventually the candidates were able to meet in-person for a handful of televised debates.

Yang started the race as the frontrunner, but as more polling became available in the final weeks, he began to slip into second, third, and even fourth place in some surveys.

However, Yang remained competitive throughout, and an Ipsos poll released on the eve of the primary showed him in second place behind Adams.

Adams cleaned up with labor endorsements around the city, while Yang received a first of its kind joint-endorsement from Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish community leaders. The borough president’s momentum was complicated by a scandal involving his primary residence, when a Politico investigation found Adams may have been living in either New Jersey or his office instead of a Bedford-Stuyvesant brownstone that he officially listed.

Garcia began to surge following her New York Times Editorial Board endorsement, and Wiley was able to capitalize on late support from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Outside of the top four, several progressive candidates failed to gain traction, most notably City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer was accused by two women of sexually assaulting them in the early 2000s. He denied both allegations, but saw a mass defection of endorsements.

The latest twist in the race came in the final weekend, when Yang and Garcia campaigned together to “promote ranked-choice voting,” but not as a co-endorsement. Adams accused them of trying to prevent a person of color from becoming mayor, to which Yang replied that he’s been Asian his whole life.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Eric Adams holds a commanding lead as officials begin ranked-choice runoffs in New York City

From left: Shaun Donovan, Andrew Yang, Ray McGuire, Kathryn Garcia, Eric Adams, and Maya Wiley with New York City's skyline tint blue in the background.
  • New York City voters are selecting Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor.
  • New York is using ranked-choice voting for the first time, so the winner may not be known for weeks.
  • Eric Adams holds a strong lead as absentee and ranked-choice votes remain outstanding.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

New York City officials are beginning the process of ranking the still-unofficial results in New York City’s first-ever ranked-choice mayoral election.

On June 29, the Board of Elections will run the first round of ranked-choice voting based on the results of in-person votes only. These results will remain incomplete and unofficial, however, since the over 124,000 absentee ballots cast in the Democratic primary won’t yet counted and factored into the tally until next week.

Voters went to the polls through June 22 to pick Democratic and Republican nominees for mayor in the race to succeed Mayor Bill de Blasio, who is term-limited.

The winner of the crowded Democratic primary field will be the favorite in November’s general election, with Democrats heavily outnumbering registered Republicans across the five boroughs.

Ranked-choice voting is being used for the first time in the city’s history for these races, complicating predictions and the logistics of counting the votes.

Unofficial and incomplete election night results only had Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams holding a commanding lead, followed by former New York City Sanitation Commissioner Kathryn Garcia, and civil rights attorney Maya Wiley.

Shortly before 11 p.m., former presidential candidate Andrew Yang conceded in a speech in front of supporters.

“I am not going to be the next Mayor of New York City,” Yang said, sitting in fourth place.

Here are the unofficial, un-ranked first-round election results that show how the candidates stood before any ranked-choice rounds are run and before absentee and provisional ballots are added to the tally:

A voter receives her ballot in New York City's June 22 mayoral election
A voter receives her ballot at Frank McCourt High School, in New York, Tuesday, June 22, 2021.

Why we may not know the winner for two more weeks.

While tabulating ranked-choice votes is done via software and is not particularly arduous on its own, it’s taking weeks to know the final results of the mayor’s race because of New York’s procedures for counting absentee ballots.

New York is continuing to allow voters to vote absentee due to the COVID-19 pandemic, and state law allows a lot of time for ballots to be accepted and mistakes with voters’ ballots to be rectified.

Absentee ballots are accepted through June 29 as long as they’re postmarked by Election Day, and voters have another week on top of that to fix or “cure” issues, like missing signatures on the outer envelopes of their ballots, under a new state law. Military and overseas absentee ballots postmarked by Election Day are also accepted through July 5.

Then, ranked-choice voting comes into play. In the mayoral, borough president, and city council races, voters have the option to rank up to five candidates in order of their preference after New York City voters approved a ballot initiative to enact ranked-choice voting in 2019.

Ranked-choice voting ensures that the candidate who eventually wins does so with a majority of the vote.

Since no candidate won over 50% of the vote outright in the Democratic mayoral primary, the votes earned by the candidate who comes in last place are redistributed up to the next-best performing candidate. The process then continues up the chain until one candidate finally earns a majority of the vote.

Here’s a likely timeline for the results, according to THE CITY and The New York Times:

  • June 22: Unofficial, first-round election night results before ranked-choice rounds are released. These results will only include in-person votes, not absentee or provisional ballots.
  • June 29: Board of Elections runs the first round of ranked-choice voting, also without full absentee and provisional results. These results will remain unofficial.
  • July 6: Ranked-choice tallies are updated with absentee and provisional ballots as they’re counted and accepted.
  • July 12: The Board of Elections is expected to finish up final ranked-choice rounds with complete absentee and provisional results.

New York City mayoral candidate Eric Adams at a campaign event
Democratic mayoral candidate Eric Adams greets supporters during a campaign event, Thursday, June 17, 2021, in the Harlem neighborhood of New York

How the campaign shaped up during the pandemic.

The primary’s early months were dominated by Zoom forums.

Nonprofit organizations, unions, and other local groups held discussions that were less debates than opportunities for the candidates to repeat their campaign promises and sharpen their messaging.

Another factor making this campaign rather unusual was the general lack of public polling, with several pollsters saying they were uncomfortable simulating ranked-choice voting with any accuracy.

By May, in-person campaign events began to heat up, and eventually the candidates were able to meet in-person for a handful of televised debates.

Yang started the race as the frontrunner, but as more polling became available in the final weeks, he began to slip into second, third, and even fourth place in some surveys.

However, Yang remained competitive throughout, and an Ipsos poll released on the eve of the primary showed him in second place behind Adams.

Adams cleaned up with labor endorsements around the city, while Yang received a first of its kind joint-endorsement from Hasidic and Orthodox Jewish community leaders. The borough president’s momentum was complicated by a scandal involving his primary residence, when a Politico investigation found Adams may have been living in either New Jersey or his office instead of a Bedford-Stuyvesant brownstone that he officially listed.

Garcia began to surge following her New York Times Editorial Board endorsement, and Wiley was able to capitalize on late support from Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.

Outside of the top four, several progressive candidates failed to gain traction, most notably City Comptroller Scott Stringer.

Stringer was accused by two women of sexually assaulting them in the early 2000s. He denied both allegations, but saw a mass defection of endorsements.

The latest twist in the race came in the final weekend, when Yang and Garcia campaigned together to “promote ranked-choice voting,” but not as a co-endorsement. Adams accused them of trying to prevent a person of color from becoming mayor, to which Yang replied that he’s been Asian his whole life.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Virginia voters select Terry McAuliffe as the Democratic nominee for governor

Terry MacAuliffe
Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (D-VA) speaks to supporters while campaigning June 4, 2021 in Charlottesville, Virginia. McAuliffe, who previously served as governor from 2014-2018, is seeking a second term as Virginia holds its Democratic primary next Tuesday.

  • Virginia is holding Democratic primaries for key statewide offices on Tuesday.
  • Former Democratic Gov. Terry McAuliffe easily clinched the nomination for his old office.
  • Polls in Virginia closed at 7 p.m. ET.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Virginia voters are casting their ballots for June 8th’s Democratic primaries for governor, lieutenant governor, and attorney general. Polls closed at 7 p.m. ET.

Governors can only serve one term at a time under the Virginia constitution, meaning current Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam can’t run for a second consecutive term.

Former Gov. Terry McAuliffe easily clinch the Democratic nomination for the governorship, which he previously held before Northam from 2014 to 2018.

The latest poll of the primary, conducted by Roanoke College, found McAuliffe leading the field by a wide margin. The poll, conducted from May 24 to June 1, surveyed 637 likely Democratic primary voters with a margin of error of ±3.9 points.

In the survey, 49% of likely Democratic voters said they had already voted or planned to vote for McAuliffe, 16% for House Delegate Jennifer Carroll Foy, 11% for Del. Jennifer McClellan, and 27% undecided. Two other candidates, Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax and Del. Lee Carter, polled in the single digits.

McAuliffe will face businessman Glenn Youngkin, who was chosen as the GOP nominee by a select number of party members in a May 8 ranked-choice party convention, with delegates casting their votes at locations around the state.

Virginia Republicans, who opted for the convention format over a traditional primary, selected Youngkin over two GOP members of the House of Delegates, Kirk Cox and Amanda Chase, and entrepreneur Pete Snyder.

McAuliffe is favored by election analysts to defeat Youngkin in the November general election in Virginia, which has trended from a swing state to solidly Democratic territory over the past two decades. The Virginia governor’s race is currently rated as “likely Democratic” by Inside Elections and the Cook Political Report, and as “leans Democratic” by the Crystal Ball at the University of Virginia Center for Politics.

Historically, however, Virginia gubernatorial elections have tended to be more difficult for the party that won the presidential election the prior year, so Democrats aren’t guaranteed a win.

The outcome of the open Democratic primary for lieutenant governor is far less certain. The Roanoke poll found that 45% of voters polled were undecided, with 16% supporting Democratic Del. Hala Ayala, 11% supporting Del. Sam Rasoul, also a Democrat, and the rest of the candidates polling in the single digits.

In the race for attorney general, Democratic incumbent Mark Herring faces a primary challenge from Del. Jerrauld “Jay” Jones, a fellow Democrat. The Roanoke College poll found that 50% of voters had voted for or planned to vote for Herring with 20% for Jones and 28% of voters undecided.

Read the original article on Business Insider

RESULTS: Louisianians voted to fill 2 US House vacancies in Saturday special elections

Karen Carter Peterson
In this Jan. 20, 2021, file photo, state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, speaks in Baton Rouge, La., about her campaign for the 2nd Congressional District seat after signing up for the race.

  • Louisianans voted in two special US House elections on Saturday.
  • The elections will fill vacancies in the 2nd and 5th Congressional Districts.
  • Julia Letlow won the race for the 5th District, while two candidates advanced to a runoff in the 2nd.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Louisiana held special elections for two vacant US House seats on Saturday, March 20. Polls closed at 8 p.m. Central Time.

The 2nd District, which is based in southern Louisiana and includes part of the Baton Rouge area and all of New Orleans, was vacated by former Rep. Cedric Richmond, who left Congress to serve in the White House as Director fo the Office of Public Engagement and a senior advisor to President Joe Biden.

State Senators Karen Carter Peterson and Troy Carter advanced to a runoff for the safely-Democratic seat, which gave Biden over 75% of the vote in 2020, Insider and Decision Desk HQ.

Richmond has endorsed Carter as his replacement, while Peterson has received the backing of EMILY’s List and Stacey Abrams, according to Ballotpedia.

In the 5th District, Rep.-elect Luke Letlow, who was elected to succeed retiring Rep. Ralph Abraham, died of COVID-19 on December 29, 2020, before he was able to assume office.

Letlow’s widow, Julia Letlow, who works as an administrator at the University of Louisiana-Monroe, will win the race to replace him outright with enough votes to avoid a runoff, Insider and Decision Desk HQ projected Saturday night.

The 5th District, which contains a large portion of eastern Louisiana, is safely Republican, backing former President Donald Trump by a margin of over 30 percentage points in 2020, according to Daily Kos.

Louisiana uses a “jungle” election system where all the candidates from all parties run in the same primary, instead of separate primaries for each party.

Since neither candidate earned over 50% of the vote in the 2nd District, Carter and Peterson will advance to a general runoff on April 24, with the winner seated in Congress shortly after.

There are currently five total vacancies in the House, creating a precarious situation for Democratic leaders presiding over a narrow eight-seat majority of 219-211 with some seats set to be vacant for months.

The special election to replace the late Republican Rep. Ron Wright of Texas’s 6th District, who died of COVID-19 on February 7, will take place on May 1.

And two representatives from safely Democratic seats, former Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico and former Rep. Marcia Fudge of Ohio, were tapped to serve in Biden’s cabinet as Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, respectively.

The special election to replace Haaland will take place on June 1, with the nominees selected by party committees. The primary to replace Fudge in Ohio’s 11th District will be on August 3 and the general election on November 2.

Read the original article on Business Insider

LIVE RESULTS: Voters go to the polls in 2 special US House elections in Louisiana

Karen Carter Peterson
In this Jan. 20, 2021, file photo, state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, speaks in Baton Rouge, La., about her campaign for the 2nd Congressional District seat after signing up for the race.

  • Louisianans are voting in two special US House elections on Saturday.
  • The elections will fill vacancies in the 2nd and 5th Congressional Districts.
  • Follow along for live results from Insider and Decision Desk HQ.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Louisiana is holding special elections for two vacant US House seats on Saturday, March 20. Polls closed at 8 p.m. Central Time.

The 2nd District, which is based in southern Louisiana and includes part of the Baton Rouge area and all of New Orleans, was vacated by former Rep. Cedric Richmond, who left Congress to serve in the White House as a senior advisor to President Joe Biden.

The leading contenders for the safely-Democratic seat, which gave Biden over 75% of the vote in 2020, are State Senator Karen Carter Peterson, Sen. Troy Carter, and Gary Chambers.

Richmond has endorsed Carter as his replacement, while Peterson has received the backing of EMILY’s List and Stacey Abrams, according to Ballotpedia.

In the 5th District, Rep.-elect Luke Letlow, who was elected to succeed retiring Rep. Ralph Abraham, died of COVID-19 on December 29, 2020, before he was able to assume office.

Letlow’s widow, Julia Letlow, who works as an administrator at the University of Louisiana-Monroe, will win the race to replace him outright with enough votes to avoid a runoff, Insider and Decision Desk HQ projected Saturday night.

The 5th District, which contains a large portion of eastern Louisiana, is safely Republican, backing former President Donald Trump by a margin of over 30 percentage points in 2020, according to Daily Kos.

Louisiana uses a “jungle” election system where all the candidates from all parties run in the same primary, instead of separate primaries for each party.

If neither candidate earns over 50% of the vote, the top two will advance to a general runoff on April 24, with the winners seated in Congress shortly after.

There are currently five total vacancies in the House, creating a precarious situation for Democratic leaders presiding over a narrow eight-seat majority of 219-211 with some seats set to be vacant for months.

The special election to replace the late Republican Rep. Ron Wright of Texas’s 6th District, who died of COVID-19 on February 7, will take place on May 1.

And two representatives from safely Democratic seats, former Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico and former Rep. Marcia Fudge of Ohio, were tapped to serve in Biden’s cabinet as Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, respectively.

The special election to replace Haaland will take place on June 1, with the nominees selected by party committees. The primary to replace Fudge in Ohio’s 11th District will be on August 3 and the general election on November 2.

Read the original article on Business Insider

LIVE UPDATES: Voters go to the polls in 2 special US House elections in Louisiana

Karen Carter Peterson
In this Jan. 20, 2021, file photo, state Sen. Karen Carter Peterson, D-New Orleans, speaks in Baton Rouge, La., about her campaign for the 2nd Congressional District seat after signing up for the race.

  • Louisianans are voting in two special US House elections on Saturday.
  • The elections will fill vacancies in the 2nd and 5th Congressional Districts.
  • Follow along for live results from Insider and Decision Desk HQ when polls close at 8 p.m. CT.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Louisiana is holding special elections for two vacant US House seats on Saturday, March 20. Polls close at 8 p.m. Central Time.

The 2nd District, which is based in southern Louisiana and includes part of the Baton Rouge area and all of New Orleans, was vacated by former Rep. Cedric Richmond, who left Congress to serve in the White House as a senior advisor to President Joe Biden.

The leading contenders for the safely-Democratic seat, which gave Biden over 75% of the vote in 2020, are State Senator Karen Carter Peterson, Sen. Troy Carter, and Gary Chambers.

Richmond has endorsed Carter as his replacement, while Peterson has received the backing of EMILY’s List and Stacey Abrams, according to Ballotpedia.

In the 5th District, Rep.-elect Luke Letlow, who was elected to succeed retiring Rep. Ralph Abraham, died of COVID-19 on December 29, 2020, before he was able to assume office.

The GOP frontrunner for the 5th District seat is Letlow’s widow, Julia Letlow, who works as an administrator at the University of Louisiana-Monroe.

The 5th District, which contains a large portion of eastern Louisiana, is safely Republican, backing former President Donald Trump by a margin of over 30 percentage points in 2020, according to Daily Kos.

Louisiana uses a “jungle” election system where all the candidates from all parties run in the same primary, instead of separate primaries for each party.

If neither candidate earns over 50% of the vote, the top two will advance to a general runoff on April 24, with the winners seated in Congress shortly after.

There are currently five total vacancies in the House, creating a precarious situation for Democratic leaders presiding over a narrow eight-seat majority of 219-211 with some seats set to be vacant for months.

The special election to replace the late Republican Rep. Ron Wright of Texas’s 6th District, who died of COVID-19 on February 7, will take place on May 1.

And two representatives from safely Democratic seats, former Rep. Deb Haaland of New Mexico and former Rep. Marcia Fudge of Ohio, were tapped to serve in Biden’s cabinet as Secretary of the Interior and Secretary of Housing & Urban Development, respectively.

The special election to replace Haaland will take place on June 1, with the nominees selected by party committees. The primary to replace Fudge in Ohio’s 11th District will be on August 3 and the general election on November 2.

Read the original article on Business Insider

LIVE UPDATES: Polls close in 2 Georgia runoff elections to determine control of the US Senate

 

  • Voting in two crucial US Senate runoffs in Georgia that will determine control of the Senate is ending on Tuesday, January 5. 
  • In Georgia’s regular Senate election, first-term Republican David Perdue is running against Democrat Jon Ossoff. 
  • Republican Senator Kelly Loeffler, appointed in 2019 to fill a vacant seat, will face Democrat Raphael Warnock.
  • If Democrats win both runoffs, the Senate will be divided evenly between 50 Democrats and 50 Republicans, leaving Vice-president elect Kamala Harris as the tie-breaker and giving Democrats the majority.
  • Polls in most of Georgia closed Tuesday at 7 p.m. ET.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

 

Over 3 million voters have voted early in-person or by mail in the Georgia runoffs, which conclude on Tuesday, January 5, according to the US Elections Project. Polls in most of Georgia close at 7 p.m. ET on Tuesday. 

The candidates:

Two US Senate runoffs are taking place in formerly safe-Republican Georgia, which in November voted for a Democratic presidential nominee, President-elect Joe Biden, for the first time since 1992. 

In Georgia, if no candidate earns over 50% of the vote in a given election, the race goes to a runoff between the top-two voter getters. No third-party or write-in candidates are permitted in runoff elections in order to ensure that a candidate earns over 50% of the vote. 

Republican Sen. David Perdue, a former business executive first elected in 2014, is running for a second term against Democrat Jon Ossoff. Ossoff is a 33-year-old CEO of an investigative documentary filmmaking company and a former US House staffer who was the Democratic nominee for the June 2017 special election for Georgia’s 6th Congressional District. 

Sen. Kelly Loeffler, a wealthy Atlanta businesswoman and owner of the WNBA team the Atlanta Dream, was appointed in late 2019 to replace former Sen. Jonny Isakson, who retired before the end of his term due to health concerns.

In November, Loeffler competed in a special jungle election with 20 other candidates to serve out the rest of Isakson’s term, which was set to expire in 2022. 

Loeffler and Democrat Raphael Warnock, senior pastor at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, emerged from the jungle election as the top-two vote-getters. 

Warnock led with 32% of the vote compared to 26% for Loeffler and 20% for GOP Rep. Doug Collins, the third-highest vote-getter. 

The worsening COVID-19 pandemic, including the high-stakes effort to get a coronavirus relief bill passed through Congress and the failed push for $2,000 stimulus checks, has shaped the dynamics of the runoff races. 

Themes of class and economic status have also played a defining role in the race. Ossoff and Warnock have accused Loeffler and Perdue, who both have high levels of personal wealth and are prolific investors, of using their positions in the Senate for profit, including with pandemic-related stock trades. Both Senators have denied any wrongdoing.

In turn, Loeffler and Perdue have tied Ossoff and Warnock to policies like defunding the police, a Green New Deal, Medicare for All, and other progressive priorities in order to paint both as advancing a socialist agenda. 

Loeffler, in particular, has hammered Warnock as “radical” in debates and ads, and said Warnock would be the first “Marxist” Senator. She has zeroed in on comments Warnock has made during sermons and guests that have appeared at the Ebenezer Baptist Church, as well as Warnock’s personal life.

Kelly Loeffler
Senator Kelly Loeffler (R-GA) speaks at a campaign event attended by Ivanka Trump and Senator David Perdue on December 21, 2020 in Milton, Georgia. The two Georgia U.S. Senate runoff elections on Jan. 5 will decide control of the Senate.

The stakes: 

The two Georgia runoffs will decide control of the US Senate and determine how much of Biden’s agenda will feasibly stand to be passed by Congress.

Going into the runoffs, Republicans control 51 seats compared to 48 for Democrats (Perdue’s term technically expired at noon on January 3 pending the outcome of his runoff race, leaving the Senate with 99 members). The Democrats flipped two Senate seats in Arizona and Colorado in November, but lost former Sen. Doug Jones’ seat in Alabama.

If both Perdue and Loeffler win, the Senate will be composed of 52 Republicans and 48 Democrats, including two Independent Senators that caucus with Democrats. 

If a Republican wins one runoff race but a Democrat wins the other, the Senate will be comprised of 51 Republicans and 49 Democrats. 

If the Democrats win both seats, the composition of the Senate will be 50-50, with Democratic Vice-president elect Kamala Harris serving as the tie-breaking vote. Because of Harris’ role as president of the US Senate, Democrats would hold the majority in the chamber. 

The winner of the Ossoff-Perdue race will serve a full six-year term and won’t be up for reelection again until 2026.

But because the Loeffler-Warnock race is technically a special election, the winner will have to prepare to run again in 2022 for a full term. 

The runoffs will also be an inflection point in an ongoing and bitterly contentious fight between different factions of the GOP following Trump’s narrow presidential election loss in Georgia.

Trump and his allies waged an all-out assault on the integrity of the state’s election process and continue to insist he would have won if not for massive fraud – even after a risk-limiting audit that included a hand recount of all five million ballots cast in the presidential race and a subsequent machine recount requested by the Trump campaign affirmed Biden’s victory. 

Trump has spent weeks publicly attacking Georgia’s Republican Gov. Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger for their refusal to echo his unfounded allegations of massive election fraud, with Loeffler and Perdue also calling on Raffensperger to step down as he staunchly defended the integrity of Georgia’s election. 

On January 2, Trump called Raffensperger to explicitly pressure him to overturn the twice-certified Georgia election. In a stunning hour-long phone call, a recording of which was obtained and published by The Washington Post, Trump unsuccessfully pleaded with Raffensperger to “find 11,780 votes” for him and regurgitated long-debunked conspiracy theories and misinformation about the election. 

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Two runoff elections in Georgia will determine control of the US Senate

Ossoff Warnock
Georgia Democratic Senate candidates Jon Ossoff and Raphael Warnock greet each other onstage during the “Vote GA Blue” concert for Georgia Democratic Senate candidates Raphael Warnock and Jon Ossoff at New Birth Church on December 28, 2020 at New Birth Church in Stonecrest, Georgia.

  • Voting in two crucial US Senate runoffs in Georgia that will determine control of the Senate is ending on Tuesday, January 5. 
  • In Georgia’s regular Senate election, first-term Republican David Perdue is running against Democrat Jon Ossoff. 
  • Republican Senator Kelly Loeffler, appointed in 2019 to fill a vacant seat, will face Democrat Raphael Warnock.
  • If Democrats win both runoffs, the Senate will be divided evenly between 50 Democrats and 50 Republicans, leaving Vice-president elect Kamala Harris as the tie-breaker and giving Democrats the majority.
  • Polls in Georgia close Tuesday at 7 p.m. ET.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Over 3 million voters have voted early in-person or by mail in the Georgia runoffs, which conclude on Tuesday, January 5, according to the US Elections Project. Polls in Georgia close at 7 p.m. ET on Tuesday. 

The candidates:

Two US Senate runoffs are taking place in formerly safe-Republican Georgia, which in November voted for a Democratic presidential nominee, President-elect Joe Biden, for the first time since 1992. 

In Georgia, if no candidate earns over 50% of the vote in a given election, the race goes to a runoff between the top-two voter getters. No third-party or write-in candidates are permitted in runoff elections in order to ensure that a candidate earns over 50% of the vote. 

Republican Sen. David Perdue, a former business executive first elected in 2014, is running for a second term against Democrat Jon Ossoff. Ossoff is a 33-year-old CEO of an investigative documentary filmmaking company and a former US House staffer who was the Democratic nominee for the June 2017 special election for Georgia’s 6th Congressional District. 

Sen. Kelly Loeffler, a wealthy Atlanta businesswoman and owner of the WNBA team the Atlanta Dream, was appointed in late 2019 to replace former Sen. Jonny Isakson, who retired before the end of his term due to health concerns.

In November, Loeffler competed in a special jungle election with 20 other candidates to serve out the rest of Isakson’s term, which was set to expire in 2022. 

Loeffler and Democrat Raphael Warnock, senior pastor at the Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, emerged from the jungle election as the top-two vote-getters. 

Warnock led with 32% of the vote compared to 26% for Loeffler and 20% for GOP Rep. Doug Collins, the third-highest vote-getter. 

The worsening COVID-19 pandemic, including the high-stakes effort to get a coronavirus relief bill passed through Congress and the failed push for $2,000 stimulus checks, has shaped the dynamics of the runoff races. 

Themes of class and economic status have also played a defining role in the race. Ossoff and Warnock have accused Loeffler and Perdue, who both have high levels of personal wealth and are prolific investors, of using their positions in the Senate for profit, including with pandemic-related stock trades. Both Senators have denied any wrongdoing.

In turn, Loeffler and Perdue have tied Ossoff and Warnock to policies like defunding the police, a Green New Deal, Medicare for All, and other progressive priorities in order to paint both as advancing a socialist agenda. 

Loeffler, in particular, has hammered Warnock as “radical” in debates and ads, and said Warnock would be the first “Marxist” Senator. She has zeroed in on comments Warnock has made during sermons and guests that have appeared at the Ebenezer Baptist Church, as well as Warnock’s personal life.

Kelly Loeffler
Senator Kelly Loeffler (R-GA) speaks at a campaign event attended by Ivanka Trump and Senator David Perdue on December 21, 2020 in Milton, Georgia. The two Georgia U.S. Senate runoff elections on Jan. 5 will decide control of the Senate.

The stakes: 

The two Georgia runoffs will decide control of the US Senate and determine how much of Biden’s agenda will feasibly stand to be passed by Congress.

Going into the runoffs, Republicans control 51 seats compared to 48 for Democrats (Perdue’s term technically expired at noon on January 3 pending the outcome of his runoff race, leaving the Senate with 99 members). The Democrats flipped two Senate seats in Arizona and Colorado in November, but lost former Sen. Doug Jones’ seat in Alabama.

If both Perdue and Loeffler win, the Senate will be composed of 52 Republicans and 48 Democrats, including two Independent Senators that caucus with Democrats. 

If a Republican wins one runoff race but a Democrat wins the other, the Senate will be comprised of 51 Republicans and 49 Democrats. 

If the Democrats win both seats, the composition of the Senate will be 50-50, with Democratic Vice-president elect Kamala Harris serving as the tie-breaking vote. Because of Harris’ role as president of the US Senate, Democrats would hold the majority in the chamber. 

The winner of the Ossoff-Perdue race will serve a full six-year term and won’t be up for reelection again until 2026.

But because the Loeffler-Warnock race is technically a special election, the winner will have to prepare to run again in 2022 for a full term. 

The runoffs will also be an inflection point in an ongoing and bitterly contentious fight between different factions of the GOP following Trump’s narrow presidential election loss in Georgia.

Trump and his allies waged an all-out assault on the integrity of the state’s election process and continue to insist he would have won if not for massive fraud – even after a risk-limiting audit that included a hand recount of all five million ballots cast in the presidential race and a subsequent machine recount requested by the Trump campaign affirmed Biden’s victory. 

Trump has spent weeks publicly attacking Georgia’s Republican Gov. Brian Kemp and Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger for their refusal to echo his unfounded allegations of massive election fraud, with Loeffler and Perdue also calling on Raffensperger to step down as he staunchly defended the integrity of Georgia’s election. 

On January 2, Trump called Raffensperger to explicitly pressure him to overturn the twice-certified Georgia election. In a stunning hour-long phone call, a recording of which was obtained and published by The Washington Post, Trump unsuccessfully pleaded with Raffensperger to “find 11,780 votes” for him and regurgitated long-debunked conspiracy theories and misinformation about the election. 

Read the original article on Business Insider