US truck and military vehicle manufacturer Navistar just disclosed it was targeted by a cyberattack

Flags fly in front of Navistar's corporate headquarters on April 17, 2018 in Lisle, Illinois.
Flags fly in front of Navistar’s corporate headquarters on April 17, 2018 in Lisle, Illinois.

US truck and military vehicle manufacturer Navistar International Corp said on Monday that the company was targeted by a cyberattack.

In an 8-K US Securities and Exchange Commission filing published on Monday, Navistar said it became aware of a potential data breach last month, saying it received a claim that data had been stolen from its IT system. It’s unclear exactly what data was taken.

“The company, with the assistance of third-party experts, continues to investigate and address the scope and impact of the cybersecurity incident,” the Illinois-based company said. Navistar manufactures military trucks, diesel engines, school and commercial buses, and more.

Navistar added that its IT system “continues to be fully operational” and that law enforcement is aware of the incident.

The company’s data breach is the latest in a string of cyberattacks. In recent weeks, the Colonial Pipeline, New York City’s transit authority, and meat supplier JBS have all been targeted.

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FireEye stock tumbles 11% after the cybersecurity group reveals hackers breached its defenses and stole diagnostic tools

FILE PHOTO: The FireEye logo is seen outside the company's offices in Milpitas, California, December 29, 2014. REUTERS/Beck Diefenbach
FireEye logo is seen outside the company’s offices in Milpitas, California

  • FireEye stock slumped as much as 11% on Wednesday, wiping $400 million off the cybersecurity group’s market capitalization.
  • The company revealed on Tuesday that hackers recently breached its defenses and stole tools it uses to test customers’ protections.
  • “We were attacked by a highly sophisticated threat actor, one whose discipline, operational security, and techniques lead us to believe it was a state-sponsored attack,” FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia said in a blog post.
  • FireEye is working with the FBI, Microsoft, and other partners to investigate the theft, and has developed and shared more than 300 countermeasures to the stolen diagnostic tools.
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FireEye shares tumbled as much as 11% on Wednesday, slashing the cybersecurity group’s market capitalization by up to $400 million. The selloff was sparked by FireEye’s disclosure that ostensibly state-sponsored hackers recently broke through its defenses and stole security-testing tools.

“We were attacked by a highly sophisticated threat actor, one whose discipline, operational security, and techniques lead us to believe it was a state-sponsored attack,” FireEye CEO Kevin Mandia said in a blog post on Tuesday after the market close.

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The hackers appeared to be “highly trained,” displayed “top-tier offensive capabilities,” and employed a “novel combination of techniques” to break through FireEye’s digital fortifications and access its Red Team tools, which mimic cyber attacks to pinpoint weaknesses in its customers’ protections.

FireEye has roped in the FBI and partners such as Microsoft to help it investigate the incident, Mandia said. It has also developed and shared more than 300 countermeasures in case the thieves deploy its diagnostic tools in the coming weeks.

The stock-price drop likely reflects concerns that FireEye’s customers will be less trusting of the company’s ability to ward off attacks if its own systems can be breached. Investors may also be worried that FireEye’s tools could be blamed for future cyberattacks, or the company could fall victim to further attacks.

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The cybersecurity group’s profile has grown in recent years, as it has helped companies such as Sony and Equifax deal with high-profile attacks. It was also called in when Russian hackers broke into US government systems in 2015.

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