This microwave by Panasonic is the best microwave we’ve tested – here’s why

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Panasonic microwave review 2021 lead

  • The Panasonic NN-SN65KB microwave comes with many useful preset buttons and cooks food efficiently.
  • We named it the best microwave overall after testing several for our guide to the best microwaves.
  • My favorite features include the Sensor Reheat preset for leftovers and the beverage warmer.

Table of Contents: Masthead StickyNN-SN65KB Microwave Oven (small)

If you thought cooking food in the microwave couldn’t get any easier, microwaves now come with tons of presets, and some are even smartphone connected. When it comes to picking out the best microwave for your household, you want something that heats food well and is dead simple to use.

After many hours of research, interviewing experts, and testing five microwaves from reputable brands in our guide to the best microwaves, I’ve learned what sets a great microwave apart from an average one. Key features like even heating, useful preset buttons, and high power output are just a few characteristics essential to the best microwave. The Panasonic NN-SN65KB microwave was our best overall pick out of the five I tested. I’ll tell you why below.

Design and specs

Panasonic microwave review 2021 interior

The first thing I noticed about the Panasonic microwave is that at 1,200 watts power, it cooked food faster than any other model I tested. It’s compact yet spacious inside, with dimensions of about 21 inches by 12 inches by 16 inches, and comes with 11 power levels and five presets, including Sensor Cook Reheat, Coffee/Milk, Turbo Defrost by the pound or kilogram, Popcorn, Frozen Foods, More and Less buttons that add or subtract 10 seconds to the cooking time, and a 30-Second button for quickly adding time.

The buttons themselves are easy to press, and the microwave chimes loudly when it’s done cooking. At first glance, this microwave has everything and anything you would need in a standard microwave.

Review of the Panasonic Microwave

Now, it was time to test how well it cooks food. I experimented with the marshmallow test – an actual industry-standard experiment to check for hot and cold spots by heating marshmallows for a set period of time. To conduct this test, I cut parchment paper to the size of the microwave’s glass tray and completely covered it with mini marshmallows, leaving no blank spaces. I cooked the marshmallows in the microwave for two minutes on high to see how they expanded and cooked. I noticed they all expanded evenly in this microwave, and at the end of two minutes, there was only a bit of burning in the very center of the marshmallows, which was to be expected since it’s the only part that doesn’t move as the turntable is spinning.

Panasonic microwave review 2021 marshmallows
Marshmallows cooked in the Panasonic microwave; an industry-standard test to check for hot spots.

The microwave’s power levels start at P10, the highest cooking level, and go down to P0, the Keep Warm level. P10 is the default setting and the one I used regularly for heating and cooking. I tested the Keep Warm level with a small bowl of stir fry sauce that I left in the microwave on P0 for 20 minutes, and it kept the sauce warm without changing its consistency. You can even set up to three stages of cooking, a great feature if you want to cook food and then automatically keep it warm for a few minutes, or if you are defrosting food and then want to cook it immediately after. This three-stage cooking process really comes in handy when you’re multitasking because you can just set it and focus on your other tasks at hand.

Panasonic microwave review 2021 control panel

Aside from cooking food, the microwave also has a Sensor Reheat feature that works well for reheating leftovers. A chart in the manual tells you what sensor level to select for different types of foods, and I tried it with oatmeal, which is Category 2. I selected the corresponding sensor level and started the microwave. Once cooking, it detects the humidity level of the food inside and starts counting down the cooking time. The oatmeal was perfectly warmed and didn’t burn or spill over.

The microwave also comes with a Coffee/Milk preset that reheated my cup of coffee perfectly. As someone who despises when my coffee gets cold, I am constantly reheating it, but nothing is worse than the burnt taste it gets after nuking it in the microwave. I was really pleased to find this preset warmed my coffee up to the perfect temperature while keeping its original flavor.

Panasonic microwave review 2021 popcorn

If you want to make popcorn, this microwave makes it super easy. The Popcorn button features three levels based on the amount of corn you’re popping. I tested this with a 3.2-ounce bag of popcorn. None of the popcorn burned and only 23 kernels were left unpopped, so I was pretty pleased with this preset feature.

Cons to consider

I was less impressed with the Frozen Food preset that categorizes food groups into numbers, much like Sensor Reheat. I used this when making frozen mac and cheese and found that the microwave grossly overestimated the amount of time needed to cook it. By the time the microwave chimed, the mac and cheese was overcooked and burned at the edges, so I’d stick to package instructions when cooking frozen foods in this microwave.

I also found the light inside to be too dim, so it was difficult to monitor food while it was cooking. However, the preset buttons heat pretty accurately so I didn’t feel the need to constantly monitor my food. Another minor downside is the noticeable fingerprint smudges on the control panel. If you’re someone who is vigilant about keeping your appliances smudge-free, you may find yourself wiping this microwave down frequently.

What are your alternatives?

The Panasonic microwave is a good option for most families. However, if you’re specifically looking for something with a larger capacity than standard, we tested and like the Panasonic NN-SD975S Microwave. If you want a microwave that can also cook foods like an oven, the Toshiba Microwave Oven EC042A5C-SS is our top choice.

We didn’t test over-the-range or built-in microwaves as part of our most recent guide, so if that’s something you’re after, you’ll have to look elsewhere.

The bottom line

At a reasonable price of around $180, the Panasonic microwave is a great option because it has more preset features than your average microwave and it heats food the best out of the microwaves we’ve tested. It’s a great option for your household, even if you have small children since it comes with a child-safety lock, and will fit most, if not all, your needs.

Pros: Five useful preset buttons, 1,200 watts of cooking power (more than most microwaves), includes a child-safety lock button

Cons: Fingerprint smudges are visible, the light inside isn’t bright enough to check food while it’s cooking, it’s loud, Frozen Foods feature doesn’t cook accurately, doesn’t have Express Cook buttons

NN-SN65KB Microwave Oven (button)

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29 thoughtful cookbook gifts for any occasion

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26 cookbooks for every type of home cook update 4x3

To me, there’s no better gift to give or receive than a great cookbook. A cookbook with beautiful photos, thoughtful narratives, and foolproof recipes can feed the imagination, transport your giftee to another city or country, and inspire them to get creative in the kitchen. There are cookbooks out there to suit every type of cook, whether novice or expert, and feed all interests from TV show cookbooks to comprehensive tomes on the science of cooking.

Every year, hundreds of new cookbooks make their way onto bookstore shelves. Here are our favorite cookbooks, new and old, to gift this year.

Here are 29 of the best cookbooks gifts for every type of cook:

For the friend who cooks with the seasons

my shanghai betty liu best cookbooks

“My Shanghai” by Betty Liu, $28.41, available at Amazon

This debut cookbook from Betty Liu (who somehow found the time to author it amid her general surgery residency) is an homage to seasonal cooking and her family’s roots in the Chinese regions of Shanghai, Jiangsu, and Zhejiang. I picked up this cookbook up in my local bookstore and couldn’t put it down (and ended up bringing it home with me). The chapters are organized by season and explain the influence the weather, holidays, and traditions have on the recipes prepared throughout the year. I love the stories Liu relates about the inspirations behind her recipes, like climbing a mountain to eat Double-Mushroom Noodle Soup at a temple, foraging spring bamboo shoots for Oil-Braised Spring Bamboo, and the bowls of breakfast noodles her father would make her before test days. I’ve already made the Shanghai Stir-Fried Rice Cakes four or five times, and I can’t wait to dive into more of the recipes as the seasons progress. 

For the cook who wants to master their grill

rodney scott best cookbooks

“Rodney Scott’s World of Barbecue” by Rodney Scott and Lolis Eric Elie, $24.99, available at Amazon

My best friend (and fellow cookbook collector) recently texted me raving about this cookbook and the genius of Rodney Scott’s Loaded Pork Skin “Nachos,” Pit-Smoked Turkey, and whole-hog approach to Carolina barbecue. Scott’s positivity and passion shine throughout the book, and you’ll learn lots about southern foodways and the history of Carolina barbecue along the way.  

For the parent planning their next trip

dishoom best cookbook

“Dishoom” by Shamil Thakrar, $16.40, available at Amazon

Whether it’s London or Bombay that is your giftee’s next destination, “Dishoom” is required reading before they jet off. The popular Dishoom restaurants in London are inspired by the Irani cafes of Bombay and serve “tipples,” snacks, and mains like Mango Kulfi, Pau Bhaji, and Roomali Roti. In “Dishoom,” you’ll learn to cook the restaurant’s entire menu, and be taken on a tour of Bombay’s cafes (complete with a map) along the way. 

For the coworker who has *opinions* on babka

jew-ish best cookbook

“Jew-ish” by Jake Cohen, $23.49, available at Amazon

At Insider Reviews we have lots of opinions, especially about food, and a recent debate centered around the merits of cinnamon versus chocolate fillings for babka. I like Jake Cohen’s philosophy in “Jew-ish,” which is that babka is delicious no matter what you fill it with. “Jew-ish” is a thoughtful collection of recipes centered around Cohen’s Ashkenazi heritage, his own self-discovery in the kitchen, and the Persian-Iraqi traditions of his husband. Cohen celebrates the origins of Jewish dishes, while also putting his own twist on the classics. You’ll see this in action in his recipes for Cacio e Pepe Rugelach, Black and White Chocolate Chip Cookies, and yes, You Can Go Your Own Way: Babka Edition.

For the family member intimidated by their new Instant Pot

instant pot best cookbook

“The Step-by-Step Instant Pot Cookbook” by Jeffrey Eisner, $10.78, available at Amazon

Insider Reviews reporter, James Brains, is currently testing Instant Pots and other multicookers for an update to our guide to the best electric pressure cookers. He’s been using recipes from this cookbook and reports that they’re easy to follow, have plenty of photos, and are delicious to boot. The book features more than 750 photos detailing step-by-step how to make the 100+ recipes, and makes a great gift for anyone who is curious about Instant Pots but hasn’t taken the plunge yet.

For the history buff

Jubilee cookbook

“Jubilee” by Toni Tipton-Martin, $20.39, available at Amazon

Toni Tipton-Martin’s personal collection of African-American cookbooks spans more than 400 titles and her knowledge of American food history is on full display in “Jubilee.” Through recipes and stories, she relates the history of Black folks who shaped American cuisine into what it is today, from those who cooked under the confines of brutal enslavement to the chefs who ran White House kitchens. “Jubilee” is a masterful work of American history, as told through food.

For the person who loves pie but fears making it

pie academy best cookbook gifts

“Pie Academy” by Ken Haedrich, $21.66, available at Amazon

A compendium of 255 pie recipes, “Pie Academy” is likely the last pie cookbook you’ll ever need. It has nearly a dozen recipes for different types of pie crust, a troubleshooting section for when things don’t go as expected, and chapters organized by seasonality and filling type. It’s guaranteed to be a hit with the pie lover in your life, especially one who is interested in making pies but has always found them a bit daunting. 

For the home cook that also loves to read

black white grey best cookbook gifts

“Black, White, and The Grey” by Mashama Bailey and John O. Morisano, $15.69, available at Amazon

While not a cookbook, “Black, White, and The Grey,” tells the story of one of the most celebrated restaurants in America: The Grey in Savannah, Georgia. Mashama Bailey, who is Black, and John O. Morisano, who is white, relate the story of how they turned a dilapidated formerly segregated Greyhound bus station into an award-winning restaurant. The dual memoir touches on race, community, and friendship, with some delicious food anecdotes along the way.

For the friend who wants to master the essentials

my korea

“My Korea” by Hooni Kim, $22.94, at Amazon

Michelin-starred chef Hooni Kim’s debut cookbook is a crash course in the essentials of Korean cuisine. The book’s tagline is “traditional flavors, modern recipes,” and that is an accurate summation of what you can expect to find in this cookbook — from Dolsot Bibimbap to Budae Jjigae to Hanjan’s Spicy Rice Cakes. When I first laid my hands on this cookbook, I wanted to make (and eat) every single recipe. If you’re looking for some solid foundation recipes, “My Korea” delivers.

For the person with quarantine cooking fatigue

Indian ish

“Indian-ish” by Priya Krishna, $18.69, available at Amazon

In her debut cookbook, Priya Krishna (contributor to Bon Appetit, New York Times, and others) offers up beloved favorite recipes from her Indian-American family, including Tomato Rice with Crispy Cheddar, Malaysian Ramen, and what her dad calls Indian Gatorade (Shikanji). The recipes are largely vegetarian, creative, fun, comforting, and guaranteed to inspire anyone who feels stuck in a rut with their cooking in 2021. 

For the person who spent 2020 mastering sourdough

new world sourdough

“New World Sourdough” by Bryan Ford, $13.42, available at Amazon

This was the year of the sourdough starter, and few people are as well-versed in fermented breads as Bryan Ford, blogger and baker. We’re not just talking about your classic sourdough boule; Ford is well-known for demonstrating the breadth of what you can do with a sourdough starter: from Sourdough Pan de Coco to Sourdough Discard Battered Fried Chicken.

For the cousin who’s just learning to cook

salt fat acid heat

“Salt, Fat, Acid, Heat” by Samin Nosrat, $19.43, available at Amazon

In this beautifully illustrated cookbook, chef and New York Times columnist Samin Nosrat outlines the foundations of cooking, from when to salt your chicken to how to make the perfect focaccia. All the information is presented in a fun, engaging way alongside original illustrations you’ll want to frame and hang in your kitchen.

For your family member who loves “Emily in Paris”

la buvette

“La Buvette” by Camille Fourmont and Kate Leahy, $14.99, available at Amazon

“La Buvette” is part cookbook, part guide to French living. Interspersed with recipes from the cookbook’s namesake cafe are beautiful pictures of Paris, tips about shopping in France’s vintage markets, and instructions on how to dry flowers. The cookbook is a lovely escape into Parisian living, perfect for any Francophile dreaming of a visit to the City of Lights. 

For your friend who knows all the best restaurants

xian foods

“Xi’an Famous Foods” by Jason Wang, $22.51, available at Amazon

Xi’an Famous Foods started as a small family-owned market stall in the Flushing neighborhood of Queens. Its hand-pulled cumin lamb noodles have become so loved that there are now 14 locations all around New York City. In this cookbook, the son of the family and CEO of the business Jason Wang divulges some of the recipes that made his family business famous, as well as other classic dishes from Xi’an in western China.

For the fan of the ‘Great British Baking Show’

Baking Kim Joy

“Baking with Kim-Joy” by Kim-Joy, $14.89, available at Amazon

Fans of GBBO will likely remember series nine runner-up Kim-Joy’s adorable and creative bakes, like her giant chocolate planet filled with “space turtles,” or her “Silke the vegetarian mermaid” pie. Kim-Joy brings the same color and fun to her bakes in her debut cookbook, which includes Pigfiteroles in Mud, Tazhong Cat Buns, and a version of her Space Turtle Cake. 

For the person experimenting with a plant-based lifestyle this year

vegetable kingdom cookbook gifts

“Vegetable Kingdom” by Bryant Terry, $17.39, available at Amazon

James Beard Award-winning chef and food activist Bryant Terry offers 150 vegan recipes in his most recent cookbook. Instead of trying to imitate meaty dishes, Terry’s book celebrates the vegetable and all its parts: skin, husk, flowers, roots, and all. You’ll find recipes for Pea Shoot and Peanut Salad, Grilled Spring Onions with Lemon-Thyme Oil, Cornmeal-Fried Oyster Mushroom Po’Boys, and more. A special hallmark of Terry’s books is that they often contain a playlist to listen to while you’re cooking, and “Vegetable Kingdom” is no different, featuring recommended tracks by Duke Ellington, Santana, Björk, and more.

For the sometimes-vegetarian

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“Jerusalem: A Cookbook” by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi, $19.96, available at Amazon

Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi were both born in Jerusalem in the same year — Tamimi on the Arab east side and Ottolenghi in the Jewish west. This cookbook is a unique, cross-cultural homage to the vibrant flavors of the city in totality with more than 100 recipes. 

For the hummus lover

falastin

“Falastin” by Sami Tamimi, $18.99, available at Amazon

Longtime Ottolenghi collaborator (and co-author of “Jerusalem,” another of our cookbook picks), Sam Tamimi, crafted his latest cookbook as an homage to Palestinian food. The book is rich in recipes, from multiple variations of shakshuka and hummus, to verdant salads, and colorful dips. Along the way, Tamimi tells the culinary history of Palestinian food — from the home cooks feeding their neighbors in refugee camps to the restaurateurs cooking for tourists in Bethlehem.

For the friend who lives for the next Li Ziqi video

The Breath of a Wok

“The Breath of a Wok” by Grace Young, $30.08, available at Amazon

Grace Young, a self-described wok therapist and advocate for the future of America’s Chinatowns, has been teaching the next generation the ins and outs of wok cooking. I bought my first wok on her recommendation and it’s easily my favorite pan to cook in. Her book “The Breath of a Wok” outlines key techniques for cooking in this versatile pan, like making use of the hot and cool zones and using the large bowl of the wok for deep frying.

For the person who recently moved

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“Molly on the Range: Recipes and Stories from An Unlikely Life on a Farm” by Molly Yeh, $19.54, available at Amazon

Molly Yeh is the star of Food Network’s “Girl Meets Farm” and winner of the Judges’ Choice IACP Cookbook Award. “Molly on the Range” explores home, family, her Jewish and Chinese heritage, and Yeh’s Midwestern farm life. You’ll find recipes for Sufganiyot, Chicken Potstickers, Challah Waffles, and more.

For the person who gets all their news from Twitter

Chrissy Teigan book

“Cravings” by Chrissy Teigen, $21.32, available at Amazon

Supermodel, mom, and prolific tweeter Chrissy Teigen is also the author of two cookbooks. Her first, “Cravings,” is a celebration of all things comfort food and includes selections from her Thai-American upbringing (Jok Moo), recipes from her husband John Legend (John’s Fried Chicken Wings with Spicy Honey Butter), and favorites inspired by her travels to Italy and beyond (Lemony Arugula Spaghetti Cacio E Pepe). The book is filled with anecdotes and Teigen’s signature humor, and the recipes are delicious and approachable.

For the person who can’t get enough of “Cravings”

Pepper Thai Cookbook

“The Pepper Thai Cookbook” by Pepper Teigen, $17.84, available at Amazon

If your giftee already has and loves “Cravings” and “Cravings: Hungry for More,” they’ll be thrilled to know that Chrissy Teigen’s mom Pepper is getting a cookbook of her own. Pepper is a beloved fixture in both of Chrissy’s books, on her website, and on her YouTube channel, where she has her own mini-series: Pepper’s Corner. You can expect “The Pepper Thai Cookbook” to include dishes like Pad Korat (the version of Pad Thai served in her hometown of Korat), Pad Thai Brussels Sprouts, and Nam Prik Sloppy Joes. This cookbook is shipping in April, and already gearing up to be one of the most anticipated cookbooks of 2021.

For the pint-sized cook in your life

ATC kids book

“The Complete Cookbook for Young Chefs” by America’s Test Kitchen, $11.85, available at Amazon

I worked for America’s Test Kitchen (ATK) for seven years and was privy to the care its team puts into each and every one of its cookbooks. ATK’s series of cookbooks for kids is the epitome of that detail and care; every one of the recipes in this volume was tested by pro chefs and kid cooks. The recipes are specifically designed with kids in mind, outlining when to get an adult for help with handling hot ingredients or sharp tools. This is the book I wish was available to me when I was a child, and I’ve gifted it and the kid’s baking book to every kid I know. I love getting reports from their parents about a new recipe they cooked or discovered.

For the person always posting pictures of their cheese board

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“Platters and Boards: Beautiful, Casual Spreads for Every Occasion” by Shelley Westerhausen, $16.39, available at Amazon

In her best-selling cookbook, author and food blogger Shelley Westerhausen shares 40 casual yet chic spreads (complete with meat and drink pairings) that anyone can make and enjoy. It’s also a visual cornucopia that’s just as satisfying to flip through as to use when hosting get-togethers when it’s safe to do so.

For the friend who likes to Instagram all their food

ottolenghi flavor

“Ottolenghi Flavor” by Yotam Ottolenghi, $25.49, available at Amazon

Yotam Ottolenghi is owner and chef of some of London’s most beloved cafes and restaurants. His recipes are some of the most colorful and beautiful out there, and his latest cookbook is no exception. “Flavor” is filled with mostly vegetarian recipes that not only pack a punch visually but flavor-wise, too. Ottolenghi and his co-authors expound the building blocks of flavor in three sections: process, pairing, and produce. The result is more than 100 ‘gram-worthy recipes from Spicy Mushroom Lasagna to Iceberg Wedges with Smoky Eggplant Cream.

For the self-described dessert person

dessert person

“Dessert Person” by Claire Saffitz, $24.94, available at Amazon

Claire Saffitz may be known for her wildly popular Gourmet Makes series on YouTube, but she’s a pastry chef at heart and her affinity for baked goods is out in full force with her new cookbook “Dessert Person.” In this cookbook, you can find creative recipes for Babkallah (a babka-Challah mashup), Apple and Concord Grape Crumble Pie, Strawberry-Cornmeal Layer Cake, and Malted Forever Brownies. It’s sure to please the dessert lover in your life.

For the person who had to cancel their vacation last year

pasta grannies

“Pasta Grannies” by Vicky Bennison, $18.99, available at Amazon

Each episode of the “Pasta Grannies” YouTube series is an escape to a different region of Italy, where local grannies (or nonne) teach the audience to prepare and cook a regional dish — from classics like Spaghetti alla Carbonara to a pasta shape from Sardinia only three women know how to make. This cookbook takes some of the most popular videos from the series and turns them into tangible recipes you can cook at home. Between watching the video and cooking from the book, you can transport yourself to a little corner of Italy without leaving your home.

For the person homesick for their grandma’s cooking

In Bibi's Kitchen

“In Bibi’s Kitchen” by Hawa Hassan, $18.69, available at Amazon

This cookbook centers around grandmothers (or bibis) from eight south and east African countries. Throughout the book, we get to know the women whose recipes are featured and learn about their personal history and the history of their country. Along the way, you’ll find recipes for Eritrean Doro Wat, Tanzanian Date Bread, Kenyan Kachumbari, and more. It’s the kind of cookbook that makes think about your grandmother.

For the person who lives by a cookie-a-day philosophy

100 cookies

100 Cookies by Sarah Keiffer, $23.99, available at Amazon

A good ol’ chocolate chip cookie never goes out of style, but if you have a cookie lover in your life, consider gifting them this homage to baked goods. You’ll find recipes for the classics (including four different variations of chocolate chip cookies) as well cookies you’ve probably never had before, like Banana-Espresso-Cacao Nib cookies.

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Omaha Steaks is one of our favorite online meat markets, and right now you can order complete Easter packages for an easy holiday dinner

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

Omaha Steaks Lifestyle

  • Online food company Omaha Steaks has been in business since 1917 and ships out 4 million orders annually.
  • It sells meat and other foods for as little as $39.99 per bundle, and offers bulk packages to help you stock up.
  • Every cut of meat ships in its own vacuum-sealed package and comes with precise, easy-to-follow cooking instructions.
  • You can still order steaks, ham, and sides in time for Easter delivery.

Filet Mignon Dinner (small)

You’ve heard of Omaha Steaks. It’s the mail order meat company that sent your boss some filet mignon as a thank you from his boss. Or maybe your uncle has been talking about it ever since he got that one box of steaks back in 1998. Or it’s possible that you saw it advertised in some in-flight magazine.

If you’re like many folks out there, you probably think the company sells quality meats but at prices that put their foods outside of your comfort zone. If you only focus on Omaha Steaks’ packages, like the $299 Butcher’s Backyard Basics or the $159 Build Your Own Holiday Feast complete with pork loin roast, savory sides, and sweet desserts, then yeah, you’d be right. On the other hand, you can also order a box of food from Omaha Steaks for less than $40.

What you get from Omaha Steaks

Try a package of four 5-ounce top sirloin steaks (seasoning included). In other words, you get a fine meal for four people at $12.50 per person. And that, friends, is better pricing than you would find for dinner at most restaurants.

The fact is, until you get into the larger packages or the choicest cuts of meat (Filet mignon costs a lot of money, okay?), ordering food from Omaha Steaks isn’t all that much more expensive than getting it from the grocery store, and the selection and quality are better than what most supermarkets offer.

Omaha Steaks Ribeye

And ordering your steaks, pork chops, burgers, lobster tails, and all sorts of other meats and sides from this hundred-year-old company is a whole lot cheaper than dining at a steakhouse. With all the variety Omaha Steaks offers, from entrees and sides to desserts and even wine, it can easily become a one-stop online shop for most of your dinner-making needs.

What the food from Omaha Steaks is like

Insider Reviews contributor Steven John tried out a combo called The Best of Omaha Steaks ($60, temporarily sold out), which came with two four-ounce filet mignons, two four-ounce top sirloins, four pork chops, four jumbo franks, four apple tarts, and a seasoning packet for the meats.

He says, “One night, when my brother and his wife and kids were visiting, I cooked up all the steaks and chops, serving three adults (my wife is a vegetarian) and three kids (four were present, but being five months old, my daughter isn’t really eating steak yet). So six people ate, and I still had the hot dogs and tarts for another time. Assuming those would create the centerpiece of another meal for four, we’re talking about 10 servings of food for $60, or $6 a person. Not bad at all.”

Other members of the Insider Reviews team have tried a variety of meat, sides, and desserts from the company. We loved the taste, not to mention the excuse to indulge in dishes like bacon-wrapped sirloin, crispy steakhouse hash browns, and red velvet cake.

Some of the best deals on the site currently are the Stock-Up Packages and Free Shipping Combos, which will help you get all the protein and sides you need to feed your house for a while – all delivered straight to your door.

Convenience and prep

omaha steaks review

Beyond the value of ordering from Omaha Steaks, there’s plenty to be said for ease of prep.

Everything you get from Omaha Steaks comes carefully wrapped in vacuum-sealed plastic, making freezer storage simple and allowing you to choose the exact portions you want each time. On the back of each box, the company provides step-by-step preparation and cooking instructions, which helped Steven grill some of the best steaks he had cooked in months.

Standard shipping costs range from $17.99 to $21.99 depending on your cart total, and there are expedited shipping options available as well. Right now, you can expect your order to be delivered within eight to nine days with standard shipping.

The bottom line

If you don’t have access to a butcher shop, which will generally be the best place to get your meat locally, consider Omaha Steaks. And if you need a great gift idea for an uncle or your boss, a box of meat is always a fine option.

Shop all meat from Omaha Steaks here

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Rastelli’s sells top-quality meat and seafood online – you can order now and have it delivered in time for Easter

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

rastellis meat and fish delivery 2

  • The famous family business Rastelli’s has gone online and you can now order beef, poultry, and seafood in bulk from $11.
  • All of Rastelli’s products are responsibly raised, antibiotic-free, and added-hormone-free, and seafood is wild-caught.
  • We ordered from Rastelli’s and loved the large selection of meat and seafood and the convenient service.
  • Order by March 27 for delivery in time for Easter.

Mixed Grill Box (small)

When you don’t want to or can’t go grocery shopping for the week, it’s tempting to drag your feet around the kitchen, opening, closing, and re-opening your fridge door in hopes that food will magically appear. But with an internet connection and a laptop, you have better options.

For general groceries, you can go to any number of online grocery delivery services such as FreshDirect and AmazonFresh. But if you’re craving something a little more gourmet, something heartier, there are even more specific delivery services.

The magic of meat delivery services like Porter Road and Snake River Farms is this: They provide curated shopping experiences, they sell high-quality and responsibly raised meat, and they’re really convenient because they’ll ship fresh products directly to your door.

A new option we’ve tried – well, new to us, though not necessarily to the world at large – is Rastelli’s.

Rastelli’s is a family business that started in 1976 as a local New Jersey butcher shop. It supplied the neighboring deli and the community with quality meat, eventually expanding into poultry and seafood and distributing its food products worldwide. If you live in New Jersey, you can shop in person at its gourmet markets, Rastelli Market Fresh. But if you don’t, you can still cook and enjoy meat, poultry, and seafood from this storied brand.

rastellis meat and fish delivery 3

How to order from Rastelli’s

On its website, Rastelli’s offers various proteins made up of 12 to 24 servings of steak, chicken, shrimp, salmon, and more. If you choose to subscribe, you’ll save a little money (5%), and there are various shipment-frequency options so your freezer won’t get overcrowded.

All of Rastelli’s animals are responsibly raised, antibiotic-free, and added hormone-free. The seafood is wild-caught.

Review of Rastelli’s

rastellis meat and fish delivery

Your order is packed in an insulated box with dry ice. From there, you can store them in your freezer and fridge until they’re ready to cook. We tried chicken, salmon, and steaks from Rastelli’s and were happy with the experience on all fronts, from convenience to taste.

The steaks were juicy, flavorful, and easy to cook, while the salmon came out perfectly flaky and moist. We thought the taste difference of the chicken breast, compared to similar versions we’ve tried from stores, was minimal, but we did appreciate that we could have antibiotic-free and organic options delivered right to us.

The bulk design means that as long as you have adequate fridge space, you’ll always have a protein waiting for you when you get home from work or school.

The bottom line

If you have a busy schedule, you know that easy access to the things you need or any subtle automation of a routine can help make life much less stressful. Ultimately, the Rastelli’s experience was as much about the quality of the food as it was about the pure and simple convenience of the service.

Mixed Grill Box (small)

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We love these sturdy, colorful aprons used by chefs – right now you can get one for 50% off during the brand’s mystery box sale

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

hedley and bennett apron review 7

  • Hedley & Bennett is an apron brand created by a former line cook.
  • Hedley & Bennett’s aprons are made from durable, breathable, beautiful materials, with thoughtful details.
  • Right now, you can save up to 50% on select aprons during the brand’s mystery box sale.

Mystery Box (medium)

When shopping for your kitchen, it’s easy to get caught up in what cookware and kitchen appliances to buy, or which cookbooks to stock your shelf with. But you can’t forget about the simple accessories that have a big impact on your cooking experience.

Take, for example, the humble and hardworking apron.

An apron bears the brunt of kitchen chaos, protecting your skin and clothing from oil splashes, errant flour, and more. An apron with pockets is even better – that way, you can store tools like pens and kitchen scissors for easy access as you prepare and cook your meal.

The apron brand created by a former cook

Not every apron is created equal, something that Ellen Bennett realized while working as a line cook in Providence, a two Michelin-starred restaurant in Los Angeles. The aprons there were cheap, unbreathable, and rigid, and they were holding back rather than helping the kitchen staff.

Armed with her field knowledge of what professional cooks really want in an apron and her interest in design, Bennett set off in 2012 to craft sturdy, comfortable aprons made with colorful, higher-quality materials.

She called her company Hedley & Bennett, and business took off within the restaurant industry. Within the year, she was outfitting places like Bäco Mercat and all of Rick Bayless’ restaurants.

hedley and bennett apron review 6

Since then, Hedley & Bennett has outfitted more than 6,000 restaurants worldwide, selling over one million aprons to industry professionals and tens of thousands more to home cooks. It has also expanded past aprons into other chefs’ apparel.

How Hedley & Bennett’s aprons are different

While the brand’s roots are in professional kitchens, Hedley & Bennett has also become a consumer favorite because its aprons combine utility, comfort, and style.

Materials and construction: The brand uses high-quality materials, including raw American denim, lightweight cotton twill, and British natural waxed canvas for the apron bodies, cotton and leather for the straps, and brass hardware throughout. Pockets and straps are reinforced for extra durability.

Should your apron have weak stitching or broken hardware, you can send it back to the brand for free repair (within one year of your purchase).

hedley and bennett apron review 4

Comfort: Since the aprons have adjustable straps made from soft materials, you’ll be able to focus on the cooking task at hand, rather than any shifting garments. The long waist straps let you create a snug, customized fit so the apron practically feels like a second skin.

Style: Hedley & Bennett’s aprons come in many sleek and appealing styles and colors, whether you want a neon apron or a vintage-style, pinstriped one. The brand also occasionally drops limited-edition collaborations, like this recent Santa Fe inspired pattern designed by Modern Family actor Jesse Taylor Ferguson. You can even create custom bulk orders for your company or restaurant.

Features to look for in an apron, according to a chef

Michael Poiarkoff, the culinary director and executive chef at The Maker Hotel, recommends that you pay attention to the material, number of pockets, and neck strap design as you shop for aprons.

On material: “When looking for an apron, I try to find something with a nice combination of form and function. I prefer an apron that is closer to blanket size, hitting below my knee and wrapping around me as to almost touch in the back. A heavier, tight-knit material is preferable so that water wicks away and the apron can be easily cleaned; anything light and loose has a limited number of wears in a professional kitchen.”

On pockets: “I like two pockets. One breast pocket large enough for five writing utensils (pencil, pen, dry-erase marker, permanent marker, highlighter), and one side pocket large enough for a paring knife and a snack. I try to make sure all of my aprons have the same pocket set-up as not to confuse my hands when things inevitably get hectic. Too many pockets leave room for fumbling around and increases the risk of getting caught on refrigerator handles, door hinges, and counter corners.”

hedley and bennett apron review 5

On neck straps: “Most culinary aprons have an adjustable strap that loops around the back of your neck. With this style of apron, the strap often jumps up over the collar of my chef’s coat and annoyingly rubs my skin all day. While the behind-the-neck strap isn’t a deal-breaker for me, a cross-back apron is preferable. With a cross-back apron, the straps go directly from shoulder to hip with nothing hitting the neck.”

Do Hedley & Bennett’s aprons fit the bill?

Mostly. They’re large and made from heavier materials, and they have at least two pockets. Many of the brand’s aprons have an adjustable neck strap, but Hedley & Bennett also has a whole section for cross-back aprons.

Ultimately, the best apron for you will still probably come down to personal preference. In general, however, you’ll want to make sure your apron is sturdy, comfy, and something you won’t mind wearing every cooking session.

In our experience, Hedley & Bennett’s aprons fit all these criteria. And more than something we wouldn’t mind wearing, they’re the aprons and chef’s gear we’re actively excited to put on every single time.

Find our individual reviews of three Hedley & Bennett products below.

A striped denim apron

hedley and bennett apron review 3

Hickory Classic Apron, available in one size

I love how sturdy yet comfortable this denim apron is, and it definitely gets extra style points. Its chest pocket is nice because it has two layers, so you can store pens and your phone or any other tool up there and nothing will get scratched up. Meanwhile, there are two more deep pockets by your hips to let you store anything else.

The straps are made from soft cotton, with the neck strap being adjustable. Even after adjusting the neck strap, I found the one-size-only apron a bit big (I’m 5’6″ and a women’s size medium, for reference), though I know many professional chefs prefer large aprons. It’s 33 inches long and 30 inches wide, which means you’ll get full coverage and protection for your clothing, but I personally wish it was just a little shorter so I could move my knees around easier.

In the end, I’m not making mad dashes around my kitchen like I’m playing a level of “Overcooked,” so I still really liked the apron overall. It’s much more durable than the average apron and can be used for many years, making it a great investment for yourself — or as a gift for an avid (and style-minded) cook. —Connie Chen, senior home and kitchen reporter 

A twill cross-back apron

hedley and bennett apron review 8

Bordeaux Crossback Apron, available in one size

As someone who went from microwaving takeout leftovers to cooking three meals a day during the pandemic, this apron has come in handy preventing oil splatters, sauce splashes, and more. 

The cross-back design is more comfortable to wear than the traditional bib apron with a neck loop. There’s no strain or weight around my neck, and when combined with the generous but not ridiculously-large cut, the apron is more like something I look forward to wearing as opposed to something I have to wear. 

The deep chest pocket holds my phone comfortably unlike others that are teeny-tiny — I never worry that my phone is going to slip out and fall into my pasta. The large bucket pocket is also roomy enough to hold a dishtowel, oven mitts, or other accessories I need when cooking so I’m not constantly searching for them around the kitchen. Aprons aren’t the prettiest things, but the deep red shade with cream straps is actually really nice. The dark color also comes in clutch to hide stains. —Jada Wong, senior home and kitchen editor 

A chambray work shirt

hedley and bennett apron review

Speckled Chambray Long Sleeve Work Shirt, available in sizes XS-4XL 

Editor’s note: the Hedley & Bennett Work Shirt is currently out of stock, but the brand makes a collection of similarly-designed apparel items for chefs. Right now, it’s featuring the Work Shirt in a short sleeve style. We’ve left our review of this shirt up, since long sleeve styles are likely to come back into stock in the cooler months.

Hedley & Bennett’s Work Shirt is about as well-thought-out a work shirt as any for any purpose, though, I suppose it could use a few more pockets. That being said, the details on this shirt are immense, while still keeping the aesthetic of a presentable button-up dress shirt with a pocket sleeve.

And it might look like a fairly ordinary shirt, but it’s built — handmade in Los Angeles, at that — with particularities in mind: a brass snap in the collar for your apron snap, and a hidden loop diagonally sewn into the breast pocket for your pens (or sunglasses, if you’re cooking outdoors). Speaking of the collar, it’s lined with darker fabric to hide perspiration, as are the cuffs. 

The fabric — 99% chambray and 1% mystery elastane or elastane-like synthetic polymer — is exceptionally pleasant to wear, if a little coarse (think of a rougher and rawer but studier linen). Regardless of what you’re looking to do in this shirt, it’s fit for anything. —Owen Burke, senior home and kitchen reporter 

Other chef-recommended aprons to try

hedley and bennett apron review 2

Christine Lau, executive chef at Kimika, recommends the Contra Chef apron from Tilit:

“That’s their waxed canvas apron. It has a leather clasp for the neck strap. And I like their Recycled Work Chef apron — the material is light, it has a pen pocket, and I appreciate the use of recycled material. I’m hoping Tilit will add a pen pocket to the Contra Chef. That would be the perfect apron.” 

Ken Addington, chef and owner of Strangeways, recommends the aprons from Bragard:

“I am old school on aprons and wear Bragard aprons, as they are simple and timeless. Bragard is solid and made sturdy, which is great for professional use as well as personal. It’s not overpriced, but it’s still elegant.” 

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The 3 best juicers we tested in 2021

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

If you buy fresh juice regularly, you may want to invest in a juicer. The best ones can pulverize an entire farmer’s market haul into smooth, flavorful juice with little foam, easily fit on the counter, won’t wake up the whole house, are simple to clean, and come with a decent warranty (10 years is the industry standard).

There are two basic juicer types on the market: centrifugal and masticating (or slow). The larger, noisier, and more affordable of the two, centrifugal juicers use a high-speed blade and tend to yield less juice and more foam than their slow-juicing counterparts.

Masticating juicers steadily turn an auger that pulverizes fruits and veggies, leaving more nutrients and enzymes intact and producing smoother, silkier, and better-tasting juice overall. For these reasons, this guide focuses solely on slow juicers.

To arrive at our top picks, we juiced everything from hardy root vegetables to leafy greens, and considered the resulting juices’ taste, texture, foam levels, and oxidation rates. We also measured the volume of liquid each machine produced and the amount of pulp left behind, as well as the juicers’ speeds and noise levels. Lastly, with the help of a mechanical engineer, we pulled apart several juicers to see if they were made with identical parts (despite differences in size and price).

We’d also like to note that, while some people claim green juice can help you lose weight and clear the body of “toxins,” these ideas are not medically supported.

“Even if you’re making it yourself, juice is still more processed than a whole fruit or veggie, and studies consistently show that it’s more beneficial to eat foods in their more natural state,” Samantha Cassetty, MS, RD, author of “Sugar Shock” told us. “Our bodies don’t register the calories we drink in the same way they register calories from food, so you don’t get the same level of fullness from juice as you would from eating an apple or veggie.”

However, Cassetty said fresh juice is still an excellent way to add more nutrients to your diet, and based on our testing, the juicers below all perform at the top level.

Here are the best juicers you can buy in 2021

The best juicer overall

hurom hp slow juicer

Not only was the Hurom HP Slow Juicer one of the most powerful models we tested, it was also the most compact and user-friendly.

Pros: Small size, intuitive design, 100% BPA-free plastic, 10-year motor warranty, easy to clean, high juice yield

Cons: 2-year parts warranty, somewhat slow (even by slow juicer standards), juice is slightly less concentrated than its more expensive competitors’

While Hurom’s HP Slow Juicer is the smallest machine we tested, it uses the same powerful motor as models that take up nearly twice the space (like the Omega VSJ843, for example). We discovered this after disassembling and examining several highly-rated juicers with the help of a mechanical engineer — a process that we describe in greater detail under “Our Methodology,” below. 

The HP comes with a fine strainer, a larger strainer to allow some pulp to pass through — always a good idea, nutritionally — and two cleaning brushes. In other words, it has exactly all you need and nothing you don’t. That doesn’t mean the machine is without its conveniences, though; we’re fans of the inner spinning brush that helps clear the strainers while you’re juicing, allowing for a higher yield.

Indeed, the HP did produce a high yield. It pulled the most liquid out of every single fruit or veggie we juiced, and consistently had among the driest discarded pulp (in these respects, it even outperformed our other recommendation from Hurom, the H-AI Self-Feeding Juicer). The resulting juice was clean, bright, and refreshing, and contained little foam, although it wasn’t quite as rich and intense as its pricier competitors’ output. 

When it’s time to clean up, there are no awkward angles to scrub, and that cleaning brush does an excellent job of removing pulp from hard-to-reach spots thanks to a convenient pick built into its handle. Hurom cautions against running the machine’s parts through the dishwasher, although we managed to do so without a problem. (Is this cleaning method a good idea, long-term? Probably not, but we wanted to make sure the HP could handle it in a pinch.) 

A note to those who tend to juice while rushing out the door: if speed is of the essence, Hurom’s HP Slow Juicer may not be the machine for you. It runs at 43 RPM, which is a bit slow even by slow juicer standards. For comparison, the Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer and the previously mentioned Hurom H-AI — two models included in this guide — run at 60 RPM, while the Omega Cold Press 365, which we’re currently testing, runs at 90 to 110 RPM. 

Aside from its relatively gentle pace, the only thing that leaves this juicer wanting is a 10-year motor warranty and a 2-year parts warranty — you’ll get better coverage from Kuvings and Omega. 

In the end, the HP’s ease of use, simple clean-up, and compact size make it a clear winner for us. After all, if your juicer is compact enough to live on your countertop instead of a cabinet, you’ll notice — and therefore use — it all the more often.

The best multi-use juicer

kuvings slow juicer

The Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer produces rich, velvety juice, and goes beyond the usual call of duty to act as a citrus juicer and ice cream maker with the help of attachments. 

Pros: Versatile, 10-year warranty on all parts, BPA-free plastic, extra-wide feeding spout

Cons: Heavy, some attachments sold separately, cleanup can be time-consuming

The Kuvings Whole Slow Juicer is a sound investment if you like the idea of an appliance that can do quadruple duty. Not only is it an excellent slow juicer in its own right, it’s designed to accommodate three attachments: smoothie and frozen dessert makers (both included) and a citrus juicer (sold separately).

To use the citrus juicer attachment, you palm halves of citrus over a reamer that’s turned by the machine’s motor. It’s simple and gets the job done, and while we think the price of the attachment is higher than it needs to be, it’s still far more affordable than purchasing a separate appliance. 

During our testing, we used the smoothie strainer to make a berry and banana smoothie that was texturally consistent, foam-free, and silkier than anything we’ve pulled from a blender. The blank strainer for frozen desserts was more difficult to master: we were successful with banana gelato, but not much else. It seems that a particular level of frozenness (and practice) is required to churn out sorbets, gelatos, and ice creams as effortlessly as this YouTuber.

As far as its main duty goes, the Whole Slow Juicer’s 3.2-inch-wide feeding spout can accommodate larger pieces of fruit than our top pick, and at 60 RPM it’s a bit faster, too. The extra speed may come at the expense of maximum juicing; compared to the Hurom HP, the Kuvings squeezed less liquid out of our fruits and vegetables, and its wetter pulp suggested that there was some good stuff left behind in the discard pile. 

That being said, the Whole Slow Juicer produced the richest, most velvety juice we tried during our taste tests, with and without the detachable external strainer that helps catch any residual pulp. 

There is one design quirk we should note, though: the chute makes an awkward turn towards the auger, which means harder fruits and vegetables like carrots and beets get hung up, while softer ones like grapes leave a significant amount of mush in the bend. We had to reverse the auger more times for the Kuvings than for any other juicer, and while we were able to send most of that aforementioned mush back through, it was an extra, messy step.

That turn in the chute also made for more complicated cleanup work, but that’s only nominal when it comes to juicers. Plus, any additional time spent was mostly offset by the Kuvings’ self-cleaning internal strainer, whose basket is lined with pulp-sweeping brushes. Like everything we tested, its parts withstood the dishwasher. 

Small flaws considered, if you want a juicer that does it all, this is the only one we know of that can make smoothies, frozen desserts (with some trial and error), and citrus juice. It’s also BPA-free and includes a 10-year warranty on all parts, which tops all of the other product warranties on our list. 

The best self-feeding juicer

hurom h ai 4x3

Hurom’s H-AI Slow Juicer has a small footprint, is easy to clean, and because it’s self-feeding, does a lot of the work for you.

Pros: Easy to use and clean, space-saving, self-feeding hopper is a time-saver, BPA-free plastic, 10-year warranty on motor

Cons: Only a two-year warranty on parts, some produce gets stuck in self-feeding hopper (though only peaches and pears, in our experience)

A self-feeding juicer like Hurom’s H-AI Slow Juicer can make juicing a good deal easier, and because it takes up so little space, it’s not unreasonable to leave it out and ready for use.

There’s a bit of debate as to whether or not the self-feeding hopper works well, but in our experience over the past two years we’ve only had two problems: once with peaches, and another time with pears. In both instances, the fruits were bordering on overripe and turned into a mush that could not be fed from the hopper into the auger. While it’s true that another juicer might have handled this problem better, most of us aren’t juicing a ton of overripe fruits. Further, if you start to encounter this problem, a good solution (before it’s too late) is to intersperse some harder fruits into the mix to help push the rest through.

Otherwise, everything we put into the hopper made it through to the auger and came out as juice, and the pulp was among the driest from the juicers we’ve tested (aside from our top pick, the Hurom HP). We also ended up with notably less waste from this juicer than any other. 

This machine yielded more juice than the Kuvings — despite the fact that both turn at 60 RPM — thanks to a preparatory blade in the hopper. However, the results weren’t as rich as the Kuvings’ and the H-AI produced a little more foam, although the difference was marginal. 

Because this machine is completely vertically integrated (even the pulp canister is built into it vertically), we found cleanup to be markedly quick. Everything pulls apart easily, and the self-feeding hopper is much more open than the Kuvings’ chute. 

If you find you don’t like the self-feeding hopper, or want to use a chute for softer fruits, there’s a two-inch-wide one in the kit, along with a fine and large strainer, so you have juicing options. 

Every component of this juicer, save for the stand and motor, has been through the washing machine well over 20 times, and we haven’t had any problems to date.

This is an expensive machine, but it has worked flawlessly for us for over two years of rigorous use. If you want a juicer that does everything, the Kuvings might be for you, but if you’re looking to juice with exceptional ease, the Hurom H-AI is tops.

Like the Hurom HP, this juicer comes with a 10-year warranty on the motor and a two-year warranty on the parts. We wish Hurom would extend the full warranty to parts, but that’s about the only shortcoming we can point to in all of the time we’ve been using it.

Our methodology

2lb carrot juice test

To test the juicers’ ability to handle a variety of fruits and vegetables, we ran beets, carrots, kale, and black seedless grapes through each machine. We weighed the produce beforehand to make sure we were putting the exact same amount in each juicer, then measured the volume (fluid ounces) of the resulting juice.

We noted the amount of foam that settled at the top of each cup of juice, the rate of oxidation (some juices browned faster than others), and the amount of pulp left behind. 

And, of course, we measured taste, however subjectively, and found that some juices were more watery than others (we used a fine strainer throughout testing) while others were incredibly rich.

We also pulled apart four juicers after speaking with Duncan Freake, a mechanical engineer at Epam Continuum, who posited that certain parts, including the augers, strainers, and receptacles were the same between Omega and HP. Sure enough, while the parts inside each of the juicers we disassembled weren’t exactly identical, it was clear that they came from the same factory, or used the same components, from Korea. And while both brands advertise that their juicers are made in Korea, they don’t divulge that many of their parts come from the same set of factories as their competitors, Zhejiang Linix Motor Co., Ltd. Granted, this is a common case with many household appliances, and something we found to be true when researching for our guide to the best countertop ice makers, too.

What else we recommend

Breville Juice Fountain Plus: If you do want a centrifugal juicer, this is one of the best in its category. We’ve used it many times in the past, we’ve seen it hold up at several small juice stands, and the price is right. Still, it produces a lot of foam, and it’s a good deal larger than the vertical slow juicers we recommend.

Omega VSJ843: This juicer, down to almost every single part, turned out to be identical to the Hurom HP. The big difference is that it comes with a 15-year warranty on “parts and performance” versus a 10-year warranty on the Hurom juicers’ motors and a two-year warranty on other parts. In the end, the motor warranty is a bigger consideration, because if you break a part (and it’s not due to defect), it’s still on you to replace. We’re going to work on comparing customer service between the two companies for further consideration.

What else we considered

Breville Bluicer: This could be a handy machine if you happen to need a juicer and a blender at once, but it’s large, and comes with a lot of parts you might not want to use (let alone store). We found the juice yield so low and the amount of foam so high, though, that on top of other detrimental factors such as size and noise, we decided against recommending it in this guide.

Hamilton Beach Big Mouth: This centrifugal high-speed juicer is more affordable than the Breville Juice Fountain Plus, but while it worked, it produced a ton of foam.

Smeg Slow Juicer: Smeg’s Slow Juicer had a lot of the same qualities as the Omega VSJ843 or the Hurom HP, but at about $500, you’re mostly paying for its ’50s-vintage appeal.

Check out our other small appliance guides

KitchenAid 5 Quart Stand Mixer

The best KitchenAid stand mixers


The best citrus juicers


The best blenders


The best espresso machines


The best ice cream makers

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Le Creuset has a little-known ‘Specials’ section of its site where you can find discounts on Dutch ovens, nonstick pans, and bakeware – here are the best deals available

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

le creuset teal and  blue cookware
  • Le Creuset, known for its beautiful cookware, has specials you can shop year-round featuring huge discounts.
  • Some of our favorites, including the Mini Cocottes Set, are included in the discounts; we’ve also listed more of our favorite deals below.

Le Creuset is known for its beautiful, well-crafted, and oftentimes, pricey cookware. While we’ve found that they’re worth the price, it definitely helps when you can find some versatile stoneware and more at a discount.

Outside of deal events like Presidents’ Day and Black Friday, you can find solid discounts on some of the Le Creuset lineup on its site, year round. The Specials section holds tons of excellent discounts pretty much all year – so you should never settle for paying retail price for Le Creuset cookware.

This time around, shoppers can also save up to 50% on select Le Creuset cookware and accessories as well, including ramekins, griddles, dinner plates, and more.

Shop the Le Creuset Specials now or keep scrolling for some of our favorite deals in the sale

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We ordered from Omaha Steaks, and it’s a definite step up in quality from what your supermarket sells

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

Omaha Steaks Lifestyle

  • Online food company Omaha Steaks has been in business since 1917 and ships out 4 million orders annually.
  • It sells meat and other foods for as little as $39.99 per bundle, and offers bulk packages to help you stock up.
  • Every cut of meat ships in its own vacuum-sealed package and comes with precise, easy-to-follow cooking instructions.

Filet Mignon Dinner (small)

You’ve heard of Omaha Steaks. It’s the mail order meat company that sent your boss some filet mignon as a thank you from his boss. Or maybe your uncle has been talking about it ever since he got that one box of steaks back in 1998. Or it’s possible that you saw it advertised in some in-flight magazine.

If you’re like many folks out there, you probably think the company sells quality meats but at prices that put their foods outside of your comfort zone. If you only focus on Omaha Steaks’ packages, like the $299 Butcher’s Backyard Basics or the $159 Build Your Own Holiday Feast complete with pork loin roast, savory sides, and sweet desserts, then yeah, you’d be right. On the other hand, you can also order a box of food from Omaha Steaks for less than $40.

What you get from Omaha Steaks

Try a package of four 5-ounce top sirloin steaks (seasoning included). In other words, you get a fine meal for four people at $12.50 per person. And that, friends, is better pricing than you would find for dinner at most restaurants.

The fact is, until you get into the larger packages or the choicest cuts of meat (Filet mignon costs a lot of money, okay?), ordering food from Omaha Steaks isn’t all that much more expensive than getting it from the grocery store, and the selection and quality are better than what most supermarkets offer.

Omaha Steaks Ribeye

And ordering your steaks, pork chops, burgers, lobster tails, and all sorts of other meats and sides from this hundred-year-old company is a whole lot cheaper than dining at a steakhouse. With all the variety Omaha Steaks offers, from entrees and sides to desserts and even wine, it can easily become a one-stop online shop for most of your dinner-making needs.

What the food from Omaha Steaks is like

Insider Reviews contributor Steven John tried out a combo called The Best of Omaha Steaks ($60, temporarily sold out), which came with two four-ounce filet mignons, two four-ounce top sirloins, four pork chops, four jumbo franks, four apple tarts, and a seasoning packet for the meats.

He says, “One night, when my brother and his wife and kids were visiting, I cooked up all the steaks and chops, serving three adults (my wife is a vegetarian) and three kids (four were present, but being five months old, my daughter isn’t really eating steak yet). So six people ate, and I still had the hot dogs and tarts for another time. Assuming those would create the centerpiece of another meal for four, we’re talking about 10 servings of food for $60, or $6 a person. Not bad at all.”

Other members of the Insider Reviews team have tried a variety of meat, sides, and desserts from the company. We loved the taste, not to mention the excuse to indulge in dishes like bacon-wrapped sirloin, crispy steakhouse hash browns, and red velvet cake.

Some of the best deals on the site currently are the Stock-Up Packages and Free Shipping Combos, which will help you get all the protein and sides you need to feed your house for a while – all delivered straight to your door.

Convenience and prep

omaha steaks review

Beyond the value of ordering from Omaha Steaks, there’s plenty to be said for ease of prep.

Everything you get from Omaha Steaks comes carefully wrapped in vacuum-sealed plastic, making freezer storage simple and allowing you to choose the exact portions you want each time. On the back of each box, the company provides step-by-step preparation and cooking instructions, which helped Steven grill some of the best steaks he had cooked in months.

Standard shipping costs range from $17.99 to $21.99 depending on your cart total, and there are expedited shipping options available as well. Right now, you can expect your order to be delivered within eight to nine days with standard shipping.

The bottom line

If you don’t have access to a butcher shop, which will generally be the best place to get your meat locally, consider Omaha Steaks. And if you need a great gift idea for an uncle or your boss, a box of meat is always a fine option.

Shop all meat from Omaha Steaks here

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The spurtle is the simple wooden kitchen tool you never knew you needed. Here are the 5 best options in 2021.

  • A spurtle is a wooden stirring tool originally used in Scotland for making porridge.
  • Modernized spurtles are now used for everything from folding batter to mashing avocados.
  • We found traditional spurtles, silicone and bamboo options, and more.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

There’s a good chance you’re wondering just what a spurtle even is. Spurtles are wooden stirring tools that date back to the 15th century in Scotland and were used to make silky, lump-free porridge. While the more traditional version of this item still proves useful, a modern take on the gadget that resembles something between a spoon and a spatula has also become extremely popular. In fact, if you’re a fan of late-night infomercials, you may have even seen the spurtle touted on QVC.

So what can you use a spurtle for? As it turns out, the options are seemingly endless. Not only does the wooden item work as a non-damaging tool for using to stir and reach the edges in pots, pans, or even Instant Pots, but it can also be used for mashing avocados to make guacamole, gently folding batter while baking, spreading sauce or jam, scooping out jars, acting as a sieve, and more. With so many handy uses, the spurtle is a great addition to any kitchen. We found options for traditional spurtles, silicone options, bamboo sets, and more.

Here are the best spurtles

The best overall

rectangle moliy spurtle
These are made of 100% beech wood.

The four-piece Moliy Wooden Spurtles Kitchen Tools Set offers a wide range of spurtle sizes and shapes so you always have the best tool for the job.

What we like: Versatile set, durable, lightweight

This wooden set features four modern spurtles in varying lengths and widths so you can choose the best one depending on your cooking needs. The smallest option is particularly good for jobs like reaching into small jam jars and spreading jelly on toast, while a large option with slats can be used as a makeshift sieve for draining or even to easily separate egg yolks and whites. Meanwhile, the mid-size option is ideal for whisking, flipping, and more. This set is also available as a three-piece set or a five-piece set that also includes a traditional wooden spoon.  

The best traditional

rectangle spurtle
This type of spurtle also works well for stirring doughs and mixing batter.

The Swift Porridge Spurtle has a classic design that works well for oats, soups, and stews.

What we like: Simple, traditional design, won’t break up oats too much

This solid wood spurtle uses the classic Scottish design and is a great choice for traditionalists. If you like to make oatmeal on the stovetop, this tool is specifically designed so it doesn’t break up the oats for a creamy and classic texture. This can be used beyond just porridge and oats for stirring soups, stews, sauces, or even eggs. At just over 11 inches long, it works for deeper saucepans too. Though it’s easy to clean, it’s not dishwasher safe.

The best silicone

rectangle silicone spurtle
Unlike wooden options, this one can go right in the dishwasher.

The Mad Hungry Silicone Two-Piece Set gives you the same functionality as its wooden counterparts with the added convenience of being dishwasher-safe.

What we like: Slotted and non-slotted set, dishwasher safe, heat resistant

Including one standard spurtle and one slotted option, this set can help you easily stir, flip, mash, sift, and serve. Like wooden spurtles, they also won’t damage your cookware like metal or plastic might. However, the silicone design of these sets them apart and means they are more heat resistant than other options and can go right in the dishwasher once you’re done. Choose from six vibrant colors ranging from Harvest Green to Pastel Pink.  

The best bamboo

rectangle bamboo spurtle
These are also available in two- and three-piece sets.

The Crate Collective Bamboo Spurtle Set is lightweight, sturdy, and eco-friendly.

What we like: Eco-friendly, slotted and unslotted set, lightweight, durable

Including a 13-inch spurtle, a slotted 11-inch spurtle, a wide spurtle, and a short, narrow spurtle, this set is made entirely from premium bamboo. The range of options gives you versatility in the kitchen, while the material means that each spurtle is super lightweight but durable. Eco-conscious cooks will also like that bamboo is a more environmentally friendly option than traditional wood. When you’re done, wash with warm water and soap and leave out to dry.  

The best colorful

rectangle marrakesh spurtle
This is sold individually or as part of a matching kitchen utensil set.

Instantly add some pizzazz to any kitchen with the vibrant Baltique Marrakesh Collection 13″ Wooden Spurtle.

What we like: Colorful rainbow design, come by itself or as a set, crafted from birch wood

This slotted spurtle can be proudly displayed on your countertop in a utensil holder rather than shoved to the back of a drawer when it’s not in use. The gorgeous tie-dye pattern instantly adds a pop of color to any kitchen space. This utensil is crafted from layers of colored birch wood to create a rainbow-hued look. You can buy it by itself or as part of a seven-piece kitchen utensil set if you want traditional serving spoons and spatulas that will match. However, be aware you’ll need to handwash this spurtle and you shouldn’t let it soak in water too long. 

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The 5 best can openers in 2021

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

  • A quality can opener will last you for years or even decades.
  • If you need a new one, the Made in USA Can Opener is our top pick as it’s simple to use and cuts well.
  • We’ve also selected efficient and high-quality electric, manual, and portable can openers.

Can openers are an essential part of every kitchen. Yet, from your dollar store find to high-end options at department stores, there are a lot of terrible can openers on the market. Fortunately, with a little bit of research, you can find a device that is durable, sanitary, and simple to use.

Most can openers also function as bottle cap openers, and some even open large jars. If you’re looking for a device that will serve a variety of purposes, the Kuhn Rikon Auto Safety Master Opener and P-38 Can Opener and P-51 Can Opener are great options. But if you’re looking for a solid can opener that does the job, the Made in USA Can Opener is our top pick.

We chose our top picks based on their track record of accurate cutting, reliable performance, and price.

Here are the best can openers in 2021

The best overall

made in usa

The Made in USA Can Opener is a manual can opener with reliable and consistent results. The handles have a grip for comfort and the sharp blades cut cleanly.

Pros: Consistent performance, long-lasting, efficient

Cons: Leaves sharp edges, manual can opener might not be ideal for those with limited mobility

The Made in USA Can Opener features a skip-proof feed wheel, is gear driven, and is made from carbon steel. The gears, wheel, and cutter are all zinc plated and heat treated.

It works like a traditional manual can opener: Press the cutting blade on the top of the can along the lip, hold the thick handle pads, and turn the crank until you have almost completed a rotation. Use a butter knife to flip the lid up. Empty the contents, then press the lid down into the can.

This method of opening cans isn’t ideal for those with limited mobility, but we have an electric option that might suit their needs better.

The best electric can opener

Best_Can_Openers_ _Hamilton_Beach_ _Amazon

When you want to open a can with minimal mess, effort, or little chance for contamination, the Hamilton Beach 76606ZA Smooth Touch Can Opener is a smart choice.

Pros: Easy to use, leaves smooth edges, works for cans of all sizes, strong magnet

Cons: Requires electricity, might have trouble with thick-rimmed cans

For those who want or need a can opener that requires little effort, an electric one is a good option. This one from Hamilton Beach operates with just the press of a button.

To operate, you just press the large ergonomic lever until the can has made a complete rotation. The magnet holds the can in place as it cuts along the sides instead of the top, so the lid won’t fall into the food. The cut leaves smooth edges, and the blade of the opener, which can collect harmful microbes if you don’t wash your cans, doesn’t make contact with the food, either.

The best ergonomic can opener

Best_Can_Openers_ _OXO_ _Amazon

When you have to open several cans to cook a meal, the OXO SteeL Can Opener‘s large ergonomic knob means you won’t tire out.

Pros: Feels comfortable in your hands, long track record

Cons: Hard to clean, the handle may slide

What sets the OXO SteeL Can Opener apart from the other models on this list is the large, soft turning knob. The large-size makes it more ergonomic than other manual can openers, and the grips are helpful if you’re operating the opener with wet hands too.

The opener is made of sleek stainless steel. The blade is sharp and makes cutting easy to manage, and there is also a handy built-in bottle cap opener.

The best versatile can opener

Best_Can_Openers_ _Kuhn_Rikon_ _Amazon

If you want to streamline the number of tools in your kitchen, the Kuhn Rikon Auto Safety Master Opener opens cans, jars, bottles, and more.

Pros: Performs a variety of tasks, leaves smooth edges, dishwasher safe

Cons: Requires reading a manual, knob is hard to turn

The Kuhn Rikon Auto Safety Master Opener opens pop-tops, cans, pull tops, jars, and bottles. Like the Hamilton Beach model, this device is a side cutter that does not come in contact with the can’s contents.

Unlike the Hamilton Beach or Made In USA models though, this can opener is not intuitive to use and would require reading the manual.

To use this opener, you should place the tool on top of the can with the two half circles lined up with the can’s rim. Once you twist the knob, the opener will grip the lid and cut. You will feel less resistance after a full circle. You should stop at this point and remove the top using the mini-pliers push button. If you try to do more than one revolution, you may get slivers or burrs of metal in your food.

The best compact can opener

Best_Can_Openers_ _US_Shelby_Co_ _Amazon

If you’re preparing for stuff to hit the fan or just want an easy way to open cans while backpacking, the P-38 Can Opener and P-51 Can Opener are inexpensive and lightweight options.

Pros: 75-year track record, compact, inexpensive

Cons: Works slowly, requires a little elbow grease, leaves sharp edges

Though it is not an official US Army-issued item, the P-38 and P-51 can openers have been used by our armed forces since they were first introduced in 1942. Nicknamed the “John Wayne” and manufactured by the US Shelby Co. in the United States, these can openers get their name for how long they are. The P-38 is 38 millimeters long and the P-51 is 51 millimeters (or about 2 inches), and both are popular among survivalists and veterans. 

These durable slabs of steel fit on a keychain. There are many websites devoted to celebrating this can opener, and the list of uses is virtually endless. US Shelby advertises the P-38’s ability to clean fingernails, clean grooves, open cans, open seams, screw drive, and cut items.

For can opening, you rotate the cutting edge 90 degrees from the stowed position. You then hold the can opener with the blade directed downward and rotate the can with your other hand as you cut the lid off.

The P-38 takes about twice as long to open cans as their cranking counterparts, and there appears to be a little bit of a learning curve and a need for elbow grease. Yet, once you get the hang of using this can opener you’ll appreciate its simple but useful design. 

FAQs

How should I clean my can opener?

Keeping your can opener clean and free of rust is imperative as a dirty or rusty opener can create unsafe food conditions. We recommend wiping your can opener down with a cloth and hot water or vinegar to clean it. It is best practice to clean your can opener immediately after using it. 

What should I look for in a can opener?

With so many options out there, it can be hard to pick a can opener that is both easy to use and good quality. First, we recommend assessing your kitchen counter space. If your counters are cramped, your best bet will be a manual can opener that can fit nicely into a utensil drawer. If you have more space and prefer a more hands off approach, an electric can opener is a great option. Many can openers have multiple functions, such as being able to open jars and other items, so it can also be helpful to think about what you would like to use your can opener for before purchasing. 

When using manual openers, a good grip ensures that you can open cans quickly and efficiently.  The handle grips on your can opener should always be comfortable to use, even if you have to open several cans at once. So when looking to purchase a new can opener, make sure that the handle grips feel comfortable in your hands. 

Check out our other kitchen guides

cutting board
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