How to allow cookies on your Mac to save passwords and other important information

Typing on laptop keyboard Mac computer
It’s easy to manage the cookies that are stored on your Mac’s Safari web browser.

  • You can allow cookies on your Mac from Safari’s Preferences page.
  • Allowing cookies lets your browser save important information like passwords and search history.
  • If you want to keep cookies from some sites only, you can selectively remove stored cookies by site.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Cookies are the little snippets of data used to track your internet browsing patterns, which are then stored in your computer. Many people believe that cookies are overused for targeted advertisements, which can often be labeled as “creepy.”

But cookies can actually be quite helpful. For example, cookies allow your computer to remember important information like log-in credentials so you don’t always have to enter your password. Cookies also let you save items in a shopping cart when you’re looking to buy something online.

If you’d like to allow cookies on your Mac’s Safari web browser, here’s how.

How to allow cookies on Mac in Safari

1. Open your Safari web browser.

2. On the left side of the toolbar at the very top of your screen, click Safari and select Preferences in the drop-down.

Screenshot of Safari Preferences drop-down
Under “Safari,” click “Preferences.”

3. In Preferences, go to the Privacy tab – the icon that looks like a hand in a circle.

4. Next to Cookies and website data, make sure the box next to Block all cookies is not checked.

Screenshot of Safari Preferences window
In the “Privacy” tab, uncheck the box next to “Cookies and website data.”

Unchecking Block all cookies will allow any and all cookies to be stored by websites you visit as well as third-party trackers, which are typically advertisers.

How to remove data stored by certain websites using Safari on Mac

In Mac’s Safari, you can remove browsing data stored by certain websites you visit on your computer.

1. Open your Safari web browser.

2. In the left side of the toolbar at the very top of your screen, click Safari and select Preferences in the drop-down.

Screenshot of Safari Preferences drop-down
Under “Safari,” click “Preferences.”

3. In Preferences, go to the Privacy tab – the icon that looks like a hand in a circle.

4. Under Block all cookies, click on Manage Website Data.

Screenshot of Safari Preferences window, Privacy tab
Click “Manage Website Data.”

5. Here you can remove information collected by certain sites by selecting a site in the list and clicking Remove at the bottom of the window. Or, you can remove information collected from all sites by clicking Remove all at the bottom of the window. Removing your cookie data might reduce the amount websites track you, but it might also log you out of certain websites.

Screenshot of Safari Preferences Manage Website Data window
Click “Remove” or “Remove all.”

6. Click Done in the bottom-right corner of the window when you’re finished.

How to enable cookies on an iPad to streamline your web browsing experienceHow to enable cookies on iPhone to personalize your web browsing experienceHow to opt out of website cookies with WebChoices and avoid targeted adsHow to enable cookies on an Android device in Google Chrome to save your data and optimize your web browsing

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Google is delaying its plan to kill third-party cookies in Chrome until 2023

Sundar Pichai Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images
Google CEO Sundar Pichai.

  • Google said Thursday it’s pushing back its plan to kill off third-party tracking cookies in Chrome.
  • It now expects to phase out cookies and replace them with tech from its Privacy Sandbox by 2023.
  • The delay comes after Google pledged to give oversight of the cookie changes to the UK’s antitrust watchdog.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Google said Thursday it intends to delay by a year its plan to kill off third-party cookies within its Chrome browser, a move likely to be well-received by the online ad industry, which has been scrambling to shift to alternative technologies.

Writing in a blog post, Google Privacy Engineering Director Vinay Goel set out a new timeline for Chrome’s cookie phase out and deployment of alternative technologies as part of its “Privacy Sandbox” initiative, which it now expects to complete by late 2023.

“While there’s considerable progress with this initiative, it’s become clear that more time is needed across the ecosystem to get this right,” the blog post said.

Google has now set out an extended timeline for the changes. Stage one is expected to start in late 2022, during which time publishers, advertisers, and adtech vendors can migrate their services to work with new cookieless technologies. The next stage is the cookie phase out, expected to start in mid 2023 and finish later that year.

Google first announced its intentions to kill off the tracking cookies, which advertisers use to track users around the web and target them with ads, in January last year. The company said the plan, which originally had a “two-year” deadline, was to replace third-party cookies with more privacy conscious technologies.

Since then, Google and other online ad industry players have been experimenting with new APIs, or application programming interfaces, designed to prevent the tracking of individual users while still allowing advertisers to target clusters of people by their interests and measure the effectiveness of their campaigns.

Google said Thursday that the Chrome team and other companies have suggested more than 30 proposals for new privacy-focused ad technologies in areas including ad measurement, targeting, and fraud detection. Of those proposals, four are in the “origin trial” stage, Google said, allowing other developers to experiment with the new features.

Chrome’s cookie plans and Privacy Sandbox experiments have sparked frenzied debates in the online ad industry and among the privacy community, with some experts speculating the moves could serve to cement Google’s advertising dominance. Chrome is by far the most-popular global web browser, cornering two-thirds of the market, while Google also continues to maintain its lead in the online ad space. EMarketer estimates Google will take a 28.6% share of worldwide digital ad spending this year.

Google’s moves have also caught the eyes of global regulators. Earlier this month, Google said it would give the UK’s Competition and Markets Authority oversight of its plans to roll out technologies from the Privacy Sandbox, including offering the watchdog a 60-day “standstill period” before it introduces any changes.

Google also pledged to limit how it will use and combine individual user data for digital ad purposes and said it will not discriminate against rivals in favor of its own ad products when implementing cookie alternatives. The commitments were offered in response to an investigation the CMA launched into the Privacy Sandbox in January.

Earlier this week, the European Union opened an antitrust probe into Google’s advertising practices, including the company’s plans to phase out cookies in Chrome.

Simon Andrews, founder of mobile marketing consultancy Addictive, said while a large portion of online ad businesses mistrusts Google, the industry needs to reach a consensus around building new privacy-focused solutions that are usable for all the players across the sector.

“Like it or not, we need Google to come up with something that the industry can get behind because if they don’t, nobody else will, and there will be a Balkanization of everything,” he said.

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How to clear cache, history, and cookies on iPhone for Safari and iOS apps, to free up space and improve speed

Clearing iPhone cache
You can clear your iPhone cache for Safari and other apps, or offload apps to increase storage space.

  • You can clear cache, history, and cookies on your iPhone for Safari to improve speed and performance.
  • You can also clear cache for iPhone apps by offloading or deleting them to free up space.
  • When you clear cache, you may lose some saved data from Safari or iPhone apps, like passwords and files.
  • Visit Insider’s Tech Reference library for more stories.

Apple offers several ways for iPhone users to clear their cache, whether it’s for Safari or iOS apps.

When you clear cache on iPhone for Safari, it means all the files, images, passwords, and scripts from previously visited websites will be wiped. You can also clear cache on iPhone apps by offloading or deleting them.

Clearing cache for Safari and certain apps can free up space on your iPhone, improving speed and performance by removing unnecessary app data.

Here’s how to clear cache on your iPhone.

How to clear cache, history, and cookies on iPhone for Safari

To clear cache on your iPhone, select Safari in the Settings app and click “Clear History and Website Data.”

Here’s a full step-by-step guide:

1. Open the Settings app and click Safari.

2. Tap “Clear History and Website Data.”

Cache 4
Tap Clear History and Website Data to clear your Safari cache, history, and cookies.

3. Your device will double-check that you want to clear Safari’s data. Click through the message that follows.

How to clear cache on iPhone for apps

To clear cache on iPhone apps, you’ll need to offload them. Offloading an app will free up storage space used by the app while still keeping its documents and data. If and when you reinstall the app, your data will be reinstated.

1. Open the Settings app.

2. Select “General” and tap “iPhone Storage.”

Cache 6
The iPhone Storage option should be beneath the Accessibility option.

3. Select the app you want to offload and tap “Offload App.”

Cache 7
Tap Offload to remove the app and make space on your iPhone.

4. Select “Offload App” from the pop-up window to confirm your choice. You can also delete the app if you no longer need it.

How to clear cache on iPhone for apps with a cache feature

Some apps have a cache feature that make it easy for you to clear it directly in the Settings app. Here’s how to find it:

1. Open your iPhone’s settings.

2. Scroll until you see the eligible app, then tap it.

3. Look for a “Clear cache” option. If the toggle next to it is green, tap it to clear the app’s cache.

How to clear the Bluetooth cache on your phone or tablet to fix issues with your connectionHow to clear the Instagram cache on your iPhone to free up storage spaceHow to clear the cache on your iPad to make it run more efficientlyHow to clear the cache on your Mac computer to make it run more efficiently

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Seeking nominations for the advertising and marketing execs helping their companies prepare for a data-privacy world

Google Office Logo Chrome
Alphabet Inc.’s Google logo.

  • Insider is looking for the top ad executives at the forefront of navigating data and privacy.
  • They could be pioneering things like a new contextual targeting approach or a first-party database.
  • Submit your nomination by 9 p.m. EST on Wednesday, March 31.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Data has long been a buzzy word in advertising, but it’s never been as critical as it is today.

Google and Apple’s plans to phase out mainstay ad-targeting tools are forcing advertisers to evolve their ad targeting, while the consumer shift to digital streaming and e-commerce are changing the way marketers collect and use people’s data.

Some companies are responding by buying startups to help scale their approach to data, while others like ad holding giant WPP are building new data operations themselves.

Insider is looking for the advertising and marketing executives who are at the forefront of helping their companies navigate these changes, whether it’s pioneering a new way of contextually targeting or building a new first-party database.

This list will be based on nominations and our own reporting. The execs can come from marketers and agencies, but should be in the weeds of tackling data and privacy, not necessarily at the C-Suite level.

Submit your nomination through this form by 9 p.m. EST on Wednesday, March 31.

Read the original article on Business Insider