GOP Rep. Jody Hice argued against DC statehood by incorrectly citing a lack of car dealerships

Jody Hice
Rep. Jody Hice (R-Georgia) speaks on the House floor.

  • In citing his opposition to DC statehood, Hice incorrectly said that the city lacks car dealerships.
  • The conservative congressman had long argued that statehood went against the intent of the Framers.
  • The proposed bill, H.R. 51, is likely to pass the House but faces major roadblocks in the Senate.
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Rep. Jody Hice of Georgia is staunchly opposed to statehood for Washington DC, an opinion shared by most congressional Republicans.

During a House Oversight and Reform Committee hearing on Monday to discuss H.R. 51, a Democratic-backed bill that would grant statehood to the District, he incorrectly cited the District’s lack of car dealerships as a rationale against the proposal.

In the past, Hice has largely opposed statehood under his view that it goes against the intention of the Framers, but he expanded on his viewpoint during the hearing.

“DC would be the only state – the only state – without an airport, without a car dealership, without a capital city and without a landfill,” he argued.

Hice was incorrect in his assessment, as the city boasts numerous car dealerships, including a Tesla showroom not far from the Capitol.

Democratic Rep. Jamie Raskin of Maryland, who represents a congressional district anchored in suburban Washington DC, slammed Hice’s rationale for opposing statehood.

“It was cited that there’s no car dealership in the District of Columbia,” he said. “That’s not a constitutional restriction. It turns out, there is a car dealership in the District of Columbia. At this point, [do] we agree that people in DC should enjoy equal political rights? Of course not, because they’re simply trying to gin up whatever arguments they can think of. These are frivolous arguments.”

After Hice was informed that he was wrong, he walked back his statement, claiming he didn’t know where a dealership in the city was located.

“If there’s a car dealership in DC, I apologize for being wrong,” he said. “I have no idea where it is.”

Read more: Meet the presidential confidants, Delaware’s closely-knit and well-positioned congressional delegation, Joe Biden’s entrusted with cementing his legacy

The House bill is likely to pass the Democratic-controlled House, but it will face major roadblocks in the Senate. While Democrats narrowly control the upper chamber due to Vice President Kamala Harris’s tiebreaking vote, Republicans are overwhelmingly opposed to the bill and prevent it from reaching the 60-vote threshold to cut off debate.

There are 215 cosponsors of H.R. 51 in the House and 41 cosponsors of the Senate bill, and all are Democrats.

Earlier in the day, Hice announced that he would challenge Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a fellow Republican who former President Donald Trump repeatedly excoriated for validating the integrity of President Joe Biden’s Georgia victory in the 2020 presidential election.

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GOP Rep. Lauren Boebert was slammed on Twitter for bungling the basics of the Constitution

lauren boebert
Rep. Lauren Boebert (R-Colorado) on the House steps of the Capitol on Monday, January 4, 2021.

  • Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado was slammed on Twitter for bungling basic constitutional knowledge.
  • She said the Constitution was not meant to “rewrite the parts you don’t like.”
  • There have been 27 amendments to the Constitution since it was first ratified in 1788.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Freshman GOP Rep. Lauren Boebert of Colorado has made headlines as a vocal and provocative defender of gun rights, but on Friday she was slammed by Twitter users for bungling a basic civics lesson.

Boebert, a self-professed champion of Constitutional rights, tweeted that “protecting and defending the Constitution doesn’t mean trying to rewrite the parts you don’t like.”

Her statement belies the fact that the document has changed and expanded multiple times, hence the additional amendments.

The Constitution, which was written in 1787, established America’s national government and fundamental laws. It was ratified by nine of the original 13 states in 1788.

When the Constitution was first drafted, the first 10 amendments, known as the Bill of Rights, were not a part of the document. In December 1791, the Bill of Rights was ratified.

There have been 27 amendments to the Constitution, which includes the Second Amendment, which guarantees a right to keep and bear arms, the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery, and the 17th Amendment, which mandated the direct election of Senators in each state.

The blowback was swift.

Charlotte Clymer, the director of communications at Catholics for Choice, called out Boebert for her lack of knowledge about women’s suffrage.

“Lauren Boebert is a member of Congress and doesn’t understand that we have literally rewritten/revised the Constitution 27 times to do things like abolish slavery and, you know, extend the right to vote and run for office to women … like Lauren Boebert,” she tweeted.

Former South Carolina Democratic state Rep. Bakari Sellers made a reference to the television game show “Jeopardy,” tweeting “What are amendments for $200?”

The GOP congresswoman, who has expressed support for the QAnon conspiracy theory while denying that she is a follower, has previously gone viral for her pro-gun political statements, including the release of an ad where she indicated that she would carry her handgun on the Capitol grounds.

During a virtual meeting this week, Boebert sported a backdrop with multiple firearms while the House Natural Resources Committee debated a proposed rule to ban firearms in its hearing room.

Boebert ridiculed the move, even calling for Democratic Rep. Raúl Grijalva of Arizona, the committee chair, to issue a personal security detail for her if she couldn’t carry a firearm.

While members of Congress can keep firearms in their offices, they cannot bring them inside the House and Senate chambers.

“This rule is absurd and discriminative,” Boebert complained. “This is a blatant violation of our constitutional rights.”

Despite Boebert’s objections, the rule was approved by a voice vote.

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Trump has not reached out to Pence since the US Capitol riots on Jan. 6: report

Mike Pence Donald Trump
President Donald Trump listens as Vice President Mike Pence speaks at a coronavirus briefing in February 2020.

  • President Donald Trump has not reached out to Vice President Mike Pence since the Jan. 6 riots at the US Capitol building, according to a NBC News report.
  • NBC News Senior Washington correspondent Hallie Jackson reported on Sunday that Trump did not contact Pence on Wednesday night, when the vice president presided over the Electoral College certification process.
  • For weeks, Trump has implored Pence to overturn the election results, with a public pressure campaign that included extraordinarily high levels of tweeting.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

President Donald Trump has not reached out to Vice President Mike Pence since the Jan. 6 riots at the US Capitol building, according to a NBC News report.

NBC News Senior Washington correspondent Hallie Jackson reported on Sunday that Trump did not contact Pence on Wednesday night, when the vice president presided over the Electoral College certification process that was restarted after being disrupted by the pro-Trump rioters who breached the Capitol.

“I’m told that not only did the president not reach out to Vice President Pence on Wednesday night – he has not called him since, per a source familiar with the matter,” Jackson tweeted. “It’s an extraordinary detail.”

Jackson appeared on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” where she said that the relationship between the two men was “not good” and noted that after the Jan. 6 riots erupted, Pence was moved to a secure location with his family, who had come to the Capitol to attend the certification.

“I think it reflects … how acrimonious [their relationship] has become,” Jackson said.

Read more: Secret Service experts are speculating in group chats about how Trump might be hauled out of the White House if he won’t budge on Inauguration Day

Pence reportedly never left the Capitol building during the rioting that left five people dead.

For weeks, Trump has implored Pence to overturn the election results. Under the Constitution, Pence, who acts as president of the Senate in his role as vice president, is bound to announce the final Electoral College count before a joint session of Congress.

Early on Jan. 7, Congress ultimately certified President-elect Joe Biden’s 306-232 Electoral College victory.

Jackson detailed the extraordinary pressure that was applied to Pence.

“I’m told that as far back as December 15 – mid December, so weeks ago – there were behind-the-scenes maneuvering to try to essentially get the vice president to do what the president wanted,” she said.

Since the Capitol riots, a bipartisan group of lawmakers have asked for Pence to invoke the 25th Amendment and remove Trump from office, but Jackson stated that she’s been told that the vice president is skeptical of such a move.

“That’s what we’ve been hearing and reporting from people close to him allies,” she added. “But there is real concern, and anger here about how this moves forward.”

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‘They chose to subvert the Constitution’: Pelosi slams House Republicans who backed Texas lawsuit seeking to overturn election results

Nancy Pelosi
Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., conducts a news conference to call for the extension of the federal unemployment insurance in the Capitol Visitor Center to on Friday, July 24, 2020.

  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Friday criticized House Republicans who joined a legal effort by Texas to overturn the election results in four key states that President-elect Joe Biden won in November.
  • “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House,” Pelosi said. “Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.”
  • In an unsigned order issued on Friday, the Supreme Court rejected the lawsuit brought by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton due to lack of standing.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Friday ripped into House Republicans who backed an effort by Texas to overturn the election results in four key states that President-elect Joe Biden won in November, accusing the members of  “subverting the Constitution.”

The California Democrat lauded the Supreme Court’s decision to toss the Texas case, which sought to invalidate the electoral results from Georgia, Michigan, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin, states where President Donald Trump and his campaign have long alleged voter fraud without providing any evidence to back up their claims.

“The Court has rightly dismissed out of hand the extreme, unlawful and undemocratic GOP lawsuit to overturn the will of millions of American voters,” she said in a statement. “The 126 Republican Members that signed onto this lawsuit brought dishonor to the House. Instead of upholding their oath to support and defend the Constitution, they chose to subvert the Constitution and undermine public trust in our sacred democratic institutions.

In a brief unsigned order issued on Friday, the Supreme Court rejected the lawsuit brought by Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton, a Trump ally, due to lack of standing. In addition to Paxton, 17 state attorneys general had signed an amicus brief backing the lawsuit.

“Texas has not demonstrated a judicially cognizable interest in the manner in which another State conducts its elections,” the Supreme Court’s order said. “All other pending motions are dismissed as moot.”

While the GOP signees represented a broad swath of conservative districts, much of the party’s House leadership was also on board, with Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of California and Minority Whip Steve Scalise of Louisiana taking part in the lawsuit. But House Republican Conference Chair Liz Cheney of Wyoming, a member of the party’s leadership, did not join the lawsuit.

In her statement, Pelosi highlighted COVID-19, criticizing the GOP for not focusing their legislative efforts on tackling the public policy issues caused by the highly-contagious virus.

“The pandemic is raging, with nearly 300,000 having died and tens of millions having lost jobs,” she added. “Strong, unified action is needed to crush the virus, and Republicans must once and for all end their election subversion – immediately.” 

Biden cruised to a 306-232 Electoral College victory in the 2020 presidential election. To win the presidency, a candidate must receive at least 270 electoral votes.

The continued Republican resistance to Biden’s victory comes as the Electoral College will meet on December 14, with electors set to formally cast their votes for the winners of each state.

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