Biden nominates Cindy McCain for ambassadorship with the UN food agency

Cindy McCain attends the Ambrosetti International Economic Forum 2019 "Lo scenario dell'Economia e della Finanza" on September 7, 2019 in Cernobbio, Italy.
Cindy McCain.

  • President Biden has tapped Cindy McCain for a post at the United Nations.
  • Cindy McCain will represent the US at the UN’s food agency if she’s confirmed by the Senate.
  • She endorsed Biden during the 2020 campaign and is the widow of the late Sen. John McCain.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Cindy McCain, an Arizona businesswoman and the widow of the late Republican Sen. John McCain, has picked to take over as the US representative for the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture.

The White House announced the nomination on Wednesday, with President Joe Biden making her one of the few Republicans set to enter the administration. Her nomination will require Senate confirmation, similar to other ambassadors.

McCain took heat from former President Donald Trump during the campaign for endorsing Biden, and even got censured by the Arizona GOP, which she called a “badge of honor.”

The 67-year-old earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Southern California and started her career as a special education teacher before meeting her future husband, then a US Navy liaison officer to the Senate after coming home from Vietnam, where he was a prisoner of war.

Although the McCains were pitted against Biden and former President Barack Obama in the 2008 presidential campaign, both she and President Biden have described themselves as friends.

“I am deeply honored and look forward the work ahead,” McCain tweeted Wednesday.

She also shared congratulatory messages she received, including from Democratic Sen. Krysten Sinema of Arizona.

The UN food agency has a mission to address global hunger and spur efforts to make agriculture more sustainable.

It also coordinates with governments following disasters to shore up their food supplies.

Biden also announced a slew of other ambassadorship picks on Wednesday, which had been delayed during the early months of the administration as they prioritized public health-related posts.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Arizona Republican committee is debating a proposal to censure Cindy McCain, wife of the late GOP Sen. John McCain

Cindy McCain-Doug Ducey
Cindy McCain embraces GOP Gov. Doug Ducey of Arizona at an Election night party on November 6, 2018.

  • The Republican committee in Arizona’s most populous county considered censuring Cindy McCain, the widow of the late GOP Sen. John McCain, according to The Arizona Republic.
  • The Maricopa County Republican Committee floated a proposal on Saturday that would have censured McCain, but the measure did not move forward.
  • The state party confirmed via Twitter that they would vote on a resolution to censure McCain on Jan. 23.
  • Cindy McCain was a prominent Republican supporter of President-elect Joe Biden’s 2020 campaign against President Donald Trump.
  • “I am a proud lifelong Republican and will continue to support candidates who put country over party and stand for the rule of law,” she tweeted on Jan. 9.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The Republican committee in Arizona’s most populous county considered censuring Cindy McCain, the widow of the late GOP Sen. John McCain, according to The Arizona Republic.

The Maricopa County Republican Committee discussed a proposal on Saturday that would have censured McCain, but the measure did not move forward, according to an acting secretary at the event.

However, the state party confirmed on Twitter that they would vote on a resolution to censure McCain on Jan. 23.

Taking such an action would be a radical departure from her longstanding position of influence within the Arizona Republican Party. McCain’s late husband, Sen. McCain, represented the state in the US Senate from 1987 until his death in 2018, and was the GOP presidential nominee in 2008.

However, the Maricopa GOP did censure former Republican Sen. Jeff Flake of Arizona, who served in the House of Representatives from 2001 to 2013 and the Senate from 2013 to 2019 and endorsed President-elect Joe Biden over President Donald Trump in the 2020 presidential election.

Read more: How full Democratic control of Washington DC could transform real estate

In response to the proposed censure, McCain reaffirmed her Republican bona fides.

“I am a proud lifelong Republican and will continue to support candidates who put country over party and stand for the rule of law,” she wrote on Twitter.

Cindy McCain, who has endured repeated insults aimed at her late husband from Trump, was a prominent Republican surrogate for President-elect Joe Biden during the 2020 presidential campaign.

Biden, who served in the US Senate for 36 years, most of them alongside Sen. McCain, has been close with the McCain family for years. 

The president-elect was the first Democratic presidential nominee to win Arizona since 1996, capturing the fast-growing Southwestern state by more than 10,000 votes.

During the 2020 Democratic National Convention, McCain had a prime speaking slot, where she fondly recalled the relationship between Biden and her late husband.

Cindy McCain has never held elective office, but in November, she was reportedly being considered to become Biden’s US Ambassador to the United Kingdom.

On Jan. 2, her daughter, Meghan McCain, took to Twitter to blast the Arizona GOP after they sent out a disparaging tweet blasting Sen. McCain.

“As the sun sets on 2020, remember that we’re never going back to the party of [Mitt] Romney, Flake, and McCain,” the Arizona GOP’s official Twitter account said. “The Republican Party is now, and forever will be, one for the working man and woman! God bless.”

Meghan McCain replied that whoever was running the account could “go to hell.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

‘Go to hell’: Meghan McCain slams Arizona GOP for attacking her late father

Meghan McCain
Meghan McCain.

  • Meghan McCain, a co-host of ABC’s “The View,” berated the Arizona GOP on Saturday for a tweet critical of her late father, longtime US Sen. John McCain.
  • After the Arizona GOP tweeted that they were “never going back to the party of [Sen.] McCain,” Meghan McCain said that the person “running this twitter account can go to hell.”
  • She also mocked the Arizona GOP’s performance this past November, with President-elect Joe Biden flipping the state to the Democratic column and Democrat Mark Kelly defeating appointed GOP Sen. Martha McSally.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Meghan McCain, a co-host of ABC’s “The View,” berated the Arizona GOP on Saturday for a tweet critical of her late father, longtime US Sen. John McCain.

McCain, a vocal Republican, was angered by a tweet that slammed the legacy of her late father, who was the 2008 Republican presidential nominee and represented the state in the US Senate from 1987 until his death in August 2018.

“As the sun sets on 2020, remember that we’re never going back to the party of [Mitt] Romney, [Jeff] Flake, and [John] McCain,” the Arizona GOP’s official Twitter account stated. “The Republican Party is now, and forever will be, one for the working man and woman! God bless.”

McCain responded: “Honestly whomever is running this twitter account can go to hell.”

She also mocked the GOP’s statewide performance this past November, adding: “How’d that work out on Election Day in Arizona?”

In the most recent election, President-elect Joe Biden became the first Democratic presidential nominee to win the state since Bill Clinton in 1996. Democrat Mark Kelly was also elected to the Senate, beating appointed GOP Sen. Martha McSally to fill the remainder of Sen. McCain’s term in the Senate.

Cindy McCain, Sen. McCain’s widow, endorsed Biden in the 2020 presidential election.

Over the past few years, Meghan McCain has often lamented the direction of the GOP under Trump, as her father was a constant target of attacks from the president.

Read more: Secret Service experts are speculating in group chats about how Trump might be hauled out of the White House if he won’t budge on Inauguration Day

Less than a month ago, McCain criticized Trump on Twitter for calling her late father “one of the most overrated people in D.C.”

“Two years after he died, you still obsess over my dad,” she wrote. “It kills you that no one will ever love you or remember you like they loved and remember him. He served his country with honor, you have disgraced the office of the presidency. You couldn’t even pull it out in Arizona.”

Sen. McCain, who withdrew his support of Trump in the run-up to the 2016 presidential election, was also the pivotal vote that kept the Affordable Care Act largely in place, which has angered the president for years.

Since the death of Sen. McCain and the retirement of former Sen. Jeff Flake, the Arizona GOP has shifted further right.

Kelli Ward, chair of the Arizona Republican Party, has had an acrimonious relationship with the McCain family, having run a scorched-earth primary campaign against the late senator for the 2016 GOP Senate nomination, which she lost. McCain was reelected to a sixth term in the Senate that fall.

A Navy lieutenant and prisoner of war in Vietnam, Sen McCain rose to become one of the most influential and well-known senators in the body, maintaining a strong focus on defense and foreign affairs.

Read the original article on Business Insider