China’s dropping fertility rate means its military has to work harder to find new troops

china military recruits
Chinese paramilitary recruits during regular training in Nanjing, January 24, 2007.

  • The People’s Liberation Army has expanded its sources of troops, including lowering education, height, and eyesight requirements.
  • China’s recent census showed the 2020 fertility rate was 1.3 children per woman, below the level needed for a stable population.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

As the world’s largest military, needing hundreds of thousands of new recruits each year, the People’s Liberation Army has been affected by China’s wider fertility and ageing issues, and tried to counter them.

The gathering pace of the PLA’s modernisation has given its instructors and recruiters the challenge of how to train a newer breed of soldier, experts said.

“Military instructors found the strict and dogmatic training modes applied in the last century didn’t work for the more individual young soldiers born in the 21st century,” said Zhou Chenming, a researcher from the Beijing-based Yuan Wang military science and technology think tank.

“Some even dared to butt against and challenge superiors when they were not happy. The military was forced to adjust. Some military instructors tell me they are still muddling through how to take charge of younger generations.”

Chinese troops
Chinese troops.

Rather than only orders and scolding, therapy sessions by professional psychotherapists have been brought in since 2011 to ease stress, according to military mouthpiece The PLA Daily.

That can help middle-aged instructors and senior leaders to better understand the new generations, but also provide data for designing new training modules such as computer war games and virtual reality training, the PLA report said. In the past, the military would leave soldiers’ morale and personal well-being to political commissars.

Physical fitness has been another tough challenge for the PLA since the military shifted its recruitment targets from peasants’ children to rural youth with a higher education level in 2000, when the military stepped up a massive equipment and weapon systems replacement.

To command and operate increasingly advanced and sophisticated weapon systems, the military recruited more than 120,000 college graduates in 2009 – the largest intake since the Communist Party regime was established in 1949. That trend has since been the norm, according to the defence ministry.

The ministry has started to adjust conscription requirements to make sure they could recruit enough qualified college students. For example, since 2014, it has lowered height requirements from 162cm (5 feet, 4 inches) to 160cm for men, and 160cm to 158cm for women, as well as lowering the bar a little for short-sighted and overweight applicants.

After protests by young soldiers against a ban on mobile phones, the army in 2015 lifted the restriction, provided that soldiers installed the army’s anti-spy software that allowed the newly established internet administration centres to closely monitor their activities.

Chinese China PLA army cadet robot
A Chinese People’s Liberation Army cadet adjusts dancing humanoid robots at the PLA’s Armored Forces Engineering Academy in Beijing, July 22, 2014.

The PLA had an extra round of conscription last year, allowing university graduates who failed to find jobs to enlist.

“To expand sources of troops, the PLA has also started recruiting high-school graduates who are not qualified enough to be admitted to university,” Zhou said.

“The shortage of soldiers is not so critical now, but it’s a reality that more and more highly educated urban children are not interested in serving in the army.”

China’s once-a-decade census, released this month, showed that 12 million babies were born in the past year, the lowest since 1961, during the Great Famine. The decision in 2016 to loosen China’s one-child policy and allow people to have a second child had failed to reverse the country’s falling birth rate.

The census showed China’s 2020 fertility rate was 1.3 children per woman – below the replacement level of 2.1 needed for a stable population.

Macau-based military expert Antony Wong Tong said that since 1993, many mainland military officials and observers had voiced concerns about the impact of the one-child policy – introduced in 1979 – on the military.

In an open report to the central government in 2012, Professor Liu Mingfu from the PLA National Defence University warned that at least 70% of PLA soldiers were from one-child families, and the figure rose to 80% among combat troops.

China soldiers Xi Jinping Beijing
People’s Liberation Army’s Honor Guard Battalion soldiers in front of photo of President Xi Jinping near Tiananmen Square in Beijing, May 20, 2020.

“We could find the PLA has recruited more female soldiers in the past decade – a popular approach adopted by developed countries facing a shortage of new blood,” Wong said.

Previous official figures showed women made up 5% of the PLA’s 2 million troops, but Zhou said the proportion had increased to 7%. Women made up 17% of the American military in 2018, according to the US government.

The PLA also set up its first female marine troop, which debuted in the 2017 Zhurihe war game parade.

Ni Lexiong, a military expert in Shanghai, said a greater proportion of women in the military would become a global trend thanks to the development of military technologies.

“Male-dominated troops is an outdated concept, and more highly educated soldiers are required, playing keyboards indoors,” Ni said.

“Modern warfare will focus on artificial intelligence, unmanned aircraft, electronic countermeasures and other confrontations that do not need too much physical strength, allowing more competent women to play a role in the armed forces.”

Read the original article on Business Insider

A 40-ton armored vehicle drives over Chinese troops in this intense video of a really unusual trust exercise

Chinese troops parade at the end of the day of the Vostok-2018 (East-2018) military drills at Tsugol training ground not far from the borders with China and Mongolia in Siberia, on September 13, 2018
Chinese troops parade at the end of the day of the Vostok-2018 (East-2018) military drills at Tsugol training ground not far from the borders with China and Mongolia in Siberia, on September 13, 2018

Chinese media recently released a video of a really intense military training exercise in which a 40-ton armored vehicle drives over troops laying on the ground, with the vehicle tracks passing dangerously close to the heads of the Chinese soldiers.

The Chinese-language Global Times posted the video last week, noting that the source was Chinese state broadcaster CCTV. The video has since made the rounds on social media.

An unspecified People’s Liberation Army (PLA) brigade in the Southern Theater Command conducted a trust exercise in which the troops demonstrated the faith in their armored vehicle drivers by literally putting their lives on the line.

At the start of the video, an officer asks the soldiers: “Do you have confidence in the soldier beside you?” After shouting back “yes,” one soldier departs to climb aboard the armored vehicle as the others drop to the ground, awaiting their fellow soldier to run over them.

The tracked armored vehicle in the video looks like the HQ-17 surface-to-air missile transporter erector launcher. The HQ-17, which was publicly revealed in 2015, is a reverse-engineered Chinese variant of the Russian Tor-M1 system.

In two other related videos, soldiers involved in the demonstration talk about their experience. One soldier on the ground says he was “really nervous.”

Another Chinese soldier described the training exercise as a test of the armored vehicle driver’s skills and character, as well as an opportunity to boost trust and confidence between soldiers.

The exercise is unusual in that it has troops lying sideways, putting them at greater risk, but it is certainly not the first time China has had armored vehicles drive over troops in training.

A series of photos from last September posted on the official website of the Chinese military shows tanks and other vehicles running over troops in Xinjiang as part of a psychological training exercise intended to strengthen their resolve.

A soldier assigned to an army division under the PLA Xinjiang Military Command lies on the ground as a tank drives over him.
A soldier assigned to an army division under the PLA Xinjiang Military Command lies on the ground as a tank drives over him.

Similar exercises have also been conducted in other countries.

In October, as The Drive reported at the time, Finland’s Jaeger Brigade, known as the Jääkäriprikaati, released videos of a German-made Leopard 2A4 tank driving over troops in the snow.

The aim of the exercise was to help troops combat “tank terror,” which is the fear of encountering an armored vehicle on the battlefield.

Read the original article on Business Insider