Inside America’s first private terminal for millionaires

  • Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) is home to America’s first private terminal.
  • The Private Suite is popular among the world’s celebrities and millionaires.
  • The terminal has 12 individual suites, its own TSA check, and a fleet of BMWs that drive guests to their planes.
  • Non-members can utilize the suite for $4,000 per international flight.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Following is a transcript of the video.

Narrator: Airports suck. Camping out in customs lines, sprinting a mile to your gate, it’s the worst and the furthest thing from luxury. But imagine you had some extra cash saved up, would you spend it to skip all of that airport madness? Well, that’s what the minds behind America’s very first private terminal are betting on. In 2017, The Private Suite opened up at LAX. And for $4,000 per international flight, guests get access to a luxurious, super secure, private terminal just two miles from the normal one.

Amina: At LAX, it takes about 2,200 steps to get from the check-in counter to your plane door. For us, it takes 70 steps.

Narrator: Each year, thousands of the world’s millionaires and celebrities relax between flights in the terminal’s 12 individual suites. The Private Suite coordinates with 70 airlines, has an onsite TSA check, and owns a fleet of BMWs that drives travelers right to their planes. So what’s it like inside the place claiming to make travel not only easy but enjoyable? We had our LA team go and check out The Private Suite themselves.

Caroline: Hello, so I just arrived to The Private Suite at LAX. And there is a lot of security, like when you pull in, they asked for my ID, and this guy in like a bulletproof vest. So it is very highly secured. I am going to pretend I am very affluent for an hour.

Narrator: When you first pull up, you enter through these ominous gates with armed guards and a sign warning no filming is allowed. Right away, you’re assigned a logistics team of eight people. They take care of everything during your stay from valeting and detailing your car to checking in your baggage. And don’t worry about missing your flight, the team’s watching the clock. When you enter the terminal, there’s no check-in. You’re escorted straight to your private suite.

Caroline: Wow. Oh, my gosh, it’s like your private hotel room.

Narrator: Each suite has a fully stocked kitchenette loaded with snacks. You can also order food off a curated menu ahead of time, so it’s ready when you arrive.

Caroline: Oh, my gosh, they have food. It’s not like the fast food options you get at the airport. You get, like, healthier options. This is exactly what I ordered. Narrator: There’s a minibar with spirits, Champagne, and white wine. You can get red wine upon request. There’s even a candy wall.

Caroline: This is perfect for kids, but it’s also, like, perfect for me as an adult. We got M&M’s, chocolate-covered, I’m assuming they’re raisins, jelly beans, Hershey’s, and Skittles.

Narrator: All of the suites come with an en suite bathroom stocked with toiletries. There’s no shower in these, but the members can utilize the spa shower just down the hall. They can also book complimentary massages, manicures, or haircuts right in their suites. And in case you forgot something, each suite has pillows, power adapters, and travel accessories on hand. One of the suites even has a backyard complete with a putting green and cornhole. When your flight time approaches, your team will let you know it’s time to pack up. You’ll breeze through TSA in under a few minutes, and you don’t have to worry about bags, The Private Suite’s taken care of checking those in. Once cleared, you’ll hop on a 7 Series BMW that drives you the seven minutes across the tarmac to your flight.

Amina: When you’re driving, being driven through the airfield, you know, between the airplanes to your plane, that’s a really special kind of experience that frankly only we can deliver, and that’s something that, a memory that people take away with them all the time.

Narrator: So how does The Private Suite manage to cut down on travel times and still maintain privacy? With lots and lots of planning.

Amina: Most people don’t realize the operational complexity that happens in the background to even getting one member through here. For example, we have a control room. It looks like, you know, the NASA space center or something. We know exactly what container in the airplane your luggage is in before your airplane actually lands so that we can intercept your luggage and take it out for you before it hits the conveyor belt. That’s the kind of meticulous coordination that happens in the background every step of the way.

Narrator: Members of The Private Suite pay a yearly fee of $4,500 and an extra $3,000 per international flight, but you can utilize the suite even if you’re not a member. You won’t have a yearly fee, but you’ll pay between $500 and $1,000 more per flight.

Caroline: I can really see the benefits of being a member if you’re traveling a lot because I think that would decrease the price a little bit. But also, if you wanna splurge on a really fun trip that you’re taking with your friends, and you’re just like, “You know what, we saved up. We need to do this, like, the best way possible. Why don’t we just come in, come into the lounge, and just get on the flight with ease.”

EDITOR’S NOTE: This video was originally published in March 2019.

Read the original article on Business Insider

The Tom Cruise deepfakes were hard to create. But less sophisticated ‘shallowfakes’ are already wreaking havoc

tom cruise BURBANK, CA - JANUARY 30: Tom Cruise onstage during the 10th Annual Lumiere Awards at Warner Bros. Studios on January 30, 2019 in Burbank. (Photo by Michael Kovac/Getty Images for Advanced Imaging Society)
  • The convincing Tom Cruise deepfakes that went viral last month took lots of skill to create.
  • But less sophisticated “shallowfakes” and other synthetic media are already creating havoc.
  • DARPA’s AI experts mapped out how hard it would be to create these emerging types of fake media.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The coiffed hair, the squint, the jaw clench, and even the signature cackle – it all looks and sounds virtually indistinguishable from the real Tom Cruise.

But the uncanny lookalikes that went viral on TikTok last month under the handle @deeptomcruise were deepfakes, a collaboration between Belgian visual-effects artist Chris Ume and Tom Cruise impersonator Miles Fisher.

The content was entertaining and harmless, with the fake Cruise performing magic tricks, practicing his golf swing, and indulging in a Bubble Pop. Still, the videos – which have racked up an average of 5.6 million views each – reignited people’s fears about the dangers of the most cutting-edge type of fake media.

“Deepfakes seem to tap into a really visceral part of people’s minds,” Henry Ajder, a UK-based deepfakes expert, told Insider.

“When you watch that Tom Cruise deepfake, you don’t need an analogy because you’re seeing it with your own two eyes and you’re being kind of fooled even though you know it’s not real,” he said. “Being fooled is a very intimate experience. And if someone is fooled by a deepfake, it makes them sit up and pay attention.”

Read more: What is a deepfake? Everything you need to know about the AI-powered fake media

The good news: it’s really hard to make such a convincing deepfake. It took Ume two months to train the AI-powered tool that generated the deepfakes, 24 hours to edit each minute-long video, and a talented human impersonator to mimic the hair, body shape, mannerisms, and voice, according to The New York Times.

The bad news: it won’t be that hard for long, and major advances in the technology in recent years have unleashed a wave of apps and free tools that enable people with few skills or resources to create increasingly good deepfakes.

Nina Schick, a deepfake expert and former advisor to Joe Biden, told Insider this “rapid commodification of the technology” is already is wreaking havoc.

“Are you just really concerned about the high-fidelity side of this? Absolutely not,” Shick said, adding that working at the intersection of geopolitics and technology has taught her that “it doesn’t have to be terribly sophisticated for it to be effective and do damage.”

The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) is well aware of this diverse landscape, and its Media Forensics (MediFor) team is working alongside private sector researchers to develop tools that can detect manipulated media, including deepfakes as well cheapfakes and shallowfakes.

As part of its research, DARPA’s MediFor team mapped out different types of synthetic media – and the level of skill and resources an individual, group, or an adversarial country would need to create it.

MediFor threat landscape.pptx

Hollywood-level productions – like those in “Star Wars: Rogue One” or “The Irishman” – require lots of resources and skill to create, even though they typically aren’t AI-powered (though Disney is experimenting with deepfakes). On the other end of the scale, bad actors with little training have used simple video-editing techniques to make House Speaker Nancy Pelosi appear drunk and incite violence in Ivory Coast, South Sudan, Kenya, and Burma.

Shick said the Facebook-fueled genocide against Rohingya Muslims also relied mostly on these so-called “cheapfakes” and “shallowfakes” – synthetic or manipulated media altered using less advanced, non-AI tools.

But deepfakes aren’t just being used to spread political misinformation, and experts told Insider ordinary people may have the most to lose if they become a target.

Last month, a woman was arrested in Pennsylvania and charged with cyber harassment on suspicion of making deepfake videos of teen cheerleaders naked and smoking, in an attempt to get them kicked off her daughter’s squad.

“It’s almost certain that we’re going to see some kind of porn version of this app,” Shick said. In a recent op-ed in Wired, she and Ajder wrote about a bot Ajder helped discover on Telegram that turned 100,000 user-provided photos of women and underage children into deepfake porn – and how app developers need to take proactive steps to prevent this kind of abuse.

Experts told Insider they’re particularly concerned about these types of cases because the victims often lack the money and status to set the record straight.

“The celebrity porn [deepfakes] have already come out, but they have the resources to protect themselves … the PR team, the legal team … millions of supporters,” Shick said. “What about everyone else?”

As with most new technologies, from facial recognition to social media to COVID-19 vaccines, women, people of color, and other historically marginalized groups tend to be disproportionately the victims of abuse and bias stemming from their use.

To counter the threat posed by deepfakes, experts say society needs a multipronged approach that includes government regulation, proactive steps by technology and social media companies, and public education about how to think critically and navigate our constantly evolving information ecosystem.

Read the original article on Business Insider