Tesla just hiked the prices of its most popular cars – here’s how much each model will set you back

Tesla Lineup
Tesla’s cars range in price from around $40,000 to $150,000

  • Tesla sells four models – the Model S, 3, X, and Y – in several different trim levels.
  • Options for them include different interior colors, extra seats, and performance packages.
  • Teslas range in price from roughly $40,000 to $150,000.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Tesla is known to quietly raise and lower prices seemingly at random.

In October, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dropped the price of the Model S sedan to $69,420 after rival Lucid announced its sedan would start at $69,900. And in March, the company hiked the price for four of its models by up to $10,000. On Friday, it raised the cost of some Model 3 and Model Y trims by up to $1,000.

With price changes on a constant basis, it can be tough to keep track of it all. Those shopping for a new Tesla can consult this guide to understand the latest prices of the Tesla Model S, 3, X, and Y, and how the models stack up.

Although add-ons vary between models, any Tesla can be optioned with the $10,000 “full self-driving” driver-assistance package, which doesn’t currently make Teslas fully autonomous.

Model S

Tesla Model 3
Tesla Model S.

Launched in 2012, the Model S sedan is Tesla’s longest-running model. The luxury four-door got an overhaul at the top of 2021, which included an updated exterior and a controversial new steering yoke. It’s the choice for EV buyers who have a little more to spend and don’t want a crossover.

Here’s how each Model S breaks down:

  • Long Range: For $79,990, the base Model S delivers an estimated range of 375 miles, a top speed of 155 mph, and a 0-60-mph time of 3.1 seconds.
  • Plaid: The $119,990 Model S Plaid, whose name is a reference to the movie “Space Balls,” travels 350 miles on a charge, hits a top speed of 200 mph, and sprints to 60 mph in 1.99 seconds, Tesla says. Both Plaid models have three motors good for more than 1,000 horsepower.
  • Plaid Plus: The $149,990 Plaid Plus is the most advanced Model S yet. Tesla says it will do 0-60 mph in under two seconds, has a top speed of 200 mph, and has a range of more than 520 miles. Deliveries are set to start in 2022.

A paint color other than white will run you $1,500 to $2,500, 21-inch wheels cost $4,500, and a white or off-white interior costs $2,500.

Model 3

Tesla Model 3 update
Tesla Model 3.

With the debut of the Model 3 in 2017, Tesla made good on its promise to build a more affordable vehicle than the Model S or Model X that came before it. And since it launched, the Model 3 has proved wildly successful, becoming both Tesla’s most popular model and the overall best-selling EV in the world in 2020.

The Model 3 comes in three flavors:

  • Standard Range Plus: The $38,490 base Model 3 gets an estimated range of 263 miles, a top speed of 140 mph, and a 0-60 time of 5.3 seconds.
  • Long Range: The $47,490 Long Range model has an EPA-estimated range of 353 miles
  • Performance: For $56,990, the sporty Model 3 Performance delivers a 315-mile range, a top speed of 162 mph, and a 0-60-mph time of 3.1 seconds. It also has a lowered suspension, better brakes, and 20-inch wheels as standard.

A paint color other than white will set you back $1,000 to $2,000, 19-inch rims cost $1,500, and a white interior – as opposed to the standard black – costs a $1,000 premium.

Read more: Don’t blame bitcoin for Tesla’s stock slide – it’s high-time faithful investors took some profits

Model X

Tesla Model X
Tesla Model X.

The Model X crossover is Tesla’s second-oldest model behind the Model S. It hit the market in 2015.

There are two versions of the Model X:

  • Long Range: For $89,990, the dual-motor base Model X delivers 350 miles of estimated range and a 155-mph top speed.
  • Plaid: The $119,990 Plaid version steps things up a notch with three motors that Tesla says put out 1,020 horsepower. Tesla says the high-performance crossover will have a 330-mile range and a 0-60-mph time of 2.5 seconds when deliveries start in May.

Like on Tesla’s other vehicles, a white paint job comes standard – black, silver, blue, or red will run you $1,500 to $2,500. Five seats come standard, and a six-seat or seven-seat layout costs $6,500 and $3,500, respectively.

A white or cream interior costs $2,000, while bigger rims go for $5,500.

Model Y

Model Y Sunset White
Tesla Model Y.

Starting deliveries in early 2020, the Model Y compact crossover is Tesla’s newest vehicle. It’s based on the same platform as the Model 3, but has more cargo capacity, rides higher, and has a general shape more like the Model X. It’s proving to be a hot seller just like its sedan sibling.

The Model Y comes in two versions:

  • Long Range: The $50,490 base vehicle has an EPA-estimated range of 326 miles, a top speed of 135 mph, and makes the sprint to 60 mph in 4.8 seconds.
  • Performance: The sportier option costs $60,990, and although it gets a lower range of 303 miles, it makes up for it in performance upgrades. The crossover accelerates to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds, has a higher top speed, and comes with bigger wheels, better brakes, and a lowered suspension.

There’s also a more affordable Standard Range model that Tesla briefly sold starting in January. Elon Musk said on Twitter it’s still available as an off-menu option.

Buyers can shell out an extra $1,000 for a tow hitch, $1,000 for a white interior, and $3,000 for third-row seating. A non-white paint job costs $1,000 to $2,000, while bigger rims command $2,000.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Here are the cheapest electric vehicles on sale under $35,000 in 2021

EMBARGO 2/14/2022 4PM ET 2022 Chevrolet BoltEV 006
2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV.

  • Electric vehicles aren’t quite cheap yet, but they’re less expensive than ever before.
  • Several can be had for under $35,000, less than the average price of a new car in the US.
  • Some of the lowest-cost EVs available include the Mini Electric, Chevy Bolt EV, and Kia Niro EV.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Tesla quietly raised the prices of several of its models on Thursday, but there are still more inexpensive electric vehicles on the market than ever before.

EVs have burst into the mainstream market in recent years, and as an increasing number of car companies make ambitious pledges to ramp up sales, zero-emission vehicles have steadily decreased in price. This year, shoppers will be able to choose from an array of at least 10 new EVs that cost less than $35,000.

But not all sub-$35,000 EVs are created equal. Estimated ranges for the cars listed below span 110 miles on the low end to more than 250 miles on the high end. Some are luxury offerings from Mini, while others come from mass-market brands like Volkswagen and Nissan.

Only General Motors and Tesla have sold enough EVs that their offerings are no longer eligible for the $7,500 federal tax credit that’s meant to spur sales of low-emission and zero-emission cars. This means that most of the vehicles below can be had for much less than their official MSRP, and why a few of the cars listed retail for more than $35,000.

Mini Electric – $29,900

Mini Electric
Mini Electric.

BMW unveiled the Mini Electric back in 2019 and started selling it last year. It’s the lowest-cost electric car currently available in the US, and its eligibility for the $7,500 federal EV tax credit makes the deal even sweeter.

That low MSRP means that the Mini Electric only gets an estimated 110 miles of range, but it’s aimed primarily at people who live in cities and probably don’t drive long distances. And with a claimed 181 horsepower and a 0-60-mph time of under seven seconds, it’s pretty quick.

Nissan Leaf – $31,620

2021 Nissan Leaf
2021 Nissan Leaf.

Introduced in 2010 and now in its second generation, the Nissan Leaf is one of the longest-running electric cars on the market.

The base model gets an EPA-estimated 149 miles of range, while pricier trim levels promise up to 226 miles along with a more powerful motor.

Chevrolet Bolt EV – $31,995

EMBARGO 2/14/2022 4PM ET 2022 Chevrolet BoltEV 002
2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV.

Like the Leaf, the Chevrolet Bolt EV was one of the first EVs to go mainstream. Chevrolet recently unveiled the revamped 2022 Bolt EV, which will retail for more than $5,000 less than the outgoing model when it hits dealers this summer.

The latest generation of the Bolt EV promises 259 miles of range across all its trim levels – just like the previous generation – but sports a much sleeker design all around.

Hyundai Ioniq Electric – $33,045

Hyundai Ioniq Electric
Hyundai Ioniq Electric.

While the Hyundai Ioniq Electric’s base price is appealing – especially with the addition of a federal tax credit – the hatchback isn’t sold in every state and has less range than some of its rivals. It gets an EPA-estimated range of 170 miles.

There’s also a more expensive $38,615 trim level available with the same powertrain but an upgraded interior and tech features.

Chevrolet Bolt EUV – $33,995

EMBARGO 2/14/2022 4PM ET 2022 Chevrolet BoltEUV 010
2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV.

The 2022 Bolt EUV is a brand new electric crossover from GM that shares its innards with the Bolt EV. Since it’s a little bigger than the hatchback, it has a slightly reduced range of 250 miles.

It affords a few inches more legroom to rear passengers than the Bolt EV and offers GM’s semi-autonomous driver-assistance tech, Super Cruise, as an option.

Hyundai Kona Electric – $37,390

Hyundai Kona Electric
Hyundai Kona Electric.

The base 2021 Hyundai Kona Electric sports a 201-horsepower motor and a respectable EPA-estimated range of 258 miles.

This month, Hyundai revealed a refreshed 2022 Kona Electric (pictured above) with a sleeker design but no powertrain changes. It hasn’t said how much the new model will cost yet.

Kia Niro EV – $39,090

Kia Niro EV 1
Kia Niro EV.

The Kia Niro EV shares a battery pack and motor with the Hyundai Kona Electric, which is no surprise given that both brands fall under the same umbrella. Specs are slightly different however, with the Niro EV getting an EPA-estimated range of 239 miles.

Volkswagen ID.4 – $39,995

Volkswagen ID.4
Volkswagen ID.4.

Volkswagen’s first EV for the US market hits streets this year, with the first deliveries beginning in March. The vehicle promises a 250-mile range and a familiar crossover shape that’s all the rage right now, so it very well may give the Tesla Model Y a run for its money.

Nissan Ariya – $40,000

Nissan Ariya front quarter_1 source
Nissan Ariya.

Another new entry to the electric-crossover market is the Nissan Ariya, the Japanese brand’s first major EV since it launched the Leaf more than a decade ago.

Details are still scant, as the Ariya isn’t set to go on sale in the US until late 2021, but we do know that the base model will start at around $40,000, there will be an all-wheel-drive option, and the longest-range model will travel up to 300 miles on a charge.

Ford Mustang Mach-E – $42,895

Mustang Mach E GT Performance Edition 03
Mustang Mach-E GT Performance Edition.

Since the 2021 Mustang Mach-E is Ford’s first major electric car – and the Blue Oval hasn’t sold very many EVs yet – the vehicle is eligible for the $7,500 federal tax credit, bringing its theoretical starting price to just over $35,000.

That starting price gets you an EPA-estimated 230 miles of range for the rear-wheel-drive model, and 211 miles for the all-wheel-drive version. There are also several other trims, including one with a 300-mile range and a high-performance model in the works that Ford claims will hit 60 mph in 3.5 seconds.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Tesla just hiked prices by up to $10,000 – here’s how much each model will set you back

Model Y Side Blue
Elon Musk’s electric automaker currently sells four models in a wide range of trims.

  • Tesla sells four models – the Model S, 3, X, and Y – in several different trim levels.
  • Options for them include different interior colors, extra seats, and performance packages.
  • Teslas range in price from roughly $40,000 to $150,000.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Tesla is known to quietly raise and lower is prices whenever it sees fit.

In October, Tesla CEO Elon Musk dropped the price of the Model S sedan to $69,420 after rival Lucid announced its sedan would start at $69,900. And on Thursday, the company hiked the price for four of its models by up to $10,000.

With price changes happening left and right, it can be tough to keep track of it all. People shopping for a new Tesla can consult this guide to understand the latest prices of the Tesla Model S, 3, X, and Y, and how the models stack up.

Although add-ons vary between models, any Tesla can be optioned with the $10,000 “full self-driving” driver-assistance package, which doesn’t currently make Teslas fully autonomous.

Model S

Tesla Model 3
Tesla Model S.

Launched in 2012, the Model S sedan is Tesla’s longest-running model. The luxury four-door got an overhaul at the top of 2021, which included an updated exterior and a controversial new steering yoke. It’s the choice for EV buyers who have a little more to spend and don’t want a crossover.

Here’s how each Model S breaks down:

  • Long Range: For $79,990, the base Model S delivers an estimated range of 375 miles, a top speed of 155 mph, and a 0-60-mph time of 3.1 seconds.
  • Plaid: The $119,990 Model S Plaid, whose name is a reference to the movie “Space Balls,” travels 350 miles on a charge, hits a top speed of 200 mph, and sprints to 60 mph in 1.99 seconds, Tesla says. Both Plaid models have three motors good for more than 1,000 horsepower.
  • Plaid Plus: The $149,990 Plaid Plus is the most advanced Model S yet. Tesla says it will do 0-60 mph in under two seconds, has a top speed of 200 mph, and has a range of more than 520 miles. Deliveries are set to start in 2022.

A paint color other than white will run you $1,500 to $2,500, 21-inch wheels cost $4,500, and a white or off-white interior costs $2,500.

Model 3

Tesla Model 3 update
Tesla Model 3.

With the debut of the Model 3 in 2017, Tesla made good on its promise to build a more affordable vehicle than the Model S or Model X that came before it. And since it launched, the Model 3 has proved wildly successful, becoming both Tesla’s most popular model and the overall best-selling EV in the world in 2020.

The Model 3 comes in three flavors:

  • Standard Range Plus: The $37,490 base Model 3 gets an estimated range of 263 miles, a top speed of 140 mph, and a 0-60 time of 5.3 seconds.
  • Long Range: The $46,490 Long Range model has an EPA-estimated range of 353 miles
  • Performance: For $55,990, the sporty Model 3 Performance delivers a 315-mile range, a top speed of 162 mph, and a 0-60-mph time of 3.1 seconds. It also has a lowered suspension, better brakes, and 20-inch wheels as standard.

A paint color other than white will set you back $1,000 to $2,000, 19-inch rims cost $1,500, and a white interior – as opposed to the standard black – costs a $1,000 premium.

Read more: Don’t blame bitcoin for Tesla’s stock slide – it’s high-time faithful investors took some profits

Model X

Tesla Model X
Tesla Model X.

The Model X crossover is Tesla’s second-oldest model behind the Model S. It hit the market in 2015.

There are two versions of the Model X:

  • Long Range: For $89,990, the dual-motor base Model X delivers 350 miles of estimated range and a 155-mph top speed.
  • Plaid: The $119,990 Plaid version steps things up a notch with three motors that Tesla says put out 1,020 horsepower. Tesla says the high-performance crossover will have a 330-mile range and a 0-60-mph time of 2.5 seconds when deliveries start in May.

Like on Tesla’s other vehicles, a white paint job comes standard – black, silver, blue, or red will run you $1,500 to $2,500. Five seats come standard, and a six-seat or seven-seat layout costs $6,500 and $3,500, respectively.

A white or cream interior costs $2,000, while bigger rims go for $5,500.

Model Y

Model Y Sunset White
Tesla Model Y.

Starting deliveries in early 2020, the Model Y compact crossover is Tesla’s newest vehicle. It’s based on the same platform as the Model 3, but has more cargo capacity, rides higher, and has a general shape more like the Model X. It’s proving to be a hot seller just like its sedan sibling.

The Model Y comes in two versions:

  • Long Range: The $49,990 base vehicle has an EPA-estimated range of 326 miles, a top speed of 135 mph, and makes the sprint to 60 mph in 4.8 seconds.
  • Performance: The sportier option costs $60,990, and although it gets a lower range of 303 miles, it makes up for it in performance upgrades. The crossover accelerates to 60 mph in 3.5 seconds, has a higher top speed, and comes with bigger wheels, better brakes, and a lowered suspension.

There’s also a more affordable Standard Range model that Tesla briefly sold starting in January. Elon Musk said on Twitter it’s still available as an off-menu option.

Buyers can shell out an extra $1,000 for a tow hitch, $1,000 for a white interior, and $3,000 for third-row seating. A non-white paint job costs $1,000 to $2,000, while bigger rims command $2,000.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Tesla reliability issues drag down its scores in 2 major car-brand rankings

Tesla Model 3_9
Tesla Model 3.

  • Two major rankings of the best car brands came out on Thursday. 
  • In Consumer Reports’ 2021 ranking, Tesla slid five spots to No. 16 due to reliability issues. 
  • JD Power’s 2021 Vehicle Dependability Study put Tesla near the bottom of the pack. 
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

Tesla received poor rankings in Consumer Reports’ Brand Report Card and JD Power’s US Vehicle Dependability Study, two major annual reports on the best car brands that were released on Thursday. 

In Consumer Reports’ 2021 study, Tesla dropped five spots to 16th place due to reliability problems with the Model S, Model Y, and Model X. The nonprofit research organization noted that Teslas get high scores in owner satisfaction and its road tests, but only the Model 3 received a high enough overall score to be recommended. 

The Tesla Model 3 made it into Consumer Reports’ “10 Top Picks” list, also released Thursday, as one of four “Green Choice” models that demonstrate good safety, performance, reliability, and affordability along with low emissions. 

For the Brand Report Card, Consumer Reports evaluated 32 brands based on expected reliability, owner-satisfaction surveys, road tests, safety features, and crash-test results. 

Mazda took the top spot, besting many more expensive luxury brands including last year’s winner, Porsche. In total, five non-luxury brands made it into the top 10: Mazda, Subaru, Honda, Toyota, and Hyundai. 

Consumer Reports Brand Report Card 2021
2021 Consumer Reports Brand Report Card.

But Tesla wasn’t the only brand to slide several spots in this year’s rankings. Lincoln fell 15 spots to 28th, due to below-average reliability for the redesigned Aviator and Corsair SUVs. 

JD Power, the influential market research company, included Tesla for the first time this year in its 32nd annual US Vehicle Dependability Study. The report measures the number of problems per 100 vehicles that drivers of three-year-old models experienced over the last 12 months. 

JD Power vehicle dependability
JD Power 2021 US Vehicle Dependability Study.

Tesla received a score of 176, placing it 30th out of 33 brands surveyed. But JD power couldn’t officially list Tesla in the ranking because it doesn’t allow JD Power to survey its owners in 15 states, so the firm had to go off of surveys from drivers in the other 35. 

JD Power said the industry-average score was 121. Lexus, Porsche, Kia, and Toyota claimed the top spots, while Jaguar, Alfa Romeo, and Land Rover ranked last. 

Read the original article on Business Insider

Here are 13 new EVs on sale for $40,000 or less in 2021

EMBARGO 2/14/2022 4PM ET 2022 Chevrolet BoltEV 006
2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV.

  • Electric vehicles aren’t quite cheap yet, but they’re cheaper than ever before. 
  • More than a dozen can be had for under $40,000, the average price for a new car in the US. 
  • Some of the lowest-cost EVs available include the Mini Electric, Chevy Bolt EV, and Tesla Model 3.
  • Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories.

There are more inexpensive electric vehicles on the market than ever before – and they’re only getting cheaper. 

EVs have burst into the mainstream market in recent years, and as an increasing number of car companies make ambitious pledges to ramp up sales, zero-emission vehicles have steadily decreased in price. This year, shoppers can choose from an array of more than a dozen EVs that cost less than $40,000, roughly the average price paid for a new car in the US. 

But not all sub-$40,000 EVs are created equal. Estimated ranges for the cars listed below span 149 miles on the low end to more than 250 miles on the high end. Some are luxury offerings from Tesla, while others come from mass-market brands like Volkswagen and Nissan. 

Only General Motors and Tesla have sold enough EVs that their offerings are no longer eligible for the $7,500 federal tax credit that’s meant to spur sales of low-emission and zero-emission cars. This means that most of the vehicles below can be had for much less than their official MSRP, and why a few of the cars listed retail for more than $40,000. 

Mini Electric – $29,900

Mini Electric
Mini Electric.

BMW unveiled the Mini Electric back in 2019 and started selling it last year. It’s the lowest-cost electric car currently available in the US, and its eligibility for the $7,500 federal EV tax credit makes the deal even sweeter. 

That low MSRP means that the Mini Electric only gets an estimated 110 miles of range, but it’s aimed primarily at people who live in cities and probably don’t drive long distances. And with a claimed 181 horsepower and a 0-60-mph time of under seven seconds, it’s pretty quick. 

Nissan Leaf – $31,620

2021 Nissan Leaf
2021 Nissan Leaf.

Introduced in 2010 and now in its second generation, the Nissan Leaf is one of the longest-running electric cars on the market.

The base model gets an EPA-estimated 149 miles of range, while pricier trim levels promise up to 226 miles along with a more powerful motor. 

Chevrolet Bolt EV – $31,995

EMBARGO 2/14/2022 4PM ET 2022 Chevrolet BoltEV 002
2022 Chevrolet Bolt EV.

Like the Leaf, the Chevrolet Bolt EV was one of the first EVs to go mainstream. Chevrolet recently unveiled the revamped 2022 Bolt EV, which will retail for more than $5,000 less than the outgoing model when it hits dealers this summer. 

The latest generation of the Bolt EV promises 259 miles of range across all its trim levels – just like the previous generation – but sports a much sleeker design all around. 

Hyundai Ioniq Electric – $33,045

Hyundai Ioniq Electric
Hyundai Ioniq Electric.

While the Hyundai Ioniq Electric’s base price is appealing – especially with the addition of a federal tax credit – the hatchback isn’t sold in every state and has less range than some of its rivals. It gets an EPA-estimated range of 170 miles. 

There’s also a more expensive $38,615 trim level available with the same powertrain but an upgraded interior and tech features. 

Chevrolet Bolt EUV – $33,995

EMBARGO 2/14/2022 4PM ET 2022 Chevrolet BoltEUV 010
2022 Chevrolet Bolt EUV.

The 2022 Bolt EUV is a brand new electric crossover from GM that shares its innards with the Bolt EV. Since it’s a little bigger than the hatchback, it has a slightly reduced range of 250 miles. 

It affords a few inches more legroom to rear passengers than the Bolt EV and offers GM’s semi-autonomous driver-assistance tech, Super Cruise, as an option. 

Tesla Model 3 – $36,990

Tesla Model 3_4
Tesla Model 3.

Tesla recently dropped the price of the Model 3 by $1,000 to $36,990, making an already popular car even more attractive. The Model 3 offers some of the best range for the money, with the base Standard Range model delivering 263 miles on a charge. 

The Model 3 Long Range, which costs $46,990, can go 353 miles on a charge, while the sportier Performance model retails for $55,990. 

Hyundai Kona Electric – $37,390

Hyundai Kona Electric
Hyundai Kona Electric.

The base 2021 Hyundai Kona Electric sports a 201-horsepower motor and a respectable EPA-estimated range of 258 miles. 

This month, Hyundai revealed a refreshed 2022 Kona Electric (pictured above) with a sleeker design but no powertrain changes. It hasn’t said how much the new model will cost yet. 

Kia Niro EV – $39,090

Kia Niro EV 1
Kia Niro EV.

The Kia Niro EV shares a battery pack and motor with the Hyundai Kona Electric, which is no surprise given that both brands fall under the same umbrella. Specs are slightly different however, with the Niro EV getting an EPA-estimated range of 239 miles. 

Tesla Model Y – $39,990

Model Y Sunset White
Tesla Model Y.

In January, Tesla unveiled a new base model of its popular Model Y crossover with a “standard” range. And this month, Tesla slashed the car’s price by $2,000, bringing it just below $40,000. 

The Model Y Standard Range can travel 244 miles on a charge, according to the EPA, and can be optioned in five-seat or seven-seat layouts. The top-tier Model Y Performance costs roughly $61,000. 

Volkswagen ID.4 – $39,995

Volkswagen ID.4
Volkswagen ID.4.

Volkswagen’s first EV for the US market hits streets this year, with the first deliveries beginning in March. The vehicle promises a 250-mile range and a familiar crossover shape that’s all the rage right now, so it very well may give the Tesla Model Y a run for its money. 

Nissan Ariya – $40,000

Nissan Ariya front quarter_1 source
Nissan Ariya.

Another new entry to the electric-crossover market is the Nissan Ariya, the Japanese brand’s first major EV since it launched the Leaf more than a decade ago.

Details are still scant, as the Ariya isn’t set to go on sale in the US until late 2021, but we do know that the base model will start at around $40,000, there will be an all-wheel-drive option, and the longest-range model will travel up to 300 miles on a charge.

Ford Mustang Mach-E – $42,895

Mustang Mach E GT Performance Edition 03
Mustang Mach-E GT Performance Edition.

Since the 2021 Mustang Mach-E is Ford’s first major electric car – and the Blue Oval hasn’t sold very many EVs yet – the vehicle is eligible for the $7,500 federal tax credit, bringing its theoretical starting price to just over $35,000. 

That starting price gets you an EPA-estimated 230 miles of range for the rear-wheel-drive model, and 211 miles for the all-wheel-drive version. There are also several other trims, including one with a 300-mile range and a high-performance model in the works that Ford claims will hit 60 mph in 3.5 seconds. 

BMW i3 – $44,450

BMW i3
BMW i3.

BMW i3 buyers can still take advantage of the full $7,500 federal tax credit, since the carmaker hasn’t sold all that many of the quirky hatchback in the several years it’s been on the market. That knocks the i3’s starting cost to around $37,000. 

But there are a few reasons that sales may have been sluggish. Aside from its unconventional looks and high price point, the base BMW i3 delivers just 153 miles of range, significantly less than more affordable options like the Tesla Model 3, Chevrolet Bolt EV, and Hyundai Kona Electric. 

There’s also a pricier version that gets a range boost from small gas engine. 

Read the original article on Business Insider