The 6 best hydration packs of 2021 for day hikes, long-distance runs, and other outdoor activities

  • It’s crucial to stay hydrated while exercising, particularly in the heat.
  • Hydration packs make it easy and comfortable to carry liters of water on a run, hike, or bike ride.
  • Our top pick, Osprey’s Skarab 18 is comfortable for running or hiking and holds 2L of water as well as essentials.

You know it’s important to stay hydrated on a hike, run, bike ride, or literally any adventure that involves some amount of exercising. But carrying a water bottle and having to constantly stop to pull it out of your pack gets old very quickly.

Hydration packs are the ideal way to make carrying and accessing water easier and minimize stoppage time. The best hydration packs not only have a pouch big enough to hold 1+ liters of water, but they also provide storage for snacks, layers, a first aid kit, and any other essentials you might need on a day hike or run. What’s more, the pack also needs to be comfortable, breathable, and quick-drying to not weigh down your adventure.

The number of hydration packs on the market can be overwhelming, but we’ve rounded up six of our favorites from brands like Osprey, CamelBak, and Salomon.

For longer hikes and backpacking trips, check out our guides to the best backpacks for men and for women.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

Here are the best hydration packs:

The best hydration pack overall

Osprey hydration pack

Osprey’s Skarab 18 is the only day-hiking hydration pack I wear, thanks to its high-quality construction, customizable fit, and easy-to-access water reservoir.

Pros: Comfortable to wear even over several hours, extra-wide clip-on water reservoir allows for easy cleaning and refills, 2.5-liter capacity is perfect for long day hikes, offers plenty of interior storage, and the ventilated foam frame helps avoid excess sweat

Cons: Too small for longer backpacking trips

Osprey has consistently made some of the finest backpacks for decades, so it’s no surprise that the Osprey Skarab 18 also happens to be my favorite hydration pack.

I’ve found it to be the ideal size for a day hike, weighing just over one pound with enough storage space for hiking essentials. Its foam frame allows for great ventilation and keeps my back cool and mostly sweat-free. Like all its packs, Osprey decked out the Skarab with plenty of straps to allow for the ultimate custom fit, regardless of whether I’m wearing it or I pass it on to a friend.

But what makes this bag truly shine is the large, 2.5-liter water pouch, which does quite well to keep me hydrated on all but the longest day hikes. Additionally, its extra-wide clip opening makes it easy to add more water or clean the reservoir after use. The pack even has a magnetic bite valve attachment that allows it to quickly attach to the Skarab’s sternum strap, allowing for easy access.

Added extras like stretch mesh pockets on the side of the pack, a scratch-free stash pocket, removable hip belts, and external bungees for more gear are Osprey staples and only add to the pack’s overall quality. Osprey’s Skarab 18 is simple when it needs to be yet is still a highly versatile and technical pack. 

The best hydration pack for male runners

camelbak hydration pack

Runners don’t want anything weighing them down, and CamelBak’s HydroBak weighs just five ounces — before being filled with water, of course. 

Pros: Weighs just five ounces without water, mesh back panel and harness aid in ventilation, new Crux reservoir allows 20% more water per drink, and its leak-proof valves are easy to flick on or off

Cons: Doesn’t offer much in the way of storage (not that runners need much of it, anyway)

A running-specific hydration pack should sinch down tight and comfortable, and be able to carry enough water for long miles. Camelbak’s HydroBak has a mesh back panel and harness to help with ventilation and keeping you cool. Its reflective accents help with visibility for early or late runs. 

Uniquely, the HydroBak features a Crux reservoir which lets you pull a full 20% more water with each swig. That means less time sucking on the tube and more time focusing on your stride. Additionally, the pack features easy-to-use leak-proof valves that you can flip on or off with a gentle push for less wasted water and no fumbling with the tube while running.

CamelBak also outfitted the Crux with a leak-proof cap and coated the tube with its anti-microbial HydroGuard technology, which is 100% BPA free and reduces the risk of bacteria growth.

Though it’s small, the HydroBak still features a few zippered pockets perfect for keeping energy gels, granola bars, and some cash for those well-earned post-run beers.

The best hydration pack for female runners

salomon adv skin 8

The Salomon ADV Skin 8 is specifically designed to sinch down on the female figure, and can carry 1 liter of water with the option of adding a reservoir in the back.

Pros: Female-specific design, adjustable to fit different chest sizes, soft material, 2 soft 500ml flasks included, many mesh and zipper pockets, room to carry warm layer

Cons: Expensive, straws can be a bit tricky to adjust

While females can wear any hydration pack, they’ll be the most comfortable in the Salomon ADV Skin 8. Designed by one of the leading trail running brands today, the ADV Skin 8 is uniquely shaped to sinch down tight around female curves so your pack isn’t throwing off your momentum. Specifically, this pack was crafted to alleviate pressure on your breasts and has an adjustable drawcord fasten in the front for a personalized fit. I’m small-chested and have lent this vest to friends as large-chested as 34DD who say it’s just as comfortable for bigger breasts.

While you can slide a traditional reservoir in the back of the pack, the other feature that makes Salomon running vests so great is their integrated soft flasks. Two half-liter water flasks sit on either side of your chest in a soft mesh pocket, allowing for quick water access mid-run.

Additionally, this pack has mesh and zippered pockets strategically placed in nooks and crannies, as well as down the back, to stash everything from car keys to a warm layer. You can even move the elastic cords and loops around to carry trail running poles wherever feels most comfortable to you.

I’ve been running in this hydration vest for two years and the only bad words I have to say about it is it’s expensive (but, in my opinion, worth it for runners) and the straw on the included flasks might need to be cut down, which can be a little tricky to do. –Rachael Schultz, Health and Fitness Updates Editor

The best hydration pack for day hikes

platypus hydration pack

The Platypus Duthie A.M. 10.0 is a day hiker’s dream, offering 7 liters of storage, strategically-placed tool organizing loops and compartments, and a huge, three-liter water reservoir. 

Pros: Plenty of storage options despite its modest 7L capacity, external tool and gear loops, capable of fitting many different body types, comes standard with huge three-liter BigZip water reservoir and magnetic hose, and FloatAir back panel offers comfort for even the longest day hikes

Cons: Expensive

Platypus’s Duthie A.M. 10.0 has plenty of internal and external storage options with a 7L capacity, perfect for short jaunts into the backcountry or several mile excursions. Its strategic approach to organization also means you won’t be digging past your car keys to get to your snacks — everything has its own place in the pack.

When it comes to the Duthie’s hydration capability, few companies deliver as well as Platypus. Featuring a large three-liter reservoir, the brand’s patented BigZip water pouch features a magnetic hose clip and also offers wearers the ability to route the house in multiple ways — a welcome function not typically seen in hydration packs.

For hardcore day hikers who also have other activities in mind, the Duthie also offers a useful carry system designed to hold pads or full-face helmets and even sports a fleece-lined pocket perfect for stashing a pair of shades.

Additionally, the pack easily conforms to a variety of body shapes and sizes with just a few adjustments of its straps and hip belt. After finding the perfect fit, Platypus’ FloatAir back panel keeps you mostly sweat-free and comfortable, no matter how long the hike.

The best hydration pack for cycling

gelindo hydration pack

Forget reaching down for any built-in water bottle holders because with Gelindo’s Insulated Hydration Pack, staying hydrated while biking is as easy as simply drinking out of a straw.

Pros: Insulated water reservoir pocket keeps liquids cool for up to four hours, mesh back panel keeps airflow at a maximum, interior organization capable of holding a variety of items without feeling cluttered, and its easily adjustable straps are capable of fitting almost any body type

Cons: Limited reflective details

While most bikes have space for attaching a water bottle holder, a hydration pack makes staying quenched much easier and Gelindo’s Insulated Hydration Pack is perfectly fit for the job.

This pack has an insulated pocket to carry its 2.5-liter water reservoir, which will keep your water cool for up to four hours. The pack is also designed to keep your body heat from warming the water. 

Gelindo included several storage pockets capable of holding energy bars and car keys, and bigger compartments to hold a spare change of clothes, larger items of food, or spare tubes. Organization also scores highly as it’s easy to reach for and access any of the interior contents, no matter how full the pack gets.

It’s no secret cyclists care about comfort and with Gelindo’s Insulated Hydration Pack, finding a perfectly comfortable fit is easily done via its adjustable shoulder straps and hip belt. Furthermore, its ergonomic mesh back allows for steady airflow to keep you from overheating, keeping you comfortable throughout the entirety of your ride.

The best hydration pack for commuting

gregory hydration pack

Gregory’s Inertia 30 makes it easy to stay hydrated while commuting with its easy-access water tube, ample interior storage, and comfortable shoulder harness.

Pros: Plenty of storage for whatever the workday requires, quick-drying 3L water reservoir is easy to fill up and features an integrated drying hangar, hydration sleeve auto-centers the water pouch to stabilize weight, versatile enough to even act as a day-hiking pack

Cons: Expensive

Even just commenting to wor requires energy, so it’s important to stay hydrated. The Gregory’s Inertia 30 is designed to not only quench thirst but also to pack a work day’s worth of gear. Be it a laptop, notebook, tablet, or otherwise, the Inertia offers enough interior storage space to tote along whatever the day calls for.

It even features several exterior pockets perfect for storing items that need to be quickly accessible, as well as a padded zippered pocket designed for sunglasses or house keys.

Gregory includes a quick-drying 3L water reservoir that has a built-in drying hangar, perfect for airing it out to avoid mold or mildew buildup. The Inertia’s dedicated hydration sleeve makes it easy to just toss the reservoir into the pack, and it automatically stabilizes the pouch’s weight to the center of your back. Gregory even made the reservoir’s tube magnetic, making it easy to take on and off.

Though we chose it for its ability to act as a commuter bag, the Inertia 30 also excels as a day-hiking pack, offering exterior loops for trekking poles, compression straps on either side, and load lifters that help stabilize the pack when it gets heavy.

At $120, it’s not the cheapest bag of the bunch but considering what it offers, and the Gregory name also means supreme durability, the Inertia 30 is worth every penny.

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The 5 best rooftop tents, for use at the campsite or in the backcountry

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

  • Rooftop tents attach to the roof of a vehicle to give you an elevated and secure place to sleep while camping.
  • The best tents are easy to pitch, come with a foam mattress, and have enough space to sleep comfortably.
  • Our top pick, the Roofnest Falcon, is a low-profile and versatile tent that pitches in under a minute.

Rooftop tents originated as an alternative method for campers to sleep off the ground, with the earliest versions existing in places like Australia or Africa to protect them from predators. Although they’re still widely used like that, many of the models prevalent in the US are geared more towards comfort and ease of use – and they’ve ushered in an entirely new era of what it means to “rough it.”

These standard rooftop tents attach to a vehicle’s roof rack and crossbars that are placed either on top of an SUV or crossover, or over the bed of a truck. There’s no lack of variety but many of the tents function similarly in that they’re able to pitch in a matter of minutes, feature a wall-to-wall foam mattress, and come with an attachable ladder for entry.

A rooftop tent’s ability to improve both the comfort and efficiency of camping does come at a cost, however. Most tend to run anywhere from $1,000 and $4,000 (or more), which is significantly more expensive than a traditional ground tent. But as they continue to grow in popularity, it’s become easier to see why they’re worth the investment.

Before I used one myself, I was skeptical. I’ve camped for over 25 years and grew accustomed to sleeping on the ground in a normal tent. And although it may not be the most comfortable way to sleep, to me, that was camping. But once I finally spent a night in a rooftop tent, it was easy to see their utility – and I quickly changed my tune.

In the years since, I’ve camped in enough rooftop tents to have a good idea of what should (and shouldn’t) deserve a spot on top of your vehicle – and have compiled a list of my five favorites below. So, no matter if you want something casual for car camping or are looking to deck out an overlanding rig, I have you covered.

At the bottom of this guide, I’ve also included some insight into the testing methodology I used in deciding which to feature, the other tents I’m currently testing, and why every camper should consider a rooftop tent.

Here are the best rooftop tents:

The best rooftop tent overall

RoofnestFalcon

The Roofnest Falcon is a low-profile rooftop tent that’s incredibly easy to pitch, comes with a comfortable foam mattress, and is compatible with additional crossbars for hauling extra gear. 

Pros: Takes under a minute to fully pitch, comes with an included foam mattress, sits just 7 inches tall when packed down, ladder can be placed on either side of the tent for access

Cons: Expensive, might be cramped for two people plus gear

The Falcon from Roofnest does three things very well: It has an extremely low profile while packed down, it takes less than a minute for just one person to pitch, and its ability to be compatible with extra gear makes it highly versatile. Those three components alone slot it in as our top overall rooftop tent, but there’s plenty more to the Falcon that makes it even more impressive.

The tent comes with its own included mattress that I found to be comfortable no matter if I was sleeping by myself among an allotment of gear, or if someone else was sharing the tent with me. I will say that space is quite limited in the Falcon’s interior, so even having one other person sleeping in it makes for a bit of a cramped night of sleep. It’s no dealbreaker but the Falcon certainly isn’t the biggest rooftop tent I’ve tested. 

Where it makes up for that lack of space is with how easy it is to pitch and its ability to carry additional gear. The Falcon’s design allows for just one person to open the tent on their own, and it fully pitches in under a minute (once you get the hang of it). Packing it down does take a little longer (and a bit more effort) but you can say the same thing about any of the rooftop tents featured in this guide. 

Concerning its versatility, the Falcon allows for the attachment of an additional set of crossbars. This helps make up for the lost roof rack real estate the tent takes up and lets you attach extra gear on top of the tent itself. Since it sits just 7 inches tall when packed down, the extra gear won’t be much more of a drag as it typically would be on your normal rack.

The tent has two separate entrances and a component on either side for the included telescoping ladder to latch into. Its interior features a number of pockets for stashing things like a smartphone, headlamp, or car keys, and a rear window zips open to allow for increased airflow or for some nighttime star gazing. 

Rooftop tents are spendy and the Roofnest Falcon is no different. Though it costs north of $3,000, it’s well worth the investment for anyone who intends to use it often.

The best hybrid rooftop tent

tepui

The Tepui Hybox doubles as a spacious rooftop tent and a cargo box, so you can easily store your gear in it when you’re not sleeping in the tent.

Pros: Can function as a rooftop gear container, hard top design improves aerodynamics, patented zipper system makes it easy to switch between the tent or storage container

Cons: Expensive, space enough for just two people

One of the drawbacks to using a rooftop tent is sacrificing the cargo capability of a vehicle’s roof rack system. With Tepui’s Hybox, you’ll not only have access to a quality rooftop tent but also 23 cubic feet of storage space via its built-in cargo box.

With the Tepui Hybox’s cargo box function, you’ll no longer be stuffing gear inside your vehicle ceiling-high while prepping for a weekend spent camping. When it’s time to convert it back to a tent, an included canopy easily zips on to create a spacious and comfortable sleeping area. Its aerodynamic design also means your car won’t be guzzling gas. 

However, the catch is that it can only be used as one or the other. For instance, any gear that’s stored inside is essentially being stored in the sleeping area. This does open up more room in the interior of the vehicle but would require gear to be removed to create a proper sleeping area.

Switching between the cargo box and the tent requires zipping on the included canopy, releasing both of its latches, and then pitching the tent straight up. This can be done easily by just one person. An included telescoping ladder attaches to either side of the tent to allow campers to choose the best point of entry. Each door on the attached canopy also zips out to act as an entryway canopy. 

The tent features a 3-inch foam mattress with a removable cotton cover (which can be easily removed when storing gear), as well as a quilted upper to help with insulation and sound dampening. Its hardshell exterior is made of a thermoplastic polymer called ABS and an aluminum substructure. The shell is both aerodynamic and durable as it’s able to take a beating and helps improve fuel efficiency for longer trips.

The best rooftop tent for families

freespirit recreation

For families of three or more, Freespirit Recreation’s High Country rooftop tent is perfect for making sure everyone has enough space to comfortably rest. 

Pros: Sleeps up to five people, durable construction, large awning covers entryway, 360-degree windows

Cons: Heavy, expensive

Camping with a large family doesn’t have to be a cramped and uncomfortable experience. With Freespirit Recreation’s High Country rooftop tent, families of up to five people can rest assured each person will have more than enough space to snooze comfortably. When pitched, the tent measures 80 inches in length, 98 inches wide, and 49 inches tall, and can hold up to 750 pounds. 

The interior of the tent features a 2.5-inch high-density foam mattress and plenty of storage pockets and gear hangers to allow for easy organization. Its exterior is made of 600D Poly-Oxford body fabric, as well as a durable aluminum alloy frame.

Its heavy-duty construction also means that it can take an absolute beating and still perform as well on its 100th use as it did on the first day. 

Freespirit Recreation designed the tent to be aerodynamic when pitched, allowing it to function well in high winds or heavy rain. Windows on all four sides of the tent offer a full 360-degree view and provide for ventilation and help reduce condensation. When packed, its included cover has front and rear cinches to create a sturdy shape, though the lines can tend to flap loudly if not secured while driving. 

Its two biggest drawbacks are its price and weight. Its $2,495 price tag is a steep initial investment but one that’s worth it for big families that need all the space they can get. Although it’s heavy at 172 pounds, installing or removing the tent with two or three people makes the process significantly easier. 

The best rooftop tent for overlanding

Smittybilt

Rooftop tents were created by overlanders and Smittybilt’s 2883 Overland Tent is the perfect companion for anyone looking to get into the lifestyle. 

Pros: Spacious interior, included mosquito screens, completely covered entryway, sleeps up to four people

Cons: Bulky when packed up

Though nearly all rooftop tents are intended for overlanding use, few do as well as Smittybilt’s 2883 Overland Tent. With size enough to sleep up to four people, a durable ripstop exterior to protect against the elements, and a sturdy aluminum frame, it’s perfect for multi-day backcountry pursuits any time of year. 

With a durable ripstop exterior and aluminum alloy frame, it’s capable of holding up in all conditions. Its 770-pound capacity means it’s able to house up to four people, too. 

What separates Smittybilt’s Overland Tent from others on this list is its attention to the details needed by overlanders. It comes with an included mosquito screen, a completely covered entryway, a fully waterproof exterior without the need for a rain fly, and LED strip lighting on the inside. A 2.3-inch high-density mattress runs the entirety of its interior to provide comfortable sleeping or sitting space. 

One of the tent’s best features is its price. At just $1,499, it offers great value compared to other rooftop tents on the market cheapest and should be the top choice for anyone getting into overlandering. 

The best budget rooftop tent

FrontRunner

The Front Runner Rooftop Tent sits just 7.87 inches tall when packed down, and its low profile helps improve fuel efficiency, reduces wind resistance, and makes it easier to store. 

Pros: Low profile when packed, weighs less than 100 pounds, built-in roof ventilator reduces condensation

Cons: Requires separately sold Front Runner tent mount kit for use on Front Runner racks

One of the biggest drawbacks of any rooftop tent is how much it impacts a vehicle’s gas mileage. Even the most aerodynamic options are still heavy and can dramatically reduce the mpg of any car. The best option currently available that attempts to fix these problems is Front Runner’s Rooftop Tent

Featuring a low-profile design, Front Runner’s tent sits just 7.87 inches tall when packed down, making it the slimmest on the market. This helps reduce the amount of wind resistance taken on while driving and improves fuel efficiency. At just 93 pounds, it’s light enough for two people to install and its compact size allows it to stow easily in a garage.

Though the tent sleeps just two people, it does come with a 2.5-inch high-density mattress, windows on each side of the tent, and privacy shades for each door and window. A telescoping aluminum ladder comes standard with the tent and has treaded steps to make climbing up and down easier. 

The exterior is built of durable 400D Oxford tent fabric that’s breathable enough to offer the ventilation necessary to reduce condensation. Its aluminum base boosts the tent’s insulation to keep the interior cool on warmer days and warm when temperatures drop.

It also comes with a fly-sheet cover to increase the amount of shade or protect against rain getting inside any open windows. A roof ventilator adds airflow and is protected by a mosquito net to keep bugs out at night.

What else I’m testing

yakima sky rise 6

Yakima Skyrise

The Yakima Skyrise has been one of the most intriguing rooftop tents since its debut. Not only is it spacious, easy to pitch, and compatible with a wide range of vehicles (and isn’t only compatible with Yakima racks, thankfully) but it’s one of the most inexpensive I’ve seen. Sold typically at around $1,600, it’s a price that’s hard to beat.

Why use a rooftop tent?

Pitching and packing a ground tent is as much a test in patience as it is deciphering a puzzle. Newer ground tents do feature easy-pitch designs but compared to a rooftop tent, even the simplest setup could be considered challenging.

Rooftop tents often take just one person to pitch and can be fully set up in less than five minutes.

Once set up, they offer more than just a comfortable place to sleep. Its high perch creates a unique vantage point for taking in your surroundings, and some even have a window on the roof for nighttime stargazing. Since most have a built-in mattress, there’s no need to toss and turn in a sleeping bag either. Use sheets and a comforter, and you’ll feel like you never left home. 

Our testing methodology

Each of the rooftop tents in this guide went through a series of tests to see how well they compared across these four categories: Ease of use, versatility, comfort, and value. Here’s how each category specifically factored into which rooftop tents were ultimately featured:

Ease of use: When judging how easy it is to use the rooftop tents tested for this guide, I looked at more than just how intuitive they were to pitch (which is often one of the most straightforward aspects of any rooftop tent). Ease of use also refers to the process of packing it back down, if there are any additional components to attach such as a rain fly or awning, and if the point(s) of entry make it easy to get in and out of the tent. 

Versatility: Rooftop tents are versatile by design, allowing for people to use them at a campsite, in the backcountry, or really anywhere the vehicle it’s attached to can go. Versatilty also pertains to any added extras it comes with like multiple points of entry, awning attachments to create covered outdoor shelter, convertible windows for air flow (and star gazing), or attachment points for other gear. 

Comfort: One of the easiest ways to judge the comfort of a rooftop tent is to consider the kind of default mattress it comes with. Many feature something similar to a 2-inch foam mattress, though the exact kind may vary. Additional areas of comfort I judged were how spacious the interior of a rooftop tent was, whether it allowed for good ventilation and airflow, and how it held up across a variety of weather conditions (be it sun in the middle of summer, an unexpected spring downpour, or the frigid temps of winter). 

Value: Judging the value of a rooftop tent is more than just comparing price tags. Even the budget model in this guide is just north of $1,000, so choosing which tent to invest in is an important consideration. This means that a rooftopt tent’s true value is a combination of the three categories above, as well as how long it’s designed to last. 

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5 lesser-known places to look for last-minute campsites this summer

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last minute campsites

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Last year, after hitting another dead end on Recreation.gov, I was just about to give up on my dream of a last-minute, weekend camping trip to Washington’s Central Cascades. Every campsite was either already booked up for every summer weekend, was located too far, or didn’t provide enough amenities to satisfy my camping troupe.

As my desired weekend inched closer, I dug around to find alternative booking sites for camping and my search paid off. Not only did I discover several new places to look for campsites beyond the usual state and federal campgrounds, but I was also able to snag an incredible campsite for my trip via Airbnb.

Though my campsite was more expensive than many of the best campsites found on federal campgrounds, booking with an alternative site also came with some handy perks, including being able to see reviews and the ability to reschedule or cancel my trip, which isn’t usually possible at federal campgrounds.

If you’re eyeing a weekend camping trip this summer it’s important to know that there are many options to consider besides federal sites, including completely private campsites.

Here are the best places for finding a last-minute campsite

Airbnb

Lesser-known places to book campsites Airbnb Sweden

Book Airbnb campsites

Pros: It’s familiar and if you’ve built up a high rating as an Airbnb guest, you might be more inclined to stay on the platform.

Cons: It’s not commonly known as a place to list campsites, so it may not offer a good representation of all the private campgrounds in the area. Additionally, service, cleaning, and occupancy taxes may be applied to the total bill.

The world’s largest vacation rental site is filled with people who are more than happy to let you pitch a tent in their backyard, as well as small independent campgrounds that promote listings on the site, too.

All you have to do is plug in your desired location and filter for campsites specifically. You can still find plenty of the unique experiences that Airbnb is famous for, like camping on a farm in Maine or in a riverside meadow in California.

Although you won’t be able to find a private campsite inside a national or state park, you can still find campsites close to the entrance like this well-stocked campground just 7 miles from Utah’s Zion National Park or this beautiful forest-adjacent field just 10 minutes Washington’s Olympia National Park.

Hipcamp

Hipcamp camping RV- Lesser-known places to book campsites

Book Hipcamp campsites

Pros: Campsite listings are incredibly thorough and they don’t stop at just listing amenities. You can also filter by available activities like swimming and climbing or terrain features like hot springs, waterfalls, and caves. Unlike Airbnb, reviewers are able to upload photographs with their reviews which helps create a realistic picture of what to expect.

Cons: You will have to pay a non-refundable 8% to 18% service fee with every listing.

A site that is touted as the “Airbnb of Camping,” Hipcamp lists hundreds of campsites, RV sites, and glamping tents on its streamlined platform. Built with campers in mind, you can filter specifically for your camping needs from running water to ADA accessibility to equestrian access.

You’ll also be able to find many listings near popular national parks like this plateau plot near the Grand Canyon, or this site at the largest campground overlooking the sweeping views of Shenandoah National Park. Hipcamp is also a great resource for less traditional camping alternatives and you can rent everything from open-air treehouses to shipping containers.

The Dyrt

camping outdoor tent - Lesser-known places to book campsites

Book The Dyrt campsites

Pros: Along with campsites, you can also find information about nearby hikes and other things to do, which can help you thoroughly plan your whole trip.

Cons: You can’t book directly on this website, but you will be able to check availability for state and national parks.

Like Trip Advisor, but specifically for the outdoors, The Dyrt is an incredible resource for planning a camping or hiking trip. It’s full of detailed information, reviews, and user-uploaded photographs that can help provide a realistic expectation of what you find before you head out into the great outdoors.

Although you can’t book campsites directly on the website, you can still use the website to find thoroughly-reviewed cabins and campsites in state and national parks, as well as private campsites. Every campsite listing includes a link where you can book directly, whether it be on recreation.gov, KOA, or an independent campground. 

Glamping Hub

Catskills glamping tent - Lesser-known places to book campsites

Book Glamping Hub campsites

Pros: Glamping Hub’s specialty is in unique accommodations, so if your travel tastes align with the eccentric, this is a great place to find hidden gems.

Cons: Prices for some of the most upscale and decked-out glamping sites will be much more similar to a hotel stay than a traditional campsite.

If you’re not quite ready to rough it at a traditional campsite, there’s always glamping. Glamping Hub has listings all over the world with over 15,000 glamorous camping sites in the US alone.

This booking site is chock-full of unique accommodations from cabins and tiny houses to train cabooses and geodesic domes and there’s no need to pack a sleeping bag. Granted, you’re not going to convince everyone that a weekend in a cabin with running water and Wi-Fi is still camping, but with a little digging, you can still find off-the-grid locations, like this romantic tent on Washington’s Whidbey Island, and hosts that offer traditional camping with a twist like this hanging tent playground in California.

Tentrr

Tentrr tent camping - Lesser-known places to book campsites

Book Tentrr campsites

Pros: Booking a campsite on private property offers seclusion and the opportunity to enjoy landscapes not accessible at any other time. Tentrr also sells its own glamping tents, so many listings will have both a backcountry and signature option.

Cons: At the time of writing, the majority of listings are concentrated on the east coast, particularly in New York. Also, the platform does not allow you to click through to a user profile to see other posts by reviewers.

A site that is exclusive to listings from private landowners, and even includes property in state parks, Tentrr features listings in 41 states and Puerto Rico. You can filter by the website’s “signature” or “backcountry” campsites depending on whether or not you want to bring your own camping equipment or shack up in a glamping tent.

The model of this site offers unique camping opportunities like this abandoned zoo in the Catskills or this quiet forest just five miles away from the Oregon Coast.

Tentrr also lets you purchase extras for your trip right when you book your reservation. These extras are offered by the hosts and vary based on the site. They could be anything from a prepaid firewood bundle and a cooking set to a tour of the on-site apiary or a needle felting workshop.

Read our full Tentrr review here

Additional campground resources

KOA and ReserveAmerica are two good resources to keep in mind where you can easily search a large number of campgrounds quickly for availability. However, many of the campsites listed are the same as those you’ll find on Recreation.gov and other popular aggregator sites — which means they may not help you out when it comes to finding under-the-radar spots to book in a pinch.

Experienced campers can also look to pitch a tent on public lands away from developed recreation facilities on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) areas.

More outdoors vacation ideas

A glamping yurt in Florida
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The 6 best hydration packs for day hikes, long-distance runs, and other outdoor activities

  • It’s crucial to stay hydrated while exercising, particularly in the heat.
  • Hydration packs make it easy and comfortable to carry liters of water on a run, hike, or bike ride.
  • The Osprey Skarab 18 hydration pack is comfortable and holds 2L of water plus all your hiking essentials.

You know it’s important to stay hydrated on a hike, run, bike ride, or literally any adventure in exercising. But carrying a water bottle or and having to constantly stop to pull it out of your pack gets old quick.

Hydration packs are the ideal way to make carrying and accessing water easier and minimize stoppage time. The best hydration packs not only have a pouch big enough to hold 1+ liters of water, but they also provide storage for snacks, layers, a first aid kit, and any other essentials you might need on a day hike or run. What’s more, the pack also needs to be comfortable, breathable, and quick-drying to not weigh down your adventure.

For longer hikes and backpacking trips, check out our guides to the best backpacks for men and for women.

The number of hydration packs on the market can be overwhelming. But we’ve dug into which packs can actually keep up on your putting and, therefore, which are worth your money.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

Here are our top picks for the best hydration packs:

The best hydration pack overall

Osprey hydration pack

Osprey’s Skarab 18 is the only day-hiking hydration pack you’ll need, thanks to its high-quality construction, internal frame that keeps it comfortable mile after mile, and easy-to-access water reservoir.

Pros: Comfortable to wear even over several hours, extra-wide clip-on water reservoir allows for easy cleaning and refills, 2.5-liter capacity is perfect for long day hikes, offers plenty of interior storage, and the ventilated foam frame helps avoid excess sweat

Cons: Too small for longer backpacking trips

Osprey has consistently made some of the finest backpacks for decades, so it’s no surprise that the Osprey Skarab 18 also happens to be our favorite hydration pack.

It’s the ideal size for a day hike, weighing just over one pound with enough storage space for hiking essentials. Its foam frame allows for great ventilation, keeping your back cool and mostly sweat-free. Like all its packs, Osprey decked out the Skarab with plenty of straps to allow for the ultimate custom fit, regardless of who’s wearing it.

But what makes this bag truly shine is the large, 2.5-liter water pouch, which should keep you hydrated for most day hikes. Additionally, its extra-wide clip opening makes it easy to add more water or clean the reservoir after use. The pack even has a magnetic bite valve attachment that allows it to quickly attach to the Skarab’s sternum strap, allowing for easy access.

Added extras like stretch mesh pockets on the side of the pack, a scratch-free stash pocket, removable hip belts, and external bungees for more gear are Osprey staples and only add to the pack’s overall quality. Osprey’s Skarab 18 is simple when it needs to be yet versatile and technical for those who demand it.

The best for male runners

camelbak hydration pack

Runners don’t want anything weighing them down, and CamelBak’s HydroBak weighs just five ounces — before being filled with water, of course. 

Pros: Weighs just five ounces without water, mesh back panel and harness aid in ventilation, new Crux reservoir allows 20% more water per drink, and its leak-proof valves are easy to flick on or off

Cons: Doesn’t offer much in the way of storage (not that runners need much of it, anyway)

A running-specific hydration pack should sinch down tight and comfortable, and be able to carry enough water for long miles. Camelbak’s HydroBak has a mesh back panel and harness to help with ventilation and keeping you cool. Its reflective accents help with visibility for early or late runs. 

Uniquely, the HydroBak features a Crux reservoir which lets you pull a full 20% more water with each swig. That means less time sucking on the tube and more time focusing on your stride. Additionally, the pack features easy-to-use leak-proof valves that you can flip on or off with a gentle push for less wasted water and no fumbling with the tube while running.

CamelBak also outfitted the Crux with a leak-proof cap and coated the tube with its anti-microbial HydroGuard technology, which is 100% BPA free and reduces the risk of bacteria growth.

Though it’s small, the HydroBak still features a few zippered pockets perfect for keeping energy gels, granola bars, and some cash for those well-earned post-run beers.

The best for female runners

salomon adv skin 8

The Salomon ADV Skin 8 is specifically designed to sinch down on the female figure, and can carry 1 liter of water with the option of adding a reservoir in the back.

Pros: Female-specific design, adjustable to fit different chest sizes, soft material, 2 soft 500ml flasks included, many mesh and zipper pockets, room to carry warm layer

Cons: Expensive, straws can be a bit tricky to adjust

While females can wear any hydration pack, they’ll be the most comfortable in the Salomon ADV Skin 8. Designed by one of the leading trail running brands today, the ADV Skin 8 is uniquely shaped to sinch down tight around female curves so your pack isn’t throwing off your momentum. Specifically, this pack was crafted to alleviate pressure on your breasts and has an adjustable drawcord fasten in the front for a personalized fit. I’m small-chested and have lent this vest to friends as large-chested as 34DD who say it’s just as comfortable for bigger breasts.

While you can slide a traditional reservoir in the back of the pack, the other feature that makes Salomon running vests so great is their integrated soft flasks. Two half-liter water flasks sit on either side of your chest in a soft mesh pocket, allowing for quick water access mid-run.

Additionally, this pack has mesh and zippered pockets strategically placed in nooks and crannies, as well as down the back, to stash everything from car keys to a warm layer. You can even move the elastic cords and loops around to carry trail running poles wherever feels most comfortable to you.

I’ve been running in this hydration vest for two years and the only bad words I have to say about it is it’s expensive (but, in my opinion, worth it for runners) and the straw on the included flasks might need to be cut down, which can be a little tricky to do. –Rachael Schultz, Health and Fitness Updates Editor

The best for day hikes

platypus hydration pack

The Platypus Duthie A.M. 10.0 is a day hiker’s dream, offering 7 liters of storage, strategically-placed tool organizing loops and compartments, and a huge, three-liter water reservoir. 

Pros: Plenty of storage options despite its modest 7L capacity, external tool and gear loops, capable of fitting many different body types, comes standard with huge three-liter BigZip water reservoir and magnetic hose, and FloatAir back panel offers comfort for even the longest day hikes

Cons: Expensive

Platypus’s Duthie A.M. 10.0 has plenty of internal and external storage options with a 7L capacity, perfect for short jaunts into the backcountry or several mile excursions. Its strategic approach to organization also means you won’t be digging past your car keys to get to your snacks — everything has its own place in the pack.

When it comes to the Duthie’s hydration capability, few companies deliver as well as Platypus. Featuring a large three-liter reservoir, the brand’s patented BigZip water pouch features a magnetic hose clip and also offers wearers the ability to route the house in multiple ways — a welcome function not typically seen in hydration packs.

For hardcore day hikers who also have other activities in mind, the Duthie also offers a useful carry system designed to hold pads or full-face helmets and even sports a fleece-lined pocket perfect for stashing a pair of shades.

Additionally, the pack easily conforms to a variety of body shapes and sizes with just a few adjustments of its straps and hip belt. After finding the perfect fit, Platypus’ FloatAir back panel keeps you mostly sweat-free and comfortable, no matter how long the hike.

The best for cycling

gelindo hydration pack

Forget reaching down for any built-in water bottle holders because with Gelindo’s Insulated Hydration Pack, staying hydrated while biking is as easy as simply drinking out of a straw.

Pros: Insulated water reservoir pocket keeps liquids cool for up to four hours, mesh back panel keeps airflow at a maximum, interior organization capable of holding a variety of items without feeling cluttered, and its easily adjustable straps are capable of fitting almost any body type

Cons: Limited reflective details

While most bikes have space for attaching a water bottle holder, a hydration pack makes staying quenched much easier and Gelindo’s Insulated Hydration Pack is perfectly fit for the job.

This pack has an insulated pocket to carry its 2.5-liter water reservoir, which will keep your water cool for up to four hours. The pack is also designed to keep your body heat from warming the water. 

Gelindo included several storage pockets capable of holding energy bars and car keys, and bigger compartments to hold a spare change of clothes, larger items of food, or spare tubes. Organization also scores highly as it’s easy to reach for and access any of the interior contents, no matter how full the pack gets.

It’s no secret cyclists care about comfort and with Gelindo’s Insulated Hydration Pack, finding a perfectly comfortable fit is easily done via its adjustable shoulder straps and hip belt. Furthermore, its ergonomic mesh back allows for steady airflow to keep you from overheating, keeping you comfortable throughout the entirety of your ride.

The best for commuting

gregory hydration pack

Gregory’s Inertia 30 makes it easy to stay hydrated while commuting with its easy-access water tube, ample interior storage, and comfortable shoulder harness.

Pros: Plenty of storage for whatever the workday requires, quick-drying 3L water reservoir is easy to fill up and features an integrated drying hangar, hydration sleeve auto-centers the water pouch to stabilize weight, versatile enough to even act as a day-hiking pack

Cons: Expensive

Even just commenting to wor requires energy, so it’s important to stay hydrated. The Gregory’s Inertia 30 is designed to not only quench thirst but also to pack a work day’s worth of gear. Be it a laptop, notebook, tablet, or otherwise, the Inertia offers enough interior storage space to tote along whatever the day calls for.

It even features several exterior pockets perfect for storing items that need to be quickly accessible, as well as a padded zippered pocket designed for sunglasses or house keys.

Gregory includes a quick-drying 3L water reservoir that has a built-in drying hangar, perfect for airing it out to avoid mold or mildew buildup. The Inertia’s dedicated hydration sleeve makes it easy to just toss the reservoir into the pack, and it automatically stabilizes the pouch’s weight to the center of your back. Gregory even made the reservoir’s tube magnetic, making it easy to take on and off.

Though we chose it for its ability to act as a commuter bag, the Inertia 30 also excels as a day-hiking pack, offering exterior loops for trekking poles, compression straps on either side, and load lifters that help stabilize the pack when it gets heavy.

At $120, it’s not the cheapest bag of the bunch but considering what it offers, and the Gregory name also means supreme durability, the Inertia 30 is worth every penny.

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The 4 best truck bed tents, perfect for use at a campsite or while overlanding

  • Truck-bed tents are designed to help campers sleep off the ground and rest more comfortably.
  • These tents create a sleeping area using the entirety of a truck’s bed, and are compatible with most truck sizes.
  • Our top pick, the Napier Outdoors Backroadz, has a sewn-in floor, lots of headroom, and sets up quickly.

Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky

While the popularity of camping continues to grow, the methods by which people enjoy the activity has steadily evolved, as well. Gone are the days where the only option for sleeping is a ground tent that takes 30 minutes of fumbling with poles to set up. Campers today have many options for how they sleep including travel trailers, roof-mounted tents, or, the latest craze, truck-bed tents.

As the name suggests, truck-bed tents sit in the empty bed of a truck to create a similar structure to that of a ground tent. Like the size of the truck beds themselves, these tents vary in size, shape, and ease-of-use. The best models feature a sewn-in floor to offer added protection, while others have large awnings to provide added shade or an area to keep dry while it rains.

Even before I first used one, it was easy to see their benefit. Like rooftop tents, they allow you to sleep off the ground, protecting you from animals, insects, and an uneven sleeping surface. Most are designed to have plenty of interior space as well, creating a roomy sleeping area that affords campers enough room to store additional gear.

After spending just one night in a truck bed tent, I was hooked – it delivered on the perks I mentioned above and then some. Though using one does require all gear in the bed of a truck to be cleared out (which can admittedly be a bit annoying), the sleeping area it creates made me wonder why I ever slept on the ground while truck camping.

If you’re still on the fence, that’s understandable. Not only is it an odd way to camp but knowing where to even start looking for a tent can be difficult – not to mention knowing all the features one should have. To help, I’ve compiled a few of my favorite truck bed tents that are perfect for warm-weather campers, owners of compact trucks, and everyone in between.

At the bottom of this guide, I’ve also included some insight into how I tested each of the included tents, as well as some key truck bed tent terms and FAQs.

Here are the best truck-bed tents:

The best overall

Napier Outdoors Backroadz

The Napier Outdoors Backroadz fits a wide range of truck bed sizes, has a full floor, can fit around truck-bed toolboxes, and features an easy-to-pitch design that can be set up in roughly five minutes. 

Though the market for truck-bed tents continues to grow, no brand does it better than Napier Outdoors. With the Backroadz, Napier delivers a tent with quality materials, thoughtful design, and a fully-covered floor that’s easy to assemble. Not only is it our favorite tent we’ve tested, but it’s one of the least expensive. 

The tent features 5.5 feet of headroom which may not allow most people to comfortably stand up but does give the interior a roomy, spacious feel. Its fully-covered floor means that it’s able to sit on top of even the dirtiest truck beds without bringing any of that dirt or grime inside. It also helps keep rain from dripping down the sides and into the tent. 

Its color-coded tent poles make it incredibly easy to pitch, and it can even be done with just one person, though we recommend getting a second person to help. The tent is also versatile enough to be pitched on the ground and moved into the truck bed, or constructed in the bed itself.

The Backroadz comes with an included rain fly to protect against rain or snow, and its entryway extends to the end of a bed’s lowered tailgate, providing extra space to store luggage, gear, or pairs of shoes. One downside, however, is that it doesn’t come with an extended awning, which would offer even more protection in inclement weather.

With a price tag under $200, a roomy interior, and an easy-pitch design, the Napier Outdoors Backroadz is not just our favorite truck tent but one of the best on the market. 

Pros: Inexpensive, color-coded poles make pitching easy, 5.5 feet of headroom, and fits many truck bed lengths

Cons: Doesn’t feature an extended awning

The best durable

Kodiak Canvas Truck Bed Tent

Gear takes a beating while camping but the Kodiak Canvas Truck Bed Tent is designed to withstand whatever the outdoors throws at it, thanks to its watertight, waterproof 100% cotton duck canvas exterior.

One of the most important qualities of any type of camping gear is its durability. Regardless of its use, you want it to last. For the Kodiak Canvas Truck Bed Tent, durability is its best asset.

Constructed out of a 100% cotton duck canvas shell (Kodiak Canvas calls it Hydra-Shield), the tent is tough enough to withstand a beating. Its heavy-duty materials don’t limit the tent elsewhere, however, as it’s still highly breathable and offers a watertight fit into the bed of a truck.

The actual design of the tent differs from the others in our guide in that it’s shaped like a tunnel, and less like dome. This helps maximize the amount of interior space and helps it feel much roomier, even though it only has a 5-foot tall ceiling. It also has an extended awning that helps prevent rain from getting inside and creates a sort of staging area for getting in or out of the tent.

Its interior features gear pockets to stow headlamps, smartphones, or other smaller pieces of gear. Since it extends to the end of a truck’s tailgate, the opening creates a small area to store backpacks or duffle bags, as well.

One downside is that it doesn’t come with its own floor. This means the bed of the truck stays exposed the entire time. It also isn’t as comfortable as a tent with a built-in floor. We brought along a sleeping bag to help with this.

It’s the most expensive tent on this list, but for anyone who camps often and wants something capable of holding up in extreme conditions, the Kodiak Canvas Truck Bed Tent is the best pick.

Pros: Has a durable canvas exterior, its awning adds protection from the elements, able to be used in nearly any weather condition

Cons: Expensive, doesn’t come with its own floor

The best for rain

Napier Outdoors Sportz truck tent

When the inevitable rainstorm hits, the Napier Outdoors Sportz tent has you covered with its 6-by-6-foot awning and rear access door, which lets you get inside your truck’s cab without having to step outside. 

Camping in the rain doesn’t have to be a miserable experience, so long as you’re prepared. With the Napier Outdoor Sportz truck bed tent, being prepared is as simple as pitching a tent. Featuring a nylon exterior, tape-seamed rainfly, and a huge extended awning, this tent offers plenty of protection from inclement weather. 

Measuring 5.6 feet in length with 5.5 feet of headroom, the Sportz offers enough interior space for two people plus gear. It even has a built-in gear loft which helps free up valuable floor space. The Sportz also comes with a sewn-in floor, which is considered a luxury for truck-bed tents. 

Its tape-seamed rainfly and nylon exterior work well in keeping moisture like rain or condensation out, yet still provide enough ventilation to keep it from getting too stuffy. Its best feature is its 6-by-6-foot awning, which works well at keeping the entryway dry while also creating a sort of staging area directly outside. This is great for changing into dry clothes or having an area outside the tent for fresh air. 

Napier color-coded the tent poles to allow for easy setup, though pitching the tent is much easier with two people. Expect the process to take anywhere from 5 to 10 minutes depending on if there’s help or not. 

The Sportz is well worth the investment for anyone who camps in areas with frequent rain, or who enjoys camping in either spring or fall. Napier makes some of the best truck-bed tents available and its Sportz is no different. 

Pros: Has a large, 6-by-6-foot awning, features a rear access door for entry to a truck’s cab, has a built-in gear loft, and comes with a sewn-in floor

Cons: Setup can be difficult with just one person 

The best for small truck beds

Rightline Gear Compact Truck Tent

Rightline Gear’s Compact Truck Tent features smaller dimensions so it can fit inside a smaller truck bed, but it still feels roomy and comfortable.

One of the biggest factors to keep in mind before buying a truck tent is knowing the length of the truck bed you’re shopping for. You don’t want to be stuck pitching a large tent on a short truck. For smaller trucks, Rightline Gear’s Compact Truck Tent is the best option available as it’s compatible with a wide range of compact trucks from brands like Nissan, Toyota, or Ford. 

The tent is constructed of water-resistant fabric with fully-taped seams, making it viable in both warm weather or rain. Setup requires just a few color-coded tent poles and can be done with just one person, though we recommend two to make it easier. 

Its interior is noticeably smaller than other picks on this list, but Rightline Gear does a good job with the design to make it feel roomier. The tent’s shorter length and headroom is easily noticeable for taller people, but for a short truck bed, there aren’t many viable alternatives. 

The tent features a large D-shaped entryway, a sky view window for stargazing, and several mesh windows which allow for increased airflow. Interior storage pockets flank either side of the tent and are good for storing smaller gear like smartphones or headlamps. It also features glow-in-the-dark zipper pulls and a lantern hook.

The Rightline Gear Compact Truck Tent is small without being inconvenient, and it’s one of the most cost-effective options for anyone who owns a shorter truck.  

Pros: Fits shorter truck beds easier than a standard truck tent, weighs just 10 pounds, features glow-in-the-dark zipper pulls, and has fully-taped seams

Cons: Less than five feet of headroom can feel cramped for taller campers 

FAQs

The qualities that make a good truck bed tent aren’t entirely dissimilar from what you’d find in a standard tent, though there are some key differences. Here are some answers to the questions I hear asked most often:

What makes a truck bend tent different from a normal tent?

The name “truck bed tent” is no play on words; these kinds of tents are literally designed to be pitched in the bed of a truck. Aside from that major difference, truck bed tents are mostly carbon copy replicas of their on-ground kin. There’s a zippered door for getting in and out of the tent, likely a few windows for air circulation, and various other features like storage compartments, rain flys, and awnings. 

What features should a truck bed tent have?

Most quality truck bed tents come with the same selection of features including a durable footprint (i.e. the bottom or floor of the tent), an entryway that sits at the tailgate of the bed, a set of windows that can zipper open and closed, and some form of storage.

More advanced truck bed tents may also come with some sort of extended awning that can act as outdoor shelter in inclement weather. It’s also recommended that you look for a tent that comes with an included rainfly. Even if you don’t plan on camping in the rain, it’s always smart to have a rain fly with you just in case. 

Are truck bed tents harder to pitch? 

The pitching process of a truck bed tent is probably its most glaring difference compared to on-ground tents. Though you’ll still use a series of poles to erect the tent, there are also a number of straps that you’ll need to use to actually secure the tent to the truck. This process can be a little tricky, especially for first-timers, but it’s always a good idea to follow any included instructions on how best to secure the tent.

What do I do with gear I’ve packed along in the bed of my truck? 

One of the major downsides of a truck bed tent is having to clear out all gear or equipment you’ve packed along that’s in the bed of your truck. Though some campers may very likely already have everything unpacked and set up around camp, I’m the kind of person who leaves at least a cooler and a bag or two floating around while camping.

It’s certainly a hassle to have to essentially unload your gear from the bed of the truck and then reload it into the cabin, but it’s your only option when camping with a truck bed tent. Of course, you could leave any unloaded gear around your campsite, though I do recommend taking extra precaution and locking it up inside your car when you’re asleep.  

How we test truck bed tents

Each of the truck bed tents featured in this guide went through a series of field tests to see how well they stacked up across these four categories: Ease of setup, durability, comfort, and value. Here’s how each category specifically factored into which tents made the cut:

Ease of setup: Setting up a truck bed tent certainly isn’t a walk in the park but you don’t want to be fumbling with tent poles and straps for 30 minutes. What I looked for when testing was both how intuitive the pitch process was and how clear the manual laid out each required step. Truck bed tents by nature are hard to set up but a clear explanation for how to do it can make a major difference.

Durability: Truck beds aren’t exactly soft, cushy areas to lay a tent — though, they are a bit less harsh than the actual ground. This means that any truck bed tent (namely, its footprint) should be able to withstand being in constant contact with the hard surface of a truck bed. This includes during setup, but also while you’re actually inside the tent and moving around. The tent should also be able to hold up to a variety of weather conditions (rain, wind, maybe even light snow). 

Comfort: The exact comfort level of a truck bed tent can be improved upon based on the kind of sleeping bag, sleeping pad, or mattress you use, but comfort as it relates specifically to the tent deals more with how much available interior space there is. Cramped tents don’t make for many happy campers, and since there’s really no reason for a truck bed tent to not be at least as big as the bed it’s going into (along with what’s essentially an infinite amount of vertical space), a quality truck bed tent should never skimp on comfort. 

Value: Value among outdoor gear is most often subjective to how you plan on using it, how often you plan on using it, and when you plan on using it. Truck bed tents are no different. While the tents I recommend aren’t exactly inexpensive, they are worthy investments that offer a great deal of value for anyone interested in doing more truck bed camping. 

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