Ports in California have never been this busy, and it’s adding to shortages of everything from furniture to electronics

Container ships waiting at the port of Long Beach, California.
  • A record-breaking number of cargo ships are waiting to dock at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, California.
  • The ships are waiting for over 8 days and causing further disruptions in US supply chains.
  • Import volumes at the California ports are only expected to increase in the coming weeks.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A record-breaking number of cargo ships are off the coast of California, waiting to get into the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach.

Over 60 ships are waiting to dock and unload, further contributing to supply chain issues and delays in the US. There are 146 total ships in the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach, according to the Marine Exchange of Southern California. Of the 146 vessels, 92 are container ships.

“The normal number of container ships at anchor is between zero and one,” Kip Louttit, the executive director of the Marine Exchange of Southern California, told Insider in July.

Last month, congestion at the ports reached an all-time high as disruptions related to the coronavirus pandemic continued to impact the industry, Insider reported. Changes in consumers’ purchasing habits during the ongoing pandemic, labor shortages at the docks, limited warehouse space, and trucking issues once goods are ready to reach their final destinations are contributing to industry-wide shortages in the US.

Import volumes at the California ports are only expected to increase in the coming weeks, according to data by the Port of Los Angeles. Wait time at the ports is currently estimated at 8.7 days, and will likely go up.

Ports on the West Coast operate as the primary location to receive goods imported from China, with containers bringing in everything from furniture to auto parts, clothes, electronics, and plastics, Shipping rates between the US and China are at an all-time high, and prices between the two regions have jumped 500% from this time last year, Insider reported.

As a result, holiday shopping this year is expected to have major disruptions related to the problems within supply chains. Experts are recommending shoppers get ahead of the curve by doing their shopping ahead of Black Friday, shop locally, and purchase only domestic goods.

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A suspected drunk Tesla driver has been arrested after allegedly passing out while on Autopilot

A close-up red Tesla logo on a white background.
A Californian couple said that their Tesla Model S caught fire and caused a house fire.

  • A Telsa driver was arrested on suspicion of drunken driving after she crashed into a California freeway wall.
  • The woman, identified as Karla Villanueva, had reportedly passed out while driving on Autopilot.
  • Her husband, who was driving behind her, reported that his wife was unconscious” in her car.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

A Telsa driver was arrested on suspicion of drunken driving after she crashed into a Southern California freeway wall on Thursday, authorities said.

The woman, identified as Karla Villanueva, reportedly passed out while driving her Tesla on Autopilot, the Associated Press reported.

Villanueva’s Tesla hit a wall late on Thursday night and then continued to move until a California Highway Patrol car pulled in front of her, which then slowed and stopped it. Authorities proceeded to wake up Villanueva.

Her husband, who was driving behind her, reported to the dispatcher that his wife was “unconscious in a Tesla” and that the vehicle was “driving itself,” according to audio from a dispatch call obtained by KABC-TV.

Villanueva was arrested Thursday and released Friday on her recognizance.

She is due in court in January 2022. It wasn’t immediately clear whether she had an attorney to speak on her behalf.

In recent months, Tesla crashes have come under scrutiny after several fatal crashes occurred while the electric cars were on Autopilot, enabling the vehicle to steer, accelerate, and brake automatically within its lane.

At least three Tesla drivers have died since 2016 while driving with Autopilot engaged.

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California Gov. Newsom’s kids have tested positive for COVID-19

gavin newsom california governor school visit
California Gov. Gavin Newsom at a school reopening press conference in March.

  • Two of California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s children tested positive for COVID-19, a spokesperson said.
  • Newsom, his partner, and two other kids tested negative.
  • The kids who tested positive have mild symptoms and will quarantine, Politico reported.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Two of California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s children tested positive for COVID-19 on Thursday, a spokesperson said.

The Governor, his partner, and his two other children have tested negative, Erin Mellon, spokesperson in the Governor’s Office told Insider in a statement.

“The family is following all COVID protocols,” Mellon said. “The Newsoms continue to support masking for unvaccinated individuals indoors to stop the spread and advocate for vaccinations as the most effective way to end this pandemic.”

Politico reported that all of Newsom’s children are under 12 and ineligible to get vaccinated.

The children don’t appear to have been exposed to COVID-19 at their private school or at any campaign events, Politico reported.

The identity of the two children who tested positive was not released to protect their privacy. They currently have mild symptoms and are quarantining.

In July, Newsom pulled two of his kids out of a summer camp after the camp wasn’t enforcing state policy to wear masks.

Earlier this week, Newsom held his position as the state’s governor following a recall election.

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California spent $276 million on its recall election. Here’s how that stacks up against the state’s spending on 3 key issues.

People wait in line outside a vote center to cast their ballots, Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Huntington Beach, Calif.
People wait in line outside a vote center to cast their ballots, Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021, in Huntington Beach, Calif.

  • The failed attempt to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom from his role cost California taxpayers $276 million.
  • We took a look at how that sum stacks up against key parts of the state’s budget.
  • We examined how much the state has allocated to helping its homeless population and funding programs that fight climate change and COVID-19.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom will remain in office following a costly recall election that cost taxpayers $276 million, according to the state’s Department of Finance.

To put that sum into context, we took a look at how much California is spending on some of its key issues this year, from homelessness and battling wildfires to combating COVID-19. Figures on California’s spending have been sourced from the state’s 2020-2021 budget.

Funding housing for the homeless

california skid row homeless tents
A man walks past tents housing the homeless on the streets in the Skid Row community of Los Angeles, California.

Homelessness was cited as a key issue in this year’s recall election, with Newsom’s GOP rivals like Larry Elder and Caitlyn Jenner each offering controversial ideas on how they would tackle the issue. An estimated 60,000 people are currently living on the streets of Los Angeles. On the state level, the US Interagency Council on Homelessness reported that in January 2020, California recorded an estimated total of more than 161,548 homeless individuals.

Per California’s 2020-2021 budget, $550 million was allocated to the Department of Housing and Community Development for Project Homekey, a sum intended to provide housing for homeless individuals and families. The $276 million spent on the recall election could have funded more than half of this amount.

The average cost of building a single unit of housing for the homeless in Los Angeles rose to $531,000 in 2020, according to an audit from City Controller Ron Galperin. Based on this metric, with $276 million, the state could have financed more than 500 units of housing with the cost of the recall election.

Fighting climate change

California drought
California has suffered a spate of extreme weather events this year, from devastating wildfires to drought. State funds are now being funneled into programs to combat climate change.

California has seen a series of extreme weather events this year, with wildfires decimating towns and a severe drought leaving its lakes bone-dry.

The state’s 2020-2021 budget allocated $50 million to a general fund to mitigate the effects of power shutdowns, in a bid to reduce the risk of wildfires sparked by utility-owned equipment. The AP reported that the state approved a $1.5 billion budget to prevent wildfires – nearly a fifth of which could have been funded by the recall election’s cost.

Additionally, $276 million could have gone a long way to funding programs to battle smog and climate change. According to a report from local news site CalMatters, key environmental programs saw funding cuts of nearly $105 million in July 2020. These funding cuts hit programs that promoted green vehicles and tackled methane excretions from cows.

Fighting COVID-19

Los Angeles Coronavirus
A Covid-19 warning sign in Los Angeles, California.

A large part of the state’s 2020-2021 budget focused on measures that could mitigate the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The state’s 2020-2021 budget shows $716 million was set aside for COVID‑19 contingencies. Another $3.5 billion was allocated for direct COVID-19 related expenditures. This sum is being earmarked for spending on personal protective equipment, expanding the surge capacity at hospitals and medical facilities, providing hotels for healthcare workers who need to quarantine after coming into contact with COVID-19 patients, and improving statewide contact tracing.

The $276 million from the recall election could have paid for more than a third of the state’s COVID-19 contingency fund, or funded slightly over a tenth of its state-wide COVID-19 related expenditures.

As of September 15, California has confirmed 4,616,854 COVID-19 cases and 67,647 deaths since the beginning of the pandemic. In the week ending Thursday, the state reported a daily average of 10,189 COVID-19 cases, per The New York Times’ COVID-19 case tracker.

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Trump released a statement claiming the California recall election was rigged less than an hour after polls closed

trump newsom
US President Donald Trump has weighed in on the California recall election – which is projected to have been won by Gov. Gavin Newsom – calling it “rigged.”

Donald Trump’s team released a statement from the former president via email blast on September 14, alleging there was “rigged voting” in California’s recall election.

Insider and Decision Desk HQ called the race for Gov. Gavin Newsom at 8:21 p.m. PT. Newsom survived the recall and beat 46 other candidates, including controversial leading GOP contender Larry Elder. Insider received the email from Trump’s team less than an hour after the polls closed in California.

“People don’t realize that, despite the Rigged voting in California (I call it the ‘Swarming Ballots’), I got 1.5 Million more votes in 2020 than I did in 2016,” Trump wrote in the statement.

There is no evidence of widespread vote-rigging in the California recall election.

Trump went on to acknowledge that Newsom will “probably win,” while zeroing in on the governor’s handling of California’s drought.

“The place is so Rigged, however, that a guy who can’t even bring water into their State, which I got federal approval to do (that is the hard part), will probably win,” Trump continued.

“Billions of gallons of water coming to California from the North is being sent out to sea, rather than being spread throughout the State. This is to protect the tiny delta smelt, which is doing far worse now without the water,” Trump wrote.

California does have a history of water flowing into the Pacific Ocean and being wasted. And the delta smelt, a small blue fish that lives only in the San Francisco Bay and the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta, is, as Trump wrote in the statement, in critical condition.

Trump also did get federal approval to divert water to irrigate farms in 2019, but The New York Times reported that this entailed lifting protections for fish like the delta smelt. In fact, Trump’s actions might have driven the fish further toward extinction, per a 2019 Guardian report. In October 2018, Trump signed a memorandum asking federal agencies to slow the water to Central Valley farms, which could have left the smelt without the fresh, cold water they need to survive and thrive.

In the statement, Trump went on to claim there are similarities between California’s recall election and the 2020 presidential election.

“Many people are already complaining that when they go to vote they are told, ‘I’m sorry, you already voted’ (Just like 2020, among many other things),” Trump wrote.

There is no evidence of voter fraud in the 2020 election and judges have ruled resoundingly against Trump campaign lawsuits that alleged voter fraud in 12 states, including Georgia, Michigan, Nevada, and Pennsylvania.

According to the Poynter Institute’s Politifact fact-checker, there were two instances of voters being mistakenly told that they had already voted in this year’s California recall election. However, they were allowed to cast provisional ballots, and there is no evidence that GOP voters were targeted.

Read the original article on Business Insider

Calls for reforming California’s recall process rise as efforts to oust Gov. Gavin Newsom fail

California Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses reporters after beating back the recall attempt that aimed to remove him from office, at the John L. Burton California Democratic Party headquarters in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021.
California Gov. Gavin Newsom addresses reporters after beating back the recall attempt that aimed to remove him from office, at the John L. Burton California Democratic Party headquarters in Sacramento, Calif., Tuesday, Sept. 14, 2021.

  • Five efforts to recall Gov. Gavin Newsom failed before a sixth petition collected the required number of signatures.
  • Only 19 states, including California, allow recall elections.
  • US Rep. Karen Bass told ABC News that more than 68 recalls are happening throughout California.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Less than an hour after polls closed, Insider and Decision Desk HQ projected that Californians overwhelmingly voted against recalling Gov. Gavin Newsom. The speedy outcome left many wondering why the effort to recall public officials is so easy, and if it should be reformed.

Five attempts to recall Newsom failed before a sixth petition, led by retired sheriff’s sergeant Orrin Heatlie and his California Patriot Coalition, collected the required number of signatures and triggered the recall election on July 1.

US Rep. Karen Bass, D-Calif., told ABC News anchor Linsey Davis that it’s too easy to recall officials in California, citing more than 68 recalls happening throughout the state targeting officials in various levels of government, including school boards, city councils, and district attorneys.

California is one of just 19 states that allow recall elections. Within 60 days, petitioners recalling a California official must collect signatures from 12% of the electorate from the last election, and from at least five counties.

“This could be a strategy to essentially grind government to a halt, to paralyze government,” Bass said. “I’m very interested in analyzing who started all these recalls. Who’s funding them? You can’t just recall someone without significant financial backing.”

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California has the highest poverty level of all states in the US, according to US Census Bureau data

An aerial view of San Francisco's first temporary sanctioned tent encampment for the homeless on May 18, 2020 in San Francisco, California. After public outrage mounted over a surge of homeless people and tents filling the streets of San Francisco during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the City opened its first temporary sanctioned tent encampment.
An aerial view of San Francisco’s first temporary sanctioned tent encampment for the homeless on May 18, 2020 in San Francisco, California. After public outrage mounted over a surge of homeless people and tents filling the streets of San Francisco during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, the City opened its first temporary sanctioned tent encampment.

  • California has the highest poverty rate in the US, a Census Bureau report shows.
  • The District of Columbia was the only location with a higher rate of poverty than California.
  • Despite this, California’s three-year poverty level average has decreased considerably since 2018.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California remains the state with the highest poverty level in the US, according to a September 2021 report from the US Census Bureau.

In the report, three-year poverty level averages were calculated for each state and the District of Columbia using the supplemental poverty measure, which found that 15.4% of California residents lived in poverty from 2018 to 2020. Only the District of Columbia had a higher rate of poverty – 16.5%.

The supplemental poverty measure expands on the official poverty measure, which was developed by Social Security economist Mollie Orshansky in the 1960s, by accounting for cost of living, work and medical expenses, tax credits, and government programs designed to assist low-income families and individuals.

By comparison, California’s three-year poverty level average has considerably decreased from 17.2 % in 2019, and 18.1% in 2018.

Social Security transfers and stimulus payments prevented a combined 38.2 million individuals across the US from falling into poverty, while medical expenses caused the largest increase of the number of individuals in poverty, according to the Census Bureau report.

Californians benefited the most from government programs like the Earned Income Tax Credit, CalFresh, and Child Tax Credit, each of which lowered poverty rates in California by more than 1% in 2019, research from the Public Policy Institute of California (PPIC) found.

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President Joe Biden stumps for California Gov. Gavin Newsom ahead of recall election

President Joe Biden talks with California Gov. Gavin Newsom as he arrives at Mather Airport on Air Force One Monday, Sept. 13, 2021, in Mather, Calif., for a briefing on wildfires at the California Governor's Office of Emergency Services.
President Joe Biden talks with California Gov. Gavin Newsom as he arrives at Mather Airport on Air Force One Monday, Sept. 13, 2021, in Mather, Calif., for a briefing on wildfires at the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services.

  • Conservative radio host and Trump loyalist Larry Elder is Gavin Newsom’s main opponent in the upcoming recall election.
  • At a rally Monday night, Newsom criticized Elder’s views on climate change, racism, taxes, and abortion.
  • Biden called Newsom one of the “best governors in the country.”
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

On his first trip to the West Coast since his election, President Joe Biden implored attendees of a rally in Long Beach to vote no in the upcoming California recall election against Gov. Gavin Newsom.

Newsom introduced the president at the rally on Monday night and mentioned several controversies surrounding his main opponent, conservative radio host and Trump loyalist Larry Elder. Newsom also criticized Elder’s views on climate change, racism, taxes, and abortion.

“You saw what happened in Texas, and the fact that we have other Republican governors that hope to model that Texas legislation as it relates to denying women the right to choice,” Newsom said. “We may have defeated Donald Trump, but we have not defeated Trumpism; Trumpism is still on the ballot in California.”

Biden took the stage and endorsed Newsom as one of the “best governors in the country,” while dubbing Elder a “Trump clone.” He listed several reasons to keep Newsom as governor, including his respect for women, belief in climate change, and respect for scientific guidance during the COVID-19 pandemic.

“The eyes of the nation are on California because the decision you’re about to make isn’t just going to have a huge impact on California. It’s going to reverberate around the nation, and quite frankly – not a joke – around the world,” Biden said.

California’s recall election for governor is set for September 14. If more than 50% of voters vote “yes” to recalling Newsom, he will be replaced by the opposing candidate who garners the most support. In the event that he is recalled, county officials would have 30 days to count votes and on the 38th day, California Secretary of State Shirley Weber would certify the election results.

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Meet Larry Elder, the conservative talk radio host and Trump loyalist, who is campaigning to replace California Gov. Gavin Newsom

FILE - In this July 13, 2021, file photo, conservative radio talk show host Larry Elder speaks to supporters during a campaign stop in Norwalk, Calif. Elder was not on the list of candidates released Saturday in the recall election that could end the term of California Gov. Gavin Newsom.
In this July 13, 2021, file photo, conservative radio talk show host Larry Elder speaks to supporters during a campaign stop in Norwalk, Calif.

  • Larry Elder, a conservative radio host, is the leading GOP candidate for the California recall election.
  • Elder told Insider that he loves California and wants to see it thrive.
  • Here are his stances on policy and past controversies.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California’s recall election for governor is set for September 14. This gives Larry Elder, who is the GOP’s fundraising lead, according to Politico, or 45 other candidates the opportunity to unseat the state’s current governor, Gavin Newsom.

Calls for a recall began prior to the pandemic when Newsom’s adversaries grew discontent with California’s “homelessness crisis, high taxes and cost of living, immigration, and rationing water and energy use,” according to Insider’s Lauren Frias. But the calls grew louder after COVID-19 took hold and Newsom implemented mitigation methods.

Ballots went out on August 16. The gubernatorial ballot asks, first, should Governor Newsom be replaced? and second if Newsom is recalled, who should replace him?

Gov. Newsom commenced his “Vote NO” Weekend of Action campaign on Friday, August 13, in San Francisco, saying the stakes of this recall election “could not be higher” in reference to Elder’s plans.

Elder, a conservative radio host, announced his participation in the recall in July. Here is what voters need to know about Elder’s background and candidacy.

What is Larry Elder’s background?

Laurence Allen Elder was born in 1969; his father was a Republican and his mother was a Democrat. He grew up in South Central Los Angeles and attended Crenshaw High School. His household was abusive and growing up he was stopped by police between 75 and 100 times he said, according to a Los Angeles Times podcast “The Times.”

Elder left South Centra and attended Brown University for his undergraduate degree, followed by the University of Michigan Law School.

After college, “The Sage from South Central,” as he calls himself, wrote several books, worked at Squire, Sanders & Dempsey before starting his own firm (Laurence A. Elder and Associates), and currently hosts his own radio show “The Larry Elder Show.” Elder also hosted “Moral Court,” a one-season television show which wasn’t a “court of law, but a court of ethics,” according to IMDB.

“I’m a business owner, talk show host, author, and a son of California,” Elder, who does not have any political experience, said of himself in a tweet. “I won’t continue to watch Gavin Newsom destroy our state.”

What does Larry Elder believe, politically?

“The biggest challenge in California, in general, is the intrusiveness of government,” he said to CalMatters. “I believe that a government that governs less governs best.”

Here are a few of the candidate’s political positions:

Elder told Insider that he loves California and wants to see it thrive. “Unfortunately, Gov. Gavin Newsom’s failed policies are running this beautiful state into the ground,” he added in a written statement to us.

The candidate also holds controversial views on women and race

On women, especially in the workplace, he has dismissed the role of sexism and said that women should disclose their plans for pregnancy to their employers,

“Glass ceiling? Ha! What glass ceiling? Women, women exaggerate the problem of sexism,” the pundit said in a 1996 ad for his radio show, CNN reported.

Elder also said “Women know less than men about political issues, economics, and current events” in a column he wrote in 2001, CNN reported.

Critics, including leaders of Black Lives Matter, Los Angeles, have said that Elder as governor would be detrimental for Black and brown people of the state.

In a 1996 ad, Elder said, “Blacks exaggerate the significance of racism.” He has also blamed some high-profile instances of police brutality on Black victims.

“Be polite. Comply. Jacob Blake could’ve been avoided had he complied; Eric Garner could’ve been avoided had he complied; Michael Brown could’ve been avoided had he complied,” Elder says about Black victims who lost their lives to police brutality.

The conservative candidate even suggested that slave owners were owed reparations following the civil war, Insider’s Morgan Keith reported.

The candidate also regularly refers to undocumented immigrants as “illegal aliens” and has said that he does not believe they should receive Medicare.

Controversies

Elder’s ex-fiancee, Alexandra Datig, claims that he flashed a gun at her in the midst of an argument while he was under the influence of marijuana, Politico reported. Elder denies this claim and referred to it as “salacious.” In a string of tweets, he said “I grew up in South Central; I know exactly how destructive this type of behavior is.”

CNN reported that Elder was accused of sexual harassment twice – denying both allegations on his radio talk show in 2011.

The first incident, as CNN reports, occurred in the 1980s. A woman who worked at private practice attempted to break the contract and accused Elder of “hitting on her.” Elder said in the episode, “That’s how, that’s how she put it. If you had seen her, you would know that the picture would be a complete defense. I’m just saying.”

Elder, who used to host a television show in Cleveland, was also accused of asking a male guest to expose his butt tattoo in the presence of two camerawomen.

“I think I was making a joke, making light – no, I don’t [remember],” Elder told CNN. “The whole point behind your series of questions is, do I disrespect women, and I don’t. I have a great deal of respect for women. My mom was a woman. I had her on my show every Friday.”

“I’ve never been accused of sexual harassment. I’ve never been accused of sexual abuse. I’ve never been accused – I worked with hundreds of women throughout my career,” he added.

What are Democrats worried about?

Democrats, including Newsom, have been comparing Elder to former President Donald Trump – and sometimes saying that he’s the more extreme of the two.

“You have someone who’s not just opposed to women’s right to choose, but actually wrote an op-ed saying women aren’t as smart as men,” Newsom said in reference to Elder.

One Los Angeles City Councilmember, Nithya Raman, tweeted that if a Republican was elected they could slash funding for many programs “that are holding the state together right now.”

Elder called Former President Trump’s 2016 election “divine intervention” in 2019.

“It was a miracle. He is almost God-sent,” he said. However, he told CNN that he was “indifferent” on the subject of a Trump endorsement that he says he has not asked for (nor has he received).

Elder has hinted that he will not accept the election results, in line with Trump’s move following the 2020 presidential election.

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Newsom slams challenger Larry Elder for telling supporters to report election fraud ahead of Tuesday’s recall election

Gavin Newsom
In this Feb. 16, 2021, file photo, California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference on the campus of the California State University of Los Angeles in Los Angeles

  • Last week, Trump claimed the California recall election would be rigged.
  • Challenger Larry Elder called on his supporters to report incidents of fraud, Politico reported.
  • Gov. Newsom slammed the effort as trying to sow doubt on the election.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom slammed recall challenger Larry Elder for sowing mistrust about California’s recall election when Elder called on his supporters to report election fraud ahead of September 14, Politico reported.

On his campaign site, Elder added a “report election incident” link that leads to StopCAFraud.com, an anonymously registered website apparently created on August 27th that allows people to submit tips about ballot fraud.

“It’s just an extension of the Big Lie and ‘Stop the Steal,'” Newsom told reporters while voting with First Partner Jennifer Siebel Newsom at the California State Archives in Sacramento on Friday. “We’re four days out, the election hasn’t even happened, and now they’re all claiming election fraud. I think it’s important to highlight that.”

The Sacramento Bee reported that Elder also threatened a lawsuit to challenge the election results. The election is set for Tuesday.

“We have a voter integrity board all set up – most of these are lawyers,” Elder said Wednesday, according to CNN. “So, when people hear things, they contact us. We’re going to file lawsuits in a timely fashion.”

Newsom told The Bee that “there is a thread within the Republican Party that, if they don’t get what they want, they are willing to assault the core tenets of an election in ways that have far-reaching consequences. It’s very, very damaging and baseless, absolutely baseless.”

Politico previously reported that former President Donald Trump has said the election is “probably rigged,” without any evidence.

“The ballots… are mail-in ballots… I guess you even have a case where you can make your own ballot. When that happens, nobody’s gonna win except these Democrats. The one thing they are good at is rigging elections, so I predict it’s a rigged election,” Trump said in an interview with Newsmax.

Trump and his allies waged dozens of lawsuits challenging the results of the 2020 Presidential election, all of which failed.

California Assemblymember Chad Mayes told Politico he’s already been getting “texts saying ‘don’t let them steal it.'”

“It’s this constant messaging that somehow if Republicans lose elections, it’s because of voter fraud. It is wrong, it is dangerous, and it needs to stop,” Mayes told Politico.

On Friday, Newsom said he would accept the election outcome.

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