People are still working from home as the Delta variant pushes back employers’ and workers’ office plans

working remotely
  • The Delta variant and coronavirus have forced some employees to stay working from home.
  • In August, about 13% of employed people worked remotely because of the pandemic, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics.
  • The number of remote workers stalled from the previous month after dropping earlier in the year.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Delta variant and the ongoing pandemic seem to still be affecting plans to have workers return to the office.

The latest data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics showed there wasn’t a decline in remote workers over August.

According to the latest data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 13.4% of employed people teleworked or worked from home in the last four weeks because of the pandemic in August.

While this represented a drop from earlier in the year when the share was 23.2% in January, the August numbers were nearly identical to July’s, at 13.2%.

“The number of people working remotely due to the pandemic … held steady between July and August, so that I think is one of the biggest effects of delta here in this report,” Julia Pollak, chief labor economist at ZipRecruiter, told ABC News.

Computer and mathematical occupations still have a high share of remote workers, with a share 46.0% in August, according to the data.

Daniel Zhao, senior economist at Glassdoor, also noted in a recent blog post on Glassdoor that the share of employed workers increased by 0.2 percentage points.

“A resurgence in remote work is likely to delay the economic recovery even more for central business districts reliant on corporate office workers,” Zhao wrote.

Some companies have had to modify their reopening plans after concerns about the Delta variant and the coronavirus. For instance, Bloomberg reported that Apple is pushing back its plans until at least January 2022. Google is also pushing back reopening until January.

A survey by the Partnership for New York City found that Manhattan employers were not as hopeful to see employees back in the office in September as they previously were.

The nonprofit found in an August survey that Manhattan employers expected 41% of staff will return to the office by the end of September – a steep drop from the 62% of confident employers in a May survey.

Some companies across different industries are also requiring employees to be vaccinated if they are in the office as the US continues to see coronavirus cases rise.

The seven-day moving average for coronavirus cases was 150,316 for September 3, according to the CDC.

64% of US adults are fully vaccinated and 74.8% have received at least one dose, according to CDC data as of September 4.

According to a list of companies compiled by NBC News, companies like Goldman Sachs, Delta Air Lines, and DoorDash have some sort of vaccination requirement. Goldman Sachs is requiring people in the office, including clients, to be fully vaccinated, NBC reported. Additionally, fully vaccinated employees will have to do weekly coronavirus testing starting September 7, as well as wear masks in some areas of the office.

The Delta variant and concerns about the virus aren’t just affecting how people work but the recovery of jobs lost during the pandemic. The US lost over 22 million jobs in March and April last year and job figures are slowly making their way back to pre-pandemic levels.

However, the US only added 235,000 jobs in August, much lower than what economists expected to see.

Both Zhao and Nick Bunker, economic research director at Indeed, told Insider that the Delta variant and the coronavirus pandemic are affecting the labor market and employment recovery.

“Delta seems to be the overwhelming factor affecting the labor market right now,” Zhao told Insider’s Juliana Kaplan,

Read the original article on Business Insider

Black workers saw a big drop in unemployment in July, but many left the labor force altogether

Unemployment benefits line
People line up to receive unemployment benefits.

  • The unemployment rate for Black Americans dropped by 1.0 percentage point in July.
  • But that’s in part because more Black Americans left the labor force altogether.
  • One expert said that it’s a “mystery” why labor force participation dropped.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

July’s jobs report brought more jobs than expected, with the US adding 943,000 nonfarm payrolls. The unemployment rate also dropped down to 5.4%, a bigger dip than anticipated.

All told, the report shows signs of more robust recovery. In fact, Insider’s Ben Winck and Andy Kiersz report that July’s numbers were so good that they actually shaved four months off of economic recovery.

Despite what looks like a heartening report, Black Americans are still falling behind – they were increasingly no longer looking for work or employed in July.

In July, the unemployment rates for Black workers and Hispanic or Latinx workers dropped. Black unemployment dropped by 1.0 percentage point, while Hispanic or Latinx unemployment dropped by 0.8 percentage points. Those figures are higher than the drop in white unemployment, which declined by just 0.4 percentage points, as seen in the following chart:

Even so, unemployment rates are still elevated for Black and Hispanic or Latinx workers. As seen in the chart, these rates are also still higher than pre-pandemic rates.

Dr. William Spriggs, the chief economist of the AFL-CIO, tweeted that “though the Black unemployment rate fell because of people dropping out of the labor force, the Black unemployment rate at 8.2% was less than the unemployment rate for High School dropouts 9.5%.”

Data for Asian Americans only goes back until 2003, not as far back as the other race and ethnicity groups noted above. The unemployment rate for Asian Americans did drop from 5.8% in June to 5.3% in July.

In June, the unemployment rate for Black Americans actually increased, even as the country added a revised 938,000 jobs. It showed how workers of color – along with women – continued to be left out as recovery picks up.

But the drops in unemployment rates have important caveats. Nick Bunker, economic research director at Indeed, told Insider the drop in Black unemployment was driven in part by Black workers leaving the labor force altogether – meaning that they weren’t counted as unemployed.

“That’s one of the situations where the unemployment rate falls for a bad reason,” Bunker said. “It wasn’t a decline in unemployment because more people got jobs. So, hopefully that’s a one-month aberration.”

The following chart highlights the labor force participation rate by race and ethnicity since 2001:

The Black labor force participation rate dropped by 0.8 percentage points to 60.8% in July, while labor force participation rates ticked up for white and Hispanic or Latinx Americans. In June, a net total of 240,000 Black Americans joined the labor force. However, 249,000 exited in July. The labor force participation rate for white Americans was 61.6% in July, and it was 65.7% for Hispanic or Latinx Americans.

“It’s a little bit of a mystery as to what happened in July, in particular,” Jasmine Tucker, the director of research at the National Women’s Law Center, told Insider. “There’s not really a big seasonal change that’s happening and there’s not something that’s tied to school.”

Those labor force drop outs will likely only exacerbate pre-existing inequities for jobless workers. Tucker said the numbers underscore the need for policy changes like funding childcare, raising the minimum wage, and paycheck fairness.

“The cost of not doing anything or not doing enough right now is way higher than doing too much,” she said.

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July jobs report beats estimates as businesses add 943,000 payrolls amid steady recovery

Help wanted sign
Restaurant storefront on Middle Neck Road in Great Neck has “Help Wanted” sign in window on July 15, 2021.

  • July job gains totaled 943,000 payrolls in July, exceeding the median estimate of 870,000 new jobs.
  • The unemployment rate fell to 5.4% from 5.9%, beating the 5.7% forecast.
  • The print shows job creation persevering as COVID cases rebounded and enhanced unemployment benefits lapsed.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Job growth in the US exceeded economists’ expectations in July, signaling the labor market’s recovery was mostly unscathed as COVID cases rebounded.

The country added 943,000 nonfarm payrolls last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics said Friday. The gain beat the median forecast of 870,000 new jobs from economists surveyed by Bloomberg. It also marks a healthy acceleration from growth seen the month prior, which was revised to 938,000 payrolls from 850,000.

The July increase serves as the seventh straight month of job additions and leaves 8.7 million Americans still unemployed. The unemployment rate dipped to 5.4% from 5.9%, also beating the median estimate of 5.7%.

“Despite the improvement, we still have a ways to go with the economy remaining 5.7 million jobs short of the pre-pandemic level. But things are undeniably moving in the right direction,” Greg McBride, chief financial analyst at Bankrate, said.

The labor-force participation rate rose slightly to 61.7%. The measure has taken on more relevance in recent months as businesses face difficulties hiring. The labor-shortage phenomenon has prompted many firms to lift wages in hopes of attracting workers. While conservative economists and politicians have blamed enhanced unemployment benefits for slower-than-expected hiring in the spring, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell has said school closures and virus fears also stifled participation through reopening.

Wage growth exceeded expectations once again, with average hourly earnings climbing 11 cents to $30.54. The uptick in wages – particularly in the hardest-hit service sectors – signals businesses paid more upfront to counter the labor shortage.

The Friday print also reveals businesses continued to hire despite the Delta variant of COVID-19 spreading across the US. Daily case counts leaped from their recent lows throughout July and ended the month at their highest levels since February.

To be sure, the BLS report’s survey period ended in the middle of July, before headlines on the Delta variant gripped the country. The past week also saw state and local governments reinstate some mask-wearing rules to curb the virus’s spread, raising some concerns that another wave of infections could hinder the recovery.

Progress toward the new normal

The government’s monthly employment report gives the most detailed snapshot of which businesses hired the most and previews what the post-pandemic labor market might look like.

The U-6 unemployment rate – which includes people working part-time for economic reasons and those marginally attached to the labor force – dropped to 9.6% from 10.1% on an unadjusted basis.

The leisure and hospitality sector again added the most jobs, with a gain of 380,000 payrolls. Two-thirds of the gains were in restaurants and bars. The sector is still down about 1.7 million jobs from levels seen just before the pandemic.

Local government education followed with a 221,000-payroll increase. The retail sector shed the most payrolls with a decline of roughly 6,000 jobs.

“While local government education added a large number of jobs this month, the private sector is driving the acceleration,” Nick Bunker, economic research director at employment website Indeed, said. “This means the rise in growth this month is not just a statistical quirk. The labor market is gaining momentum.”

About 5.2 million Americans cited COVID-19 as the main reason why their employers closed down. That’s down from 6.2 million in June. The number of Americans naming the pandemic as the primary reason they didn’t seek work held at about 1.6 million.

The share of Americans working remotely fell to 13.2% from 14.4%. While down from last year’s highs, the reading suggests a significant proportion of workers will continue telecommuting even after the pandemic fades.

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The pandemic ended the daily commute

crowded subway
  • Many Americans stopped commuting daily amid lockdowns and working from home in the last year.
  • The average amount of time spent traveling each day dropped from about an hour and 12 minutes in 2019 to 47 minutes in 2020.
  • Only about two-thirds of Americans traveled anywhere on an average day in 2020, down from 84% in 2019.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The daily grind is over.

It’s one of the smaller, but potentially surprisingly pleasant, changes from the horrible last year of pandemic and lockdowns: Taking the subway or driving a car to work has come to an end for millions of Americans.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ recently released results from the American Time Use Survey showed that the average amount of time Americans spent traveling on a given day dropped from about an hour and 12 minutes in 2019 to 47 minutes in 2020.

Even more dramatically, while 84% of Americans traveled somewhere outside their homes on a typical day in 2019, only 67% did in 2020. These stats include commuting, but also time spent traveling to stores, taking children to school, or any other trip to or from the home.

The Time Use Survey annually asks thousands of Americans to keep a diary, listing how they spend their time on a typical day. Because of the disruptions caused by the onset of the pandemic last spring, BLS released estimates comparing May through December 2019 to the same months in 2020.

One consequence of this is that all of the 2020 figures reflect the period after COVID-19 began to spread widely and lockdowns were implemented across the country.

The Time Use Survey also showed that the share of Americans working from home almost doubled from 22% in 2019 to 42% in 2020. That varied across industries, with sectors like finance and professional services seeing much higher telecommuting rates than transportation or leisure and hospitality:

Other data also show a big drop-off in commuting during the pandemic. A study of traffic congestion by the Texas A&M Transportation Institute found that the number of hours commuters spent stuck in traffic each year was cut nearly in half, from 54 hours per commuter in 2019 to 27 hours in 2020.

A Zillow analysis reported by The Wall Street Journal found that homebuyers are paying much less of a premium for living close to work, as remote working situations make commute time less of a factor in choosing where to live.

The Journal’s Nicole Freedman wrote, “in the two-year period ended in May 2021, home values in neighborhoods with a 70-minute commute rose 30.2%, strongly outpacing a 9.2% price gain for 20-minute-commute areas and a price decline of 2.5% for neighborhoods within 10 minutes of a job center” in the Boston metro area.

We’ll see what happens as the economy continues to reopen, but for now at least, lots of Americans are saving time on one of the most frustrating parts of the workday.

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Leisure and hospitality workers got a ton of jobs in June – and they got a raise

Restaurant server US
  • Leisure and hospitality added 343,000 payrolls in June, making up 40% of total job gains.
  • The June jobs report also showed higher wages for those workers, suggesting pay increases are helping hiring.
  • But wages in the sector are still recovering from the hit caused by the coronavirus recession.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The June jobs report added 850,000 payrolls, going beyond expectations as the economy continues to recover from the pandemic. A large chunk of the big jobs gain came from leisure and hospitality, and the reason for this likely comes down to higher wages.

Of the 850,000 payrolls added, leisure and hospitality made up 343,000 of them, or 40% of the total gain. Pay in the sector jumped 3.6% over the past three months, and the correlation between increased jobs and increased wages is suggesting that higher wages work. For the month of June, wages shot up 7.1% from a year ago, the biggest gain for any sector.

“The continued progress for the leisure and hospitality sector is excellent news. Continued payroll gains for these industries hit so hard by the pandemic is a sign that more workers can quickly return to work,” Nick Bunker, economic research director for jobs site Indeed, wrote in a statement. He added that 23% of gains added overall last month were from food services and drinking places.

Despite the fifth consecutive month of gains in the industry, leisure and hospitality is still 2.2 million jobs, or 12.9%, below pre-pandemic employment. However, Bunker told Insider that given the progress made in the industry, it looks like the pace of recovery is pretty quick.

Following the April jobs report that fell significantly below expectations, Insider reported that one of the possible reasons workers weren’t rushing back to work, despite a high number of job openings, was that they were holding out for higher wages.

Around the same time, major companies including Costco and Target have raised their minimum wages to at least $15 an hour, putting pressure on other employers to follow suit.

But, as Heidi Shierholz, a former Obama administration economist and now director of Policy at the Economic Policy Institute, pointed out on Twitter, wages for workers in leisure and hospitality “plummeted” last year during the recession, so even with the strong wage growth in those sectors this year, wages are not that much higher than if the pandemic had never happened.

“Over the last three months, leisure & hospitality has added 977,000 jobs-well over half of the 1.7 million total jobs added over that period,” Shierholz wrote. She added that these numbers “are just not signaling a big labor shortage.”

In an attempt to remedy the labor shortage, GOP-led states have been ending unemployment benefits early under the argument the benefits are disincentivizing the return to work. But June’s jobs data were collected before some of the cuts went into effect, meaning benefits might not have been the problem, rather, low wages were.

Betsey Stevenson, another former economist for the Obama administration, wrote on Twitter that the solution to finding workers is simply offering a higher wage.

“So it turns out that you can find workers, you just have to pay a better wage than in the past because wages of low-wage workers are going up.”

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June jobs report trounces expectations with 850,000 payroll gains as labor-market recovery picks up

Job interview california
Ray Liberge, 48, of Lawndale, talking to Jacky Estrada, the human-resources manager for the Zislis Group, after getting hired as a line cook at Rock’N Fish in Manhattan Beach, during a job fair at The Brews Hall in Torrance.

  • The US added 850,000 payrolls in June, beating the median estimate of a 720,000-payroll gain.
  • The unemployment rate rose to 5.9% from 5.8%. The median estimate was for a drop to 5.6%.
  • The payrolls increase is the largest since August and marks a sixth straight month of additions.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Hiring accelerated again in June as Americans returned to the workforce and reopening further juiced demand.

The US economy added 850,000 nonfarm payrolls last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics announced Friday. The median estimate from economists surveyed by Bloomberg was for an increase of 720,000 jobs. The data suggests the labor shortage waned as businesses raised pay to attract workers.

The June print marks the strongest month of job growth since August and the sixth consecutive month of payroll additions. May payroll additions were revised to 583,000 from 559,000.

The unemployment rate rose to 5.9% from 5.8%. Economists expected the headline rate to hit 5.6%.

The labor-force participation rate was unchanged at 61.6%. The metric has become the go-to gauge for tracking the nationwide labor shortage. Hiring unexpectedly slowed through the spring as virus fears, childcare costs, and enhanced unemployment insurance kept Americans from seeking work. Firms have since raised wages to pull in job applications.

Average hourly earnings rose again, by 10 cents, to $30.40. The gain signals firms still lifted wages into the summer to speed up their hiring efforts.

“This pace of progress is solid and it looks like things can get even better,” Nick Bunker, an economic research director at the hiring website Indeed, said. “There’s still quite a bit of damage left to repair, but today’s report suggests that we may rebuild sooner rather than later.”

Snapshot of recovery

The monthly BLS report is among the most detailed snapshots of the labor market’s performance and gives new insights as to how the broader economy is recovering.

Even after the month’s stronger hiring, about 9.5 million Americans remain unemployed. Total payrolls are still about 6.8 million shy of their pre-pandemic peak.

The U-6 unemployment rate – which counts Americans working part time for economic reasons and those marginally attached to the workforce – rose to 10.1% on an unadjusted basis from 9.7%.

Gains were largest in the leisure-and-hospitality and accommodation sectors, where businesses added 343,000 and 75,000 payrolls, respectively. In leisure and hospitality, restaurants and bars counted for more than half of the gain.

The construction industry lost the most jobs, with a decline of 7,000 payrolls.

Roughly 6.2 million Americans named the pandemic as the primary reason their employer ended operations, down from 7.9 million. About 1.6 million cited the pandemic as the main reason they didn’t seek work, down from 2.5 million in May.

The share of Americans telecommuting fell to 14.4% through the month. That compares with the May share of 16.6%.

Experts see encouraging growth through the 2nd half

June stands to represent a turning point for the labor market’s recovery. The month saw the first few states end the federal boost to unemployment insurance ahead of its September expiration. Twenty-six states – all but one governed by Republicans – have announced plans to prematurely cancel the benefit, saying the move should encourage Americans to return to the workforce.

While the set of cancellations aren’t reflected in the June jobs report, jobless claims data out Thursday suggests the plan is working. Filings for unemployment benefits fell to 364,000 last week, beating economist estimates and marking a new pandemic-era low. Continuing claims still rose, suggesting Americans on unemployment insurance weren’t yet rushing to find jobs.

Survey data backs that up. Just 10% of surveyed job seekers urgently sought work in late May and early June, Indeed said. The most cited reasons for the slow return to work were virus fears, employed spouses, and financial cushions.

Those factors keeping Americans from taking jobs should fade as schools reopen and vaccination continues, Federal Reserve Chair Jerome Powell said. Americans can look forward to “strong job creation building up over the summer and going into the fall,” he told reporters during a June 16 press conference.

He added that while hiring stumbled in April, some of the slowdown was most likely caused by a skills mismatch between workers and open jobs. There “may be something of a speed limit” on the recovery as people look for work in new areas, Powell said.

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25 high-paying jobs of the future that don’t require a college degree

First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material Moving Workers
First-line supervisor of transportation and material moving workers is one career that doesn’t require a college degree and has a bright future ahead.

  • Not all high-paying jobs that are likely to see big employment growth by 2029 need a college degree.
  • We looked at these growing jobs that don’t require a college degree using wage data and employment projections.
  • Here are 25 high-paying jobs that don’t require a college degree and that have bright futures ahead.
  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.
25. Production, planning, and expediting clerks

two workers talking and taking inventory in a warehouse

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 14,800

Median annual earnings in 2020: $49,640

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

24. Machinists

machinists

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 16,300

Median annual earnings in 2020: $45,840

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

23. Heating, air conditioning, and refrigeration mechanics and installers

Air condition technician service checking air conditioner on the wall building

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 15,100

Median annual earnings in 2020: $50,590

Typical educational requirements: Postsecondary nondegree award

22. First-line supervisors of housekeeping and janitorial workers

hotel housekeeping cart

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 19,400

Median annual earnings in 2020: $42,040

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

21. Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives (except technical and scientific products)

worker in distribution warehouse

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 13,200

Median annual earnings in 2020: $62,070

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

20. Operating engineers and other construction equipment operators

construction site

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 16,900

Median annual earnings in 2020: $49,770

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

19. First-line supervisors of mechanics, installers, and repairers

mechanics reading manual

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 13,300

Median annual earnings in 2020: $70,240

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

18. Bus drivers

bus driver

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 20,800

Median annual earnings in 2020: $45,900

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

17. First-line supervisors of landscaping, lawn service, and groundskeeping workers

landscaping

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 19,400

Median annual earnings in 2020: $51,010

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

16. Firefighters

firefighter

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 20,300

Median annual earnings in 2020: $52,500

Typical educational requirements: Postsecondary nondegree award

15. Plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters

plumber

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 20,900

Median annual earnings in 2020: $56,330

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

14. Flight attendants

flight attendant

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 21,100

Median annual earnings in 2020: $59,050

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

13. All other medical dosimetrists, medical records specialists, and health technologists and technicians

medical dosimetrists

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 29,000

Median annual earnings in 2020: $44,090

Typical educational requirements: Postsecondary nondegree award

12. First-line supervisors of transportation and material-moving workers (except aircraft cargo handling supervisors)

First-Line Supervisors of Transportation and Material Moving Workers
First-line supervisor of transportation and material moving workers is one career that doesn’t require a college degree and has a bright future ahead.

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 23,500

Median annual earnings in 2020: $54,870

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

11. Insurance sales agents

sales agent

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 27,500

Median annual earnings in 2020: $52,180

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

10. Heavy and tractor-trailer truck drivers

truck driver

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 30,600

Median annual earnings in 2020: $47,130

Typical educational requirements: Postsecondary nondegree award

9. First-line supervisors of personal service and entertainment and recreation workers

workers talking to each other in a hair salon and a woman sitting in a salon chair

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 35,000

Median annual earnings in 2020: $42,000

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

8. Massage therapists

massage

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 34,400

Median annual earnings in 2020: $43,620

Typical educational requirements: Postsecondary nondegree award

7. First-line supervisors of construction trades and extraction workers

construction managers

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 33,000

Median annual earnings in 2020: $67,840

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

6. Police and sheriff’s patrol officers

police

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 39,100

Median annual earnings in 2020: $65,540

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

5. Computer user support specialists

computer user support

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 54,800

Median annual earnings in 2020: $52,690

Typical educational requirements: Some college, no degree

4. Licensed practical and licensed vocational nurses

nurse taking blood pressure

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 65,700

Median annual earnings in 2020: $48,820

Typical educational requirements: Postsecondary nondegree award

3. Industrial machinery mechanics

fixing production line industrial machine

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 62,300

Median annual earnings in 2020: $55,490

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

2. Electricians

electrician

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 62,200

Median annual earnings in 2020: $56,900

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

1. Sales representatives of services (except advertising, insurance, financial services, and travel)

Sales rep

Projected new positions between 2019 and 2029: 64,200

Median annual earnings in 2020: $58,770

Typical educational requirements: High school diploma or equivalent

Method and data source

To find out which high-paying jobs are likely to grow over the next several years, we used the latest employment projections and median annual wages from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Using 2019-2029 employment projections and May 2020 annual wages, we calculated the geometric mean for each occupation to allow for an overall ranking of occupations.

Since we want to focus on high-paying jobs, we looked at only those that make above the median wage among all occupations of $41,950. To look at occupations that don’t require a college degree, we then found the highest-ranking jobs on our overall list where the typical required education is a high school diploma or its equivalent, postsecondary degree award, some college but with no degree, or has no formal education requirement. 

Some of the following jobs are expected to grow above the average among all occupations from 2019 to 2029, at 3.7%. One of those especially quickly growing occupations is industrial machinery mechanics, which is expected to see employment growth of 62,300 new jobs between 2019 and 2029, or a 15.6% expansion. 

It is important to note that the estimates developed by BLS use historical data and do not take into account the effects of the pandemic on employment, per a BLS press release regarding the recent employment projections.

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Restaurants and hotels continued their streak of adding the most jobs out of any industry in May

A waiter pours champagne for customers in New York City.
A waiter without a mask pours champagne for customers during the “Eggs and Leggs Drag Brunch” at Da Capo on the Upper West Side on May 22, 2021 in New York City.

  • The US added 559,000 jobs in May, a bounce back from the disappointing 278,000 added in April.
  • As in April, leisure and hospitality had the largest number of jobs added among industry sectors.
  • On the other end, construction employment dropped by 20,000.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

More US jobs were added in May than in April, and most of the gains once again fell in the leisure and hospitality industry.

The US added 559,000 nonfarm payroll jobs in May, according to the latest jobs report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, below economists’ median estimate of 674,000, per Insider’s Ben Winck.

Leisure and hospitality saw another strong month of job gains. The Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that most of these gains were from food services and drinking places. That includes places like restaurants and bars.

Most industries saw some increase in their employment over the month, but some industries saw larger gains than others. The following chart shows where the job gains, and losses, were from April 2021 to May 2021:

Employment in leisure and hospitality increased by 292,000 in May after increasing by 328,000 in April, totaling four consecutive months of six-figure job gains.

“The leisure and hospitality sector added another healthy amount of jobs, but it was roughly the same number as were added the month before,” Nick Bunker, economic research director at Indeed, wrote in a statement. “Any future pickup in job growth for the overall labor market is dependent on this industry seeing more of a bounceback.”

Elise Gould, senior economist at the Economic Policy Institute, wrote on Twitter that the industry is still below pre-pandemic employment by about 2.5 million. She added she’s “optimistic that we will continue to see solid growth in coming months as vaccine distribution continues and businesses find it safe to reopen.”

The second-largest gain was in the education and health services sector at 87,000, which was higher than the 25,000 job gains this industry had in April. Most of the government jobs added in May were from local and state education jobs. State government education added 50,000 jobs and local government education added 53,000 jobs.

“Growth in ambulatory health care services accounted for essentially all of the employment change in health care,” BLS wrote in an analysis.

Four sectors saw job losses in May, including retail trade which lost 5,800 jobs and construction which lost 20,000 jobs in a single month. At almost 15.2 million jobs, retail trade is still 2.6% below pre-pandemic employment, while at about 7.4 million jobs, construction is still 2.9% below February 2020 employment. Additionally, employment in mining and logging did not change from April.

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Friday’s jobs report will show hiring rebounded last month after a shockingly grim April, economists say

Fair Wage Demonstration Hiring Washington DC
  • Friday’s jobs report will show whether hiring rebounded in May or slowed further from April’s weaker-than-expected pace.
  • Economists are forecasting a gain of 674,000 payrolls and for the unemployment rate to hit a new pandemic low.
  • Whether the report misses or exceeds expectations could shift Fed policy, Bank of America said.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ monthly jobs report is among the most closely watched gauges of economic health, but Friday’s release is even more anticipated than usual.

It’s the first reading since April data showed a sharp slowdown in hiring and stupefied economists across the board. The Friday report will reveal whether the deceleration was a one-month fluke – or the start of a stagnating recovery.

Economists are largely optimistic. The median estimate for May payroll growth sees the US adding 674,000 jobs throughout the month. That would mark a sharp rebound from April’s 266,000-payroll bounce. Economists also expect the unemployment rate to dip to 5.9% from 6.1%. That level would represent a new-pandemic-era low.

Data published Thursday suggests the forecasts could ring true. ADP’s monthly employment report showed the US adding 978,000 private payrolls in May, blowing the 674,000-payroll estimate out of the water. The reading marked the strongest month of private-payroll growth since June 2020 and a fifth straight month of job additions.

Separately, weekly filings for unemployment benefits fell to a fifth consecutive pandemic-era low last week as layoffs slowed further. Jobless claims totaled an unadjusted 385,000 for the week that ended Saturday, narrowly beating the median estimate for 388,000 claims. Claims have steadily trended lower throughout May, signaling the labor market’s recovery picked up after April’s less-than-stellar data.

To be sure, weekly claims counts and ADP’s report are also volatile and only loosely tied to the government’s nonfarm payrolls data. As seen just one month ago, strong prints from both indicators can still precede an upsetting jobs report.

“It is hard to know what to make of the signal from the ADP report because it has not reliably predicted the BLS data in recent months,” Daniel Silver, an economist at JPMorgan, said in a Thursday note. “Declines in initial claims likely reflect improving conditions in the labor market, although other factors could also be at play.”

Hiring should improve, but don’t get too excited

Experts are finding reasons to temper their expectations for other labor-market signals. Data from the Ultimate Kronos Group and Homebase both show modest increases in hours worked in May, Bank of America economists said last week. The former’s shift-work measure rose by just 0.1% between the May and April payroll weeks, compared to the 0.3% decline from the prior period. The reading “could mean a slightly better jobs report but does not suggest a gangbusters print,” the team led by Michelle Meyer said.

The Homebase employee working index rose just 1.7% between the May and April survey weeks. That similarly hints at a “soft reading,” the bank added.

Other metrics, such as the Conference Board’s labor-market differential index and national purchasing managers’ indices, suggest hiring improved in May. Still, the BofA economists cautioned against “reading too much” into such information for the “magnitude of hiring,” and instead see them as pointing to a general improvement in hiring.

“All told, we see scope for decent gains in employment in May following a disappointing report in April,” the team said.

Taper time? Or delay further?

There’s a fair deal riding on the Friday report, the bank added. The Federal Reserve has indicated it won’t pull back on its ultra-accommodative monetary policy until it sees “substantial further progress” toward maximum employment and above-2% inflation.

The latter condition is already being met, with price growth trending above average as the US reopens. The Friday jobs report, then, is a “critical data point” for the Fed’s next steps toward policy normalization, the BofA economists said.

On one hand, a stronger-than-expected report could push the central bank further toward tapering its emergency asset purchases. The Fed has been buying at least $120 billion of Treasurys and mortgage-backed securities each month to support market functioning. Officials have been adamant they don’t expect to shrink the purchases in the near-term, yet minutes from the Federal Open Market Committee’s April meeting suggested they may soon discuss a plan for eventual tapering.

A strong rebound in employment “could give the Fed more confidence in the recovery and the ability to start guiding markets toward a taper,” BofA said.

Conversely, another disappointing report could push tapering further into the future, the economists said. The central bank has made clear that it’s willing to maintain its easy monetary policy for as long as needed to support the economic recovery. Any sign of the labor market recovery stagnating would likely entice the Fed to keep rates near zero for as long as needed to promote hiring.

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Here’s how much everyone who works at an American hotel makes

maid housekeeper making bed hotel
A hotel housekeeper makes a bed.

  • After a difficult year for hotels and travel, the leisure and hospitality industry is recovering.
  • The industry gained 331,000 jobs in April, marking three straight months of job gains.
  • Salaries for hotel jobs vary; the following is a look at how much select hotel positions make.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.
37. Non-restaurant food servers earn a median of $25,020 a year, and there are 19,320 employed in the hotel industry.

room service students
Food servers.

36. Laundry and dry-cleaning workers earn a median of $25,100 a year, and 28,960 are employed in the hotel industry.

woman doing laundry
Dry cleaning.

35. Maids and housekeeping cleaners earn a median of $25,320 a year, and there are 355,930 employed in the hotel industry.

hotel maid
Housekeeper.

34. Desk clerks earn a median of $25,370 a year, and 201,620 are employed in the hotel industry.

hotel front desk
Desk clerk.

33. Dining room and cafeteria attendants, as well as bartender helpers, earn a median of $25,530, and 42,740 are employed in the hotel industry.

hotel dining room
Dining room workers.

32. Passenger vehicle drivers earn a median of $25,760 a year and 6,610 are employed in the hotel industry.

chauffeur
Chauffeur.

31. Fast food and counter workers earn a median of $25,870, and there are 16,290 employed in the hotel industry.

granary cafe the silo
Restaurant.

30. Waiters and waitresses earn a median of $26,550 a year, and 108,350 are employed in the hotel industry.

waitress server restaurant food service diner waiting tables .JPG
Servers.

29. Restaurant hosts and hostesses earn a median of $26,710 a year, and 13,670 are employed in the hotel industry.

restaurant hostess
Hostess.

28. Bartenders earn a median of $26,890 a year, and 31,820 are employed in the hotel industry.

hotel bartender
Bartender.

27. Baggage porters and bellhops earn a median of $27,060 a year, and 15,950 are employed in the hotel industry.

Bellhop
Bellhop.

26. Dishwashers earn a median of $27,080 a year, and 21,910 are employed in the hotel industry.

gramercy tavern dishes
Dishwasher.

25. Food preparation workers earn a median of $28,220 a year, and 9,750 are employed in the hotel industry.

food prep
Food prep.

24. Janitors and cleaners (except maids) earn a median of $29,320 a year, and 34,390 are employed in the hotel industry.

janitor
Cleaner.

23. Landscaping and groundskeeping workers earn a median of $29,580 a year, and 8,340 are employed in the hotel industry.

mowing the lawn
Groundskeeping.

22. Security guards earn a median of $31,600 a year, and 22,010 are employed in the hotel industry.

security guard
Security.

21. Restaurant cooks earn a median of $31,720 a year, and 59,580 are employed in the hotel industry.

restaurant kitchen chef cook food
Chef.

20. Concierges earn a median of $31,960 a year, and 8,510 are employed in the hotel industry.

concierge hotel
Concierge.

19. Office clerks earn a median of $32,550 a year, and 6,020 are employed in the hotel industry.

office worker laptop plant
Office worker.

18. Maintenance and repair workers earn a median of $33,870 a year, and 70,190 are employed in the hotel industry.

AC unit repair
Doing maintenance.

17. Bookkeeping, accounting, and auditing clerks earn a median of $35,530 a year, and 15,730 are employed in the hotel industry.

accounting
Accounting.

16. First-line supervisors of housekeeping and janitorial workers earn a median of $37,390 a year, and 27,750 are employed in the hotel industry.

hotel maid
Housekeeping.

15. Secretaries and administrative assistants earn a median salary of $39,040, and 6,120 are employed in the hotel industry.

coworker administrative assistant
Administrative assistant.

14. First-line supervisors of food preparation and serving workers earn a median of $40,850 a year, and 21,720 are employed in the hotel industry.

chef and cooks
Food preparation.

13. First-line supervisors of office and administrative support workers earn a median of $44,190 a year, and 28,150 are employed in the hotel industry.

business colleagues are looking at a computer together
Office supervisor.

12. Meeting, convention, and event planners earn a median of $48,350 a year, and 6,320 are employed in the hotel industry.

An intelligent vision robot plays Scrabble at the Industrial Technology Research Institute booth during CES 2018 at the Las Vegas Convention Center on January 10, 2018
A convention.

11. Sales representatives of services earn a median of $53,070, and 17,260 are employed in the hotel industry.

Salesperson
Meeting.

10. Lodging managers earn a median of $55,730 a year, and 27,040 are employed in the hotel industry.

hotel concierge
Hotel worker.

9. Human resources specialists earn a median of $56,760 a year, and 3,440 are employed in the hotel industry.

human resources
HR specialist.

8. Chefs and head cooks earn a median of $60,020 a year, and 10,870 are employed in the hotel industry.

chefs
Chef.

7. First-line supervisors of mechanics, installers, and repairers earn a median of $61,130 a year, and 6,270 are employed in the hotel industry.

elevator repair
Elevator repair.

6. Accountants and auditors earn a median of $62,120 a year, and 6,800 are employed in the hotel industry.

work meeting accountant
Office meeting.

5. Food service managers earn a median of $67,170 a year, and 6,020 are employed in the hotel industry.

chef disney
Food service manager.

4. General and operations managers earn a median of $79,330 a year, and 12,870 are employed in the hotel industry.

Emmanuel Moine, the manager of Glen Mhor Hotel, poses for a photograph in Inverness, Scotland, Britain March 8, 2019. Picture taken March 8, 2019. REUTERS/Russell Cheyne
Manager.

3. Administrative services and facilities managers earn a median of $86,880 a year, and 2,960 are employed in the hotel industry.

training manager office
Presentation.

2. Sales managers earn a median of $94,000 a year, and 4,620 are employed in the hotel industry.

business analyst presentation
Sales.

1. Financial managers earn a median of $112,520 a year, and 3,030 are employed in the hotel industry.

business meeting
Meeting.

Method and data source

Although the leisure and hospitality industry is slowly recovering as the US continues to reopen and more people start to travel again, employment projections show the hotel industry could still end 2021 with fewer jobs than before the pandemic.

According to the American Hotel & Lodging Association, hotels are projected to see a loss of 478,245 jobs in 2021 relative to 2019 employment. The American Hotel & Lodging Association notes that the projections are based on just hotel property jobs, and don’t include losses in related businesses.

Hotels employ a wide variety of workers, and salaries range from well below the US median wage to very high paying.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics’ Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics program offers data on employment and wages across different occupations and industries, including the traveler accommodation industry.

Hotel jobs tend to be lower paying than average. The median annual wage for an employee in the traveler accommodation industry was just $28,320, below the overall median wage of $41,950, in 2020 (the most recent data). Housekeepers, for example, earned just $25,320 per year in 2020.

The above slides are employment and wages for 37 select occupations in the hotel industry, ranked from lowest to highest wage. Both the number of people in that job and median annual pay are May 2020 figures from the Occupational Employment and Wage Statistics program.

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