Donald Trump Jr. tried to entice people to tune in to his dad’s boxing event by teasing Area 51 intel

GettyImages donald trump jr
Donald Trump Jr speaks during a rain shower to an audience wearing ponchos at a Fighters Against Socialism campaign rally in support of his father, President Donald Trump.

  • Donald Trump Jr. said he planned to press his father on Area 51 intel at a boxing event on Saturday.
  • The former president and his son were scheduled to provide commentary on the boxing match.
  • “I’m definitely asking about aliens,” Trump Jr. said in a Twitter video promoting the event.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

In a bizarre tease, Donald Trump Jr. told his Twitter followers he might unveil information pertaining to Area 51 during a Saturday night boxing match for which he and his father were scheduled to provide commentary.

He and the former president promoted a boxing match between Evander Holyfield and Vitor Belfort, where they called a live gamecast of the events from the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Florida.

Trump Jr. in a tweet said he’d press his father on Area 51 at the event.

“We’re gonna have a few hours, we’re gonna ask a lot of awesome questions,” he said in the video. “I’m definitely asking about aliens because I think now maybe we get a solid answer on what is going on at Area 51 and everywhere else.”

“You’re gonna want to listen. You’re gonna want to tune in,” he added.

The former president faced criticism for agreeing to serve as a commentator for a boxing match on the anniversary of 9/11. His niece Mary blasted the move, calling it “disgraceful.”

“If another former president decided to spend 9/11 commenting on a boxing match on pay-per-view, people would … their heads would explode,” she told CNN’s Anderson Cooper on Thursday night.

“If there is no blowback on the right for this,” she continued, “then that tells us everything we need to know about the current state of the Republican Party, and it tells us that the Democrats really need to start wrapping their heads around the fact that this is not a party that can be worked with, this is not a party that should be conceded to.”

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Holyfield faces Belfort in a PPV boxing match this Saturday with live commentary from former President Trump – here’s how to watch

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Holyfield vs. Belfort ppv fight promotional image
  • Evander Holyfield will box Vitor Belfort in a pay-per-view (PPV) match on September 11.
  • Former President Donald Trump will provide optional commentary for the fight.
  • The event costs $50 and is streaming exclusively through Fite.TV starting at 7 p.m. ET.

Evander Holyfield vs. Vitor Belfort PPV Live Stream (small)Evander Holyfield vs. Vitor Belfort PPV Live Stream with Donald Trump Commentary (small)

Former undisputed world heavyweight champion Evander Holyfield will fight former UFC light heavyweight champion Vitor Belfort in an eight-round boxing match on September 11. The match will be held at the Hard Rock Casino in Hollywood, Florida.

Holyfield vs. Belfort is a $50 pay-per-view (PPV) event with optional commentary from former President Donald Trump. Coverage starts at 7 p.m. ET with a fight card that also includes UFC veterans Anderson Silva and Tito Ortiz.

Holyfield is a late replacement for boxer Oscar De La Hoya, who was hospitalized with a breakthrough case of COVID-19 in early September. The 58-year-old Holyfield’s last professional fight was in 2011, and according to ESPN, the California State Athletic Commission wouldn’t sanction his fight against Belfort, leading promoters to move the event to Florida. Belfort is 44-years-old and last fought in UFC in 2018; his only professional boxing match came in 2006.

Along with the fight card, the Fite.TV PPV includes a post-event concert performed by rapper 6ix9ine. There will also be performances in between fights by Brazilian popstar Anitta, Cuban group Gente de Zona, and Latino star Lunay.

How to watch Holyfield vs. Belfort

Evander Holyfield vs. Vitor Belfort will be available to watch as a $50 PPV event streamed by Fite.TV. Buyers can purchase the fight with or without guest commentary from former President Donald Trump.

Evander Holyfield vs. Vitor Belfort PPV Live Stream (small)Evander Holyfield vs. Vitor Belfort PPV Live Stream with Donald Trump Commentary (small)

Holyfield vs. Belfort is a one-time purchase, so you don’t need a subscription to watch the event with the Fite.TV app or via the official Fite.TV website. The Fite.TV app is available on Android and Apple mobile devices, and streaming players like Apple TV, Roku, and Xbox. You can also stream through a web browser on a computer or laptop.

Holyfield vs. Belfort fight card

David Haye versus Joe Fournier

Andy Vences versus Jono Carroll

Anderson Silva versus Tito Ortiz

Evander Holyfield versus Vitor Belfort

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Donald Trump and his son set to do boxing commentary for the Evander Holyfield vs Vitor Belfort fight on Saturday

Donald Trump alternate live boxing telecast
A poster for the alternate live commentary as seen on Fite.TV’s website.

  • Donald Trump has signed a contract to commentate a boxing match live on Saturday, alongside his son Donald Trump Jr.
  • The fight, organized by Triller Fight Club, involves Evander Holyfield and Vitor Belfort squaring off in the ring.
  • The Trumps is set to also provide commentary for three other fights as part of the boxing event.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Former US President Donald Trump has signed a contract to announce a boxing match between Evander Holyfield and Vitor Belfort on Saturday, reported ESPN.

He and his son, Donald Trump Jr., will call a live “gamecast” of a total of four fights from the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Hollywood, Florida, match organizer Triller Fight Club told ESPN.

“I love great fighters and great fights,” said President Trump in a statement from Triller, reported several outlets.

“I look forward to seeing both this Saturday night and sharing my thoughts ringside. You won’t want to miss this special event.”

The Trumps’ alternate commentary has been listed on pay-per-view site FITE.tv, which was acquired by social media app Triller’s parent company earlier this year.

This isn’t Donald Trump Sr.’s first foray into the boxing world. He’s hosted matches involving legends like Mike Tyson before at his casinos in Atlantic City, New Jersey, back in the 70s and 80s.

Saturday’s event pits former heavyweight boxing champion Holyfield, 58, against former UFC lightweight champion Belfort, 44. Holyfield is filling in as a short-notice replacement for Oscar De La Hoya, who contracted COVID-19 and had to drop the fight.

Other fights from the event include matches between Anderson Silva and Tito Ortiz and David Haye and Joe Fournier.

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Watch YouTuber Jake Paul return to the boxing ring to fight former UFC champ Tyron Woodley in a PPV match on August 29

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

Jake Paul and Tyron Woodley Press conference
Jake Paul and Tyron Woodley face off during a press conference before their cruiserweight fight on August 29.

  • YouTuber Jake Paul will box former UFC champion Tyron Woodley on August 29 in Cleveland, Ohio.
  • Paul vs. Woodley is a $60 pay-per-view (PPV) event broadcasting at 8 p.m. ET on Fite.TV and Showtime.
  • The PPV will also include three undercard matches and a co-main event fight.

Table of Contents: Masthead Stickyvs. Tyron Woodley (small)

YouTube star turned boxer Jake Paul will face former UFC welterweight champion Tyron Woodley in a pay-per-view (PPV) boxing match on August 29. The $60 PPV event starts at 8 p.m. ET and will be streamed live via Showtime and Fite.TV.

Paul has won all three of his boxing matches by knockout so far, though two of those matches were against non-fighters, like former NBA player Nate Robinson. In his last fight, Paul knocked out mixed martial artist Ben Askren in less than two minutes. Askren is also known for being on the receiving end of the fastest knockout in UFC history.

Woodley held UFC’s welterweight championship belt from July 2016 to March 2019 but lost his last four fights. Now 39-years-old, Woodley is no longer under contract with UFC. Woodley’s manager, Malki Kawa, said he’ll likely earn “a multi-million dollar payday” for fighting Paul. When he was UFC champ, Woodley earned $500,000 for defending the belt.

Paul’s older brother, Logan Paul, fought undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather in an exhibition back in June, but Jake’s fight against Woodley will be an officially sanctioned cruiserweight match with a 190lb weight limit. Woodley is shorter than Paul and typically fought at 170lbs in UFC, so Paul will enter the fight with a size advantage.

Legendary boxing trainer and analyst Teddy Atlas said he expects Paul to knock out Woodley thanks to his prior experience in the boxing ring, Woodley’s style as a mixed martial artist, and the age and physical disparities between the two fighters.

How to watch Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley

Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley will be available to watch as a $60 pay-per-view event streamed by Fite.TV and Showtime. You don’t need a subscription to Showtime or Fite.TV to purchase the pay-per-view. You can also buy the fight through most cable and satellite providers, including Xfinity, Verizon Fios TV, and more.

vs. Tyron Woodley (button)

The Showtime and Fite.TV apps are both available on Android and Apple mobile devices, and streaming players like Apple TV, Roku, and Xbox. You can also stream through a web browser on a computer or laptop.

Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley date and time

The Paul vs. Woodley pay-per-view event will start at 8 p.m. ET on August 29 and is scheduled to include six fights in total.

The broadcast team will reportedly include Showtime host Brian Custer, Logan Paul, and Bellator featherweight champion A.J. McKee. Other media content will be provided by Barstool Sports.

Fite.TV will also stream a free pre-show before the fight at 7 p.m. ET on August 29.

Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley fight card

  • Charles Conwell versus Juan Carlos Rubio
  • Tommy Fury versus Anthony Taylor
  • Ivan Baranchyk versus Montana Love
  • Daniel Dubois versus Joe Cusumano
  • Amanda Serrano versus Yamileth Mercado
  • Jake Paul versus Tyron Woodley

vs. Tyron Woodley (small)

Read the original article on Business Insider

Watch YouTuber Jake Paul return to the boxing ring to fight former UFC champ Tyron Woodley in a PPV match this Sunday

When you buy through our links, Insider may earn an affiliate commission. Learn more.

Jake Paul and Tyron Woodley Press conference
Jake Paul and Tyron Woodley face off during a press conference before their cruiserweight fight on August 29.

  • YouTuber Jake Paul will box former UFC champion Tyron Woodley on August 29 in Cleveland, Ohio.
  • Paul vs. Woodley is a $60 pay-per-view (PPV) event broadcasting at 8 p.m. ET on Fite.TV and Showtime.
  • The PPV will also include three undercard matches and a co-main event fight.

Table of Contents: Masthead Stickyvs. Tyron Woodley (small)

YouTube star turned boxer Jake Paul will face former UFC welterweight champion Tyron Woodley in a pay-per-view (PPV) boxing match on August 29. The $60 PPV event starts at 8 p.m. ET and will be streamed live via Showtime and Fite.TV.

Paul has won all three of his boxing matches by knockout so far, though two of those matches were against non-fighters, like former NBA player Nate Robinson. In his last fight, Paul knocked out mixed martial artist Ben Askren in less than two minutes, but Askren was also on the receiving end of the fastest knockout in UFC history.

Woodley held UFC’s welterweight championship belt from July 2016 to March 2019 but lost his last four fights. Now 39-years-old, Woodley is no longer under contract with UFC but his manager, Malki Kawa, said he’ll likely earn “a multi-million dollar payday” for fighting Paul. When he was UFC champ, Woodley earned $500,000 for defending the belt.

Paul’s older brother, Logan Paul, fought undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather in an exhibition back in June, but Jake’s fight against Woodley will be an officially sanctioned cruiserweight match with a 190lb weight limit. Woodley is shorter than Paul and typically fought at 170lbs in UFC, so Paul will enter the fight with a size advantage.

Legendary boxing trainer and analyst Teddy Atlas said he expects Paul to knock out Woodley thanks to his prior experience in the boxing ring, Woodley’s style as a mixed martial artist, and the age and physical disparities between the two fighters.

How to watch Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley

Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley will be available as a $60 pay-per-view event streamed by Fite.TV and Showtime. You don’t need a subscription to Showtime to purchase the pay-per-view. You can also buy the fight through most pay-TV cable and satellite providers, including Xfinity, Verizon Fios TV, and more.

vs. Tyron Woodley (button)

The Showtime and Fite.TV apps are both available on computers, Android and Apple phones and tablets, and streaming devices like Amazon Fire TV, Roku, and Xbox.

Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley date and time

The Paul vs. Woodley pay-per-view event will start at 8 p.m. ET on August 29 and is scheduled to include six fights in total.

The broadcast team will reportedly include Showtime host Brian Custer, Logan Paul, and Bellator featherweight champion A.J. McKee. Other media content will be provided by Barstool Sports.

Fite.TV will also stream several free events leading up to the pay-per-view, including the weigh-in on August 28 at 5 p.m. ET and a pre-show before the fight at 7 p.m. ET on August 29.

Jake Paul vs. Tyron Woodley fight card

  • Charles Conwell versus Juan Carlos Rubio
  • Tommy Fury versus Anthony Taylor
  • Ivan Baranchyk versus Montana Love
  • Daniel Dubois versus Joe Cusumano
  • Amanda Serrano versus Yamileth Mercado
  • Jake Paul versus Tyron Woodley

vs. Tyron Woodley (small)

Read the original article on Business Insider

Austin McBroom’s lawyer said there’s no way they’ll see profits from the influencer boxing match that some fighters said left them unpaid

Bryce Hall and Austin McBroom fight during LiveXLive’s "Social Gloves: Battle Of The Platforms"
Influencers Bryce Hall and Austin McBroom fight at Miami’s Hard Rock Stadium during LiveXLive’s “Social Gloves: Battle Of The Platforms” on June 12, 2021.

  • An influencer boxing event took place on June 12 and some of the contestants say they were not paid.
  • Two production companies are each placing the blame on the other.
  • The lead attorneys for Simply Greatness Productions and LiveXLive explain their lawsuits.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

An influencer boxing event took place on June 12, but some of the famous contestants say they have yet to be paid.

Now, an explosive legal battle is afoot between the two companies who produced the pay-per-view competition special – and one lawyer says there’s a chance nobody will see profits from the event at all.

Austin McBroom, who is part of the “ACE Family” YouTube vlog channel he shares with his wife Catherine Paiz McBroom and their three children, was the mastermind behind “Social Gloves: Battle of the Platforms.” He fought as a headliner in the YouTubers vs. TikTokers boxing matches and he also runs Simply Greatness Productions (SGP), which hired another media company, LiveXLive, to help co-produce the show.

SGP and LiveXLive have filed lawsuits against each other after the event failed to live up to financial expectations set by the success of other fights featuring influencers such as Logan Paul vs. Floyd Mayweather on June 6.

Over one month later, some of the fighters say they haven’t been paid the millions they were offered, according to LivexLive’s lawsuit. Brooklyn Nets star James Harden who invested $2 million says he hasn’t made any money either, Page Six reported.

Simply Greatness Productions says they think LiveXLive is not being transparent about how much money they made

DDG walks out to his fight during LiveXLive’s "Social Gloves: Battle Of The Platforms"
DDG heads to the ring after the stadium begins playing his correct entrance song.

SGP is suing LiveXLive, alleging breach of contract and fraud. SGP is accusing LiveXLive of selling endorsements and sponsorship agreements that SGP was not aware of, and spending money that would not be returned.

SGP and McBroom are also placing blame on their former business partner Paul Cazers, whom they say over-exaggerated his experience in the entertainment industry, according to the lawsuit. Cazers did not respond to a request for comment.

Just hours after that suit was filed on July 21, LiveXLive filed its own lawsuit in return against SGP and the McBrooms for $100 million – a figure largely derived from potential damage to their reputation in the industry, according to the suit.

James Sammataro, a partner at Pryor Cashman LLP and the lead attorney for SGP’s suit, said in an interview with Insider that because of LiveXLive’s financial decisions, nobody involved would see a profit.

“Quite frankly, we’ll never see that,” Sammataro said of the 75% of the profits SGP was supposed to receive. “I think we are realistic enough to realize that we’re not at the point that there’s ever going to be any profits for this event.”

That may mean some of the influencers who fought in the event won’t be paid in full: AnEsonGib, VinnieHacker, DDG, FaZe Jarvis, Landon McBroom, Ryan Johnston, Bryce Hall, Tayler Holder, Deji, Nate Wyatt, Michael Le, Ben Azelart, and Cale Saurage. Those influencers did not respond to requests for comment.

But Insider’s Dan Whateley previously reported that one fighter’s manager, who requested anonymity to avoid damaging their relationship with the event organizers, said they had no issues with payment.

Austin Mcboom and Bryce Hall fight in the Battle of the Platforms
The Battle of the Platforms promotional poster.

LiveXLive kept asking for more and more money and went over budget “by millions,” Sammataro alleged, with the promise that the end result would deliver a bigger profit.

But the several billion supposed social-media impressions did not translate to a major sale of pay-per-view subscriptions for the event. Pay-per-view packages started at $49.99 and went up to $89.99 if viewers wanted to purchase extras such as shows or an NFT (a non-fungible token).

In the end, the event only sold 136,000 subscriptions. But Jeffrey Katz, a senior partner at Watkins & Letofsky, LLP, the lead attorney representing LiveXLive, told Insider that LiveXLive warned McBroom and SPG that they would not break 200,000 purchases if they didn’t follow through with the marketing strategy they had outlined.

“LiveXLive said, we are telling you right now, that if you do not improve your marketing strategy, you will not break 200,000,” Katz told Insider. “And they rejected it. Sheer and utter hubris on the part of the McBrooms.”

McBroom has “dug himself an enormous hole” by refusing to implement the marketing strategy put forward by LiveXLive’s experienced team, thinking he could sell tickets based on his social-media following alone, Katz said.

YouTube creator Austin McBroom leans over the ring after a boxing match at the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami on June 12, 2021
YouTube creator Austin McBroom celebrates after his fight during the “Social Gloves” boxing event in Miami on June 12, 2021.

According to Sammataro, it is unclear why more viewers did not end up paying for the event, and that’s one question SGP and McBroom want to be answered by the lawsuit. He said it could be as simple as TikTok users not being accustomed or willing to pay for something, as TikTok is a free app.

“Three and a half billion impressions, all the media buzz that was surrounding this, didn’t convert to pay per view sales,” he said. “Maybe it was priced too high. Maybe the execution wasn’t done right. Maybe it was pirated. Maybe it wasn’t marketed and promoted properly, or maybe there’s something sinister going on.”

But still, SGP said that LiveXLive is not being transparent enough about how much money the event made.

“We know there’s not enough money to cover everyone, but we think there’s more money than has been reported,” Sammataro said. “So the truth is somewhere in the middle.”

LiveXLive will not release the funds until the lawsuits are resolved, Sammataro said. Until then, SGP cannot know how much each fighter will be paid – and the company is trying to avoid bankruptcy, he said.

LiveXLive has filed a defamation lawsuit against the McBrooms and Simply Greatness Productions for $100 million

Catherine McBroom in a boxing ring.

LiveXLive’s return lawsuit against McBroom and SGP seeks $100 million in damages.

Katz told Insider that LiveXLive actually does have the funds to pay talent in full. But he said the challenge in releasing them is that the McBrooms and SGP “sold people a bag of lies.”

“The McBrooms and their entire approach to this event was built upon a stack of lies, lies that even LiveXLive fell victim to,” he said.

The company was approached with a marketing deck by McBroom, which showed he expected the event to make $225 million based on the fighters’ followings on YouTube and TikTok, according to Katz.

SGP approached LiveXLive in crisis because their partnership with streaming platform Live Nation had fallen through and they had no venue for the event, Katz said. This was when LiveXLive stepped in at SGP’s request and procured business deals and secured the Hard Rock Stadium, he said.

Austin and Catherine McBroom at the boxing event.
Catherine Paiz and Austin McBroom.

When the final numbers came in, SGP tried to flip the narrative, according to Katz, and accused LiveXLive of “lying and cheating and diverting sales.”

“That is the basis in part to the complaint that LiveXLive has brought,” he said. “We’re a public company. Our reputation is important. We are followed by the market. We are followed by investors. If we get a reputation of lying to our clients that is death to us.”

LiveXLive’s stock price has dropped from $4.81 to $3.69 since June 12.

Katz could not say how the total profits from the event compared to McBroom’s initial estimate of $225 million, but he called the loss “substantial.”

Insider has seen a letter from a bankruptcy attorney hired by SGP, saying that it has been enlisted to represent SGP in working out the claims of all its creditors or, “if a workout is not feasible, a likely bankruptcy filing.”

Katz said LiveXLive has tried every avenue to avoid going to court, but the company is stuck in a “Gordian knot” until SGP cooperates. He said the time leading up to the impending court cases “will be very telling.”

“It’s come to this legal battle because they’ve put themselves in a position where they’re extremely desperate,” he said.

“So what they’re doing is – and this is not atypical and what I see in my business – they’ve chosen to become victim and to deflect blame.”

Read more stories from Insider’s Digital Culture team.

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Remembering Kid Yamaka, the telegenic star and proudly Jewish boxer

One boxer is seen aiming a swing at another boxer, who is seen blocking his face.
Zachary Wohlman punches Alonso Loeza during a Welterweights fight at Staples Center on November 10, 2012 in Los Angeles, California. Loeza would win the fight.

  • Zachary Wohlman, a boxer known as Kid Yamaka, died in February at 32.
  • Wohlman survived a nightmarish childhood in Los Angeles to become a promising welterweight and telegenic media star.
  • The writer Alex Halperin explores Wohlman’s legacy as a celebrated Jewish athlete, and what Wohlman meant to some of those who knew him best.
  • See more stories on Insider’s business page.

Late in February, mourners gathered at Zuma Beach in Malibu to remember Zachary Wohlman, a boxer who had recently died at 32. In the billion dollar sunshine, they stood around a wreath of white orchids, the flowers Wohlman tended when he wasn’t bloodying his opponents.

Wohlman’s movie star good looks had survived a broken jaw, a textbook pugilist’s nose, and multiple other facial traumas. One eulogist, a longtime sparring partner, boasted about kicking Kid Yamaka’s ass.

Some of the bereaved wore jackets embroidered with Wohlman’s tag line, “All class.” His young widow gave out t-shirts for Kid Yamaka’s “retirement party.” Some grievers wore wetsuits. Others went shirtless. They embraced and stood close, mostly wearing masks.

Wohlman had survived a nightmarish childhood in the Valley to become a promising welterweight and telegenic media star. He had hoped to fight for a world championship.

However realistic the dream, his ongoing struggles with addiction, made it less so. “I’ll just be honest,” he said in the Emmy-nominated docu-series, “Why We Fight.” “I have a problem with opiates.” Yet for a time he was able to overcome his illness to express himself as a fighter and as a man with an enviable capacity for love and empathy. “There’s nothing more therapeutic than being of service to somebody,” Wohlman had said.

As one mourner said: “He often helped me when I should have been helping him.”

“If you make a living getting hit in the face, something went wrong,” Wohlman said in a short film directed by Matt Ogens. But keep listening and unarmed combat sounds less like a job and more like a calling, the purest distillation of the human condition. Boxers say you don’t know someone until you fight them, and maybe they’re right.

Jews have a special reverence for our tribe’s great athletes, perhaps because there are so few of them. Wohlman wasn’t observant, but he cared about his heritage. He got Bar Mitzvahed at 20 and had an attachment to Jewish stars, whether diamond encrusted or massive and tattooed across his belly – “FAITH”.

A magazine cover has an illustration of a soldier in boxing gloves under the title "The Ring"
The March 1943 cover of Ring Magazine with an illustration of boxer Barney Ross.

He was conscious of himself as heir to an endangered tradition of Jewish boxers. In the first half of the 20th century, when big bouts resonated far beyond the ring and Jews had a much more tenuous position in American life, quite a few found glory in the ring. In 1933, Max Baer wore Star of David trunks when he defeated Hitler’s favorite fighter and former heavyweight champion, Max Schmelling, at Yankee Stadium. (Baer’s victory led to an affair with Greta Garbo. Schmelling later defeated Joe Louis and then lost to him in a 1938 title fight dubbed the “battle of the century.”)

One of the most celebrated Jewish fighters was Barney Ross, a tough Chicago kid, the son of a murdered rabbi, who held world championships in three weight classes, including welterweight. Later, Ross enlisted in the Marines and earned a Silver Star for valor fighting Japanese soldiers at Guadalcanal. While recovering from his wounds, Ross became addicted to morphine. There’s a 1957 movie about him called “Monkey on My Back.”

Ogens’ film juxtaposes Wohlman wrapping his hands for the ring with wrapping tefillin. With the phylacteries, a rabbi tells him, “Your arms become instruments not of destruction but of God.” Wohlman shadow boxes across the old city of Jerusalem, a Rocky sequel that never got made.

A more memorable sequence, to my mind a more Jewish one, comes in the first episode of the docu-series “Why We Fight.” Wohlman travels to Tijuana, for an easy fight to juice his won/loss record and with that his prospects for a higher profile bout back home.

Wohlman scores a first round TKO against a tomato can named Roman Mendez. After the fight, he visits Mendez’ barrio to meet the boxer’s family and see the pig Mendez buys with his prize money. Wohlman meets another fighter, a candy hawker by day, and encourages him to train harder, and to be faithful to his wife.

Two men wearing grey suits stand side by side, as one pumps his fist
Zachary Wohlman (left) and Freddie Roach, the legendary Hall of Fame trainer, attend Smash Global II in 2016 in Los Angeles.

A later episode distills the grim economics of bloodsport even more starkly. In Cambodia, Wohlman meets a 10-year old prize-fighter and his trainer/promoter, the self-described “Don King of Cambodia,” who both cares for and profits from pre-pubescent fighters. “I want [the 10-year old] to be wealthy and whatever his version of successful is,” Wohlman said. “But I don’t think what I hope he’ll become and the reality will meet.”

Wohlman didn’t just perform concern on camera. For the last two years of his life, he directed Ring of Hope, a boxing program for at-risk kids in Dallas. He’d hoped to open a branch in L.A., hinting at a life he could have led once his dreams of glory subsided.

Instead the people who loved him gathered on the beach to say goodbye. After the tributes, the singing and the crying, two guys in wetsuits bore the wreath out to sea. As the waves enveloped it, the crowd applauded.

“High-speed miserable chess”

I first heard of Wohlmann a few years ago from my friend Vanessa Adriance, a corporate litigator who became one of his closest friends. A serious amateur jock, Adriance had been cardio boxing for a couple years at an L.A. gym when he showed up.

Wohlman introduced himself as an acolyte of Freddie Roach, a legendary Hall of Fame trainer whose gym, Wild Card Boxing, is on the second floor of a Hollywood strip mall. Wohlman began to teach real boxing, how to throw a punch, how to dodge one, not anything Adriance had to worry about when she was just getting sweaty whaling on a bag.

Adriance found Wohlman “magnetic” and, with her marriage falling apart, she was open to new experiences. She and another woman decided they wanted to box each other. Wohlman wasn’t interested in supervising them, but he offered to spar with Adriance. He wouldn’t knock her out, but he’d punch her and she could punch back.

Adriance started going to every class he taught, pestering him for months until he told her to get a mouth guard at the Sports Authority. He found some dusty headgear lying around the gym and rubbed her face with vaseline – “greased” her – to reduce the damage from his punches.

Two people wearing casual exercise clothing are seen sparring in a boxing ring.
Vanessa Adriance (left) sparring with Zachary Wohlman.

“It doesn’t feel good to get punched of course,” Adriance said of that first day of sparring but the pain didn’t overwhelm her. “What I remember is being disoriented.” It felt like she was underwater and didn’t know which way was up. For some people, Wohlman said, throwing the first punch is harder. Not for my friend. “I don’t know what that says about me,” she said. She thinks she landed a sloppy jab or two.

She also found it intellectually engaging, like “high-speed miserable chess,” litigation in the raw. As she describes it, Wohlman indulged her, like a father driving with a toddler on his lap. But she refused to let go of the wheel. After three rounds she felt overwhelmed by the adrenaline rush, “Something about hard sparring cleanses your brain,” she said “It will rinse you clean or it will break you emotionally, whatever dam is holding it together.”

As she got to know Wohlman, she learned his story. (Wohlman’s widow didn’t respond to interview requests for this story.) His mother, he has said in interviews, changed the locks on him when he was 15 and he went to live with his father. They committed crimes and did meth together, he has said, until a police raid one morning. Wohlmann flushed money and drugs down the toilet and the cops told him his father was going to prison.

When Wohlman got fired from the gym, she followed him to the hallowed and intimidating confines of Wild Card. She felt the pull of the gym’s “weird, fast intimacy.” People whose names she didn’t know would wipe up her blood or reach into her mouth to pull out her guard. It seems she’s spoken about little else since.

Wohlman won the Los Angeles Golden Gloves in 2010 and then went pro, stringing together a professional record of 10-3-2 according to the site BoxRec. No brawler, he had an old-school fighting style and cared about technique. “He was a lot tougher and meaner and angrier than his boxing style almost allowed him to be,” Javier Calderon, a longtime sparring partner said. “He was willing to take a shot to give a shot.”

Calderon, who describes himself as “a gainfully unemployed artist,” sparred with and mentored Wohlman for about 12 years. “I beat his ass until he got better.” Wohlman lacked a “concussive” punch but he was accurate. Calderon thinks Wohlman may have been responsible for tearing his retina, an injury that needed surgery. “His jab was working beautifully and digging into my eyeballs”

A man is seen listing his shirt to reveal his chest tattoos
The boxer Kid Yamaka attends SKEE Live at The Conga Room at L.A. Live on November 12, 2013 in Los Angeles, California.

“One of his love languages was sparring,” said Eli Cobillas, who knew Wohlman in Dallas. He had a “slick, crafty” style and liked to put on soul or jazz before he started punching.

Eric Brown, a celebrated trainer who named Wohlman Kid Yamaka, said Wohlman liked to humiliate his opponents by standing right in front of them while somehow remaining untouchable.

Calderon is a tee-totaller who says he was never around Wohlman when he was high. Rather he emphasized Wohlman’s drive to improve himself. “I knew that even when things were going good, it’s a balancing act, a tightrope walk,” Calderon said. “There were times when he faltered and faltered hard.”

In December Wohlman came back to California and went to a rehab facility in the desert east of LA. It was the first time he was really sober since he was 19, he told Adriance, our mutual friend. In rehab he learned to play chess, which reminded him of slow-motion boxing.

On January 29 he posted a picture of a 60-days sober key chain on Instagram.

Adriance last spoke to Wohlman two weeks later, on the Friday before Valentine’s Day. He said he was coming out of a meeting with someone he’d met in rehab.

He died the next day. His body turned up at a gas station bathroom.

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Boxing legend Floyd Mayweather faces YouTube star Logan Paul in a PPV match tonight – here’s how to watch the fight live

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Floyd Mayweather and Logan Paul
  • Undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather will fight YouTube star Logan Paul in a PPV event at 8 p.m. ET.
  • The $50 pay-per-view (PPV) is available to order via Showtime, Fanmio, and most cable providers.
  • A Showtime plan is not needed to order the PPV, and existing members still need to pay the $50 fee.

Boxing PPV: Mayweather vs. Paul (small)

YouTube star Logan Paul will face undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather in an exhibition pay-per-view fight. Showtime and Fanmio will stream the pay-per-view event live from Miami, Florida, starting tonight at 8 p.m. ET.

You’ll have to pay $50 plus taxes and fees to watch Mayweather vs. Paul using the Showtime app, Fanmio app, or cable/satellite TV providers like Xfinity.

The fight will be the largest spectacle yet for Paul, who embarked on a professional boxing career alongside his brother and fellow YouTube star Jake Paul more than two years ago. While Jake has earned victories in his first three professional boxing matches, Logan lost his official debut against another YouTuber in November 2019.

Mayweather boasts an undefeated record with 50 wins and 27 knockouts; he last fought against former UFC champion Conor McGregor in 2017. At 44 years old, Mayweather no longer contends for world championships, but he’s still considered one of the best boxers of his generation and remains an influential figure in the sport.

Paul stands six inches taller than Mayweather and will likely weigh significantly more on the day of the fight, but Mayweather’s years of experience and unmatched technique make him the clear favorite. On the undercard, Badou Jack will face Dervin Colina in a light heavyweight match; and former NFL player Chad Johnson will make his boxing debut.

How to watch Mayweather vs. Paul

Mayweather vs. Paul is a $50 pay-per-view event produced by Showtime. You can order the fight to watch online via the Showtime app or the Fanmio app. You can also order directly through cable/satellite providers like Xfinity and Spectrum. The event starts tonight at 8 p.m. ET.

A Showtime subscription is not required to purchase the PPV. Though Showtime is presenting Mayweather vs. Paul, the event won’t be broadcast on Showtime’s cable channels. Showtime subscribers still have to pay $50 to their TV provider or through the Showtime app to watch the fight.

Boxing PPV: Mayweather vs. Paul (small)

The Showtime app is available on Apple devices, Roku, Roku TVs, Android, Amazon Fire TV, Xbox, and Android smart TVs from Sony and Hisense. You can also visit Showtime.com to watch on your computer.

The Fanmio app is available on Apple devices, Google TV, Android TV, and Amazon Fire TV. Fanmio PPV purchases of the fight also include a free limited-edition shirt.

Here’s the full fight card for Mayweather vs. Paul

  • Chad Johnson versus Brian Maxwell [four-round exhibition]
  • Jarrett Hurd versus Luis Arias [10-round super welterweight fight]
  • Badou Jack versus Dervin Colina [10-round light heavyweight fight]
  • Floyd Mayweather versus Logan Paul [eight-round exhibition]
Read the original article on Business Insider

Boxing legend Floyd Mayweather faces YouTube star Logan Paul in a PPV match this Sunday – here’s how to watch the fight live

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

Floyd Mayweather and Logan Paul
  • Undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather will fight YouTube star Logan Paul on June 6.
  • The match headlines a $50 pay-per-view (PPV) event presented by Showtime.
  • A Showtime plan is not needed to order the PPV, and existing members still need to pay the $50 fee.

Boxing PPV: Mayweather vs. Paul (small)

YouTube star Logan Paul will face undefeated boxer Floyd Mayweather in an exhibition pay-per-view fight on June 6. Showtime will stream the pay-per-view fight live from Miami, Florida, starting at 8 p.m. ET.

You’ll have to pay $50 plus taxes and fees to stream Mayweather vs. Paul using the Showtime app, or you can order it through your cable or satellite TV provider.

The fight will be the largest spectacle yet for Paul, who embarked on a professional boxing career alongside his brother and fellow YouTube star Jake Paul more than two years ago. While Jake has earned victories in his first three professional boxing matches, Logan lost his official debut against another YouTuber in November 2019.

Mayweather boasts an undefeated record with 50 wins and 27 knockouts; he last fought against former UFC champion Conor McGregor in 2017. At 44 years old, Mayweather no longer contends for world championships, but he’s still considered one of the best boxers of his generation and remains an influential figure in the sport.

Paul stands six inches taller than Mayweather and will likely weigh significantly more on the day of the fight, but Mayweather’s years of experience and unmatched technique make him the clear favorite for this exhibition bout. On the undercard, Badou Jack will face Dervin Colina in a light heavyweight match; and former NFL player Chad Johnson will make his boxing debut.

How to watch Mayweather vs. Paul

Mayweather vs. Paul is a $50 pay-per-view event produced by Showtime. You can order the fight to stream online via the Showtime app, or purchase it through your cable/satellite provider. The event will start at 8 p.m. ET on June 6. A Showtime subscription is not required to purchase the PPV.

Boxing PPV: Mayweather vs. Paul (small)

The Showtime app is available on Apple devices, Roku, Android, Amazon Fire TV, Xbox, PlayStation, and smart TVs from Samsung and LG. You can also visit Showtime.com to watch on your computer.

Though Showtime is presenting Mayweather vs. Paul, the event won’t be broadcast on Showtime’s cable channels. Showtime subscribers still have to pay $50 to their TV provider or through the Showtime app to watch the fight.

Here’s the full fight card for Mayweather vs. Paul

  • Chad Johnson versus Brian Maxwell [four-round exhibition]
  • Jarrett Hurd versus Luis Arias [10-round super welterweight fight]
  • Badou Jack versus Dervin Colina [10-round light heavyweight fight]
  • Floyd Mayweather versus Logan Paul [eight-round exhibition]
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Jose Ramirez and Josh Taylor face off to decide the undisputed junior welterweight champion on May 22 – here’s how to watch live

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Josh Taylor coronavirus
Josh Taylor hoists the Muhammed Ali trophy after a 2019 victory.

  • Jose Ramirez will face Josh Taylor to determine the world’s undisputed junior welterweight champion.
  • Ramirez (26-0) is the WBC and WBO champ, while Taylor (17-0) holds the IBF and WBA belts.
  • The main event will be broadcast live from Las Vegas on May 22 at at 8 p.m. ET via ESPN+ and ESPN.

Monthly Subscription Service (small)

Jose Ramirez and Josh Taylor will fight to decide the world’s undisputed junior welterweight champion on May 22 in Las Vegas. Both fighters will enter the match with undefeated records; WBC and WBO champion Ramirez is 26-0 with 17 knockouts, while IBF and WBA champ Taylor is 17-0 with 13 knockouts.

The winner of Ramirez vs. Taylor will become the first undisputed champion in the junior welterweight class since Terence Crawford unified the four title belts in August 2017. Taylor enters the fight as the betting favorite, despite the younger Ramirez having more career wins. The title bout is an early contender for boxing’s best fight of the year, given the stakes between two undefeated champions.

Ramirez vs. Taylor will air on May 22 via ESPN and ESPN+, with the main card starting at 8 p.m. ET. Undercard matches will start at 4:45 p.m. ET on ESPN+. The entire event will be simulcast in Spanish on ESPN+ and ESPN Deportes.

How to watch Ramirez vs. Taylor

To watch Ramirez vs. Taylor live on May 22 you need access to the ESPN channel or ESPN+ streaming service.

The early undercard matches start at 4:45 p.m. ET and are exclusive to ESPN+. The main card will air on ESPN, ESPN+, and ESPN Deportes starting at 8 p.m. ET. An ESPN+ subscription costs $6 a month or $60 per year. ESPN cable subscribers can stream the fight on ESPN.com using their TV provider account information.

Monthly Subscription Service (small)

If you don’t have access to the ESPN on cable and you don’t want to sign up for ESPN+, you also have the option to watch the main event on ESPN through a live streaming service like Sling TV Orange, Hulu + Live TV, Fubo TV, and YouTube TV.

Of those services, Sling TV’s Orange plan is your cheapest option at just $35 a month ($10 for your first month).

TV (small)+ Live TV (small)TV (small)TV (small)

Here’s the full fight card for Ramirez vs. Taylor

Undercard

  • Jose Enrique Vivas versus Luis Coria (Featherweight)
  • Andres Cortes versus Eddie Garza (Junior lightweight)
  • Jose Gallegos versus Raymond Muratalla (Lightweight)
  • Javier Martinez versus Calvin Metcalf (Middleweight)
  • Robeisy Ramirez versus Ryan Lee Allen (Featherweight)

Main Card

  • Jose Carlos Ramirez versus Josh Taylor (Junior welterweight title fight)
  • Jose Zepeda versus Henry Lundy (WBC Silver light welterweight title fight)
  • Elvis Rodriguez versus Kenneth Sims Jr. (Junior welterweight)
Read the original article on Business Insider